Слова на букву schw-stag (15990) Universalium
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Universalium →  !kun-arti arti-boom boom-chri chri-de k de k-enol enol-gano gano-hipp hipp-john john-lowe lowe-moth moth-oik oil-pius pius-ramp ramp-schw schw-stag stag-tils tils-unre unre-work


Слова на букву schw-stag (15990)

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>
self-sealing
—self-sealer, n. /self'see"ling, self"-/, adj. capable of sealing itself automatically or without the application of adhesive, glue, or moisture: a self-sealing automobile ...
self-searching
adj., n. * * *
self-sedimented
adj. * * *
self-seed
self-seed (sĕlfʹsēdʹ) intr.v. self-·seed·ed, self-·seed·ing, self-·seeds To self-sow. * * *
self-seeker
/self"see"keuhr/, n. a person who seeks his or her own interest or selfish ends. [1625-35] * * *
self-seeking
—self-seekingness, n. /self"see"king/, n. 1. the seeking of one's own interest or selfish ends. adj. 2. given to or characterized by self-seeking; selfish. [1580-90] * * *
self-selected
See self-selection. * * *
self-selection
—self-selected, adj. /self"si lek"sheuhn, self'-/, n. selection made by or for oneself: goods arranged on shelves for customer self-selection. * * *
self-selective
See self-selected. * * *
self-sent
adj. * * *
self-serve
/self"serrv"/, adj. self-service. [1925-30] * * *
self-service
/self"serr"vis/, n. 1. the serving of oneself in a restaurant, shop, gas station, or other facility, without the aid of a waiter, clerk, attendant, etc. adj. 2. noting or ...
self-serving
/self"serr"ving/, adj. 1. preoccupied with one's own interests, often disregarding the truth or the interests, well-being, etc., of others. 2. serving to further one's own ...
self-servingly
See self-serving. * * *
self-set
adj. * * *
self-shadowed
adj. * * *
self-shadowing
adj. * * *
self-shelter
n. * * *
self-sheltered
adj. * * *
self-shine
n. * * *
self-shining
adj. * * *
self-similar
adj. * * *
self-sinking
adj. * * *
self-slaughter
—self-slaughtered, adj. /self"slaw"teuhr/, n. suicide. [1595-1605] * * *
self-slayer
—self-slain, adj. /self"slay"euhr/, n. one who kills oneself. [1680-90] * * *
self-sold
adj. * * *
self-soothed
adj. * * *
self-soothing
adj. * * *
self-sought
adj. * * *
self-sounding
adj. * * *
self-sow
self-sow (sĕlfʹsōʹ) intr.v. self-·sows, self-·sown, self-·sow·ing To reproduce or spread by natural dispersion of seed: a plant that self-sows readily. * * *
self-sown
/self"sohn"/, adj. 1. sown by itself, or without human or animal agency, as of a plant grown from seeds dropped from another plant. 2. sown by any agency other than humans, as of ...
self-spaced
adj. * * *
self-spacing
adj. * * *
self-speech
n. * * *
self-spitted
adj. * * *
self-sprung
adj. * * *
self-stabilized
adj. * * *
self-starter
—self-starting, adj. /self"stahr"teuhr/, n. 1. starter (def. 3). 2. Informal. a person who begins work or undertakes a project on his or her own initiative, without needing to ...
self-starting
See self-starter. * * *
self-starved
adj. * * *
self-steered
adj. * * *
self-steering
adj. * * *
self-sterile
/self'ster"il/ or, esp. Brit., /-uyl, self"-/, adj. Zool. incapable of self-fertilization. [1875-80] * * *
self-sterilized
adj. * * *
self-stick
/self"stik"/, adj. having a surface coated or treated to stick to another surface without the use of glue or moisture; self-adhesive. Also, self-sticking. [1945-50] * * *
self-stimulated
adj. * * *
self-storage
self-stor·age (sĕlfʹstôrʹĭj, -stōrʹ-) adj. Of, relating to, or being a commercial facility in which customers can rent space to store possessions: a self-storage ...
self-strong
adj. * * *
self-stuck
adj. * * *
self-study
/self"stud"ee/, n., pl. self-studies, adj. n. 1. the study of something by oneself, as through books, records, etc., without direct supervision or attendance in a class: She ...
self-styled
/self"stuyld"/, adj. styled, called, or considered by oneself as specified: a self-styled leader. [1815-25] * * *
self-subdual
n. * * *
self-subdued
adj. * * *
self-subsistent
adj. * * *
self-subsisting
adj. * * *
self-subversive
adj. * * *
self-sufficiency
See self-sufficient. * * *
self-sufficient
—self-sufficiency, n. —self-sufficiently, adv. /self"seuh fish"euhnt, self'-/, adj. 1. able to supply one's own or its own needs without external assistance: The nation grows ...
self-support
—self-supported, adj. —self-supportedness, n. —self-supporting, adj. —self-supportingly, adv. /self"seuh pawrt", -pohrt", self'-/, n. the supporting or maintaining of ...
self-supported
See self-support. * * *
self-supporting
See self-supported. * * *
self-surrender
/self"seuh ren"deuhr, self'-/, n. the surrender or yielding up of oneself, one's will, affections, etc., as to another person, an influence, or a cause. [1695-1705] * * *
self-survey
n. * * *
self-surveyed
adj. * * *
self-surviving
adj. * * *
self-suspended
adj. * * *
self-suspicious
adj. * * *
self-sustaining
—self-sustained, adj. —self-sustainingly, adv. —self-sustainment, n. /self"seuh stay"ning, self'-/, adj. self-supporting. [1835-45] * * *
self-sustainingly
See self-sustaining. * * *
self-sway
n. * * *
self-tapping
adj. * * *
self-tapping screw
/self"tap'ing/ a screw designed to tap its corresponding female thread as it is driven. Also called tapping screw. * * *
self-taught
/self"tawt"/, adj. 1. taught to oneself or by oneself to be (as indicated) without the aid of a formal education: self-taught typing; a self-taught typist. 2. learned by oneself: ...
self-taxed
adj. * * *
self-teacher
n. * * *
self-teaching
adj. * * *
self-tempted
adj. * * *
self-test
/self"test"/ n. 1. a test that can be administered to oneself. v.t. 2. to administer a test to (oneself). * * *
self-testing
adj. * * *
self-therapy
n., pl. self-therapies. * * *
self-thinning
adj. * * *
self-thought
n. * * *
self-threading
adj. * * *
self-tightening
adj. * * *
self-tipping
adj. * * *
self-tire
v.i., self-tired, self-tiring. * * *
self-to-self
/self"teuh self"/, adj. autologous. * * *
self-tolerance
self-tol·er·ance (sĕlfʹtŏlʹər-əns) n. Tolerance by the body's immune system to its own cells and tissues. * * *
self-tolerant
adj.; self-tolerantly, adv. * * *
self-torment
—self-tormented, adj. —self-tormenting, adj. —self-tormentingly, adv. —self-tormentor, n. /self"tawr"ment, self'-/, n. an act or instance of tormenting oneself, as with ...
self-torture
n. * * *
self-tortured
adj. * * *
self-torturing
adj. * * *
self-trained
adj. * * *
self-treated
adj. * * *
self-trial
n. * * *
self-troubled
adj. * * *
self-troubling
adj. * * *
self-trust
n. * * *
self-trusting
adj. * * *
self-tuition
n. * * *
self-understood
adj. * * *
self-undoing
adj. * * *
self-uniform
n. * * *
self-union
n. * * *
self-unity
n. * * *
self-unloading
adj. * * *
self-unveiling
adj. * * *
self-usurp
v.i. * * *
self-validating
/self'val"i day'ting, self"-/, adj. requiring no external confirmation, sanction, or validation. [1940-45] * * *
self-valued
adj. * * *
self-valuing
adj. * * *
self-varying
adj. * * *
self-vaunted
adj. * * *
self-vaunting
adj. * * *
self-ventilated
adj. * * *
self-vindicated
adj. * * *
self-violent
adj. * * *
self-want
n. * * *
self-warranting
adj. * * *
self-weary
adj. * * *
self-weight
n. * * *
self-weighted
adj. * * *
self-whipper
n. * * *
self-whipping
adj. * * *
self-whole
adj. * * *
self-will
—self-willed, adj. —self-willedly, adv. —self-willedness, n. /self'wil", self"-/, n. stubborn or obstinate willfulness, as in pursuing one's own wishes, aims, etc. [bef. ...
self-willed
See self-will. * * *
self-winding
/self"wuyn"ding/, adj. (of a timepiece) kept wound or wound periodically by a mechanism, as an electric motor or a system of weighted levers, so that winding by hand is not ...
self-wise
adj. * * *
self-witness
n. * * *
self-witnessed
adj. * * *
self-working
adj. * * *
self-worn
adj. * * *
self-worship
n. * * *
self-worshiping
adj. * * *
self-worth
—self-worthiness /self"werr"dhee nis/, n. /self"werrth"/, n. the sense of one's own value or worth as a person; self-esteem; self-respect. [1960-65] * * *
self-wounded
adj. * * *
self-wounding
adj. * * *
self-writing
adj. * * *
self-written
adj. * * *
self-wrong
/self"rawng", -rong"/, n. wrong done to oneself. [1580-90] * * *
self-wrought
adj. * * *
selfcontentedly
See self-content. * * *
selfdom
self·dom (sĕlfʹdəm) n. Selfhood. * * *
selfheal
/self"heel'/, n. 1. a plant, Prunella vulgaris, of the mint family, having pinnate leaves and tubular violet-blue flowers, formerly believed to have healing properties. 2. any of ...
selfhood
/self"hood/, n. 1. the state of being an individual person; individuality. 2. one's personality. 3. selfishness. [1640-50; SELF + -HOOD] * * *
selfish
—selfishly, adv. —selfishness, n. /sel"fish/, adj. 1. devoted to or caring only for oneself; concerned primarily with one's own interests, benefits, welfare, etc., regardless ...
selfishly
See selfish. * * *
selfishness
See selfishly. * * *
selfless
—selflessly, adv. —selflessness, n. /self"lis/, adj. having little or no concern for oneself, esp. with regard to fame, position, money, etc.; unselfish. [1815-25; SELF + ...
selflessly
See selfless. * * *
selflessness
See selflessly. * * *
selfness
/self"nis/, n. selfhood. [1580-90; SELF + -NESS] * * *
Selfridge
/sel"frij/, n. Harry Gordon, 1857?-1947, British retail merchant, born in the U.S. * * *
Selfridge, Harry Gordon
▪ British merchant born Jan. 11, 1858, Ripon, Wis., U.S. died May 8, 1947, London, Eng.  founder of Selfridges department store in London.       The son of a small ...
Selfridges
a famous department store on Oxford Street, London. It is one of the oldest and largest department stores in Britain, and is particularly well known for its food department. * * *
selfsame
—selfsameness, n. /self"saym', -saym"/, adj. being the very same; identical. [1375-1425; late ME selve same; see SELF, SAME; c. Dan selvsamme, OHG selbsama] Syn. exact, very, ...
selfsameness
See selfsame. * * *
selfward
—selfwardness, n. /self"weuhrd/, adv. Also, selfwards. 1. in the direction of or toward oneself: a selfward-moving gesture. 2. within oneself; inward: She turned her thoughts ...
Selig, Bud
▪ 2003       At times during 2002 Bud Selig, commissioner of Major League Baseball, seemed to some observers to be vying to become the most unpopular man in the sport. ...
Seligman, C.G.
▪ British anthropologist in full  Charles Gabriel Seligman   born Dec. 24, 1873, London, Eng. died Sept. 19, 1940, Oxford       a pioneer in British anthropology who ...
Seligman, Edwin Robert Anderson
▪ American economist born April 25, 1861, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 8, 1939, Lake Placid, N.Y.       American economist and educator, an expert on ...
Selihoth
Seph. /seuh lee khawt", slee-/; Ashk. /seuh lee khohs", slee"kheuhs/, n. Hebrew. 1. (used with a pl. v.) liturgical prayers serving as expressions of repentance and pleas for ...
Selim I
▪ Ottoman sultan byname  Yavuz (“The Grim”)   born 1470, Amasya, Ottoman Empire [now in Turkey] died Sept. 22, 1520, Çorlu  Ottoman sultan (1512–20) who extended the ...
Selim II
▪ Ottoman sultan byname  Sari (“The Blond”)   born May 1524 died December 1574, Constantinople, Ottoman Empire [now Istanbul, Turkey]       Ottoman sultan from ...
Selim III
born Dec. 24, 1761, Constantinople, Ottoman Empire died July 29, 1808, Constantinople Ottoman sultan (r. 1789–1807). He inherited the throne during a losing war with Austria ...
Selim, Mosque of
▪ mosque, Edirne, Turkey Turkish  Selimiye Cami,         in Edirne, Tur., mosque, considered to be the masterwork of the great Ottoman architect Sinan, completed in ...
Selinus
Ancient Greek city, southern coast of Sicily. Founded by Greek colonists in the 7th century BC, Selinus achieved great prosperity in the 5th century BC, the time when its Doric ...
Seljuk
/sel joohk"/, adj. 1. noting or pertaining to any of several Turkish dynasties that ruled over large parts of Asia from the 11th to the 13th centuries. n. 2. a member of a Seljuk ...
Seljuq
▪ Turkish dynasty also spelled  Seljuk        ruling military family of the Oğuz (Ghuzz) Turkmen tribes that invaded southwestern Asia in the 11th century and ...
Seljūq dynasty
or Saljūq dynasty (с 11th–13th centuries) Muslim Turkmen dynasty that ruled Persia, Iraq, Syria, and Anatolia. Seljūq was the chief of a nomadic Turkish tribe. His ...
selkie
sel·kie also sil·kie (sĭlʹkē) n. A creature or spirit in Scottish and Irish folklore that has the form of a seal but can also assume human form.   [Dialectal diminutive of ...
Selkirk
/sel"kerrk/, n. 1. Alexander (originally Alexander Selcraig), 1676-1721, Scottish sailor marooned on a Pacific island: supposed prototype of Robinson Crusoe. 2. Also called ...
Selkirk Mountains
a mountain range in SW Canada, in SE British Columbia. Highest peak, Mt. Sir Donald, 11,123 ft. (3390 m). * * * Mountain range, southeastern British Columbia, Canada, and ...
Selkirk, Alexander
▪ Scottish sailor Selkirk also spelled  Selcraig   born 1676, Largo, Fife, Scot. died Dec. 12, 1721, at sea       Scottish sailor who was the prototype of the ...
Selkirk, Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of, Lord Daer And Shortcleuch
▪ Scottish philanthropist born June 20, 1771, St. Mary's Isle, Kirkcudbright, Scot. died April 8, 1820, Pau, France  Scottish philanthropist who in 1812 founded the Red ...
Selkirk,Alexander
Sel·kirk (sĕlʹkûrk'), Alexander. 1676-1721. Scottish sailor who was marooned (1704-1709) on an island off Chile and is thought to have inspired Daniel Defoe's Robinson ...
SelkirkMountains
Selkirk Mountains A range of the Rocky Mountains in southeast British Columbia, Canada. It rises to 3,524.3 m (11,555 ft) at Mount Sir Sanford. * * *
Selkirkshire
▪ former county, Scotland, United Kingdom also called  Selkirk        historic county in southeastern Scotland, occupying a rolling upland region dissected by the ...
Selkup
▪ people also called  Ostyak Samoyed        an indigenous Arctic people (Arctic) who traditionally resided in central Russia between the Ob (Ob River) and the Yenisey ...
sell
sell1 —sellable, adj. /sel/, v., sold, selling, n. v.t. 1. to transfer (goods) to or render (services) for another in exchange for money; dispose of to a purchaser for a price: ...
sell date.
See pull date. * * *
sell-back
/sel"bak'/, n. an act or instance of selling something previously purchased. * * *
sell-off
/sel"awf', -of'/, n. 1. Stock Exchange. a sudden and marked decline in stock or bond prices resulting from widespread selling. 2. an act or instance of liquidating assets or ...
Sella
/sel"euh/, n. Douay Bible. Zillah. * * *
Sella, Quintino
▪ Italian statesman born July 7, 1827, Mosso, near Biella, Piedmont [Italy] died March 14, 1884, Biella       statesman who helped place the new national government on ...
sellable
See sell. * * *
Sellafield
a nuclear power station (= a building where electricity is produced) on the coast of north-west Britain, near the Lake District. It is the only centre in Britain for reprocessing ...
Sellars, Peter
born Sept. 27, 1957, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S. U.S. stage director. He attended Harvard University, where he began developing his innovative and often controversial style of ...
Sellars, Wilfrid
▪ American philosopher in full  Wilfrid Stalker Sellars  born May 20, 1912, Ann Arbor, Mich., U.S. died July 2, 1989, Pittsburgh, Pa.       American philosopher best ...
sellback
sell·back (sĕlʹbăk') n. The act or an instance of selling something back that one had previously bought. * * *
seller
/sel"euhr/, n. 1. a person who sells; salesperson or vender. 2. an article considered with reference to its sales: one of the poorest sellers. [1150-1200; ME; see SELL1, -ER1] * ...
seller's market
seller's market n. a state of trade favorable to the seller, with relatively great demand and high prices of something for sale * * *
seller's option
(on the New York Stock Exchange) a special transaction that gives the seller the right to make late delivery of a security within a specified period, ranging from 5 to not more ...
seller'smarket
sell·er's market also sell·ers' market (sĕlʹərz) n. A market condition characterized by high prices and a supply of commodities falling short of demand. * * *
Sellers
(1925–80) an English comedy actor. His skill at copying other people’s voices in an amusing way first became well known through the radio programme The Goon Show. By the ...
sellers' market
a market in which goods and services are scarce and prices relatively high. Cf. buyers' market. * * *
Sellers, Peter
orig. Richard Henry Sellers born Sept. 8, 1925, Southsea, Hampshire, Eng. died July 24, 1980, London British film actor. The son of vaudeville performers, he acted from ...
selling
/sel"ing/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to a sale or sales: the selling price of oranges. 2. engaged in selling: two selling offices in New York. 3. readily salable; in strong demand ...
selling climax
a brief, abrupt decline in stock prices that is succeeded by a rally. [1945-50] * * *
selling floor.
floor (def. 10). * * *
selling point
a unique or advantageous feature that appeals to the prospective buyer of a service, product, etc.: A generous discount is the chief selling point of the book club. [1920-25] * * ...
selling race
a claiming race at the end of which the winning horse is offered for sale. [1895-1900] * * *
selling-plater
/sel"ing play'teuhr/, n. a horse that competes in a selling race; an inferior horse. [1885-90] * * *

<< < 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.072 c;