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Sarnia
/sahr"nee euh/, n. a port in SE Ontario, in S Canada, on the S shore of Lake Huron, on the St. Clair River, across from Port Huron, Michigan. 50,892. * * *
Sarnia-Clearwater
▪ Ontario, Canada       city, seat of Lambton county, southeastern Ontario, east-central Canada, on the St. Clair River, at the southern end of Lake Huron, 55 miles ...
sarnie
➡ sandwich. * * *
Sarno
▪ Italy       town, Campania regione, southern Italy, at the foot of Saretto hill near the sources of the Sarno (ancient Sarnus) River, just northwest of Salerno. Near ...
Sarnoff
/sahr"nawf, -nof/, n. David, 1891-1971, U.S. businessman and broadcasting executive, born in Russia. * * *
Sarnoff, David
born Feb. 27, 1891, Minsk, Russia died Dec. 12, 1971, New York, N.Y., U.S. Russian-born U.S. communications executive. After immigrating with his family to New York in 1900, he ...
Sarnoff,David
Sar·noff (särʹnôf'), David. 1891-1971. American radio and television pioneer who proposed the first commercial radio receiver and in 1926 formed the National Broadcasting ...
saro
also called  Giant Otter,         rare South American species of otter (q.v.). * * *
Saro-Wiwa, Ken
orig. Kenule Beeson Saro-Wiwa born Oct. 10, 1941, Bori, near Port Harcourt, Nigeria died Nov. 10, 1995, Port Harcourt Nigerian writer and activist. He taught at the University ...
Saro-Wiwa, Kenule Beeson
▪ 1996       ("KEN"), Nigerian author and environmentalist (b. Oct. 10, 1941, Bori, near Port Harcourt, Nigeria—d. Nov. 10, 1995, Port Harcourt), used his popular ...
sarod
/seuh rohd"/, n. a lute of northern India, played with a bow. [1860-65; < Hindi < Pers] * * * ▪ musical instrument       stringed musical instrument of the lute family ...
sarodist
See sarod. * * *
sarong
/seuh rawng", -rong"/, n. 1. a loose-fitting skirtlike garment formed by wrapping a strip of cloth around the lower part of the body, worn by both men and women in the Malay ...
Saronic Gulf
/seuh ron"ik/ an inlet of the Aegean, on the SE coast of Greece, between Attica and the Peloponnesus. 50 mi. (80 km) long; 30 mi. (48 km) wide. Also called Gulf of Aegina. * * ...
SaronicGulf
Sa·ron·ic Gulf (sə-rŏnʹĭk) An arm of the Aegean Sea in southern Greece between Attica and the Peloponnesus east of Corinth. A canal links it with the Gulf of Corinth. * * ...
saros
—saronic /seuh ron"ik/, adj. /sair"os/, n. Astron. the period of 223 synodic months, equaling 6585.32 days or 18 years, 11.32 days (or 10.32 days if 5 leap years occur in the ...
Saros
/sahr"ohs, -aws/, n. Gulf of, an inlet of the Aegean, N of the Gallipoli Peninsula. 37 mi. (60 km) long; 22 mi. (35 km) wide. * * * ▪ astronomy       in astronomy, ...
Saros,Gulf of
Sa·ros (sârʹŏs', säʹrôs), Gulf of An inlet of the northeast Aegean Sea indenting northwest European Turkey north of Gallipoli. * * *
Sarouk
/seuh roohk"/, n. a tightly woven Oriental rug with soft colors and, usually, a center design. Also, Saruk. [1895-1900; named after Sarouk, village in western Iran] * * *
Saroyan
/seuh roy"euhn/, n. William, 1908-81, U.S. dramatist, short-story writer, and novelist. * * *
Saroyan, William
born Aug. 31, 1908, Fresno, Calif., U.S. died May 18, 1981, Fresno U.S. writer. Saroyan was the largely self-educated son of an Armenian immigrant. He made his initial impact ...
Saroyan,William
Sa·roy·an (sə-roiʹən), William. 1908-1981. American writer whose works include short stories, such as The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze (1934), plays, most notably ...
Sarpedon
/sahr peed"n, -pee"don/, n. Class. Myth. a Lycian prince, son of Zeus, killed by Patroclus in the Trojan War. * * * ▪ Greek mythology  in Greek legend, son of Zeus, the king ...
Sarpi, Paolo
born Aug. 14, 1552, Venice died Jan. 14, 1623, Venice Italian patriot, scholar, and state theologian. At age 20 Sarpi became court theologian to the duke of Mantua, a post that ...
sarplar
/sahr"plahr, -pleuhr/, n. 1. a coarse cloth bagging. 2. Obs. a. a bale of wool weighing 2240 lb. (1016 kg) or 80 tods. b. the weight of such a bale. Also, sarpler /sahr"pleuhr/, ...
sarracenia
☆ sarracenia [sar΄ə sē′nē ə, sar΄əsēn′yə ] n. 〚ModL, after M. Sarrazin, Fr-Cdn physician who sent a specimen to botanists in France ( c. 1700)〛 any of a genus ...
Sarraceniaceae
▪ plant family       family of pitcher plants (pitcher plant) that belong to the order Ericales and are native to North and South America. These low-growing perennial ...
Sarraut, Albert
▪ French statesman in full  Albert-pierre Sarraut   born July 28, 1872, Bordeaux, France died Nov. 26, 1962, Paris  French Radical Socialist statesman most noted for his ...
Sarraute
/sann rddoht"/, n. Nathalie /nann tann lee"/, born 1902, French novelist. * * *
Sarraute, Nathalie
orig. Nathalie Ilyanova Tcherniak born July 18, 1900, Ivanova, Russia died Oct. 19, 1999, Paris, France French novelist and essayist. She practiced law until с 1940, when she ...
sarrazin
/sar"euh zin/, n. buckwheat (defs. 1-3). [1680-90; < F (blé) sarrasin SARACEN (wheat)] * * *
Sarre
/sannrdd/, n. French name of Saar. * * *
sarrusophone
—sarrusophonist, n. /seuh rooh"zeuh fohn', -rus"euh-/, n. a metal double-reed wind instrument with a conical bore, related to the oboe and used esp. in military ...
SARS
SARS [särz] n. 〚s(evere) a(cute) r(espiratory) s(yndrome)〛 an acute, highly contagious, viral respiratory disease characterized by coughing, a high fever, and breathing ...
sarsaparilla
/sas'peuh ril"euh, sahr'seuh peuh-, sahr'speuh-/, n. 1. any of various climbing or trailing tropical American plants belonging to the genus Smilax, of the lily family, having ...
sarsen
/sahr"seuhn/, n. any of numerous large sandstone blocks or fragments found in south-central England, probably remnants of eroded Tertiary beds. Also called Druid stone, ...
sarsenet
/sahrs"nit/, n. sarcenet. Also, sarsnet. * * *
Sarsfield, Patrick
▪ Irish Jacobite born , Lucan, County Dublin, Ire. died August 1693, Huy, Austrian Netherlands        Jacobite soldier who played a leading role in the Irish Roman ...
Sartāwī, ʿIsām
▪ Palestinian leader also spelled  Issam Sartawi  born 1935, Acre, Palestine [now ʿAkko, Israel] died April 10, 1983, Albufeira, Portugal       Palestinian ...
Sarthe
/sannrddt/, n. a department in NW France. 490,385; 2411 sq. mi. (6245 sq. km). Cap.: Le Mans. * * *
Sarthe River
▪ river, France       river, rising in the Perche hills north of Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne département, northwestern France. The Sarthe flows alternately west and south ...
Sarti, Giuseppe
▪ Italian conductor byname  Il Domenichino  baptized Dec. 1, 1729, Faenza, Papal States died July 28, 1802, Berlin       Italian conductor and composer of liturgical ...
Sarto
/sahr"toh/; It. /sahrdd"taw/, n. Andrea del /ahn dray"euh del/; It. /ahn drdde"ah del/. See Andrea del Sarto. * * *
Sarton
/sahr"tn/, n. May, 1912-95, U.S. poet, novelist, and playwright. * * *
Sarton, Eleanore Marie
▪ 1996       ("MAY"), U.S. poet and author (b. May 3, 1912, Wondelgem, Belgium—d. July 16, 1995, York, Maine), explored the human condition, ranging from love and ...
Sarton, George Alfred Leon
▪ American scholar born Aug. 31, 1884, Ghent died March 22, 1956, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.       Belgian-born U.S. scholar and writer whose voluminous research and ...
Sarton, May
▪ American writer original name  Eleanore Marie Sarton  born May 3, 1912, Wondelgem, Belg. died July 16, 1995, York, Maine, U.S.       American poet, novelist, and ...
sartor
sartor [sär′tər] n. 〚LL < L sartus, pp. of sarcire, to patch < IE base * serk-, woven substance, to hedge in > Gr herkos, a hedge〛 a tailor: literary or humorous term * * ...
Sartor Resartus
/sahr"teuhr ri sahr"teuhs/ a satirical work (1833-34) by Carlyle. * * *
sartorial
—sartorially, adv. /sahr tawr"ee euhl, -tohr"-/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to tailors or their trade: sartorial workmanship. 2. of or pertaining to clothing or style or manner ...
sartorially
See sartorial. * * *
sartorius
/sahr tawr"ee euhs, -tohr"-/, n., pl. sartorii /-tawr"ee uy', -tohr"-/. Anat. a long, flat, narrow muscle extending obliquely from the front of the hip to the inner side of the ...
sartorius muscle
▪ anatomy       (from the Latin sartor, “mender”), long, narrow, ribbonlike thigh muscle beginning at the front of the crest of the pelvic girdle, extending ...
Sartre
/sahr"treuh, sahrt/; Fr. /sannrdd"trddeu/, n. Jean-Paul /zhahonn pawl"/, 1905-80, French philosopher, novelist, and dramatist: declined 1964 Nobel prize for literature. * * *
Sartre, Jean-Paul
born June 21, 1905, Paris, France died April 15, 1980, Paris French philosopher, novelist, and playwright, the foremost exponent of existentialism. He studied at the Sorbonne, ...
Sartre,Jean Paul
Sar·tre (särʹtrə, särt), Jean Paul. 1905-1980. French writer and philosopher. A leading existentialist, he wrote literary works, such as the autobiographical novel Nausea ...
Sarudahiko
▪ Japanese mythology also spelled  Sarutahiko,         in Japanese mythology, an earthly deity who offered himself as a guide to the divine grandchild Ninigi, when he ...
sarugaku
▪ Japanese theatre       form of popular Japanese entertainment dating from at least the 11th century, which reached its high point by the 14th century. Originally, ...
Saruhan Dynasty
▪ Turkmen dynasty       Turkmen dynasty (c. 1300–1410) that ruled in the Manisa region of western Anatolia.       The dynasty was founded by Saruhan, a tribal ...
Saruk
/seuh roohk"/, n. Sarouk. * * *
Sarūk carpet
Sarūk also spelled  Sarouk   originally, floor covering handwoven in the village of Sārūq, north of Arāk (Solṭānābād) in western Iran; later, floor covering ...
Sarum chant
▪ vocal music       liturgical chant (liturgical music) of the Sarum Use, the medieval church rite centred at Salisbury, Eng. The name derives from the Latin name for ...
Sarum use
/sair"euhm/ the liturgy or modified form of the Roman rite used in Salisbury before the Reformation and revived in part by some English churches. [1560-70; after Sarum (now Old ...
sarus crane
/sahr"euhs/ a large, gray crane, Grus antigone, of Asia, having a naked, red head. [1830-40; < Hindi saras < Skt sarasa pertaining to lakes] * * *
saruscrane
sa·rus crane (särʹəs) n. A large crane (Grus antigone) of southern Asia, having a partly red head and neck.   [Hindi sāras, from Sanskrit sārasaḥ, from sārasa-, of ...
Saruwaged Range
▪ mountains, Papua New Guinea       mountain range on the Huon Peninsula, northeastern New Guinea, Papua New Guinea. The range, rising to 13,520 feet (4,121 metres) at ...
Sarvastivada
One of the 18 schools of Hinayana Buddhism that developed during the first four or five centuries after the Buddha's death. The name literally means the teaching that everything ...
Saryan, Martiros
▪ Armenian painter in full  Martiros [Sergeyevich] Saryan , Saryan also spelled  Sarian  born February 16 [February 28, New Style], 1880, Novy Nakhichevan, near ...
Sarykol Range
▪ mountain range, Asia       mountain range on the border of the Gorno-Badakhshan autonomous oblast (province) of Tajikistan and the People's Republic of China. Lying in ...
Sarzana
▪ Italy       town, Liguria region, northern Italy, on the fertile plain of the Magra River, just east of La Spezia. Mentioned as a fortress in 963 and as a town in ...
Sarzec, Ernest de
▪ French archaeologist born 1832, Rennes, France died 1901, Vienna       French archaeologist whose excavation of the mound of Tello (ancient Girsu, Arabic Tall ...
SAS
(in full the Special Air Service) a branch of the British army consisting of a small group of specially trained soldiers who are used for difficult or secret operations. Members ...
Sasak
▪ people also spelled  Sassak,         largest ethnic group on Lombok, one of the Lesser Sunda Islands in Indonesia, constituting most of the island's population and ...
Sasakawa, Ryoichi
▪ 1996       Japanese businessman, philanthropist, and suspected World War II criminal who used his vast wealth, amassed from a gambling empire, to aid international ...
Sasaki, Hideo
▪ 2001       American landscape architect and educator (b. Nov. 25, 1919, Reedley, Calif.—d. Aug. 30, 2000, Walnut Creek, Calif.), pioneered a collaborative approach ...
Sāsān
▪ Persian prince flourished 1st century AD?       eponymous ancestor of the Sāsānian dynasty in ancient Persia. Details of his life vary, but most scholars believe he ...
Sasanian dates established on direct ancient evidence
▪ Table Sasanian dates established on direct ancient evidence event reign years Seleucid era Christian era accession of Artabanus (Ardawan) V 1 212/213 inscription of ...
Sāsānian dynasty
or Sāssānian dynasty Persian dynasty (AD 224–651). Founded by Ardashīr I (r. AD 224–241) and named for his ancestor Sāsān (с 1st century AD), it replaced the Parthian ...
Sasanian kings*
▪ Table Sasanian kings* name reign years defeat of Artabanus V (Ardavan) 226 Ardashir I 224–241 Shapur I 241–272 Hormizd I 272–273 Bahram I 273–276 Bahram ...
Sasaram
▪ India also spelled  Sahsaram   city, southwestern Bihar state, northeastern India. Located at a major road and rail junction, it is an agricultural trade centre. Carpet ...
SASE
self-addressed stamped envelope. Also, sase, S.A.S.E., s.a.s.e. * * *
Sasebo
/sah"se baw'/, n. a seaport on NW Kyushu, in SW Japan. 251,188. * * * ▪ Japan       city, Nagasaki ken (prefecture), Kyushu, Japan, near the mouth of Ōmura-wan ...
Saseno
/sah"seuh naw'/, n. an island off the W coast of Albania, at the entrance to Valona Bay: belongs to Albania. 2 sq. mi. (5 sq. km). * * *
sash
sash1 —sashless, adj. /sash/, n. 1. a long band or scarf worn over one shoulder or around the waist, as by military officers as a part of the uniform or by women and children ...
sash bar
Chiefly Brit. muntin (def. 1). [1830-40] * * *
sash chain
a chain for connecting a vertically sliding window sash with a counterweight. * * *
sash cord
a cord for connecting a vertically sliding window sash with a counterweight. Also called sash line. [1770-80] * * *
sash ribbon
a strip of steel or aluminum alloy for connecting a vertically sliding window sash with a counterweight. [1860-65] * * *
sash weight
a counterweight to a vertically sliding window sash. [1730-40] * * *
Sasha
/sah"sheuh/, n. 1. a female given name, form of Sandra or Alexandra. 2. a male give name, form of Alexander. * * *
sashay
/sa shay"/, v.i. Informal. 1. to glide, move, or proceed easily or nonchalantly: She just sashayed in as if she owned the place. 2. to chassé in dancing. [1830-40, Amer.; ...
sashimi
/sah shee"mee/; Japn. /sah"shee mee'/, n. Japanese Cookery. raw fish cut into very thin slices. Cf. sushi. [1875-80; < Japn sashi stabbing + mi(y) body ( < *mui)] * * * ▪ ...
sasin
/say"sin/, n. See black buck. [1825-35; of undetermined orig.] * * *
Sask
Sask abbrev. Saskatchewan * * *
Sask.
Saskatchewan. * * *
Saskatchewan
/sa skach"euh won', -weuhn/, n. 1. a province in W Canada. 907,650; 251,700 sq. mi. (651,900 sq. km). Cap.: Regina. 2. a river in SW Canada, flowing E to Lake Winnipeg: formed by ...
Saskatchewan River
River, southwestern and southern central Canada. The largest river system of Alberta and Saskatchewan, it rises in the Canadian Rockies as the North and South Saskatchewan ...
Saskatchewan, flag of
▪ Flag History       Canadian provincial flag consisting of horizontal stripes of green and gold with the provincial coat of arms (arms, coat of) in the upper hoist ...
Saskatchewan, University of
Canadian public university in Saskatoon, founded in 1907. It has colleges of arts and sciences, graduate studies, agriculture, veterinary medicine, engineering, law, medicine, ...
SaskatchewanRiver
Saskatchewan River A river, about 547 km (340 mi) long, of south-central Canada formed by the confluence of the North and South Saskatchewan rivers in central Saskatchewan and ...
saskatoon
/sas'keuh toohn"/, n. Canadian. 1. any of several shad bushes, esp. the serviceberry, Amelanchier canadensis. 2. the berry of these bushes. [1790-1800; < Cree misa·skwato·min ...
Saskatoon
/sas'keuh toohn"/, n. a city in S Saskatchewan, in SW Canada. 133,750. * * * City (pop., 2001: 196,811), south-central Saskatchewan, Canada. It was founded on the Saskatchewan ...
Sasolburg
▪ South Africa       town, northern Free State province, South Africa, south of Johannesburg. Established in 1954, it was built by Sasol Ltd. (the former South African ...
Sasquatch
/sas"kwoch, -kwach/, n. See Big Foot. [1925-30; < Mainland Halkomelem sésq'ac] * * * ▪ legendary creature from Salish se'sxac“wild men” also called ...
sass
sass1 /sas/, n. Chiefly New Eng., Midland, and Southern U.S. 1. stewed fruit; fruit sauce. 2. fresh vegetables. [1765-75; var. of SAUCE] sass2 /sas/, Informal. n. 1. impudent or ...
sassaby
/sas"euh bee/, n., pl. sassabies. a large, blackish-red South African antelope, Damaliscus lunatus, having curved horns. [1810-20; said to be < Tswana] * * * ▪ ...
sassafras
/sas"euh fras'/, n. 1. an American tree, Sassafras albidum, of the laurel family, having egg-shaped leaves and long clusters of greenish-yellow flowers. 2. the aromatic bark of ...
Sassafras Mountain
▪ mountain, United States       highest point in South Carolina, U.S., at 3,560 feet (1,085 metres). It lies in the Blue Ridge (a segment of the Appalachian ...
sassafras oil
a yellowish or reddish-yellow, aromatic volatile oil distilled from sassafras root, used in flavoring, perfumery, and medicine. [1790-1800] * * *
sassafras tea
a tea made from the aromatic dried bark of the root of the sassafras tree, often used medicinally as a stimulant, diaphoretic, and diuretic. [1775-85] * * *
Sassandra River
River, western Côte d'Ivoire. It rises as the Tienba in the northwestern highlands and becomes the Sassandra at its confluence with the Férédougouba. It courses southeast 400 ...
Sassanian
Sas·sa·ni·an or Sa·sa·ni·an (sə-sāʹnē-ən, să-) also Sas·sa·nid (sə-säʹnĭd, -sănʹĭd, săsʹə-nĭd) adj. Of or relating to a Persian dynasty (A.D. 224-651) ...
Sassanid
/seuh sah"nid, -san"id/, n., pl. Sassanids, Sassanidae /-sah"ni dee', -san"i-/, adj. n. 1. a member of a dynasty that ruled in Persia A.D. 226-651. adj. 2. of or pertaining to ...
Sassari
It. /sahs"sah rddee/, n. a city in NW Sardinia. 114,561. * * * ▪ Italy       city, Sardinia, Italy, near the north coast of the island on the edge of the limestone ...
Sassenach
/sas"euh neuhkh, -nak/, n. an English inhabitant of the British Isles: used, often disparagingly, by the Gaelic inhabitants. [1765-75; < ScotGael Sasunnach, Ir Sasanach English, ...
Sassetta
/sahs set"tah/, n. Stefano di Giovanni /ste"fah naw dee jaw vahn"nee/, 1392?-1450, Italian painter. * * * orig. Stefano di Giovanni died с 1450, Siena, Republic of ...
sassily
See sassy1. * * *
sassiness
See sassily. * * *
Sassoon
/sa soohn"/, n. Siegfried (Loraine) /seeg"freed law rayn", loh-/, 1886-1967, English poet and novelist. * * *
Sassoon, Siegfried
▪ British writer born Sept. 8, 1886, Brenchley, Kent, Eng. died Sept. 1, 1967, Heytesbury, Wiltshire       English poet and novelist, known for his antiwar poetry and ...
Sassoon,Siegfried Lorraine
Sas·soon (sə-so͞onʹ, să-), Siegfried Lorraine. 1886-1967. British writer known for his antiwar poems, based on his combat experience in World War I, and for his ...
Sassou-Nguesso, Denis
▪ president of Republic of the Congo born 1943, Edou, Rep. of the Congo       Congolese politician who first became president in 1979 and seized power through a coup in ...
sasswood
/sas"wood'/, n. a tropical African tree, Erythrophleum suavolens, of the legume family, having a poisonous bark and hard, durable wood. Also called sassy bark, sassywood /sas"ee ...
sassy
sassy1 /sas"ee/, adj., sassier, sassiest. Informal. saucy. sassy2 /sas"ee/, n. See sassy bark. [1855-60; of uncert. orig.] * * *
sassy bark
1. sasswood. 2. the bark of the sasswood, used as a poison in certain tribal ordeals. [1855-60] * * *
Sastri, Srinivasa
▪ Indian statesman in full Valangiman Sankarana-rayana Srinivasa Sastri born Sept. 22, 1869, Madras, India died April 17, 1946, Madras       liberal Indian statesman ...
sastruga
/sas"treuh geuh, sah"streuh-, sa strooh"-, sah-/, n., pl. sastrugi /-gee/. Usually, sastrugi. ridges of snow formed on a snowfield by the action of the wind. Also, ...
sastrugi
sastrugi [sas tro͞o′gē] pl.n. 〚< Russ zastruga, wind-formed furrow〛 long, wavelike ridges of hard snow, formed perpendicular to the direction of the wind and common in ...
Sasuntzi Davith
▪ Armenian folk epic       Armenian (Armenian literature) folk epic dealing with the adventures of the Christian king David of Sasun in his defense against infidel ...
sat
sat1 /sat/, v. a pt. and pp. of sit. sat2 /sut/, n. Hinduism. 1. (in Vedic mythology) the realm of existence, populated by people and gods. Cf. Asat. 2. reality. Cf. ...
SAT
Trademark. college admissions tests sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board: the SAT I measures mathematical and verbal reasoning skills, and the SAT II measures ...
Sat-cit-ananda
/sut"chit"ah nun"deuh/, n. Hinduism. reality, seen through the discovery of Brahman as sat or ultimate being, cit or pure consciousness, and ananda or perfect bliss. Also, ...
Sat.
1. Saturday. 2. Saturn. * * *
sat.
1. saturate. 2. saturated. * * *
Sata, Ineko
▪ 1999       Japanese writer and feminist whose semiautobiographical works reflected her concern with class struggle; she insisted on forming her own opinions and held ...
Satan
/sayt"n/, n. the chief evil spirit; the great adversary of humanity; the devil. [bef. 900; ME, OE < LL < Gk Satân, Satán < Heb satan adversary] * * * ▪ ...
satang
/sah tang"/, n., pl. satang. a monetary unit and former coin of Thailand, the 100th part of a baht. [1910-15; < Thai sataan (sp. satang) ult. < Pali sata- HUNDRED + anga portion, ...
satanic
—satanically, adv. —satanicalness, n. /seuh tan"ik, say-/, adj. 1. of Satan. 2. characteristic of or befitting Satan; extremely wicked; devillike; diabolical. Also, ...
satanic school
▪ literature       pejorative designation for the poets John Keats (Keats, John), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Shelley, Percy Bysshe), Leigh Hunt (Hunt, Leigh), and Lord Byron ...
Satanic Verses
a novel (1988) by Salman Rushdie about the religion of Islam. Some Muslims found it very offensive. The Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran declared that Rushdie should be killed, and ...
satanically
See satanic. * * *
Satanism
—Satanist, n. /sayt"n iz'euhm/, n. 1. the worship of Satan or the powers of evil. 2. a travesty of Christian rites in which Satan is worshiped. 3. diabolical or satanic ...
Satanist
See Satanism. * * *
Satara
▪ India       city, southwestern Maharashtra (Mahārāshtra) state, western India. It is located west of the confluence of the Krishna (Krishna River) and Venna rivers, ...
Sātavāhana Dynasty
▪ Indian dynasty       Indian family that, according to some interpretations based on the Purāṇas (ancient religious and legendary writings), belonged to the Andhra ...
satay
satay or saté [sä tā′] n. 〚Malay or Javanese < ?〛 a dish consisting of chunks of marinated meat, shrimp, etc., broiled on skewers and dipped in a spicy peanut sauce * * ...
SATB
Music. soprano, alto, tenor, bass. * * *
satchel
—satcheled, adj. /sach"euhl/, n. a small bag, sometimes with a shoulder strap. [1300-50; ME sachel < OF < L saccellus, double dim. of saccus SACK1; see -ELLE] * * *
satcheled
See satchel. * * *
satchelful
See satcheled. * * *
Satcher, David
▪ 1999       On Feb. 12, 1998, David Satcher was sworn in as the 16th surgeon general of the U.S. Public Health Service; his confirmation by a wide margin (65-35) in the ...
Satchmo
the popular name of the jazz musician Louis Armstrong. It was short for ‘satchel mouth’, because he had a very large mouth. A satchel is a type of large bag. * * *
Satcom
/sat"kom'/, n. one of a series of privately financed geosynchronous communications satellites that provide television, voice, and data transmissions to the U.S. [1965-70; ...
sate
sate1 /sayt/, v.t., sated, sating. 1. to satisfy (any appetite or desire) fully. 2. to fill to excess; surfeit; glut. [1595-1605; var. of obs. sade to satiate, OE sadian (akin to ...
sateen
/sa teen"/, n. a strong cotton fabric constructed in satin weave and having a lustrous face. [1875-80; var. of SATIN, by assoc. with velveteen] * * *
satellite
—satellited, adj. /sat"l uyt'/, n. 1. Astron. a natural body that revolves around a planet; a moon. 2. a country under the domination or influence of another. 3. something, as ...
satellite chromosome
Genetics. See B chromosome. * * *
satellite city.
See new town. Also called satellite town. [1910-15] * * *
satellite communication
Introduction  in telecommunication, the use of artificial satellites to provide communications links between various points on Earth (Earth satellite). Communications ...
satellite dish
dish (def. 8). * * *
satellite observatory
▪ astronomy  Earth-orbiting spacecraft that allows celestial objects and radiation to be studied from above the atmosphere. Astronomy from Earth's surface is limited to ...
Satellite TV
▪ 1997 by Robert Stoffels       By the end of 1996, several thousand artificial satellites were circling the Earth. About 1,000 of them were in a geosynchronous ...
satellitecell
satellite cell n. Any of the cells that encapsulate the bodies of nerve cells in many ganglia. * * *
satellitedish
satellite dish n. A dish antenna used to receive and transmit signals relayed by satellite. * * *
satelliteDNA
satellite DNA n. A portion of DNA in eukaryotes whose density differs from that of the majority of DNA and that consists of short, repeating sequences of nucleotide pairs, often ...
satellitestation
satellite station n. A radio or television station that rebroadcasts a received transmission immediately on a different wavelength. * * *
satelloid
/sat"l oyd'/, n. Aerospace. a low-altitude satellite using engines with small thrust to maintain its orbit. [1950-55; SATELL(ITE) + -OID] * * *
satem
/sah"teuhm/, adj. belonging to or consisting of those branches of the Indo-European family in which alveolar or palatal fricatives, as the sounds /s/ or /sh/, developed in ...
sati
/su tee", sut"ee/, n. 1. a Hindu practice whereby a widow immolates herself on the funeral pyre of her husband: now abolished by law. 2. a Hindu widow who so immolates ...
Sati
/su tee", sut"ee/, n. Hindu Mythology. the wife of Rudra, who immolated herself following a quarrel between her father and her husband. Also, Sati. * * *
satiability
See satiable. * * *
satiable
—satiability, satiableness, n. —satiably, adv. /say"sheuh beuhl, -shee euh-/, adj. capable of being satiated. [1560-70; SATI(ATE) + -ABLE] * * *
satiably
See satiability. * * *
satiate
—satiation, n. v. /say"shee ayt'/; adj. /say"shee it, -ayt'/, v., satiated, satiating, adj. v.t. 1. to supply with anything to excess, so as to disgust or weary; surfeit. 2. to ...
satiated
/say"shee ay'tid/, adj. satisfied, as one's appetite or desire, to the point of boredom. [1685-95; SATIATE + -ED2] * * *
satiation
See satiate. * * *
Saticon
/sat"i kon'/, Television, Trademark. a camera tube similar to the vidicon in construction and operation but using a combination of the semiconductors selenium, arsenic, and ...
Satie
/sah tee"/, n. Erik Alfred Leslie /e rddeek" annl frdded" les lee"/, 1866-1925, French composer. * * *
Satie, Erik
orig. Eric Alfred Leslie Satie born May 17, 1866, Honfleur, Calvados, France died July 1, 1925, Paris French composer. He studied at the Paris Conservatoire (1879–82) but ...
Satie,Erik Alfred Leslie
Sa·tie (sä-tēʹ), Erik Alfred Leslie. 1866-1925. French composer who rebelled against romanticism with his unorthodox and often whimsical compositions, such as Socrate ...
satiety
/seuh tuy"i tee/, n. the state of being satiated; surfeit. [1525-35; < L satietas; r. earlier sacietie < MF sacieté < L] * * * ▪ physiology       desire to limit ...
Satilla
Sa·til·la (sə-tĭlʹə) A river, about 354 km (220 mi) long, of southeast Georgia flowing generally east, south, and east to an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. * * *
satin
—satinlike, adj. /sat"n/, n. 1. a fabric in a warp-effect or filling-effect satin weave, as acetate, rayon, nylon, or silk, often having a glossy face and a soft, slippery ...
satin glass
an American art glassware having colored glass set into indentations in a thickness of opaque glass, the whole covered with clear glass and etched slightly with acid. Also called ...
Satin Slipper, The
(French, Le Soulier de Satin) a play (1925-28) by Paul Claudel. * * *
satin spar
Mineral. a fibrous variety of gypsum having a silky luster, used as a gem. [1795-1805] * * *       massive (noncrystalline) variety of the mineral gypsum (q.v.). * * *
satin stitch
a long, straight embroidery stitch worked closely parallel in rows to form a pattern that resembles satin. [1675-85] * * *
satin weave
one of the basic weave structures in which the filling threads are interlaced with the warp at widely separated intervals, producing the effect of an unbroken surface. Also ...
satin-flower
/sat"n flow'euhr/, n. a Californian plant, Clarkia amoena, of the evening primrose family, having cup-shaped pink or purplish flowers blotched with red. [1590-1600] * * *
satinet
/sat'n et"/, n. 1. a satin-weave fabric made with cotton warp and wool filling, fulled and finished to resemble wool. 2. a thin, light satin. Also, satinette. [1695-1705; < F; ...
satinflower
satin flower n. 1. A plant (Clarkia amoena) of coastal California having showy, red-blotched flowers. 2. See honesty. * * *
satinpod
/sat"n pod'/, n. either of two European plants belonging to the genus Lunaria, of the mustard family, L. annua or L. rediviva, cultivated for their shiny flowers and large, ...
satinstitch
satin stitch n. An embroidery stitch worked in close parallel lines to give a solid satinlike finish. * * *
satinweave
satin weave n. A basic weave construction with the interlacing of the threads so arranged that the face of the cloth is covered with warp yarn or filling yarn and no twill line ...
satinwood
/sat"n wood'/, n. 1. the satiny wood of an East Indian tree, Chloroxylon swietenia, of the rue family, used esp. for making furniture. 2. the tree itself. [1785-95; SATIN + ...
satiny
/sat"n ee/, adj. satinlike; smooth; glossy. [1780-90; SATIN + -Y1] * * *
satire
/sat"uyeur/, n. 1. the use of irony, sarcasm, ridicule, or the like, in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc. 2. a literary composition, in verse or prose, in which ...
satirical
—satirically, adv. —satiricalness, n. /seuh tir"i keuhl/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, containing, or characterized by satire: satirical novels. 2. indulging in or given to ...
satirically
See satirical. * * *
satirist
/sat"euhr ist/, n. 1. a writer of satires. 2. one who indulges in satire. [1580-90; SATIRE + -IST] * * *
satirize
—satirizable, adj. —satirization, n. —satirizer, n. /sat"euh ruyz'/, v.t., satirized, satirizing. to attack or ridicule with satire. Also, esp. Brit., satirise. [1595-1605; ...
satisfaction
—satisfactional, adj. —satisfactionless, adj. /sat'is fak"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act of satisfying; fulfillment; gratification. 2. the state of being satisfied; contentment. 3. ...
satisfactorily
See satisfactory. * * *
satisfactoriness
See satisfactorily. * * *
satisfactory
—satisfactorily, adv. —satisfactoriness, n. /sat'is fak"teuh ree, -fak"tree/, adj. 1. giving or affording satisfaction; fulfilling all demands or requirements: a satisfactory ...
satisfiable
sat·is·fi·a·ble (sătʹĭs-fī'ə-bəl) adj. Capable of being satisfied: satisfiable needs and desires. * * *
satisfice
☆ satisfice [sat′is fīs΄] vi. satisficed, satisficing 〚coined by H. A. SIMON2 Herbert Alexander
satisfied
/sat"is fuyd'/, adj. 1. content: a satisfied look. 2. completely paid, as a bill. 3. convinced, as in an argument: Their opponents were finally satisfied. [1565-75; SATISFY + ...
satisfier
See satisfy. * * *
satisfy
—satisfiable, adj. —satisfier, n. —satisfyingly, adv. —satisfyingness, n. /sat"is fuy'/, v., satisfied, satisfying. v.t. 1. to fulfill the desires, expectations, needs, ...
satisfyingly
See satisfier. * * *
Satna
▪ India also called  Shat Nagar  or  Bhatgarh        city, northeastern Madhya Pradesh state, central India. It is situated on the Tons River, a tributary of the ...
Satnami sect
Religious community in India that challenges political and religious authority by worshiping the supreme god Satnam. Combining practices from Islam and Hinduism, Satnamis ...
Sato
/sah"toh/; Japn. /sah"taw/, n. Eisaku /ay sah"kooh/; Japn. /ay"sah kooh'/, 1901-75, Japanese political leader: prime minister 1964-72; Nobel peace prize 1974. * * *
Satō Eisaku
▪ prime minister of Japan born March 27, 1901, Tabuse, Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan died June 3, 1975, Tokyo       prime minister of Japan between 1964 and 1972, who ...
Satō Haruo
▪ Japanese author born April 9, 1892, Shingū, Wakayama prefecture, Japan died May 6, 1964, Tokyo       Japanese poet, novelist, and critic whose fiction is noted for ...
Satō Nobuhiro
▪ Japanese scientist born July 18, 1769, Nishimonai, Dewa province [modern Akita prefecture], Japan died Feb. 17, 1850, Edo [now Tokyo]       scientist and an early ...
Satō, Eisaku
born March 1, 1901, Tabuse, Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan died June 3, 1975, Tokyo Prime minister of Japan (1964–72) who presided over Japan's post-World War II reemergence as a ...
Sato,Eisaku
Sa·to (säʹtō), Eisaku. 1901-1975. Japanese politician who served as prime minister (1964-1972). He shared the 1974 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts toward nuclear ...
satori
/seuh tawr"ee, -tohr"ee/, n. Zen. sudden enlightenment. [1720-30; < Japn: n. deriv. of v. "to awaken" (sato- aware + -r- formative affix)] * * * ▪ Zen Buddhism Chinese  Wu, ...
Satpura Range
▪ hills, India       range of hills, part of the Deccan plateau, western India. The hills stretch for some 560 miles (900 km) across the widest part of peninsular ...
satrap
/say"trap, sa"-/, n. 1. a governor of a province under the ancient Persian monarchy. 2. a subordinate ruler, often a despotic one. [1350-1400; ME < L satrapa < Gk satrápes < ...
Satrapi, Marjane
▪ 2009 born 1969, Rasht, Iran       In 2008 illustrator and writer Marjane Satrapi had reached a level of worldwide fame that would have seemed unlikely in the 1980s, ...
satrapy
/say"treuh pee, sa"-/, n., pl. satrapies. the province or jurisdiction of a satrap. [1595-1605; < L satrapia < Gk satrapeía, equiv. to satrape-, s. of satrápes SATRAP + -ia ...
SATs
➡ exams * * *
Satsuma
/sat sooh"meuh, sat"seuh meuh/ Japn. /sah"tsoo mah'/, n. 1. a former province on S Kyushu, in SW Japan: famous for its porcelain ware. 2. (l.c.) a kind of mandarin orange. * * ...
Satsuma ware
a Japanese pottery from Kyushu, first produced in the early 17th century and after 1800 having a crackle glaze and overglaze polychrome enameling and gilding. Also, ...
Sattahip
▪ Thailand       port, south-central Thailand. It lies on the northern Gulf of Thailand coast, at the head of a small bay protected by Phra Island. It was developed as a ...
sattva
/sut"veuh/, n. Hinduism. See under guna. [ < Skt] * * *
sattvic
/sut"vik, sat"-/, adj. Hinduism. characterized by sattva: having a serene, harmonious, balanced mind or attitude. [SATTV(A) + -IC] * * *
Satu Mare
▪ Romania Hungarian  Szatmár Németi,  or  Szatmár        city, northwestern Romania. It lies on the northeastern fringe of the Great Hungarian Plain, on the ...
Satu-Mare
/sah"tooh mah"rdde/, n. a city in NW Rumania. 108,152. * * *
Satun
▪ Thailand also spelled  Satul,         town, southern Thailand, on the Malay Peninsula. Satun remains a small community at the end of a branch road; its shallow ...
saturable
—saturability, n. /sach"euhr euh beuhl/, adj. capable of being saturated. [1560-70; < L saturabilis, equiv. to satura(re) to SATURATE + -bilis -BLE] * * *
saturant
/sach"euhr euhnt/, n. 1. something that causes saturation. adj. 2. that saturates; saturating. [1745-55; < L saturant- (s. of saturans, prp. of saturare to SATURATE), equiv. to ...
saturate
v. /sach"euh rayt'/; adj., n. /sach"euhr it, -euh rayt'/, v., saturated, saturating, adj., n. v.t. 1. to cause (a substance) to unite with the greatest possible amount of another ...
saturated
/sach"euh ray'tid/, adj. 1. soaked, impregnated, or imbued thoroughly; charged thoroughly or completely; brought to a state of saturation. 2. (of colors) of maximum chroma or ...
saturated fat
Nutrition. a type of single-bond animal or vegetable fat, as that found in butter, meat, egg yolks, and coconut or palm oil, that in humans tends to increase cholesterol levels ...
saturated liquid
Thermodynam. a liquid whose temperature and pressure are such that any decrease in pressure without change in temperature causes it to boil. Cf. saturated vapor. * * *
saturated vapor
Thermodynam. a vapor whose temperature and pressure are such that any compression of its volume at constant temperature causes it to condense to liquid at a rate sufficient to ...
saturatedfat
saturated fat n. A fat, most often of animal origin, that is solid at room temperature and whose fatty acid chains cannot incorporate additional hydrogen atoms. An excess of ...
saturater
/sach"euh ray'teuhr/, n. a person or thing that saturates. Also, saturator. * * *
saturation
/sach'euh ray"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of saturating. 2. the state of being saturated. 3. Meteorol. a condition in the atmosphere corresponding to 100 percent relative ...
saturation bombing
intense area bombing intended to destroy everything in the target area. [1940-45] * * *
saturation diving
—saturation dive. a method of prolonged diving, using an underwater habitat to allow divers to remain in the high-pressure environment of the ocean depths long enough for their ...
saturation level.
See carrying capacity. * * *
saturation point
1. the point at which a substance will receive no more of another substance in solution, chemical combination, etc. 2. a point at which some capacity is at its fullest; limit: ...
saturationpoint
saturation point n. 1. Chemistry. The point at which a substance will receive no more of another substance in solution. 2. The point at which no more can be absorbed or ...
saturator
/sach"euh ray'teuhr/, n. 1. saturater. 2. Chem. a device for saturating an inert gas with the vapor of a volatile liquid by slowly bubbling the gas through it. [1880-85; SATURATE ...
Saturday
/sat"euhr day', -dee/, n. the seventh day of the week, following Friday. [bef. 900; ME Saturdai; OE Saternesdaeg, partial trans. of L Saturni dies Saturn's day; c. D zaterdag, LG ...
Saturday Evening Post
a US magazine established in 1821 and published each week. It became one of America’s most popular general magazines from the 1920s to the 1960s and was known especially for ...
Saturday Night Live
the longest running US television comedy series, which started in 1975 on NBC. The careers of many comic actors have begun on the programme. The original group included Chevy ...
Saturday night special
☆ Saturday night special n. 〚from their use in weekend crimes〛 Slang any small, cheap, short-barreled handgun that is readily available * * *
Saturday-night special
/sat"euhr day nuyt', -dee-/, Informal. a cheap, small-caliber handgun that is easily obtainable and concealable. [1965-70] * * *
Saturdaynight special
Saturday night special n. Informal A cheap handgun easily obtained and concealed. * * *
Saturdays
/sat"euhr dayz', -deez/, adv. on Saturdays: Saturdays we go to the movies. [SATURDAY + -S1] * * *
Saturn
/sat"euhrn/, n. 1. an ancient Roman god of agriculture, the consort of Ops, believed to have ruled the earth during an age of happiness and virtue, identified with the Greek god ...
Saturnalia
—Saturnalian, adj. /sat'euhr nay"lee euh, -nayl"yeuh/, n., pl. Saturnalia, Saturnalias. 1. (sometimes used with a pl. v.) the festival of Saturn, celebrated in December in ...
Saturnalian
Saturnalian [sat΄ərnā′lē ən, sat΄ərnāl′yən] adj. 1. of the Saturnalia 2. [s-] riotously merry or orgiastic * * *
Saturnian
/seuh terr"nee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to the planet Saturn. 2. of or pertaining to the god Saturn, whose reign is referred to as the "golden age." 3. prosperous, happy, ...
Saturnian verse
▪ poetry also called  Saturnian metre        the ancient Latin verse used mainly by Livius Andronicus (Livius Andronicus, Lucius) and Gnaeus Naevius (Naevius, Gnaeus) ...
saturniid
/seuh terr"nee id/, n. 1. any of several large, brightly colored moths of the family Saturniidae, comprising the giant silkworm moths. adj. 2. belonging or pertaining to the ...
saturniid moth
or giant silkworm moth Any of some 800 moth species of the principally tropical family Saturniidae. Adults have a stout, hairy body and broad wings, often vividly coloured and ...
saturnine
—saturninely, adv. —saturnineness, saturninity /sat'euhr nin"i tee/, n. /sat"euhr nuyn'/, adj. 1. sluggish in temperament; gloomy; taciturn. 2. suffering from lead poisoning, ...
saturninely
See saturnine. * * *


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