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stupefaction
/stooh'peuh fak"sheuhn, styooh'-/, n. 1. the state of being stupefied; stupor. 2. overwhelming amazement. [1535-45; < NL stupefaction- (s. of stupefactio) senseless state, equiv. ...
stupefactive
/stooh'peuh fak"tiv, styooh'-/, adj. serving to stupefy. [1520-30; < ML stupefactivus, equiv. to L stupefact(us) (see STUPEFACTION) + -ivus -IVE] * * *
stupefier
See stupefy. * * *
stupefy
—stupefiedness /stooh"peuh fuyd'nis, -fuy'id-, styooh"-/, n. —stupefier, n. —stupefyingly, adv. /stooh"peuh fuy', styooh"-/, v.t., stupefied, stupefying. 1. to put into a ...
stupefyingly
See stupefier. * * *
stupendous
—stupendously, adv. —stupendousness, n. /stooh pen"deuhs, styooh-/, adj. 1. causing amazement; astounding; marvelous: stupendous news. 2. amazingly large or great; immense: a ...
stupendously
See stupendous. * * *
stupendousness
See stupendously. * * *
stupid
—stupidly, adv. —stupidness, n. /stooh"pid, styooh"-/, adj., stupider, stupidest, n. adj. 1. lacking ordinary quickness and keenness of mind; dull. 2. characterized by or ...
stupidity
/stooh pid"i tee, styooh-/, n., pl. stupidities for 2. 1. the state, quality, or fact of being stupid. 2. a stupid act, notion, speech, etc. [1535-45; < L stupiditas, equiv. to ...
stupidly
See stupid. * * *
stupidness
See stupidly. * * *
Stupino
▪ Russia       city centre of a rayon (sector), Moscow oblast (province), Russia. It lies southeast of Moscow on the Oka River, which separates it from Kashira. Stupino ...
stupor
—stuporous, adj. /stooh"peuhr, styooh"-/, n. 1. suspension or great diminution of sensibility, as in disease or as caused by narcotics, intoxicants, etc.: He lay there in a ...
stuporous
See stupor. * * *
Sturbridge
/sterr"brij'/, n. a town in central Massachusetts: reconstruction of early American village. 5976. * * * ▪ Massachusetts, United States       town (township), Worcester ...
sturdily
See sturdy. * * *
sturdiness
See sturdily. * * *
sturdy
sturdy1 —sturdily, adv. —sturdiness, n. /sterr"dee/, adj., sturdier, sturdiest. 1. strongly built; stalwart; robust: sturdy young athletes. 2. strong, as in substance, ...
Sturdza, Dimitrie Alexandru
▪ prime minister of Romania born March 10, 1833, Miclăuşeni, Moldavia [now in Romania] died Oct. 21, 1914, Bucharest, Rom.       Romanian statesman who four times ...
Sture, Sten, The Elder
▪ Swedish regent Danish in full  Sten Gustafsson Sture Den Äldre   born c. 1440, , Sweden died 1503, Sweden       regent of Sweden (1470–97, 1501–03) who ...
Sture, Sten, The Younger
▪ regent of Sweden Danish in full  Sten Svantesson Sture Den Yngre   born c. 1492, , Sweden died Feb. 3, 1520, Lake Malar [now in Sweden]       regent of Sweden from ...
Sture, Svante
▪ regent of Sweden born c. 1460 died Jan. 2, 1512, Vesterås Castle, Sweden       regent of Sweden (1503–12), successor to Sten Sture the Elder.       The son ...
Sturge, Joseph
▪ British philanthropist born August 2, 1793, Elberton, Gloucestershire, England died May 14, 1859, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire  English philanthropist, Quaker ...
sturgeon
/sterr"jeuhn/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) sturgeon, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) sturgeons. any of various large fishes of the family Acipenseridae, ...
Sturgeon
/sterr"jeuhn/, n. Theodore (Hamilton), 1918-85, U.S. science-fiction writer. * * * Any of about 20 species (family Acipenseridae) of large, primitive fishes that live mainly in ...
Sturgeon Bay
▪ Wisconsin, United States       city, seat (1861) of Door county, northeastern Wisconsin, U.S. Situated about 45 miles (70 km) northeast of Green Bay, it is a lake ...
Sturgeon, Theodore
▪ American author original name  Edward Hamilton Waldo , pseudonyms  E. Waldo Hunter,  E. Hunter Waldo , and  Frederick R. Ewing  born Feb. 26, 1918, Staten Island, ...
Sturgeon, William
▪ British electrical engineer born May 22, 1783, Whittington, Lancashire, Eng. died Dec. 4, 1850, Prestwich, Lancashire       English electrical engineer who devised ...
Sturges
/sterr"jis/, n. Preston, 1898-1959, U.S. playwright and screenwriter. * * *
Sturges, Preston
orig. Edmond Preston Biden born Aug. 29, 1898, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Aug. 6, 1959, New York, N.Y. U.S. film director. Initially a playwright, he wrote the Broadway hits ...
Sturgis
/sterr"jis/, n. Russell, 1836-1909, U.S. architect and author. * * * ▪ South Dakota, United States       city, seat (1889) of Meade county, western South Dakota, U.S. ...
Stürgkh, Karl, Count von
▪ prime minister of Austria born Oct. 30, 1859, Graz, Austria died Oct. 21, 1916, Vienna       Austrian prime minister (1911–16) whose authoritarian regime was ended ...
Sturluson
/sterr"leuh seuhn/, n. See Snorri Sturluson. * * *
Sturm und Drang
/shtoorddm' oont drddahng"/ 1. a style or movement of German literature of the latter half of the 18th century: characterized chiefly by impetuosity of manner, exaltation of ...
Sturm, Charles-François
▪ French-Swiss mathematician in full  Jacques-Charles-François Sturm  born September 29, 1803, Geneva, Switzerland died December 18, 1855, Paris, France  French ...
Sturm, Der
▪ German periodical       (German: “The Assault”), a periodical and later a gallery—both established by Herwarth Walden in the early 20th century in ...
Sturm, Johannes
▪ German educator born Oct. 1, 1507, Schleiden, Julich died May 3, 1589, Strassburg       German educator whose Latin Gymnasium at Strassburg became a model for ...
Sturm-Liouville problem
▪ mathematics or  eigenvalue problem        in mathematics, a certain class of partial differential equations (partial differential equation) (PDEs) subject to extra ...
Sturmabteilung
/shtoorddm"ahp"tuy'loong/, n. a political militia of the Nazi party, organized about 1923 and notorious for its violence and terrorism up to 1934, when it was purged and ...
Sturmer, Boris Vladimirovich
▪ prime minister of Russia Sturmer also spelled  Shtyurmer   born July 28 [July 16, old style], 1848 died Sept. 2, 1917, Petrograd, Russia       Russian public ...
Sturmund Drang
Sturm und Drang (shto͝ormʹ o͝ont drängʹ) n. 1. Turmoil; ferment: “A book's historical roots represent another barrier; so does the personal Sturm und Drang of the ...
Sturnidae
▪ bird family       songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of the starlings (starling), mynas, and oxpeckers, about 107 species of jaunty, aggressive birds ...
sturt
—sturty, adj. /sterrt/, n., Scot. violent quarreling. [1325-75; ME; metathetic var. of STRUT1] * * *
Sturt, Charles
▪ Australian explorer born April 28, 1795, Bengal, India died June 16, 1869, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, Eng.       Australian explorer whose expedition down the ...
Sturtevant, Alfred (Henry)
born Nov. 21, 1891, Jacksonville, Ill., U.S. died April 5, 1970, Pasadena, Calif. U.S. geneticist. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University and taught principally at ...
Sturtevant, Alfred Henry
▪ American geneticist born Nov. 21, 1891, Jacksonville, Ill., U.S. died April 5, 1970, Pasadena, Calif.       American geneticist who in 1913 developed a technique for ...
Sturtian Series
▪ geology       division of Proterozoic rocks in south central Australia (the Proterozoic Eon lasted from 2.5 billion to 540 million years ago).       The ...
Sturzo, Luigi
born Nov. 26, 1871, Caltagirone, Sicily died Aug. 8, 1959, Rome, Italy Italian priest and political leader. Ordained a priest in 1894, he earned a doctorate in Rome, then ...
Stüssi, Rudolf
▪ Swiss politician died July 22, 1443, near Zürich       Swiss burgomaster of Zürich, whose expansionist ambitions precipitated the first civil war of the Swiss ...
stutter
—stutterer, n. —stutteringly, adv. /stut"euhr/, v.t., v.i. 1. to speak in such a way that the rhythm is interrupted by repetitions, blocks or spasms, or prolongations of ...
stutter-step
stutter-step [stut′ər step΄] vi. stutter-stepped, stutter-stepping to move in sudden stops and starts so as to deceive or evade an opponent, as in sports n. the act or ...
stutterer
See stutter. * * *
stuttering
or stammering or dysphemia Speech defect affecting the rhythm and fluency of speech, with involuntary repetition of sounds or syllables and intermittent blocking or prolongation ...
stutteringly
See stutterer. * * *
Stuttgart
/stut"gahrt, stoot"-/; for 1 also Ger. /shtoot"gahrddt/, n. 1. a city in and the capital of Baden-Württemberg, in SW Germany. 594,100. 2. a town in central Arkansas. 10,941. * * ...
Stuttgart Ballet
▪ ballet, Stuttgart, Germany German  Stuttgarter Ballett,        resident ballet company of Stuttgart, Ger., that emerged in the 1960s as an internationally prominent ...
Stuttgart disease
Pathol. See canine leptospirosis. Also, Stuttgart's disease. * * *
Stutthof
▪ concentration camp, Poland       Nazi (Nazi Party) German concentration camp and extermination camp located outside the village of Stutthof (now Sztutowo, Poland), ...
Stutz
/stuts/, n. Harry Clayton, 1876-1930, U.S. automobile manufacturer. * * *
Stuyvesant
/stuy"veuh seuhnt/, n. Peter, 1592-1672, Dutch colonial administrator in the Americas: last governor of New Netherlands 1646-64. * * *
Stuyvesant, Peter
born с 1592, Scherpenzeel, Friesland, Neth. died February 1672, near New York, N.Y. Dutch colonial governor. In 1643 he became director of the Dutch West India Co.'s Caribbean ...
Stuyvesant,Peter
Stuy·ve·sant (stīʹvĭ-sənt), Peter or Petrus 1592?-1672. Dutch colonial administrator. The last Dutch governor (1646-1664) of New Netherland, he was unpopular for his harsh ...
STV
subscription television. See pay television. * * *
sty
sty1 /stuy/, n., pl. sties, v., stied, stying. n. 1. a pen or enclosure for swine; pigpen. 2. any filthy place or abode. 3. a place of bestial debauchery. v.t. 4. to keep or ...
Stygian
/stij"ee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to the river Styx or to Hades. 2. dark or gloomy. 3. infernal; hellish. Also, stygian (for defs. 2, 3). [1560-70; < L Stygi(us) < Gk ...
styl-
styl- pref. Variant of stylo-. * * *
stylar
/stuy"leuhr/, adj. having the shape of an ancient style; resembling a pen, pin, or peg. [1605-15; STYL(US) + -AR1] * * *
stylate
/stuy"layt, -lit/, adj. Biol. having a style. [1865-70; < NL stylatus; see STYLE, -ATE1] * * *
style
—styleless, adj. —stylelessness, n. —stylelike, adj. /stuyl/, n., v. styled, styling. n. 1. a particular kind, sort, or type, as with reference to form, appearance, or ...
style sheet
a listing of the rules of usage in style employed by a publishing house or in a publishing project. Cf. stylebook (def. 1). [1930-35, Amer.] * * *
stylebook
/stuyl"book'/, n. 1. a book containing rules of usage in typography, punctuation, etc., employed by printers, editors, and writers. 2. a book featuring styles, fashions, or the ...
styler
/stuy"leuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that styles. 2. an electric appliance for setting or styling the hair. [STYLE + -ER1] * * *
stylet
/stuy"lit/, n. 1. a stiletto or dagger. 2. any similar sharp-pointed instrument. 3. Med. a. a probe. b. a wire run through the length of a catheter, cannula, or needle to make it ...
styli
/stuy"luy/, n. a pl. of stylus. * * *
styli-
styli- pref. Variant of stylo-. * * *
styliform
/stuy"leuh fawrm'/, adj. having the shape of an ancient style; stylar. [1570-80; < NL stiliformis, equiv. to L stil(us) STYLUS + -I- + -formis -FORM] * * *
styling
See styler. * * *
stylish
—stylishly, adv. —stylishness, n. /stuy"lish/, adj. characterized by or conforming to style or the fashionable standard; fashionably elegant; smart or chic: She wore a very ...
stylishly
See stylish. * * *
stylishness
See stylishly. * * *
stylist
/stuy"list/, n. 1. a writer or speaker who is skilled in or who cultivates a literary style. 2. a designer or consultant in a field subject to changes in style, esp. ...
stylistic
—stylistically, adv. /stuy lis"tik/, adj. of or pertaining to style. Also, stylistical. [1855-60; STYLE + -ISTIC] * * *
stylistically
See stylistic. * * *
stylistics
—stylistician /stuy'li stish"euhn/, n. /stuy lis"tiks/, n. (used with a sing. v.) the study and description of the choices of linguistic expression that are characteristic of a ...
stylite
—stylitic /stuy lit"ik/, adj. /stuy"luyt/, n. Eccles. Hist. one of a class of solitary ascetics who lived on the top of high pillars or columns. [1630-40; < LGk stylítes, ...
stylitic
See stylite. * * *
stylitism
See stylitic. * * *
stylization
See stylize. * * *
stylize
—stylization, n. —stylizer, n. /stuy"luyz/, v.t., stylized, stylizing. to design in or cause to conform to a particular style, as of representation or treatment in art; ...
stylizer
See stylization. * * *
stylo-
stylo-1 a combining form representing style or styloid in the formation of compound words: stylography. [comb. form repr. L stilus. See STYLUS, -O-] stylo-2 a combining form ...
stylobate
/stuy"leuh bayt'/, n. Archit. (in a classical temple) a course of masonry, part of the stereobate, forming the foundation for a colonnade, esp. the outermost colonnade. [1555-65; ...
stylograph
/stuy"leuh graf', -grahf'/, n. a fountain pen in which the writing point is a fine, hollow tube instead of a nib. Also called stylographic pen. [1865-70; STYLO-1 + -GRAPH] * * *
stylographic
—stylographically, adv. /stuy"leuh graf"ik/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to a stylograph. 2. of, pertaining to, or used in stylography. Also, stylographical. [1800-10; STYLO-1 + ...
stylography
/stuy log"reuh fee/, n. the art of writing, tracing, drawing, etc., with a style. [1830-40; STYLO-1 + -GRAPHY] * * *
stylohyoid
/stuy'loh huy"oyd/, adj., Anat. of, pertaining to, or situated between the styloid process of the temporal bone and the hyoid bone. [1700-10; < NL stylohyoideus. See STYLO-1, ...
styloid
/stuy"loyd/, adj. 1. Bot. resembling a style; slender and pointed. 2. Anat. pertaining to a styloid process. [1605-15; < NL styloides. See STYLE, -OID] * * *
styloid process
Anat. a long, spinelike process of a bone, esp. the projection from the base of the temporal bone. See diag. under skull. [1700-10] * * *
stylolite
—stylolitic /stuy'leuh lit"ik/, adj. /stuy"leuh luyt'/, n. Geol. an irregular columnar structure in certain limestones, the columns being approximately at right angles to the ...
stylopodium
/stuy'leuh poh"dee euhm/, n., pl. stylopodia /-dee euh/. Bot. a glandular disk or expansion surmounting the ovary and supporting the styles in plants of the parsley ...
stylus
/stuy"leuhs/, n., pl. styli /-luy/, styluses. 1. an instrument of metal, bone, or the like, used by the ancients for writing on waxed tablets, having one end pointed for incising ...
stymie
/stuy"mee/, n., v., stymied, stymieing. n. 1. Golf. (on a putting green) an instance of a ball's lying on a direct line between the cup and the ball of an opponent about to ...
Stymphalian birds
/stim fay"lee euhn, -fayl"yeuhn/, Class. Myth. a flock of predacious birds of Arcadia that were driven away and killed by Hercules as one of his labors. * * *
stymy
/stuy"mee/, n., pl. stymies, v.t., stymied, stymying. stymie. * * *
Styne, Jule
orig. Julius Kerwin Stein born Dec. 31, 1905, London, Eng. died Sept. 20, 1994, New York, N.Y., U.S. British-born U.S. songwriter. Born to Ukrainian Jewish parents, he and his ...
stypsis
/stip"sis/, n. the employment or application of styptics. [1885-90; < LL stypsis < Gk stypsis, equiv. to styp- (var. s. of stýphein to contract) + -sis -SIS] * * *
styptic
—stypticity /stip tis"i tee/, stypticalness, n. /stip"tik/, adj. Also, styptical. 1. serving to contract organic tissue; astringent; binding. 2. serving to check hemorrhage or ...
styptic pencil
a pencil-shaped stick of a paste containing alum or a similar styptic agent, used to stanch the bleeding of minor cuts. [1930-35] * * *
stypticity
See styptic. * * *
stypticpencil
styptic pencil n. A short medicated stick, often of alum, applied to a cut to check bleeding. * * *
Styr
/stear/; Russ. /stirdd/, n. a river in NW Ukraine, flowing N to the Pripet River. 300 mi. (480 km) long. * * *
styracaceous
/stuy'reuh kay"sheuhs/, adj. belonging to the Styracaceae, the storax family of plants. Cf. storax family. [ < NL Styracace(ae) (see STORAX, -ACEAE) + -OUS] * * *
styralyl acetate
/stuy"reuh lil, stear"euh-/, Chem. See methylphenylcarbinyl acetate. [ < NL styrax (see STORAX) + -AL3 + -YL] * * *
styrax
sty·rax (stīʹrăks) n. See storax.   [Latin. See storax.] * * *
styrene
/stuy"reen, stear"een/, n. Chem. a colorless, water-insoluble liquid, C8H8, having a penetrating aromatic odor, usually prepared from ethylene and benzene or ethylbenzene, that ...
styrene resin
Chem. a transparent thermoplastic resin formed by polymerizing styrene. * * *
Styria
/stear"ee euh/, n. a province in SE Austria: formerly a duchy. 1,187,512; 6327 sq. mi. (16,385 sq. km). Cap.: Graz. German, Steiermark. * * *
Styrofoam
/stuy"reuh fohm'/, Trademark. a brand of expanded plastic made from polystyrene. * * *
Styrofoam{™}
n [U] a type of very light plastic material, also called ‘expanded polystyrene’, made by the US Dow Chemical Company. It is used as protective material for packing things in, ...
Styron
/stuy"reuhn/, n. William, born 1925, U.S. author. * * *
Styron, William
born June 11, 1925, Newport News, Va., U.S. U.S. novelist. Educated at Duke University, Styron became part of the American expatriate community in Paris in the 1950s. His first ...
Styron, William Clark, Jr.
▪ 2007       American novelist (b. June 11, 1925, Newport News, Va.—d. Nov. 1, 2006, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts), was noted for his treatment of tragic themes ...
Styron,William
Sty·ron (stīʹrən), William. Born 1925. American writer primarily known for his novels, including Lie Down in Darkness (1951) and The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967). * * *
stythe
/stuyth, stuydh/, n. Brit. Mining. chokedamp. [1700-10; orig. uncert.] * * *
Styx
/stiks/, n. Class. Myth. a river in the underworld, over which the souls of the dead were ferried by Charon, and by which the gods swore their most solemn oaths. * * * In Greek ...
Størmer, Fredrik
▪ Norwegian geophysicist and mathematician born Sept. 3, 1874, Skien, Nor. died Aug. 13, 1957, Oslo  geophysicist and mathematician who developed a mathematical theory of ...
Stœng Trêng
▪ Cambodia also spelled  Stung Treng,         town, northeastern Cambodia. Stœng Trêng lies at the confluence of the San, Kŏng, and Mekong rivers. It is linked to ...
Su
Su abbrev. Sunday * * * (as used in expressions) Kan su Chiang su Su Song Su Sung Wu su li Chiang * * *
Su Shi
▪ Chinese author Wade-Giles romanization  Su Shih , courtesy name (zi)  Zizhan , literary name (hao)  Dongpo Jushi , also called  Su Dongpo  born January 8, 1037, ...
Su Song
or Su Sung born 1020, Fujian Province, China died 1101, Kaifeng Chinese scholar and administrative and financial expert in the imperial bureaucracy. His Illustrated ...
su-
var. of sub- before sp: suspect. * * *
Su-ao
▪ Taiwan       coastal town and port in I-lan hsien (county), northeastern Taiwan. It is situated 13 miles (21 km) southeast of I-lan city, in the southern part of the ...
suability
See suable. * * *
suable
—suability, n. —suably, adv. /sooh"euh beuhl/, adj. liable to be sued; capable of being sued. [1615-25; SUE + -ABLE] * * *
Suakoko
▪ Liberia also spelled  Suakokota,         town, central Liberia, western Africa. It is the site of the government's Central Agricultural Experimental Station ...
Suárez
/swahr"ez/; Sp. /swah"rddeth, -rddes/, n. Francisco /fran sis"koh/; Sp. /frddahn thees"kaw, -sees"-/, 1548-1617, Spanish theologian and philosopher. * * *
Suarez Gomez, Roberto
▪ 2001       Bolivian drug trafficker (b. 1932, Trinidad, Bol.—d. July 20, 2000, Santa Cruz, Bol.), nicknamed the “king of cocaine,” was one of the world's most ...
Suárez González, Adolfo
▪ prime minister of Spain born September 25, 1932, Cebreros, near Ávila, Spain       prime minister of Spain from July 1976 until January 1981 and secretary-general of ...
Suarez Mason, Carlos Guillermo
▪ 2006       Argentine general (b. Jan. 2, 1924, Buenos Aires, Arg.—d. June 21, 2005, Buenos Aires), ordered the execution of thousands of political opponents during ...
Suárez, Francisco
born Jan. 5, 1548, Granada, Spain died Sept. 25, 1617, Lisbon Spanish theologian and philosopher. In his Metaphysical Disputations (1597), he drew on the works of Aristotle, ...
suasion
—suasive /sway"siv/, suasory /sway"seuh ree/, adj. —suasively, adv. —suasiveness, n. /sway"zheuhn/, n. 1. the act of advising, urging, or attempting to persuade; ...
suasive
sua·sive (swāʹsĭv) adj. Having the power to persuade or convince; persuasive.   [Latin suāsus, past participle of suādēre, to advise; see suasion + ...
suasively
See suasive. * * *
suasiveness
See suasively. * * *
Suassuna, Ariano
▪ Brazilian writer born June 16, 1927, João Pessoa, Braz.       Brazilian dramatist and fiction writer, the prime mover in the Movimento Armorial (“Armorial ...
suave
—suavely, adv. —suaveness, n. /swahv/, adj., suaver, suavest. (of persons or their manner, speech, etc.) smoothly agreeable or polite; agreeably or blandly ...
suavely
See suave. * * *
suaveness
See suavely. * * *
suaviter in modo, fortiter in re
/swah"wi terdd' in moh"doh, fohrdd"ti terdd' in rdday"/; Eng. /swav"i teuhr in moh"doh, fawr"ti teuhr in ree", fohr"-, swah"vi teuhr/, Latin. gently in manner, firmly in ...
suavity
/swah"vi tee, swav"i-/, n., pl. suavities. 1. a suave or smoothly agreeable quality. 2. suavities, suave or courteous actions or manners; amenities. Also, suaveness. [1400-50; ...
sub
/sub/, n., v., subbed, subbing. Informal. n. 1. a submarine. 2. a substitute. 3. a submarine sandwich. See hero sandwich. 4. a subcontractor. 5. a sublieutenant. 6. a ...
SUB
supplemental unemployment benefits. * * *
sub judice
/sub jooh"di see'/; Lat. /soob yooh"di ke'/ before a judge or court; awaiting judicial determination. [1605-15; < L sub judice] * * *
sub rosa
/sub roh"zeuh/ confidentially; secretly; privately. [1920-25; < L sub rosa lit., under the rose, from the ancient use of the rose at meetings as a symbol of the sworn confidence ...
sub specie aeternitatis
sub specie aeternitatis [sub spē′shi ē΄ ē tʉr΄ni tā′tis] adv. 〚L, lit., under the aspect of eternity〛 from the standpoint of eternity; from a universal ...
sub verbo
/soob werdd"boh/; Eng. /sub verr"boh/, Latin. (used as a direction to a reference) under the word or heading. * * *
sub voce
/soob woh"ke/; Eng. /sub voh"see/, Latin. (used as a direction to a reference) under the specified word. * * *
sub-
1. a prefix occurring originally in loanwords from Latin (subject; subtract; subvert; subsidy); on this model, freely attached to elements of any origin and used with the meaning ...
sub-Andean
adj. * * *
sub-Atlantic
adj. * * *
sub-Carpathian
adj. * * *
sub-Christian
adj. * * *
sub-editor
sub-editor or subeditor [sub ed′it ər] n. Brit. COPY EDITOR sub-edit vt. * * *
sub-Himalayan
adj. * * *
sub-level
/sub"lev'euhl/, n. Mining. a drift, dug through ore, into which overlying material, esp. from an upper layer of ore, is caved. * * *
sub-Pontine
adj. * * *
sub-Pyrenean
adj. * * *
sub-rosa
See sub rosa. * * *
sub-Saharan
/sub'seuh har"euhn, -hair"euhn, -hahr"euhn/, adj. of, pertaining to, or in Africa south of the Sahara Desert: a sub-Saharan country; sub-Saharan peoples. [1960-65] * * *
sub-zero
/sub zear"oh/, adj. 1. indicating or recording lower than zero on some scale, esp. on the Fahrenheit scale: a week of sub-zero temperatures. 2. characterized by or appropriate ...
sub.
1. subordinated. 2. subscription. 3. substitute. 4. suburb. 5. suburban. 6. subway. * * *
subabbot
n. * * *
subabdominal
sub·ab·dom·i·nal (sŭb'ăb-dŏmʹə-nəl) adj. Located or occurring below the abdomen. * * *
subability
n., pl. subabilities. * * *
subabsolute
adj. * * *
subacademic
adj. * * *
subacademical
adj.; subacademically, adv. * * *
subaccount
n. * * *
subacetabular
adj. * * *
subacetate
/sub as"i tayt'/, n. Chem. a basic salt of acetic acid. [1810-20; SUB- + ACETATE] * * *
subacid
—subacidity /sub'euh sid"i tee/, subacidness, n. —subacidly, adv. /sub as"id/, adj. 1. slightly or moderately acid or sour: a subacid fruit. 2. (of a person or a person's ...
subacidulous
adj. * * *
subacrid
adj.; subacridly, adv.; subacridness, n. * * *
subacridity
n. * * *
subacrodrome
adj. * * *
subacrodromous
adj. * * *
subacromial
adj. * * *
subacuminate
adj. * * *
subacute
—subacutely, adv. /sub'euh kyooht"/, adj. somewhat or moderately acute. [1745-55; SUB- + ACUTE] * * *
subacute sclerosing panencephalitis
/skli roh"sing pan"en sef'euh luy"tis, pan'-/, Pathol. a rare infection of the central nervous system caused by the measles virus, occurring in children and adolescents several ...
subacutely
See subacute. * * *
subacutesclerosing panencephalitis
subacute scle·ros·ing panencephalitis (sklə-rōʹsĭng) n. An often fatal degenerative disease of the central nervous system occurring chiefly in young people, caused by slow ...
subadar
/sooh'beuh dahr"/, n. (formerly, in India) 1. a provincial governor of the Mogul empire. 2. the chief native officer of a company of native troops in the British Indian ...
subadditive
adj.; subadditively, adv. * * *
subaddress
sub·ad·dress (sŭbʹə-drĕs') n. A section of a computer device for input and output accessible through an operation code. * * *
subadjacent
adj.; subadjacently, adv. * * *
subadministrate
v.t., subadministrated, subadministrating. * * *
subadministrative
adj.; subadministratively, adv. * * *
subadolescent
adj., n. * * *
subadult
adj., n.; subadultness, n. * * *
subadvocate
n. * * *
subaerate
v.t., subaerated, subaerating. * * *
subaeration
n. * * *
subaerial
—subaerially, adv. /sub air"ee euhl, -ay ear"ee euhl/, adj. located or occurring on the surface of the earth. [1825-35; SUB- + AERIAL] * * *
subaffluence
n. * * *
subaffluent
adj.; subaffluently, adv. * * *
subage
n. * * *
subagency
n., pl. subagencies. * * *
subagent
/sub ay"jeuhnt/, n. 1. a person whose duties as an agent are delegated to him or her by another agent. 2. a person who works for or under the supervision of an agent. [1810-20, ...
subaggregate
adj., n.; subaggregately, adv. * * *
subaggregative
adj. * * *
subalary
adj. * * *
subalate
adj. * * *
subalated
adj. * * *
subalgebraic
adj. * * *
subalgebraical
adj.; subalgebraically, adv. * * *
subalimentation
/sub'al euh men tay"sheuhn/, n. Pathol. hypoalimentation. [SUB- + ALIMENTATION] * * *
suballiance
n. * * *
subalmoner
n. * * *
subalpine
/sub al"puyn, -pin/, adj. 1. pertaining to the regions at the foot of the Alps. 2. Bot. growing on mountains below the limit of tree growth, and above the foothill, or montane, ...
subaltern
—subalternity, n. /sub awl"teuhrn/ or, esp. for 3, 6, /sub"euhl terrn'/, adj. 1. lower in rank; subordinate: a subaltern employee. 2. Brit. Mil. noting a commissioned officer ...
subalternate
—subalternation /sub awl'teuhr nay"sheuhn, -al'-/, n. /sub awl"teuhr nit, -al"-/, adj. 1. subordinate. 2. Bot. placed singly along an axis, but tending to become grouped ...
subalternation
See subalternate. * * *
subanal
adj. * * *
subanconeal
adj. * * *
subangular
adj.; subangularly, adv.; subangularness, n. * * *
subangularity
n., pl. subangularities. * * *
subangulate
adj.; subangulately, adv. * * *
subangulated
adj. * * *
subantarctic
/sub'ant ahrk"tik, -ahr"tik/, adj. of, pertaining to, similar to, or being the region immediately north of the Antarctic Circle; subpolar. [1870-75; SUB- + ANTARCTIC] * * *
subantique
adj.; subantiquely, adv.; subantiqueness, n. * * *
subantiquity
n., pl. subantiquities. * * *
subapical
—subapically, adv. /sub ap"i keuhl, -ay"pi-/, adj. Anat. located below the apex. [1840-50; SUB- + APICAL] * * *
subapically
See subapical. * * *
subapparent
adj.; subapparently, adv.; subapparentness, n. * * *
subappressed
adj. * * *
subapprobative
adj.; subapprobativeness, n. * * *
subapprobatory
adj. * * *
subaquatic
/sub'euh kwat"ik, -euh kwot"-/, adj. 1. living or growing partly on land, partly in water. 2. under water. [1780-90; SUB- + AQUATIC] * * *
subaqueous
/sub ay"kwee euhs, -ak"wee-/, adj. 1. existing or situated under water; underwater. 2. occurring or performed under water. 3. used under water. [1670-80; SUB- + AQUEOUS] * * *
subarachnoid
/sub'euh rak"noyd/, adj. Anat. of, pertaining to, or situated below the arachnoid membrane. [1830-40; SUB- + ARACHNOID] * * *
subarachnoid block.
See spinal block. * * *
subarboreal
adj. * * *
subarboreous
adj. * * *
subarborescent
adj. * * *
subarchesporial
adj. * * *
subarchitect
n. * * *
subarctic
/sub ahrk"tik, -ahr"tik/, adj. of, pertaining to, similar to, or being the region immediately south of the Arctic Circle; subpolar. [1850-55; SUB- + ARCTIC] * * *
Subarctic Current.
See Aleutian Current. * * *
subarcuate
adj. * * *
subarcuated
adj. * * *
subarea
—subareal, adj. /sub"air'ee euh/, n. a subsidiary area, field, study, or the like. [SUB- + AREA] * * *
subarid
/sub ar"id/, adj. moderately arid. [1910-15; SUB- + ARID] * * *

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