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Слова на букву schw-stag (15990)

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smilodon
/smuy"leuh don'/, n. any of several saber-toothed cats of the extinct genus Smilodon, that ranged from California through most of South America during the Pleistocene Epoch and ...
smirch
—smirchless, adj. /smerrch/, v.t. 1. to discolor or soil; spot or smudge with or as with soot, dust, dirt, etc. 2. to sully or tarnish (a person, reputation, character, etc.); ...
smirk
—smirker, n. —smirkingly, adv. /smerrk/, v.i. 1. to smile in an affected, smug, or offensively familiar way. n. 2. the facial expression of a person who smirks. [bef. 900; ME ...
smirker
See smirk. * * *
smirkily
See smirker. * * *
smirkingly
See smirker. * * *
smirky
See smirker. * * *
smitch
/smich/, n. Informal. smidgen. [1830-40; orig. uncert.] * * *
smite
—smiter, n. /smuyt/, v., smote or (Obs.) smit; smitten or smit; smiting. v.t. 1. to strike or hit hard, with or as with the hand, a stick, or other weapon: She smote him on the ...
smiter
See smite. * * *
smith
/smith/, n. 1. a worker in metal. 2. a blacksmith. v.t. 3. to forge on an anvil; form by heating and pounding: to smith armor. [bef. 900; (n.) ME, OE; c. G Schmied, ON smithr, ...
Smith
/smith/, n. 1. Adam, 1723-90, Scottish economist. 2. Alfred E(manuel), 1873-1944, U.S. political leader. 3. Bessie, 1894?-1937, U.S. singer. 4. Charles Henry ("Bill Arp"), ...
Smith & Wesson
a company that makes guns, and also knives and bicycles. It was established in 1852 in Springfield, Massachusetts, by Horace Smith and Daniel B Wesson: He had been shot at close ...
Smith Act
▪ United States [1940] formally  Alien Registration Act of 1940        U.S. federal law passed in 1940 that made it a criminal offense to advocate violent overthrow ...
Smith Center
▪ Kansas, United States       city, seat (1872) of Smith county, northern Kansas, U.S. Smith Center is located about 85 miles (135 km) northwest of Salina. It was ...
Smith College
Private liberal arts college for women in Northampton, Mass. It was founded in 1871 through the bequest of Sophia Smith (1796–1870). Bachelor's degrees are granted in most ...
Smith Sound
Channel between Ellesmere Island, Canada, and northwestern Greenland. About 30–45 mi (48–72 km) wide, the sound extends northward for 55 mi (88 km) from Baffin Bay to the ...
Smith Square
a square in central London, near the Houses of Parliament. Until 2004 is was the address of the main offices of the Conservative Party. People sometimes used ‘Smith Square’ ...
Smith, A.J.M.
▪ Canadian poet and anthologist in full  Arthur James Marshall Smith  born Nov. 8, 1902, Montreal died Nov. 21, 1980, East Lansing, Mich., U.S.       Canadian poet, ...
Smith, Abby Hadassah; and Smith, Julia Evelina
▪ American suffragists Respectively,   born June 1, 1797, Glastonbury, Conn., U.S. died July 23, 1878, Glastonbury born May 27, 1792, Glastonbury died March 6, 1886, ...
Smith, Adam
(baptized June 5, 1723, Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scot. died July 17, 1790, Edinburgh) Scottish social philosopher and political economist. The son of a customs official, he studied at ...
Smith, Al
▪ American politician in full  Alfred Emanuel Smith   born Dec. 30, 1873, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 4, 1944, New York City       U.S. politican, four-time ...
Smith, Alexis
▪ 1994       (GLADYS SMITH), U.S. actress (b. June 8, 1921, Penticton, B.C.—d. June 9, 1993, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a striking and statuesque leading lady and ...
Smith, Alfred E(manuel)
born Dec. 30, 1873, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 4, 1944, New York City U.S. politician. After working in the Fulton fish market to help support his family, he began his ...
Smith, Amanda
▪ American religious leader née  Berry   born Jan. 23, 1837, Long Green, Md., U.S. died Feb. 24, 1915, Sebring, Fla.       American evangelist and missionary who ...
Smith, Anna Deavere
▪ 2009 born Sept. 18, 1950, Baltimore, Md.  Anna Deavere Smith, who rose to prominence in the early 1990s while performing highly acclaimed one-woman shows dealing with race ...
Smith, Anna Nicole
▪ 2008 Vickie Lynn Hogan        American celebrity born Nov. 28, 1967 , Mexia, Texas died Feb. 8, 2007, Hollywood, Fla. engaged in a lifestyle that frequently captured ...
Smith, Arnold Cantwell
▪ 1995       Canadian diplomat (b. Jan. 18, 1915, Toronto, Ont.—d. Feb. 7, 1994, Toronto), as the first secretary-general of the Commonwealth, organized and ...
Smith, Bernard
▪ British organ maker byname  Father Smith   born c. 1630, , Germany died Feb. 18, 1708, London       German-born master organ builder in Restoration ...
Smith, Bessie
orig. Elizabeth Smith born April 15, 1898?, Chattanooga, Tenn., U.S. died Sept. 26, 1937, Clarksdale, Miss. U.S. blues and jazz singer. Smith sang popular songs as well as ...
Smith, Charles
▪ 2007       American musician (b. Sept. 6, 1948, Jersey City, N.J.—d. June 20, 2006, Maplewood, N.J.), was the lead guitarist for the group Kool and the Gang, which ...
Smith, Charlotte
▪ English writer née Turner born May 4, 1749, London, Eng. died Oct. 28, 1806, Tilford, near Farnham, Surrey  English novelist and poet, highly praised by the novelist Sir ...
Smith, Cyril Stanley
born Oct. 4, 1903, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died Aug. 25, 1992, Cambridge, Mass., U.S. British-born U.S. metallurgist. He worked as a researcher at the Massachusetts ...
Smith, Dame Maggie
orig. Margaret Natalie Smith born Dec. 28, 1934, Ilford, Essex, Eng. British actress. She first gained recognition on Broadway in New Faces of 1956, and, after winning praise ...
Smith, David
▪ American sculptor in full  David Roland Smith  born March 9, 1906, Decatur, Indiana, U.S. died May 23, 1965, Albany, New York       American sculptor whose ...
Smith, David (Roland)
born March 9, 1906, Decatur, Ind., U.S. died May 23, 1965, Albany, N.Y. U.S. sculptor. He learned to work with metal while employed at an automobile plant. In 1926 he went to ...
Smith, David Hamilton
▪ 2000       American medical researcher who in 1996 was honoured with the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research for work that led to the development of a ...
Smith, Dean
▪ American coach in full  Dean Edwards Smith  born February 28, 1931, Emporia, Kansas, U.S.       American collegiate basketball coach at the University of North ...
Smith, Dean Edwards
▪ 1998       The 1982 Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) championship game between the University of North Carolina and the University of Virginia featured some of the ...
Smith, Dick
▪ 1994       Australia's answer to Leonardo da Vinci, Dick Smith continued to amaze the public with his displays of versatility when he was blown into the record books ...
Smith, Eliza Roxey Snow
▪ American Mormon leader and poet née  Eliza Roxey Snow  born Jan. 21, 1804, Becket, Mass., U.S. died Dec. 5, 1887, Salt Lake City, Utah [U.S.]       American Mormon ...
Smith, Emmitt
born May 15, 1969, Pensacola, Fla., U.S. U.S. football player. He set 58 school football records at the University of Florida, and as a running back for the Dallas Cowboys of ...
Smith, Erminnie Adele Platt
▪ American anthropologist née Platt born April 26, 1836, Marcellus, N.Y., U.S. died June 9, 1886, Jersey City, N.J.       American anthropologist who was the first ...
Smith, George
born March 19, 1824, London, Eng. died April 6, 1901, Byfleet, near Weybridge, Surrey British publisher. He took over his father's bookselling and publishing business in 1846. ...
Smith, George Washington
▪ American dancer born c. 1820, , Philadelphia died Feb. 18, 1899, Philadelphia       American dancer, ballet master, and teacher, considered the only male American ...
Smith, Gerrit
born March 6, 1797, Utica, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 28, 1874, New York, N.Y. U.S. reformer and philanthropist. Born into a wealthy family, he became active in the temperance ...
Smith, Hamilton O(thanel)
born Aug. 23, 1931, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. microbiologist. He received his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University. While studying the mechanism whereby the bacterium Haemophilus ...
Smith, Hamilton Othanel
▪ American biologist born Aug. 23, 1931, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American microbiologist who shared, with Werner Arber (Arber, Werner) and Daniel Nathans (Nathans, ...
Smith, Hannah Whitall
▪ American evangelist and reformer née  Hannah Whitall  born Feb. 7, 1832, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died May 1, 1911, Iffley [near Oxford], Eng.       American ...
Smith, Hazel Brannon
▪ 1995       U.S. publisher and editor (b. 1914?, Gadsden, Ala.—d. May 14, 1994, Cleveland, Tenn.), courageously crusaded for social reform and consistently promoted ...
Smith, Hoke
born Sept. 2, 1855, Newton, N.C., U.S. died Nov. 27, 1931, Atlanta, Ga. U.S. politician. He was publisher of the Atlanta Journal (1887–1900), which he used to promote ...
Smith, Howard Kingsbury, Jr.
▪ 2003       American journalist and broadcaster (b. May 12, 1914, Ferriday, La.—d. Feb. 15, 2002, Bethesda, Md.), was a longtime radio and television newscaster who ...
Smith, Huey
▪ American musician born Jan. 26, 1934, New Orleans, La., U.S.       American pianist, bandleader, songwriter, and vocalist, a principal figure in the 1950s rock and ...
Smith, Ian
▪ prime minister of Rhodesia in full  Ian Douglas Smith  born April 8, 1919, Selukwe, Rhodesia [now Shurugwi, Zimbabwe] died Nov. 20, 2007, Cape Town, S.Af.  first ...
Smith, Ian (Douglas)
born April 8, 1919, Selukwe, Rhodesia First native-born prime minister of the British colony of Southern Rhodesia (1964–65). An ardent advocate of white rule, in 1965 he ...
Smith, Ian Douglas
▪ 2008  Rhodesian politician born April 8, 1919, Selukwe, Rhodesia [now Shurugwi, Zimb.] died Nov. 20, 2007, Cape Town, S.Af. was the first native-born prime minister of the ...
Smith, Jedediah
▪ American explorer born June 24, 1798, Bainbridge, N.Y., U.S. died May 27, 1831, near Cimarron River       trader and explorer who was the first American to enter ...
Smith, Jeff
▪ 2005 Jeffrey L. Smith        American television personality (b. Jan. 22, 1939, Tacoma, Wash.—d. July 7, 2004, Seattle, Wash.), hosted the extremely popular TV ...
Smith, Jessie Willcox
▪ American painter and illustrator born September 8, 1863, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. died May 3, 1935, Philadelphia       American artist best remembered for her ...
Smith, Jimmy
▪ 2006 James Oscar Smith        American musician (b. Dec. 8, 1928, Norristown, Pa.—found dead Feb. 8, 2005, Scottsdale, Ariz.), made the previously scorned electric ...
Smith, John
(baptized Jan. 6, 1580, Willoughby, Lincolnshire, Eng. died June 1631, London) English explorer. After a period as a military adventurer, he joined an English group preparing to ...
Smith, Joseph
born Dec. 23, 1805, Sharon, Vt., U.S. died June 27, 1844, Carthage, Ill. Founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon church). He began experiencing ...
Smith, Joseph F
▪ American religious leader born Nov. 13, 1838, Far West, Mo., U.S. died Nov. 19, 1918, Salt Lake City, Utah       American religious leader, sixth president ...
Smith, Joseph, III
▪ American religious leader [1832-1914] born Nov. 6, 1832, Kirtland, Ohio, U.S. died Dec. 10, 1914, Independence, Mo.       American religious leader, first president ...
Smith, Julia
▪ 1998       British television producer and director who was one of the creators of the long-running BBC soap opera "EastEnders," which from its first airing in 1985 ...
Smith, Kate
orig. Kathryn Elizabeth Smith born May 1, 1909, Greenville, Va., U.S. died June 17, 1986, Raleigh, N.C. U.S. singer, long known as the "First Lady of Radio. " Smith studied ...
Smith, Kiki
▪ American artist born Jan. 18, 1954, Nürnberg, Ger.       German-born American sculptor, installation artist, and printmaker whose intense and expressionistic work ...
Smith, Lee
▪ American author born Nov. 1, 1944, Grundy, Va., U.S.       American author of fiction about her native southeastern United States.       Smith was educated at ...
Smith, Leslie Charles
▪ 2006       British toy manufacturer (b. March 6, 1918, Enfield, Middlesex, Eng.—d. May 26, 2005, London, Eng.), as joint founder of Lesney Products, in 1953 ...
Smith, Linda
▪ 2007       British comedian (b. Jan. 25, 1958, Erith, Kent, Eng.—d. Feb. 27, 2006, London, Eng.), delighted millions with her warm, but often satiric, humour about ...
Smith, Lowell Dennis
▪ 2008       American dancer born June 5, 1951, Memphis, Tenn. died Oct. 22, 2007, Los Angeles, Calif. performed for 17 years with the Dance Theater of Harlem, ...
Smith, Margaret Chase
orig. Margaret Madeline Chase born Dec. 14, 1897, Skowhegan, Maine, U.S. died May 29, 1995, Skowhegan U.S. politician. She served as secretary to her husband, Clyde Smith, ...
Smith, Michael
▪ 2001       British-born Canadian biochemist (b. April 26, 1932, Blackpool, Lancashire, Eng.—d. Oct. 5, 2000, Vancouver, B.C.), won the 1993 Nobel Prize for Chemistry ...
Smith, Michelle
▪ 1997       Prior to 1996, Ireland had won only five Olympic gold medals, and no medal (gold, silver, or bronze) had been won by Irish women. In one memorable week in ...
Smith, Mike
▪ 2009 Michael George Smith        British singer and songwriter born Dec. 6, 1943, Edmonton, Middlesex, Eng. died Feb. 28, 2008, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Eng. was ...
Smith, Oliver
▪ 1995       U.S. set designer (b. Feb. 13, 1918, Waupun, Wis.—d. Jan. 23, 1994, Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.), used his imaginative painter's eye to create magnificent and ...
Smith, Patti
▪ American poet, songwriter, and singer Introduction in full  Patti Lee Smith   born December 30, 1946, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.       American poet, rock songwriter, ...
Smith, Preserved
▪ American historian born July 22, 1880, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. died May 15, 1941, Louisville, Ky.       American historian noted for his scholarly works on the ...
Smith, Red
orig. Walter Wellesley Smith born Sept. 25, 1905, Green Bay, Wis., U.S. died Jan. 15, 1982, Stamford, Conn. U.S. sports columnist. Smith worked for various newspapers before ...
Smith, Robert
▪ United States statesman born Nov. 3, 1757, Lancaster, Pa. [United States] died Nov. 26, 1842, Baltimore, Md., U.S.       U.S. secretary of state under President James ...
Smith, Robert E.
▪ 1999       American television personality (b. Nov. 27, 1917, Buffalo, N.Y.—d. July 30, 1998, Hendersonville, N.C.), was the creator and host of "The Howdy Doody ...
Smith, Roger Bonham
▪ 2008       American business executive born July 12, 1925, Columbus, Ohio died Nov. 29, 2007, near Detroit, Mich. served as chairman and CEO (1981–90) of the ...
Smith, Samuel
born July 27, 1752, Carlisle, Pa. died April 22, 1839, Baltimore, Md., U.S. U.S. politician. He was a merchant in Baltimore and fought in the American Revolution. He served in ...
Smith, Seba
▪ American editor and author born Sept. 14, 1792, Buckfield, Maine, U.S. died July 28, 1868, Patchogue, N.Y.       American editor and humorist, creator of the ...
Smith, Sir George Adam
▪ Scottish preacher and scholar born Oct. 19, 1856, Calcutta, India died March 3, 1942, Balerno, Midlothian, Scot.       Scottish preacher and Semitic scholar who ...
Smith, Sir Harry, Baronet
▪ British general born June 28, 1787, Whittlesey, Isle of Ely, Eng. died Oct. 12, 1860, London  British general, governor of Cape Colony and high commissioner in South Africa ...
Smith, Sir Keith Macpherson; and Smith, Sir Ross Macpherson
▪ Australian pilots Respectively,   born Dec. 20, 1890, Adelaide, S.Aus. died Dec. 19, 1955, Sydney, N.S.W. born Dec. 4, 1892, Adelaide, S.Aus. died April 13, 1922, ...
Smith, Sophia
▪ American philanthropist born Aug. 27, 1796, Hatfield, Mass., U.S. died June 12, 1870, Hatfield       American philanthropist whose inherited fortune allowed her to ...
Smith, Stevie
orig. Florence Margaret Smith born Sept. 20, 1902, Hull, Yorkshire, Eng. died March 7, 1971, London British poet. She lived most of her life with an aunt in a London suburb ...
Smith, Sydney
▪ English preacher born June 3, 1771, Woodford, Essex, Eng. died Feb. 22, 1845, London  one of the foremost English preachers of his day, and a champion of parliamentary ...
Smith, Theobald
born July 31, 1859, Albany, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 10, 1934, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. microbiologist and pathologist. He received his M.D. from Cornell University. He discovered ...
Smith, Thomas John
▪ 1999       Australian racehorse trainer who was said to have been the country's most successful; among his credits were 34 Sydney trainers' premierships—33 of them ...
Smith, Tommie
▪ American athlete born June 6, 1944, Clarksville, Texas, U.S.    American sprinter who held the world record for the 200-metre dash with turn (1966–71), his best time ...
Smith, Vernon L.
▪ American economist born January 1, 1927, Wichita, Kansas, U.S.       American economist, corecipient of the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2002 for his use of ...
Smith, W(illiam) Eugene
born Dec. 20, 1918, Wichita, Kan., U.S. died Oct. 15, 1978, Tucson, Ariz. U.S. photojournalist. He worked as a photographer for local papers then went to New York City and ...
Smith, W. Eugene
▪ American photographer in full  William Eugene Smith  byname  Gene Smith  born December 20, 1918, Wichita, Kansas, U.S. died October 15, 1978, Tucson, ...
Smith, W. Wallace
▪ American religious leader in full  William Wallace Smith   born Nov. 18, 1900, Lamoni, Iowa, U.S. died Aug. 4, 1989, Independence, Mo.       American religious ...
Smith, Walter Bedell
▪ United States general born October 5, 1895, Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. died August 9, 1961, Washington, D.C.  U.S. Army general, diplomat, and administrator who served as ...
Smith, Wilfred Cantwell
▪ 2001       Canadian theologian (b. July 21, 1916, Toronto, Ont.—d. Feb. 7, 2000, Toronto), was a scholar of Islam and comparative religions who encouraged dialogue ...
Smith, Will
▪ 1999       By the time he won the 1998 Grammy award for best rap solo performance for "Men in Black," charismatic rapper, actor, writer, and producer Will Smith, ...
Smith, William
born March 23, 1769, Churchill, Oxfordshire, Eng. died Aug. 28, 1839, Northampton, Northamptonshire English engineer and geologist, known as the founder of the science of ...
Smith, William Jay
▪ American poet born April 22, 1918, Winnfield, Louisiana, U.S.       American lyric poet who wrote for both adults and children.       The son of an army ...
Smith, William Robertson
▪ Scottish scholar born Nov. 8, 1846, Keig, Aberdeenshire, Scot. died March 31, 1894, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Eng.  Scottish Semitic scholar, encyclopaedist, and student ...
Smith, Zadie
▪ 2004       In 2003 Granta magazine named Zadie Smith one of the best young British novelists. Such praise was nothing new for the English author whose debut novel, ...
Smith, Zilpha Drew
▪ American social worker born Jan. 25, 1851/52, Pembroke, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1926, Boston, Mass.       American social worker under whose guidance in the late ...
Smith,Adam
Smith (smĭth), Adam. 1723-1790. Scottish political economist and philosopher. His Wealth of Nations (1776) laid the foundations of classical free-market economic theory. * * *
Smith,Alfred Emanuel
Smith, Alfred Emanuel. Known as “the Happy Warrior.” 1873-1944. American politician. He served as governor of New York (1919-1920 and 1923-1928) and was defeated in the 1928 ...
Smith,Bessie
Smith, Bessie. 1894?-1937. photographed in 1936 by Carl Van Vechten (1880-1964) Libraryof Congress Photo: Carl Van Vechten collection American singer and songwriter who became a ...
Smith,David
Smith, David. 1906-1965. American sculptor best known for his use of scrap and welded metal, especially in Medals of Dishonor (1940), a series of bronze relief plaques which ...
Smith,Hamilton Othanel
Smith, Hamilton Othanel. Born 1931. American microbiologist. He shared a 1978 Nobel Prize for the discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to molecular genetics. * ...
Smith,Hannah Whitall
Smith, Hannah Whitall. 1832-1911. American evangelist, writer, and reformer who was a founder of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (1874). * * *
Smith,Ian
Smith, Ian. Born 1919. Zimbabwean politician who unilaterally declared independence from Great Britain for the former colony of Rhodesia in 1965. * * *
Smith,Jedediah Strong
Smith, Jedediah Strong. 1799-1831. American trader and explorer who opened a number of trade routes throughout the West. * * *
Smith,John
Smith, John. 1580?-1631. English colonist, explorer, and writer whose maps and accounts of his explorations in Virginia and New England were invaluable to later explorers and ...
Smith,Joseph
Smith, Joseph. 1805-1844. American religious leader. He founded (1830) the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and led his congregation westward from New York State to ...
Smith,Julia Evelina
Smith, Julia Evelina. 1792-1886. American suffragist. With her sister Abby Hadassah Smith (1797-1878) she became famous for refusing to pay taxes until she could vote. * * *
Smith,Kathryn Elizabeth
Smith, Kathryn Elizabeth. Known as “Kate.” 1909-1986. American singer noted especially for her rendition of Irving Berlin's “God Bless America,” first performed in ...
Smith,Margaret Chase
Smith, Margaret Chase. 1897-1995. American politician who served as U.S. representative (1940-1949) and senator (1949-1973) from Maine. * * *
Smith,Michael
Smith, Michael. Born 1932. British-born Canadian biochemist who developed a method for making a specific genetic mutation at any spot on a DNA molecule. He shared a 1993 Nobel ...
Smith-Connally Anti-Strike Act
▪ United States [1943] also called  War Labor Disputes Act        (June 25, 1943), measure enacted by the U.S. Congress, over President Franklin D. Roosevelt's veto, ...
smithereens
/smidh'euh reenz"/, n.pl. small pieces; bits: broken into smithereens. Also, smithers /smidh"euhrz/. [1820-30; dial. smithers ( < ?) + Hiberno-E -een dim. suffix ( < Ir -ín)] * ...
smithery
/smith"euh ree/, n., pl. smitheries. the work, craft, or workshop of a smith. [1615-25; SMITH + -ERY] * * *
Smithfield
/smith"feeld'/, n. a town in N Rhode Island. 16,886. * * * ▪ area, London, United Kingdom       area in the northwestern part of the City of London (London, City of). ...
Smithfield ham
Trademark. See Virginia ham. * * *
Smithfield Market
London’s main meat market. There has been a meat market at Smithfield, on the edge of the City, since the 12th century. The glass buildings of today’s market were built in ...
Smithies, Oliver
▪ American scientist born June 23, 1925, Halifax, Yorkshire [now in West Yorkshire], Eng.       British-born American scientist who, with Mario R. Capecchi (Capecchi, ...
smithing
Fabrication and repair of metal objects by hot and cold forging on an anvil or with a power hammer or by welding and other means. Blacksmiths traditionally worked with iron ...
SmithIsland
Smith Island A group of closely placed islands in southern Chesapeake Bay on the Maryland-Virginia border. Settled in the mid-17th century, the islands are the site of several ...
smiths
➡ Bronze Age Britain * * *
Smiths
a British pop group formed in Manchester in 1982. The group made several successful albums in the 1980s, including The Smiths (1984) and Meat is Murder (1985). Their best-known ...
Smiths, the
▪ British rock group Introduction       one of the most popular and critically acclaimed English bands of the 1980s. The original members were lead singer Morrissey ...
Smithson
/smith"seuhn/, n. James, 1765-1829, English chemist and mineralogist. * * *
Smithson, Alison Margaret
▪ 1994       British architect (b. June 22, 1928, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England—d. Aug. 16, 1993, London, England), with her husband, Peter, was in the forefront of ...
Smithson, Alison; and Smithson, Peter
▪ British architects in full, respectively,  Alison Margaret Smithson, née Gill, and Peter Denham Smithson   Respectively,   born June 22, 1928, Sheffield, Yorkshire, ...
Smithson, James
▪ British scientist born 1765, Paris, France died June 27, 1829, Genoa [Italy]       English scientist who provided funds for the founding of the Smithsonian ...
Smithson, Peter Denham
▪ 2004       British architect (b. Sept. 18, 1923, Stockton-on-Tees, Durham, Eng.—d. March 3, 2003, London, Eng.), with his wife, Alison, was among the foremost ...
Smithson, Robert
▪ American sculptor and writer born Jan. 2, 1938, Passaic, N.J., U.S. died July 20, 1973, Amarillo, Texas       American sculptor and writer associated with the Land ...
Smithson,James
Smith·son (smĭthʹsən), James. 1765-1829. British chemist, mineralogist, and philanthropist. His gift to the United States helped establish (1846) the Smithsonian ...
Smithsonian
➡ Smithsonian Institution * * *
Smithsonian American Art Museum
▪ museum, Washington, District of Columbia, United States       first federal art collection of the United States, housing the world's largest collection of American ...
Smithsonian Institution
/smith soh"nee euhn/ an institution in Washington, D.C., founded 1846 with a grant left by James Smithson, for the increase and diffusion of knowledge: U.S. national museum and ...
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
▪ Panama  a collection of scientific facilities in Panama that is primarily devoted to ecological studies. Although located on Panamanian territory, the institute has been ...
smithsonite
/smith"seuh nuyt'/, n. Mineral. a native carbonate of zinc, ZnCO3, that is an important ore of the metal. [1825-35; named after J. SMITHSON (who distinguished it from calamine); ...
Smithton
▪ Tasmania, Australia       town, northwestern Tasmania, Australia, at the mouth of the Duck River on Duck Bay. The site was included in a grant made to the Van ...
Smithtown
/smith"town'/, n. a city on N Long Island, in SE New York. 30,906. * * *
smithy
/smith"ee, smidh"ee/, n., pl. smithies. 1. the workshop of a smith, esp. a blacksmith. 2. a blacksmith. [1250-1300; ME smithi < ON smithja; akin to OE smiththe. See SMITH] * * *
Smith’s
➡ Smith (XIV). * * *
smitten
/smit"n/, adj. 1. struck, as with a hard blow. 2. grievously or disastrously stricken or afflicted. 3. very much in love. v. 4. a pp. of smite. [1200-50; ME; see SMITE, -EN3] * * ...
Smitty
/smit"ee/, n. a male given name, form of Smith. * * *
smk
To support. a. samekh, from Hebrew sāmek, samekh, from Phoenician *samk, support (?), fifteenth letter of the Phoenician alphabet; b. sigma, from Greek sīgma, sigma, altered ...
šmm
East Semitic noun *šamm-, plant, herb. 1. sesame, sesamoid, from Greek sēsamē, sēsamon, from a Semitic source akin to Ugaritic ššmn, Phoenician ššmn, Aramaic šumšəmā, ...
šmn
Common Semitic noun *šamn-, oil, fat. 1. Gethsemane, from Greek Gethsēmani, from Hebrew gat šemen, oil press, from šemen, oil (gat, press; see wgn). 2. sesame, sesamoid, from ...
smock
—smocklike, adj. /smok/, n. 1. a loose, lightweight overgarment worn to protect the clothing while working. v.t. 2. to clothe in a smock. 3. to draw (a fabric) by needlework ...
smock frock
a loose overgarment of linen or cotton, as that worn by European farm laborers. Cf. blouse (def. 3). [1790-1800] * * *
smock mill
a windmill with sails and shaft carried by a cap rotating on an octagonal tower. [1795-1805] * * *
smocking
/smok"ing/, n. 1. smocked needlework. 2. embroidery stitches used to hold gathered cloth in even folds. [1885-90; SMOCK + -ING1] * * *
smog
—smogless, adj. /smog, smawg/, n. 1. smoke or other atmospheric pollutants combined with fog in an unhealthy or irritating mixture. 2. See photochemical smog. v.t. 3. to cover ...
smogbound
/smog"bownd', smawg"-/, adj. Meteorol. surrounded by smog. [SMOG + -BOUND1] * * *
smoggy
/smog"ee, smaw"gee/, adj., smoggier, smoggiest. full of or characterized by smog. [1925-30; SMOG + -Y1] * * *
smogless
See smoggy. * * *
Smohalla
▪ American Indian leader also called  Smowhola,  Smoholler,  Smokeholer,  Smuxale,  Snohallow , and  Somahallie  born c. 1815 or 1820, Upper Columbia River, Oregon ...
smokable
/smoh"keuh beuhl/, adj. 1. suitable for being smoked. n. 2. Usually, smokables. things for smoking, as cigars or cigarettes. Also, smokeable. [1830-40; SMOKE + -ABLE] * * *
smoke
—smokelike, adj. /smohk/, n., v., smoked, smoking. n. 1. the visible vapor and gases given off by a burning or smoldering substance, esp. the gray, brown, or blackish mixture ...
smoke and mirrors
(used with a sing. or pl. v.) something that distorts or blurs facts, figures, etc., like a magic or conjuring trick; artful deception. [1980-85] * * *
smoke bomb
a bomb that produces a continuous discharge of smoke rather than an explosion, used to mark a target for aerial attack, indicate wind direction, produce a smoke screen, ...
smoke chamber
an enlarged area between the throat of a fireplace and the chimney flue. * * *
smoke detector
an electronic fire alarm that is activated by the presence of smoke. Also called smoke alarm. [1925-30] * * *       device used to warn occupants of a building of the ...
smoke dome
the smoke chamber covering of a prefabricated metal fireplace unit. * * *
smoke jumper
☆ smoke jumper n. an employee of the forest service parachuted to strategic spots in fighting forest fires * * *
smoke pot
a can of chemicals that produces a great quantity of smoke when ignited. * * *
smoke screen
1. a mass of dense smoke produced to conceal an area, vessel, or plane from the enemy. 2. something intended to disguise, conceal, or deceive; camouflage. [1910-15] * * *
smoke shelf
a ledge at the bottom of a smoke chamber, so made as to deflect or break downdrafts from the chimney. Also called wind shelf. * * *
smoke shop
1. a shop selling tobacco products. 2. Slang. a. a place where marijuana or other illicit drugs are sold surreptitiously. b. See head shop. [1790-1800] * * *
smoke tree
1. Also called American smoke tree, chittamwood. a tree, Cotinus obovatus, of the cashew family, native to the southeastern U.S., having egg-shaped leaves and large clusters of ...
smoke-dry
/smohk"druy'/, v., smoke-dried, smoke-drying. v.t. 1. to dry or cure (meat or other food) using smoke. v.i. 2. to become dried by smoke: to be eaten as soon as it ...
smoke-eater
/smohk"ee'teuhr/, n. Slang. a firefighter. [1925-30] * * *
smoke-filled room
/smohk"fild', -fild"/ a place, as a hotel room, for conducting secret negotiations, effecting compromises, devising strategy, etc. [1915-20] * * *
smoke-filledroom
smoke-filled room (smōkʹfĭld') n. 1. A room filled with smoke, especially tobacco smoke. 2. A place, especially a hotel room near a political or business convention, where a ...
smokeable
See smokable. * * *
smokebomb
smoke bomb n. A bomb designed to give out thick smoke upon exploding, used especially to mark a target or to create a smoke screen. * * *
smokechaser
/smohk"chay'seuhr/, n. a person who fights forest fires, esp. one with lightweight equipment. [SMOKE + CHASER1] * * *
smokedetector
smoke detector n. An alarm device that automatically detects the presence of smoke. Also called smoke alarm. * * *
smokehouse
/smohk"hows'/, n., pl. smokehouses /-how'ziz/. a building or place in which meat, fish, etc., are cured with smoke. [1665-75; SMOKE + HOUSE] * * *
smokejack
/smohk"jak'/, n. an apparatus for turning a roasting spit, set in motion by the current of ascending gases in a chimney. [1665-75; SMOKE + JACK1] * * *
smokejumper
/smohk"jum'peuhr/, n. a firefighter who parachutes to forest fires inaccessible to ground crews. [1925-30; SMOKE + JUMPER1] * * *
smokeless
—smokelessly, adv. —smokelessness, n. /smohk"lis/, adj. emitting, producing, or having little or no smoke. [1575-80; SMOKE + -LESS] * * *
smokeless powder
any of various substitutes for ordinary gunpowder that give off little or no smoke, esp. one composed wholly or mostly of guncotton. [1885-90] * * *
smokeless tobacco
1. snuff1 (def. 9). 2. See chewing tobacco. * * *
smokelesspowder
smokeless powder n. A relatively smoke-free propellant charge composed mainly of nitrocellulose, used in projectiles and small artillery rockets. * * *
smokelesstobacco
smokeless tobacco n. 1. Tobacco cut for chewing. 2. See snuff3. * * *
smokeout
/smohk"owt'/, n. a day during which smokers are encouraged to abstain from smoking as part of a campaign to emphasize the hazards of the practice. [patterned on phrasal verbs ...
smokeproof
/smohk"proohf'/, adj. that cannot be penetrated by smoke: a fireproof and smokeproof compartment. [1900-05; SMOKE + -PROOF] * * *
smoker
/smoh"keuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that smokes. 2. Railroads. a. Also called smoking car. a passenger car for those who wish to smoke. b. a compartment for those who wish to ...
smoker's tongue
Pathol. leukoplakia in the mouth caused by irritation due to smoking. Also called smoker's patches. * * *
smoker'scough
smok·er's cough (smōʹkərz) n. A rough, dry cough caused by excessive smoking of tobacco. * * *
smokescreen
smoke screen or smoke·screen (smōkʹskrēn') n. 1. A mass of dense artificial smoke used to conceal military areas or operations from an enemy. 2. An action or statement used ...
smokestack
/smohk"stak'/, n. 1. Also called stack. a pipe for the escape of the smoke or gases of combustion, as on a steamboat, locomotive, or building. adj. 2. pertaining to, engaged in, ...
smoketree
smoke tree n. Either of two deciduous plants, Cotinus obovatus, a tree of the southern United States, or C. coggygria, a shrub of Eurasia, having plumelike clusters of small ...
smokey
/smoh"kee/, n., pl. smokeys. (often cap.) Slang. 1. an officer or officers of a state highway patrol. 2. a state police car. Also called Smokey Bear. [1970-75, Amer.; shortened ...
Smokey Bear
➡ Smokey the Bear * * *
Smokey the Bear
1. the symbol used by the US Forest Service to help prevent forest fires. He is a friendly bear wearing a Forest Service hat and is used on posters and television advertisements ...
Smokies
Smokies [smō′kēz] GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS * * * ➡ Smoky Mountains * * *
smokily
See smoky. * * *
smokiness
See smokily. * * *
smoking
smok·ing (smōʹkĭng) adj. 1. Engaging in the smoking of tobacco: smoking passengers. 2. Designated or reserved for smokers: the smoking section of a restaurant. 3. Of or ...
smoking car
smoker (def. 2a). [1855-60, Amer.] * * *
smoking gun
indisputable proof or evidence of a crime. [1970-75] * * *
smoking jacket
a loose-fitting jacket for men, often of a heavy fabric and trimmed with braid, worn indoors, esp. as a lounging jacket. [1875-80] * * *
smoking lamp
formerly, a lamp aboard ship for lighting pipes, now used figuratively to indicate when smoking is or is not allowed: The smoking lamp is lit. [1880-85] * * *
smoking room
a room set apart for smoking, as in a hotel or clubhouse. [1680-90] * * *
smoking stand
an ashtray mounted on a low pedestal, often placed next to an armchair, sofa, etc. Also called smoker. * * *
smoking-concert
/smoh"king kon'seuhrt/, n. Brit. a concert where smoking is allowed. [1885-90] * * *
smoking-room
smok·ing-room (smōʹkīng-ro͞om', -ro͝om') adj. Marked by indecency; obscene: smoking-room humor. * * *
smokingcar
smoking car n. A railroad car in which smoking is allowed; a smoker. * * *
smokinggun
smoking gun n. Informal Something that serves as indisputable evidence or proof, especially of a crime: “There is no smoking gun or paper trail to [the CIA]” (Thomas ...
smokingjacket
smoking jacket n. A man's evening jacket, often made of a fine fabric, elaborately trimmed, and usually worn at home. * * *
smokingroom
smoking room n. A room, as in a hotel or private club, set aside for smokers. * * *
smoko
/smoh"koh/, n., pl. smokos. Australia and New Zealand Informal. 1. a rest period during work. 2. an informal evening entertainment, esp. for males. Also, smoke-oh. [1895-1900; ...
smoky
—smokily, adv. —smokiness, n. /smoh"kee/, adj., smokier, smokiest. 1. emitting smoke, esp. in large amounts. 2. hazy; darkened or begrimed with smoke. 3. having the character ...
smoky bat
▪ mammal family       either of two bat species found in the Central and South American tropics and classified as a family unto themselves. Amorphochilus schnablii is ...
Smoky Hill
a river flowing E from E Colorado to the Republican River in central Kansas. 540 mi. (870 km) long. * * *
Smoky Hill River
▪ river, United States       river formed by two headstreams (North and South forks) that rise north of Cheyenne Wells, Cheyenne county, in eastern Colorado, U.S., and ...
Smoky Mountains
Smoky Mountains GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS * * * (also the Smokies) another name for the Great Smoky Mountains. * * *
Smoky Mountains.
See Great Smoky Mountains. * * *
smoky quartz
a smoky-yellow to dark brown or black variety of quartz, used as a gem. Also called cairngorm, Cairngorm stone. [1830-40] * * * Common, coarse-grained variety of quartz that ...
smoky topaz
Jewelry. smoky quartz used as a gemstone: not a true topaz. [1790-1800] * * *
SmokyHill River
Smok·y Hill River (smōʹkē) A river rising in eastern Colorado and flowing about 901 km (560 mi) eastward across central Kansas to join the Republican River and form the ...
smokyquartz
smoky quartz n. A transparent or semitransparent brown or gray to nearly black variety of quartz, used as a gemstone. Also called cairngorm. * * *
SmokyRiver
Smoky River A river, about 402 km (250 mi) long, of west-central Alberta, Canada, flowing generally northward to the Peace River. * * *
smolder
/smohl"deuhr/, v.i. 1. to burn without flame; undergo slow or suppressed combustion. 2. to exist or continue in a suppressed state or without outward demonstration: Hatred ...
Smolensk
/smoh lensk"/, Russ. /smu lyensk"/, n. a city in the W Russian Federation in Europe, on the upper Dnieper, SW of Moscow: Russians defeated by Napoleon 1812. 338,000. * * * City ...
Smolensk Upland
▪ region, Russia Russian  Smolenskaya Vozvyshennost,  also called Smolensk-Moscow Upland,         ridge of high land, western Russia, running in a west-southwest to ...
Smollett
/smol"it/, n. Tobias George, 1721-71, English novelist. * * *
Smollett, Tobias
▪ Scottish novelist in full  Tobias George Smollett  baptized March 19, 1721, Cardross, Dumbartonshire, Scot. died Sept. 17, 1771, near Livorno, Tuscany [Italy]  Scottish ...
Smollett, Tobias (George)
(baptized March 19, 1721, Cardross, Dumbartonshire, Scot. died Sept. 17, 1771, near Livorno, Tuscany) English satirical novelist. Throughout his life Smollett combined the roles ...
Smollett,Tobias George
Smol·lett (smŏlʹĭt), Tobias George. 1721-1771. British writer known for his adventure novels, such as Roderick Random (1748) and Peregrine Pickle (1751). * * *
smolt
/smohlt/, n. a young, silvery salmon in the stage of its first migration to the sea. [1425-75; late ME; perh. akin to SMELT2] * * *
Smolyan
▪ Bulgaria formerly  (until 1934) Pashmakli,         town, southern Bulgaria, on the Cherna River in the southeastern Rhodope Mountains. Its elevation, 3,300 feet ...
Smon-lam chen-mo
▪ Buddhist celebration also called  Monlam Chenmo        (Tibetan: “Great Prayer”), most important Tibetan Buddhist celebration of the year, held annually as part ...
smooch
smooch1 /smoohch/, v.t., n. smutch. smooch2 —smoocher, n. /smoohch/, Informal. v.i. 1. to kiss. 2. to pet. n. 3. a kiss; smack. [1580-90; var. of obs. smouch to kiss < ?; cf. ...
smoodge
—smoodger, n. /smoohj/, v.i., smoodged, smoodging. Australian. to curry favor; seek unwarranted recognition. [1895-1900; perh. alter. of SMOOCH2] * * *
smoosh
☆ smoosh [smoosh ] vt. alt. sp. of SMUSH * * * smoosh (smo͝osh) tr.v. Informal smooshed, smoosh·ing, smoosh·es To squash or mash: “Some particularly unhappy homeowners ...
Smoot, George F.
▪ American physicist in full  George Fitzgerald Smoot III  born Feb. 20, 1945, Yukon, Fla., U.S.    American physicist, who was corecipient, with John C. Mather (Mather, ...
Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act
(1930) U.S. legislation that raised import duties by as much as 50%, adding considerable strain to the worldwide economic climate of the Great Depression. Despite a petition ...
smooth
—smoothable, adj. —smoother, n. —smoothly, adv. —smoothness, n. /smoohdh/, adj., smoother, smoothest, adv., v., n. adj. 1. free from projections or unevenness of surface; ...
smooth breathing
a symbol (') used in the writing of Greek to indicate that the initial vowel over which it is placed is unaspirated. Cf. rough breathing. [1740-50] * * *
smooth dogfish
any of several requiem sharks having no spines in front of the dorsal fin, esp. Mustelus canis, ranging along the American coast of the Atlantic Ocean. * * *
smooth endoplasmic reticulum.
See under endoplasmic reticulum. * * *
smooth fox terrier
smooth fox terrier n. see FOX TERRIER * * *
smooth hound
      any of a number of small sharks of the family Triakidae, among them the well-known smooth dogfish. See dogfish. * * *
smooth muscle
Anat. involuntary muscle tissue in the walls of viscera and blood vessels, consisting of nonstriated, spindle-shaped cells. [1885-90] * * * ▪ anatomy also called ...
smooth snake
▪ reptile       (Coronella austriaca), moderately abundant, nonvenomous snake occurring from western Europe to the Caucasus, belonging to the family Colubridae. It has ...
smooth sumac
a shrub or small tree, Rhus glabra, of the cashew family, native to North America, having pinnate leaves and green flowers in a dense terminal cluster. [1805-15, Amer.] * * *
smooth-faced
/smoohdh"fayst"/, adj. 1. beardless; smooth-shaven. 2. having a smooth or polished surface, as a stone. 3. deceitfully ingratiating. [1570-80] * * *
smooth-shaven
/smoohdh"shay"veuhn/, adj. having the beard and mustache shaved off; clean-shaven. [1625-35] * * *
smooth-spoken
/smoohdh"spoh"keuhn/, adj. speaking or spoken easily and softly. [1815-25] * * *
smooth-talk
/smoohdh"tawk'/, v.t. to persuade by flattery, cajolery, coaxing, or the like: We smooth-talked the company into a huge donation. * * *
smooth-tongued
/smoohdh"tungd"/, adj. fluent or convincing in speech; glib. [1585-95] * * *
smoothbore
/smoohdh"bawr', -bohr'/, adj. 1. (of firearms) having a smooth bore; not rifled. n. 2. a smoothbore gun. [1790-1800; SMOOTH + BORE1] * * *
smoothbreathing
smooth breathing n. 1. The symbol (ʹ) written over some initial vowels and diphthongs in ancient Greek to indicate that a word does not begin with the sound (h). 2. In ancient ...
smoothcollie
smooth collie n. A collie similar to the rough collie but having a short dense flat coat. * * *
smoothdogfish
smooth dogfish n. Any of several dogfishes lacking a spine in front of the dorsal fin, especially a species (Mustelus canis) found abundantly on the American Atlantic coast and ...
smoothen
/smooh"dheuhn/, v.t., v.i. to make or become smooth. [1625-35; SMOOTH + -EN1] * * *
smoother
See smooth. * * *
smoothfox terrier
smooth fox terrier n. A small fox terrier of a breed developed in England, having a smooth white coat with patches of black or tan. * * *


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