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Слова на букву stag-tils (15990)

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subtetanical
adj. * * *
subtext
—subtextual, adj. /sub"tekst'/, n. the underlying or implicit meaning, as of a literary work. [1945-50; trans. of Russ podtékst; see SUB-, TEXT] * * *
subtextual
See subtext. * * *
subthalamic
adj. * * *
subtheme
n. * * *
subtherapeutic
—subtherapeutically, adv. /sub'ther euh pyooh"tik/, adj. indicating a dosage, as of a drug or vitamin, less than the amount required for a therapeutic effect. [SUB- + ...
subtherapeutically
See subtherapeutic. * * *
subthoracal
adj. * * *
subthoracic
adj. * * *
subthreshold
/sub thresh"ohld, -thresh"hohld/, adj. Psychol., Physiol. (of a stimulus) too weak to produce a response. [1940-45; SUB- + THRESHOLD] * * *
subthrill
n. * * *
subtile
—subtilely, adv. —subtileness, n. /sut"l, sub"til/, adj., subtiler, subtilest. subtle. [1325-75; ME < L subtilis fine (orig. of fabric), equiv. to sub- SUB- + -tilis, akin to ...
subtilely
See subtile. * * *
subtileness
See subtilely. * * *
subtilin
sub·ti·lin (sŭbʹtə-lĭn) n. An antibiotic peptide obtained from the bacterium Bacillus subtilis that is active against gram-positive bacteria and various pathogenic ...
subtilisin
/sub til"euh sin/, n. Biochem. a proteolytic enzyme produced by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, used as an active ingredient in detergents and also in research to help reveal ...
subtility
See subtilely. * * *
subtilization
See subtilize. * * *
subtilize
—subtilization, n. —subtilizer, n. /sut"l uyz', sub"teuh luyz'/, v., subtilized, subtilizing. v.t. 1. to elevate in character; sublimate. 2. to make (the mind, senses, etc.) ...
subtilty
/sut"l tee, sub"til-/, n., pl. subtilties. Archaic. subtlety. Also, subtility /sub til"i tee/. * * *
subtitle
—subtitular /sub tich"euh leuhr, -tit"yeuh-/, adj. /sub"tuyt'l/, n., v., subtitled, subtitling. n. 1. a secondary or subordinate title of a literary work, usually of ...
subtle
—subtleness, n. —subtly, adv. /sut"l/, adj., subtler, subtlest. 1. thin, tenuous, or rarefied, as a fluid or an odor. 2. fine or delicate in meaning or intent; difficult to ...
subtleness
See subtle. * * *
subtlety
/sut"l tee/, n., pl. subtleties. 1. the state or quality of being subtle. 2. delicacy or nicety of character or meaning. 3. acuteness or penetration of mind; delicacy of ...
subtly
See subtleness. * * *
subtonic
/sub ton"ik/, n. the seventh tone of a scale, being the next below the upper tonic. [1825-35; SUB- + TONIC] * * *
subtopic
/sub"top'ik, sub top"-/, n. a topic that is included within another topic. [SUB- + TOPIC] * * *
subtorrid
/sub tawr"id, -tor"-/, adj. subtropical (def. 2). [1850-55; SUB- + TORRID] * * *
subtotal
/sub"toht'l, sub toht"-/, n., adj., v., subtotaled, subtotaling or (esp. Brit.) subtotalled, subtotalling. n. 1. the sum or total of a part of a group or column of figures, as in ...
subtotem
n. * * *
subtotemic
adj. * * *
subtower
n. * * *
subtract
—subtracter, n. /seuhb trakt"/, v.t. 1. to withdraw or take away, as a part from a whole. 2. Math. to take (one number or quantity) from another; deduct. v.i. 3. to take away ...
subtracter
See subtract. * * *
subtraction
/seuhb trak"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of subtracting. 2. Math. the operation or process of finding the difference between two numbers or quantities, denoted by a minus ...
subtractive
/seuhb trak"tiv/, adj. 1. tending to subtract; having power to subtract. 2. Math. (of a quantity) that is to be subtracted; having the minus sign (-). [1680-90; SUBTRACT + ...
subtractive color
Photog. cyan, yellow, or magenta, as used in the subtractive process of color photography. Also called subtractive primary. * * *
subtractive process
a process of color photography in which the colors are formed by combination of cyan, yellow, and magenta lights. Cf. additive process. [1925-30] * * *
subtrahend
/sub"treuh hend'/, n. Arith. a number that is subtracted from another. Cf. minuend. [1665-75; < L subtrahendum, neut. ger. of subtrahere; see SUBTRACT] * * *
subtranslucent
adj. * * *
subtransparent
adj.; subtransparently, adv.; subtransparentness, n. * * *
subtransversal
adj.; subtransversally, adv. * * *
subtransverse
adj.; subtransversely, adv. * * *
subtrapezoid
adj. * * *
subtrapezoidal
adj. * * *
subtread
n. * * *
subtreasury
—subtreasurer, n. —subtreasurership, n. /sub trezh"euh ree, sub"trezh'-/, n., pl. subtreasuries. 1. a subordinate or branch treasury. 2. (formerly) any of the branch ...
subtrench
n. * * *
subtrend
n. * * *
subtriangular
adj. * * *
subtriangulate
adj. * * *
subtribal
adj. * * *
subtribe
n. * * *
subtrifid
adj. * * *
subtrigonal
adj. * * *
subtrihedral
adj. * * *
subtriplicate
adj. * * *
subtriplicated
adj. * * *
subtriquetrous
adj. * * *
subtrochanteric
adj. * * *
subtrochlear
adj. * * *
subtropical
/sub trop"i keuhl/, adj. 1. bordering on the tropics; nearly tropical. 2. pertaining to or occurring in a region between tropical and temperate; subtorrid; semitropical. n. 3. a ...
subtropical high
Meteorol. one of several highs, as the Azores and Pacific highs, that prevail over the oceans at latitudes of about 30 degrees N and S. Also called subtropical anticyclone. Cf. ...
subtropics
/sub trop"iks/, n.pl. subtropical regions. [1895-90; SUB- + TROPICS] * * *
subtruncate
adj. * * *
subtruncated
adj. * * *
subtrunk
n. * * *
subtubiform
adj. * * *
subtunic
n. * * *
subtunnel
n. * * *
subturriculate
adj. * * *
subturriculated
adj. * * *
subtutor
n. * * *
subtutorship
n. * * *
subtwined
adj. * * *
subtympanitic
adj. * * *
subtype
—subtypical /sub tip"i keuhl/, adj. /sub"tuyp'/, n. 1. a subordinate type. 2. a special type included within a more general type. [1860-65; SUB- + TYPE] * * *
Subud
Indonesian religious movement based on spontaneous and ecstatic exercises. Founded in 1933 by Muḥammad Subuh, a student of Sufism who underwent a mystical experience in 1925, ...
subulate
/sooh"byeuh lit, -layt'/, adj. Biol. slender, somewhat cylindrical, and tapering to a point; awlshaped. [1750-60; < NL subulatus, equiv. to L subul(a) awl + -atus -ATE1] * * *
subultimate
adj. * * *
subumbellar
adj. * * *
subumbellate
adj. * * *
subumbellated
adj. * * *
subumbilical
adj. * * *
subumbonal
adj. * * *
subumbonate
adj. * * *
subumbrella
—subumbrellar, adj. /sub'um brel"euh/, n. Zool. the concave undersurface of a coelenterate medusa, as a jellyfish. [1875-80; SUB- + UMBRELLA] * * *
subuncinal
adj. * * *
subuncinate
adj. * * *
subuncinated
adj. * * *
subunequal
adj.; subunequally, adv.; subunequalness, n. * * *
subungual
adj. * * *
subunit
n. * * *
subuniversal
adj. * * *
subuniverse
n. * * *
suburb
—suburbed, adj. /sub"errb/, n. 1. a district lying immediately outside a city or town, esp. a smaller residential community. 2. the suburbs, the area composed of such ...
suburban
—suburbanism, n. /seuh berr"beuhn/, adj. 1. pertaining to, inhabiting, or being in a suburb or the suburbs of a city or town. 2. characteristic of a suburb or suburbs. n. 3. a ...
suburbanite
/seuh berr"beuh nuyt'/, n. a person who lives in a suburb of a city or large town. [1885-90; SUBURBAN + -ITE1] * * *
suburbanization
See suburbanize. * * *
suburbanize
—suburbanization, n. /seuh berr"beuh nuyz'/, v.t., suburbanized, suburbanizing. to give suburban characteristics to: to suburbanize a rural area. Also, esp. Brit., ...
suburbia
/seuh berr"bee euh/, n. 1. suburbs collectively. 2. suburbanites collectively. 3. the social or cultural aspects of life in suburbs. [1895-1900; SUBURB + -IA] * * *
suburbicarian
/seuh berr'bi kair"ee euhn/, adj. 1. being near the city of Rome. 2. designating any of the dioceses surrounding the city of Rome, each of which is under the jurisdiction of a ...
suburethral
adj. * * *
subursine
adj. * * *
subvariety
n., pl. subvarieties. * * *
subvassal
n. * * *
subvassalage
n. * * *
subvein
n. * * *
subvene
/seuhb veen"/, v.i., subvened, subvening. to arrive or occur as a support or relief. [1750-60; < L subvenire, equiv. to sub- SUB- + venire to COME] * * *
subvention
—subventionary, adj. /seuhb ven"sheuhn/, n. 1. a grant of money, as by a government or some other authority, in aid or support of some institution or undertaking, esp. in ...
subventionary
See subvention. * * *
subventral
adj.; subventrally, adv. * * *
subventricose
adj. * * *
subventricular
adj. * * *
subverbal
adj. * * *
subvermiform
adj. * * *
subversion
/seuhb verr"zheuhn, -sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of subverting. 2. the state of being subverted; destruction. 3. something that subverts or overthrows. [1350-1400; ME < LL ...
subversionary
See subversion. * * *
subversive
—subversively, adv. —subversivism, subversiveness, n. /seuhb verr"siv/, adj. 1. Also, subversionary /seuhb verr"zheuh ner'ee, -sheuh-/. tending to subvert or advocating ...
subversively
See subversive. * * *
subversiveness
See subversively. * * *
subvert
—subverter, n. /seuhb verrt"/, v.t. 1. to overthrow (something established or existing). 2. to cause the downfall, ruin, or destruction of. 3. to undermine the principles of; ...
subvertebral
adj. * * *
subvertebrate
n., adj. * * *
subverter
See subvert. * * *
subvertical
adj.; subvertically, adv.; subverticalness, n. * * *
subverticilate
adj. * * *
subverticilated
adj. * * *
subvesicular
adj. * * *
subvestment
n. * * *
subvicar
n. * * *
subvicarship
n. * * *
subvillain
n. * * *
subviral
/sub vuy"reuhl/, adj. Microbiol. 1. of or pertaining to any macromolecule smaller in size or possessing a lesser degree of organization than a comparable intact viral ...
subvirile
adj. * * *
subvirus
sub·vi·rus (sŭb-vīʹrəs) n. pl. sub·vi·rus·es A viral protein or other substance smaller than a virus and having some of the properties of a virus.   sub·viʹral ...
subvisible
/sub viz"euh beuhl/, adj. invisible unless viewed through a microscope. [SUB- + VISIBLE] * * *
subvisual
adj., n. * * *
subvitalized
adj. * * *
subvitreous
adj.; subvitreously, adv.; subvitreousness, n. * * *
subvocal
/sub voh"keuhl/, adj. mentally formulated as words, esp. without vocalization. [1920-25; SUB- + VOCAL] * * *
subvocalization
See subvocalize. * * *
subvocalize
v., subvocalized, subvocalizing. * * *
subvocalizer
See subvocalization. * * *
subvocally
See subvocal. * * *
subwar
n. * * *
subwarden
n. * * *
subway
/sub"way'/, n. 1. Also called, esp. Brit., tube, underground. an underground electric railroad, usually in a large city. 2. Chiefly Brit. a short tunnel or underground passageway ...
subwealthy
adj. * * *
subwink
n. * * *
subwoofer
/sub"woof'euhr/, n. a loudspeaker component designed to reproduce only extremely low bass frequencies, generally below 125 Hz. [SUB- + WOOFER] * * *
subworker
n. * * *
subworkman
n., pl. subworkmen. * * *
subzone
—subzonal, subzonary, adj. /sub"zohn'/, n. a subdivision of a zone. [1885-90; SUB- + ZONE] * * *
subzygomatic
adj. * * *
suc
successor. * * *
suc-
var. of sub- before c: succeed. * * *
succah
Seph. /sooh kah"/; Ashk., Eng. /sook"euh/, n., pl. succoth, succot, succos Seph. /sooh kawt"/; Ashk. /soo kohs"/, Eng. succahs. Hebrew. sukkah. * * *
succedaneum
—succedaneous, adj. /suk'si day"nee euhm/, n., pl. succedanea /-nee euh/. a substitute. [1635-45; < NL succedaneum, n. use of neut. sing. of L succedaneus substituted, equiv. ...
succedent
/seuhk seed"nt/ adj. 1. following or succeeding; subsequent. n. 2. Astrol. See succedent house. [1350-1400; ME < L succedent-, s. of succedens, prp. of succedere to SUCCEED] * * *
succedent house
Astrol. any of the four houses that fall between the angular and cadent houses: the second, fifth, eighth, and eleventh houses, which correspond, respectively, to possessions and ...
succeed
—succeedable, adj. —succeeder, n. /seuhk seed"/, v.i. 1. to happen or terminate according to desire; turn out successfully; have the desired result: Our efforts succeeded. 2. ...
succeeder
See succedent. * * *
succeeding
—succeedingly, adv. /seuhk see"ding/, adj. being that which follows; subsequent; ensuing: laws to benefit succeeding generations. [1555-65; SUCCEED + -ING1] * * *
succentor
/seuhk sen"teuhr/, n. Eccles. a precentor's deputy. [1600-10; < LL, equiv. to L suc- SUC- + -cen-, comb. form of canere to sing + -tor -TOR] * * *
succès d'estime
/syuuk se des teem"/, French. success won by reason of merit and critical respect rather than by popularity. * * *
succès de scandale
/syuuk sedeu skahonn dannl"/, French. success won by reason of topical, usually scandalous, subject matter rather than by merit and critical respect. * * *
succès fou
/syuuk se fooh"/, French. an extraordinarily great success. * * *
succèsd'estime
suc·cès d'es·time (sük-sĕʹ dĕs-tēmʹ) n. An important but unpopular success or achievement.   [French : succès, success + de, of + estime, esteem.] * * *
succèsfou
suc·cès fou (sük-sĕʹ fo͞oʹ) n. A wild success.   [French : succès, success + fou, mad.] * * *
success
—successless, adj. —successlessly, adv. —successlessness, n. /seuhk ses"/, n. 1. the favorable or prosperous termination of attempts or endeavors. 2. the attainment of ...
success story
an account of the achievement of success, fortune, or fame by someone or some enterprise. * * *
successful
—successfully, adv. —successfulness, n. /seuhk ses"feuhl/, adj. 1. achieving or having achieved success. 2. having attained wealth, position, honors, or the like. 3. ...
successfully
See successful. * * *
successfulness
See successfully. * * *
succession
—successional, adj. —successionally, adv. /seuhk sesh"euhn/, n. 1. the coming of one person or thing after another in order, sequence, or in the course of events: many ...
succession of crops
1. the continuous cultivation of a crop throughout a season by successive plantings or by the use of varieties with different rates of growth. 2. the successive cultivation of ...
successional
See succession. * * *
successionally
See successional. * * *
successive
—successively, adv. —successiveness, n. /seuhk ses"iv/, adj. 1. following in order or in uninterrupted sequence; consecutive: three successive days. 2. following another in a ...
successiveapproximation
successive approximation n. A method for estimating the value of an unknown quantity by repeated comparison to a sequence of known quantities. * * *
successively
See successive. * * *
successiveness
See successively. * * *
successor
—successoral, adj. /seuhk ses"euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that succeeds or follows. 2. a person who succeeds another in an office, position, or the like. [1250-1300; < L, ...
succinate
/suk"seuh nayt'/, n. Chem. a salt or ester of succinic acid. [1780-90; < F; see SUCCINIC, -ATE2] * * *
succinct
—succinctly, adv. —succinctness, n. /seuhk singkt"/, adj. 1. expressed in few words; concise; terse. 2. characterized by conciseness or verbal brevity. 3. compressed into a ...
succinctly
See succinct. * * *
succinctness
See succinctly. * * *
succinctorium
/suk'singk tawr"ee euhm, -tohr"/, n., pl. succinctoria /-tawr"ee euh, -tohr"ee euh/. Rom. Cath. Ch. subcinctorium. * * *
succinic
/seuhk sin"ik/, adj. 1. pertaining to or obtained from amber. 2. Chem. of or derived from succinic acid. [1780-90; < F succinique < L succin(um), sucinum amber + F -ique -IC] * * ...
succinic acid
Chem. a colorless, crystalline, water-soluble solid, C4H6O4, used chiefly in the manufacture of lacquers, dyes, and perfume. [1780-90] * * * ▪ chemical compound also called ...
succinicacid
suc·cin·ic acid (sək-sĭnʹĭk) n. A colorless crystalline dicarboxylic acid, C4H6O4, occurring naturally in amber and important in the Krebs cycle. It is also synthesized ...
succinylcholine
suc·cin·yl·cho·line (sŭk'sə-nĭl-kōʹlēn) n. A crystalline compound, C14H30N2O4, formed by esterification of succinic acid with choline and used medically to produce ...
succinylcholine chloride
/suk"seuh nil koh"leen, -kol"een, -seuh nl-/, Pharm. a crystalline compound, C14H30Cl2N2O4, used as a skeletal muscle relaxant in surgical procedures. [SUCCIN(IC) + -YL + ...
succinylsulfathiazole
suc·cin·yl·sul·fa·thi·a·zole (sŭk'sə-nĭl-sŭl'fə-thīʹə-zōl') n. An antibacterial drug, C13H13N3O5S2, derived from sulfonamide and used in the prevention and ...
succor
—succorable, adj. —succorer, n. /suk"euhr/, n. 1. help; relief; aid; assistance. 2. a person or thing that gives help, relief, aid, etc. v.t. 3. to help or relieve. Also, ...
succorable
See succor. * * *
succorance
—succorant, adj. /suk"euhr euhns/, n. the act of seeking out affectionate care and social support. [1935-40; SUCCOR + -ANCE] * * *
succorer
See succorable. * * *
succory
/suk"euh ree/, n., pl. succories. chicory. [1525-35; < MLG suckerie, perh. < ML, b. L succus juice and cichorium CHICORY; the plant's roots are full of sap] * * *
succotash
/suk"euh tash'/, n. a cooked dish of kernels of corn mixed with shell beans, esp. lima beans, and, often, with green and sweet red peppers. [1745-55, Amer.; < Narragansett (E ...
succoth
Seph. /sooh kawt"/; Ashk. /soo kohs"/, n. Hebrew. a pl. ofsuccah. Also, succot, succos. * * *
Succoth
Seph. Heb. /sooh kawt"/; Ashk. Heb., Eng. /soo"keuhs, sooh kohs"/, n. Judaism. Sukkoth. Also, Succot, Succos. * * *
succour
suc·cour (sŭkʹər) n. & v. Chiefly British Variant of succor. * * *
succuba
/suk"yeuh beuh/, n. a succubus. [1550-60; < L: paramour, equiv. to succub(are) to lie beneath (suc- SUC- + cubare to lie down; cf. CONCUBINE) + -a fem. n. suffix] * * *
succubous
/suk"yeuh beuhs/, adj. Bot. (of leaves) overlapping, with the base of each leaf covering part of that under it. Cf. incubous. [1855-60; < L succub(are) to lie under (see SUCCUBA) ...
succubus
/suk"yeuh beuhs/, n., pl. succubi /-buy'/. 1. a demon in female form, said to have sexual intercourse with men in their sleep. Cf. incubus (def. 1). 2. any demon or evil ...
succulence
See succulent. * * *
succulency
See succulence. * * *
succulent
—succulence, succulency, n. —succulently, adv. /suk"yeuh leuhnt/, adj. 1. full of juice; juicy. 2. rich in desirable qualities. 3. affording mental nourishment. 4. (of a ...
succulently
See succulence. * * *
succumb
—succumber, n. /seuh kum"/, v.i. 1. to give way to superior force; yield: to succumb to despair. 2. to yield to disease, wounds, old age, etc.; die. [1480-90; < L succumbere, ...
succursal
/seuh kerr"seuhl/, adj. subsidiary, esp. noting a religious establishment that is dependent upon a principal one. [1835-45; < F succursale < L succurs(us) (see SUCCOR) + -ale ...
succus
suc·cus (sŭkʹəs) n. pl. suc·ci (sŭkʹī, -sī) A fluid, such as gastric juice or vegetable juice, contained in or secreted by living tissue. * * *
succuss
—succussion /seuh kush"euhn/, n. —succussive, adj. /seuh kus"/, v.t. 1. to shake up; shake. 2. Med. to shake (a patient) in order to determine if a fluid is present in the ...
succussatory
See succussion. * * *
succussion
suc·cus·sion (sə-kŭshʹən) n. 1. The act or process of shaking violently, especially as a method of diagnosis to detect the presence of fluid and air in a body cavity. 2. ...
Suceava
▪ Romania       city, capital of Suceava judeţ (county), northeastern Romania. Founded on a terrace above the right bank of the Suceava River before the 14th century, ...
Sucellus
▪ Celtic deity       powerful and widely worshiped Celtic god; his iconographic symbols were usually his mallet and libation saucer, indicative of his powers of ...
such
/such/, adj. 1. of the kind, character, degree, extent, etc., of that or those indicated or implied: Such a man is dangerous. 2. of that particular kind or character: The food, ...
such and such
1. definite or particular, but not named or specified: They turned out to be such and such kind of people. 2. something or someone not specified: if such and such should ...
suchand such
such and such adj. Not specified; unnamed or undetermined: They agreed to meet at such and such an hour. pron. Something unspecified or undetermined. * * *
Suchet, Louis-Gabriel, duke d'Albufera da Valencia
▪ French marshal born March 2, 1770, Lyon, France died Jan. 3, 1826, Marseille  marshal of France, one of the most brilliant of Napoleon's (Napoleon I) generals, most ...
suchlike
/such"luyk'/, adj. 1. of any such kind; similar. pron. 2. persons or things of such a kind. [1375-1425; late ME; see SUCH, LIKE1] * * *
suchness
/such"nis/, n. 1. a fundamental, intrinsic, or characteristic quality or condition: seraphic indifference to the suchness of his surroundings. 2. Buddhism. Tathata. [bef. 1000; ...
Suchocka, Hanna
▪ prime minister of Poland born April 3, 1946, Pleszew, near Poznań, Pol.       first woman prime minister of Poland (1992–93).       The daughter of a ...
Suchou
Chin. /syuu"joh"/, n. Wade-Giles. Suzhou. * * *
Süchow
Chin. /syuu"joh"/, n. Older Spelling. Xuzhou. * * * ▪ China Chinese (Wade-Giles)  Hsü-chou , also called  T'ung-shan , (Pinyin)  Xuzhou , or ...
suck
—suckless, adj. /suk/, v.t. 1. to draw into the mouth by producing a partial vacuum by action of the lips and tongue: to suck lemonade through a straw. 2. to draw (water, ...
sucker
—suckerlike, adj. /suk"euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that sucks. 2. Informal. a person easily cheated, deceived, or imposed upon. 3. an infant or a young animal that is ...
sucker bait
Slang. an enticement calculated to lure a person into a scheme in which he or she may be victimized. * * *
sucker list
Informal. a list of names and addresses of persons considered by a business, charity organization, etc., to be likely purchasers or donors. [1945-50, Amer.] * * *
sucker punch
☆ sucker punch Slang n. a quick punch delivered without warning; an unexpected blow vt. to punch (someone) unexpectedly: sometimes written sucker-punch * * *
sucker-punch
—sucker punch. /suk"euhr punch'/, v.t. Slang. to strike (someone) with an unexpected blow. * * *
suckerfish
/suk"euhr fish'/, n., pl. suckerfishes, (esp. collectively) suckerfish. remora. [1835-45, Amer.; SUCKER + FISH] * * *
suckering
Vegetative formation of a new stem and root system from an adventitious bud of a stem or root, either naturally or by human action. Such asexual reproduction is based on the ...
suckerpunch
sucker punch n. Slang An unexpected punch or blow.   suckʹer-punch' (sŭkʹər-pŭnch') v. * * *
sucket fork
/suk"it/ a utensil for sweetmeats of the 16th, 17th, and early 18th centuries, having fork tines at one end and a spoon bowl at the other end of a common stem. [sucket, alter. of ...
suckfish
/suk"fish'/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) suckfish, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) suckfishes. 1. remora (def. 1). 2. a clingfish. [1745-55; SUCK + FISH] * * *
sucking
/suk"ing/, adj. 1. not weaned. 2. very young. [bef. 1000; ME souking(e), OE sucende; see SUCK, -ING2] * * *       drawing of fluids into the mouth by creating a vacuum ...
sucking louse
sucking louse n. LOUSE (n. 1a) * * * Any of more than 400 species (suborder Anoplura, order Phthiraptera) of small, wingless, flat ectoparasitic insects found worldwide. They ...
sucking louse.
See under louse (def. 1). [1905-10] * * *
suckinglouse
sucking louse n. Any of various small wingless insects of the order Anoplura that have mouthparts adapted for piercing and sucking. * * *
suckle
/suk"euhl/, v., suckled, suckling. v.t. 1. to nurse at the breast or udder. 2. to nourish or bring up. 3. to put to suck. v.i. 4. to suck at the breast or udder. [1375-1425; late ...
suckler
/suk"leuhr/, n. 1. an animal that suckles its young; mammal. 2. a suckling. [1425-75; late ME; see SUCKLE, -ER1] * * *
suckling
/suk"ling/, n. an infant or a young animal that is not yet weaned. [1400-50; late ME; see SUCK, -LING1] * * * In mammals, the drawing of milk into the mouth from the nipple of a ...
Suckling
/suk"ling/, n. Sir John, 1609-42, English poet. * * * In mammals, the drawing of milk into the mouth from the nipple of a mammary gland. In human beings, it is referred to as ...
Suckling, Sir John
born February 1609, Whitton, Middlesex, Eng. died 1642, Paris, France English Cavalier poet, dramatist, and courtier. He inherited his father's considerable estates at age 18 ...
Suckling,Sir John
Suck·ling (sŭkʹlĭng), Sir John. 1609-1642. English poet and courtier whose witty, unaffected works include Session of the Poets and Aglaura (both 1637). * * *
Sucksdorff, Arne
▪ 2002       Swedish motion-picture director and cinematographer (b. Feb. 3, 1917, Stockholm, Swed.—d. May 4, 2001, Stockholm), was a noted documentary filmmaker and ...
sucky
/suk"ee/, adj., suckier, suckiest. Slang. disagreeable; unpleasant. [SUCK + -Y1] * * *
sucralfate
/sooh"kreuhl fayt'/, n. Pharm. a sugar-aluminum complex, C12H54Al16O75S8, used for the treatment of duodenal ulcer. [prob. SUCR(OSE) + AL(UMINUM) + (SUL)FATE] * * *
sucralose
su·cra·lose (so͞oʹkrə-lōs') n. An intensely sweet, heat-stable derivative of sucrose that contains no calories.   [Probably blend of sucrose, and galactose.] * * *
sucrase
/sooh"krays, -krayz/, n. Biochem. invertase. [1895-1900; < F sucre SUGAR + -ASE] * * * ▪ enzyme also called  Invertase,         any member of a group of enzymes ...
Sucre
/sooh"krdde/, n. 1. Antonio José de /ahn taw"nyaw haw se" dhe/, 1793-1830, Venezuelan general and South American liberator: 1st president of Bolivia 1826-28. 2. a city in and ...
Sucre (Alcalá), Antonio José de
born Feb. 3, 1795, Cumaná, New Granada died June 4, 1830, Berruecos, Gran Colombia Liberator of Ecuador and first president of Bolivia (1826–28). A close ally of Simón ...


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