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Слова на букву unre-work (15990)

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Walīd, al-
▪ Umayyad caliph also called  al-Walīd I,  in full  Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Walīd ibn ʿAbd al-Malīk ibn Marwān  born 668? died 715, Damascus [now in ...
waling
/way"ling/, n. Engin., Building Trades. 1. a number of wales, taken as a whole. 2. timber for use as wales. 3. wale1 (def. 5). [1830-40; WALE1 + -ING1] * * *
walk
/wawk/, v.i. 1. to advance or travel on foot at a moderate speed or pace; proceed by steps; move by advancing the feet alternately so that there is always one foot on the ground ...
walk shorts.
See walking shorts. * * *
walk to heel
➡ pets * * *
walk-behind
/wawk"bi huynd'/, adj. 1. being a motor-driven machine, as a power lawn mower or a snowblower, designed for operation with the operator walking behind and guiding the machine by ...
walk-down
/wawk"down'/, n. 1. a store, living quarters, etc., located below the street level and approached by a flight of steps: It was a dimly lit walk-down optimistically called a ...
walk-in
/wawk"in'/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to persons who walk into a place from the street, esp. irregularly or without an appointment: walk-in customers; walk-in sales; a walk-in ...
walk-in apartment
a ground-floor apartment having a private entrance directly from the street, rather than through a hallway of the building. * * *
walk-in closet
a closet that is large enough to walk around in. * * *
walk-in refrigerator
a refrigerated storage room, as at a butcher shop. * * *
walk-off
/wawk"awf', -of'/, n. Informal. a person who escapes easily, esp. by walking away from a place of detention; a walkaway: The guards rounded up the walk-offs from the prison ...
walk-on
/wawk"on', -awn'/, n. 1. Also called walking part. a small part in a play or other entertainment, esp. one without speaking lines. Cf. bit2 (def. 6). 2. an entertainer or actor ...
walk-through
/wawk"throoh'/, n. 1. Theat., Television. a. a rehearsal in which physical action is combined with reading the lines of a play. b. a perfunctory performance of a script. 2. ...
walk-up
/wawk"up'/, n. 1. an apartment above the ground floor in a building that has no elevator. 2. a building, esp. an apartment house, that has no elevator. adj. 3. located above the ...
walkability
See walk. * * *
walkable
—walkability, n. /waw"keuh beuhl/, adj. 1. capable of being traveled, crossed, or covered by walking: a walkable road; a walkable distance. 2. suited to or adapted for walking: ...
walkabout
/wawk"euh bowt'/, n. 1. Chiefly Brit. a. a walking tour. b. an informal public stroll taken by members of the royal family or by a political figure for the purpose of greeting ...
walkaround pay
/wawk"euh rownd'/ extra pay earned by an employee for accompanying an official inspector on a plant tour or around a job site. * * *
walkathon
/waw"keuh thon'/, n. 1. a long-distance walking race for testing endurance. 2. such a contest held to raise funds for a charity or special cause, with supporters or sponsors ...
walkaway
/wawk"euh way'/, n. 1. an easy victory or conquest. 2. a patient or inmate who escapes from an institution by walking away when not being supervised or guarded. [1885-90; n. use ...
walker
/waw"keuhr/, n. 1. an enclosing framework on casters or wheels for supporting a baby who is learning to walk. 2. a similar device, usually a waist-high four-legged framework of ...
Walker
/waw"keuhr/, n. 1. Alice, born 1944, U.S. novelist and short-story writer. 2. David, 1785-1830, U.S. abolitionist. 3. James John (Jimmy), 1881-1946, U.S. politician: mayor of New ...
Walker Art Gallery
an art museum in Liverpool, north-west England. It was opened in 1877 and contains one of Britain’s largest collections of European painting. * * *
Walker Cup
a golf competition for men who are not professional players, held every two years between a US team and a mixed British and Irish team. It was first held in 1922 and named after ...
Walker Evans
➡ Evans (III) * * *
Walker hound
an American foxhound having a black, tan, and white, or, sometimes, a tan and white coat. Also called Walker foxhound. [1900-05, Amer.; after John W. Walker and his descendants, ...
Walker Law
▪ United States [1920]       (1920), first significant U.S. legislation concerning the sport of boxing, enacted in the state of New York under the sponsorship of James ...
Walker, A'Lelia
▪ American businesswoman original name  Lelia McWilliams  born June 6, 1885, Vicksburg, Miss., U.S. died Aug. 16, 1931, Long Branch, N.J.       American businesswoman ...
Walker, Alexander
▪ 2004       British film critic (b. March 22, 1930, Portadown, County Armagh, N.Ire.—d. July 15, 2003, London, Eng.), wrote fearlessly outspoken movie reviews for ...
Walker, Alice
▪ American writer in full  Alice Malsenior Walker  born Feb. 9, 1944, Eatonton, Ga., U.S.    American writer whose novels, short stories, and poems are noted for their ...
Walker, Alice (Malsenior)
born Feb. 9, 1944, Eatonton, Ga., U.S. U.S. writer. After attending Spelman College and Sarah Lawrence College, Walker moved to Mississippi and became involved with the civil ...
Walker, Arthur Bertram Cuthbert, II
▪ 2002       American physicist and educator (b. Aug. 24, 1936, Cleveland, Ohio—d. April 29, 2001, Stanford, Calif.), helped develop solar telescopes used in 1987 to ...
Walker, Billy
▪ 2007 William Marvin Walker        American singer (b. Jan. 14, 1929, Ralls, Texas—d. May 21, 2006, near Montgomery, Ala.), was since 1960 a mainstay at the Grand Ole ...
Walker, Cindy
▪ 2007       American songwriter (b. July 20, 1918, Mart, Texas—d. March 23, 2006, Mexia, Texas), penned such country standards as “Cherokee Maiden” (1941), ...
Walker, David
born Sept. 28, 1785, Wilmington, N.C., U.S. died June 28, 1830, Boston, Mass. U.S. abolitionist. The son of a slave father and a free mother, he was educated and traveled ...
Walker, David Mathieson
▪ 2002       American astronaut (b. May 20, 1944, Columbus, Ga.—d. April 23, 2001, Houston, Texas), was the pilot of the space shuttle Discovery in 1984 and the ...
Walker, Doak
▪ 1999       American football player who won the 1948 Heisman Trophy, played for the Detroit Lions for six seasons, during which the team won two National Football ...
Walker, Edward Craven
▪ 2001       British inventor (b. July 4, 1918, Singapore—d. Aug. 15, 2000, Ringwood, Hampshire, Eng.), developed the lava lamp, originally called the Astro lamp, ...
Walker, Edwin Anderson
▪ 1994       general (ret.), U.S. Army (b. Nov. 10, 1909, Center Point, Texas—d. Oct. 31, 1993, Dallas, Texas), valiantly served in World War II as the leader of the ...
Walker, Francis A.
▪ American economist in full  Francis Amasa Walker  born July 2, 1840, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. died January 5, 1897, Boston       American economist and ...
Walker, Jack
▪ 2001       British industrialist (b. May 19, 1929, Blackburn, Lancashire, Eng.—d. Aug. 17, 2000, Isle of Jersey), made millions in the steel industry and in ...
Walker, James J(ohn)
known as Jimmy Walker born June 19, 1881, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 18, 1946, New York City U.S. politician. He entered politics after graduating from New York Law ...
Walker, JamesJ
▪ mayor of New York City in full  James John Walker , byname  Jimmy Walker   born June 19, 1881, New York City died Nov. 18, 1946, New York City  flamboyant mayor of New ...
Walker, John E.
▪ British chemist in full  John Ernest Walker  born Jan. 7, 1941, Halifax, Yorkshire, Eng.       British chemist who was corecipient, with Paul D. Boyer (Boyer, Paul ...
Walker, Johnny
▪ 2004 Badruddin Jamaluddin Qazi        Indian film comedian (b. March 23, 1924?, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India—d. July 29, 2003, Mumbai [Bombay], India), was ...
Walker, Junior
▪ 1996       (AUTRY DEWALT), U.S. rhythm-and-blues tenor saxophonist and leader of Motown's Junior Walker and the All Stars, the group that scored such hits as "These ...
Walker, Kara
▪ 2007  In 2006 the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City featured an exhibition by American artist Kara Walker titled “After the Deluge,” which was inspired in part ...
Walker, Kath
▪ Australian author original Anglo-Australian name in full  Kathleen Jean Mary Ruska , Aboriginal name  Oodgeroo Noonuccal  born Nov. 3, 1920, Australia died Sept. 16, ...
Walker, Maggie Lena Draper
▪ American entrepreneur née  Maggie Lena Draper  born July 15, 1867, Richmond, Virginia, U.S. died December 15, 1934, Richmond       American businesswoman, who ...
Walker, Margaret
▪ American author and poet in full  Margaret Abigail Walker,  married name  Margaret Alexander   born July 7, 1915, Birmingham, Ala., U.S. died Nov. 30, 1998, Chicago, ...
Walker, Mary Edwards
▪ American physician and reformer born Nov. 26, 1832, near Oswego, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 21, 1919, Oswego  American physician and reformer who is thought to have been the only ...
Walker, Mickey
▪ American boxer byname of  Edward Patrick Walker,  also called  The Toy Bulldog  born July 13, 1901, Elizabeth, N.J., U.S. died April 28, 1981, Freehold, N.J.  American ...
Walker, Patric William
▪ 1996       U.S.-born British astrologer whose syndicated newspaper and magazine columns were read by millions of avid followers in the U.S. and Britain (b. Sept. 25, ...
Walker, Robert J
▪ American statesman also called  Robert J(ames) Walker  born July 19/23, 1801, Northumberland, Pa., U.S. died Nov. 11, 1869, Washington, D.C.       U.S. Senator from ...
Walker, Sarah Breedlove
orig. Sarah Breedlove born Dec. 23, 1867, near Delta, La., U.S. died May 25, 1919, Irvington, N.Y. U.S. businesswoman and philanthropist, the first African American female ...
Walker, Sir Emery
▪ English printer born April 2, 1851, London died July 22, 1933, London       engraver and printer associated with the revival of fine printing in England in the late ...
Walker, T-Bone
▪ American musician byname of  Aaron Thibeaux Walker   born May 28, 1910, Linden, Texas, U.S. died March 16, 1975, Los Angeles, Calif.  African-American musician and ...
Walker, William
born May 8, 1824, Nashville, Tenn., U.S. died Sept. 12, 1860, Trujillo, Hond. U.S. military adventurer. He moved to California (1850), where his interest in colonizing Baja ...
Walker,Alice
Wal·ker (wôʹkər), Alice. Born 1944. American writer whose works include the novels Meridian (1976) and The Color Purple (1982), for which she won a Pulitzer Prize. * * *
Walker,James John
Walker, James John. Known as “Jimmy.” 1881-1946. American politician who was the mayor of New York City from 1926 to 1932, when charges of corruption forced his ...
Walker,Sarah Breedlove
Walker, Sarah Breedlove. Known as “Madam C.J. Walker.” 1867-1919. American businesswoman who developed a straightening agent for hair (1905) and built the most successful ...
WalkerLake
Walker Lake A salt lake of western Nevada southeast of Carson City. * * *
walkie-talkie
/waw"kee taw"kee/, n. Radio. a combined transmitter and receiver light enough to be carried by one person: developed originally for military use in World War II. Also, ...
walking
/waw"king/, adj. 1. considered as a person who can or does walk or something that walks: The hospital is caring for six walking patients. He's walking proof that people can lose ...
walking bass
/bays/ (in jazz piano) a left-hand accompaniment consisting of a continuous rhythm of four beats to the measure, usually with a repetitive melodic pattern. * * *
walking beam
Mach. an overhead oscillating lever, pivoted at the middle, for transmitting force from a vertical connecting rod below one end to a vertical connecting rod, pump rod, etc., ...
walking catfish
an Asian catfish, Clarias batrachus, that can survive out of water and move overland from one body of water to another: introduced into Florida. [1965-70] * * * Species (Clarias ...
walking delegate
(formerly) an official appointed by a trade union to go from place to place to investigate working conditions, to ascertain whether union contracts were being fulfilled, and, ...
walking fern
a fern, Camptosorus rhizophyllus, having simple, triangular fronds tapering into a prolongation that bends at the top and often takes root at the apex. Also called walking ...
walking fish
any of various fishes able to survive and move about for short periods of time on land, as the mudskipper or climbing perch. [1860-65] * * *
walking horse.
See Tennessee walking horse. * * *
walking leaf
1. See leaf insect. 2. See walking fern. [1650-60] * * *
walking line
a line on the plan of a curving staircase on which all treads are of a uniform width and that is considered to be the ordinary path taken by persons on the stair. * * *
walking papers
Informal. a notification of dismissal. [1815-25, Amer.] * * *
Walking Purchase
▪ United States history       (Aug. 25, 1737), land swindle perpetrated by Pennsylvania authorities on the Delaware Indians, who had been the tribe most friendly to ...
walking shorts
medium to long shorts, often cut fuller than Bermuda shorts and used for walking or leisure activity. Also called walk shorts. [1960-65] * * *
walking stick
1. a stick held in the hand and used to help support oneself while walking. 2. Also, walkingstick. Also called stick insect. any of several insects of the family Phasmidae, ...
walking ticket
Informal. See walking papers. [1825-35, Amer.] * * *
walking wounded
1. casualties, as of a military conflict, who are wounded but ambulatory. 2. Informal. persons who have been damaged or defeated psychologically or emotionally by their ...
walking-around money
/waw"king euh rownd"/ 1. money that is carried on the person for routine expenses and minor emergencies; pocket money. 2. Also called street money. Political Slang. cash sums ...
walkingbass
walking bass (bās) n. A bass line composed of nonsyncopated notes of equal value, used in jazz and baroque music, for example. * * *
walkingcatfish
walking catfish n. A freshwater catfish (Clarius batrachus), native to southeast Asia, that is able to breathe out of water and travel short distances on land. * * *
walkingdelegate
walking delegate n. A trade union official appointed to inspect and confer with local unions or to serve as a representative of a union in dealings with an employer. * * *
walkingfern
walking fern n. An eastern North American fern (Camptosorus rhizophyllus) having undivided fronds that often take root at the tip. * * *
walkinghorse
walking horse n. A Tennessee walking horse. * * *
walkingleaf
walking leaf n. 1. A walking fern. 2. See leaf insect. * * *
walkingpapers
walking papers pl.n. Slang A notice of discharge or dismissal. * * *
walkingstick
walking stick n. 1. A cane or staff used as an aid in walking. 2. A stick insect, especially a widely distributed North American species (Diapheromera femorata) that is brown to ...
Walkman
/wawk"meuhn, -man'/, Trademark. a brand of small portable stereo cassette player, radio, or cassette player and radio used with headphones. * * *
walkof life
walk of life n. pl. walks of life An occupation, profession, or social class: People from all walks of life supported the cause. * * *
walkout
/wawk"owt'/, n. 1. a strike by workers. 2. the act of leaving or being absent from a meeting, esp. as an expression of protest. 3. a doorway in a building or room that gives ...
walkover
/wawk"oh'veuhr/, n. 1. Racing. a walking or trotting over the course by a contestant who is the only starter. 2. an unopposed or easy victory. 3. any task easily done. 4. ...
walkup
walk·up also walk-up (wôkʹŭp') n. 1. An apartment house or office building with no elevator. 2. An apartment or office in a building with no elevator. * * *
Walküre, Die
Ger. /dee vahl kyuu"rddeuh/. See Ring of the Nibelung. * * *
walkway
/wawk"way'/, n. 1. any passage for walking, esp. one connecting the various areas of a ship, factory, park, etc. 2. a garden path or walk. 3. the front walk of a house, leading ...
walky-talky
/waw"kee taw"kee/, n., pl. walky-talkies. walkie-talkie. * * *
Walkyrie
/wahl kear"ee, -kuy"ree, vahl-, wahl"kear ee, vahl"-/, n. Valkyrie. * * *
wall
—wall-less, adj. —wall-like, adj. /wawl/, n. 1. any of various permanent upright constructions having a length much greater than the thickness and presenting a continuous ...
wall box
Building Trades. an enclosed iron or steel socket built into a masonry wall to support the end of a wooden beam. [1870-75] * * *
wall creeper
a small, gray and crimson Old World bird, Tichodroma muraria, that inhabits cliffs in mountainous areas. [1660-70] * * * ▪ bird  (Tichodroma muraria), bird of the mountains ...
wall fern
the polypody, esp. Polypodium vulgare or P. virginianum. [1515-25] * * *
wall hanging
a tapestry, carpet, or similar object hung against a wall as decoration; arras. [1895-1900] * * *
wall molding.
See back molding. * * *
wall newspaper
▪ newspaper       newspaper produced for display on walls or in other prominent places in cities, towns, and villages, usually in developing countries. The practice is ...
wall painting
mural painting executed by any of various techniques, as encaustic, tempera, fresco, or oil paint on canvas, often as an enhancement of the architecture of which the recipient ...
wall pellitory
wall pellitory n. PELLITORY (sense 1) * * *
wall plate
1. Also called raising plate. Building Trades. a horizontal member built into or laid along the top of a wall to support and distribute the pressure from joists, rafters, etc. 2. ...
wall plug
an electrical outlet permanently mounted on a wall. [1895-1900] * * *
wall rock
Mining. the rock forming the walls of a vein. [1855-60, Amer.] * * *
wall rocket
wall rocket n. a yellow-flowered European plant (Diplotaxis tenuifolia) of the crucifer family, found on rocky walls * * *
wall rue
a small, delicate fern, Asplenium rutamuraria, having fan-shaped leaflets and growing on walls and cliffs. [1540-50] * * *
wall socket
socket (def. 2b). * * *
Wall Street
1. a street in New York City, in S Manhattan: the major financial center of the U.S. 2. the money market or the financiers of the U.S. [1820-30, Amer. for def. 2] * * * Street ...
Wall Street Journal
the leading financial newspaper in the US. It was first published in 1889 by Charles H Dow and Edward D Jones and is still owned by Dow Jones & Company, which also publishes the ...
Wall Street Journal, The
U.S. daily national newspaper, the most influential American business-oriented paper and one of the most respected dailies in the world. Founded in 1889 by Charles H. Dow, ...
Wall Streeter
a person who is employed on Wall Street or in the financial district. [1880-85, Amer.; WALL STREET + -ER1] * * *
wall system
a modular system of shelves, some of which may be enclosed by doors, either mounted on a wall or arranged in freestanding units, for holding books, bric-a-brac, etc., and ...
wall tent
a tent having four perpendicular sides, usually larger and with more headroom than most pyramid-shaped tents. [1835-45, Amer.] * * *
wall-hung
/wawl"hung'/, adj. designed to be hung from or attached to a wall: a wall-hung medicine cabinet for the bathroom. * * *
Wall-Streeter
See Wall Street. * * *
wall-to-wall
adj., adv. /wawl"teuh wawl"/; n. /wawl"teuh wawl'/, adj. 1. covering the entire floor from one wall to another: wall-to-wall carpeting. 2. Informal. occupying a space or period ...
walla
/wah"lah, -leuh/, n. wallah. * * *
Walla Walla
/wol"euh wol"euh/ a city in SE Washington. 25,618. * * * ▪ Washington, United States       city, seat (1859) of Walla Walla county, southeastern Washington, U.S. It ...
wallaba
/wol"euh beuh/, n. 1. any of several trees belonging to the genus Eperua, of the legume family, native to the Guianas and northern Brazil. 2. the hard, heavy wood of any of these ...
wallaby
/wol"euh bee/, n., pl. wallabies, (esp. collectively) wallaby. any of various small and medium-sized kangaroos of the genera Macropus, Thylogale, Petrogale, etc., some of which ...
Wallace
/wol"is, waw"lis/, n. 1. Alfred Russel /rus"euhl/, 1823-1913, English naturalist, explorer, and author. 2. George Corley /kawr"lee/, born 1919, U.S. politician: governor of ...
Wallace and Gromit{™}
two characters, a man and his dog, who appear in the short animated films made by Nick Park (1958– ). In the first film, A Grand Day Out (1989), Wallace builds a rocket and ...
Wallace Collection
a museum of art in London, England. It was opened in 1900 and contains a large collection of 18th-century French paintings and furniture, as well as other paintings, sculpture, ...
Wallace Stevens
➡ Stevens * * *
Wallace's line
Zoogeog. an imaginary line that separates the Oriental and Australian zoogeographical regions and passes between Bali and Lombok, west of Celebes, and east of the ...
Wallace, (Richard Horatio) Edgar
born April 1, 1875, Greenwich, London, Eng. died Feb. 10, 1932, Hollywood, Calif., U.S. British novelist, playwright, and journalist. He held odd jobs, served in the army, and ...
Wallace, (William Roy) DeWitt and Lila Acheson
Lila Acheson Wallace orig. Lila Bell Acheson born Nov. 12, 1889, St. Paul, Minn., U.S. died March 30, 1981, Mount Kisco, N.Y. born Dec. 25, 1889, Virden, Man., Can. died May 8, ...
Wallace, Alfred Russel
born Jan. 8, 1823, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales died Nov. 7, 1913, Broadstone, Dorset, Eng. British naturalist. Though trained as a surveyor and architect, he became interested in ...
Wallace, Anthony F.C.
▪ Canadian-American anthropologist in full  Anthony Francis Clarke Wallace   born April 15, 1923, Toronto, Ont., Can.       Canadian-born American psychological ...
Wallace, David Foster
▪ 2009       American novelist, short-story writer, and essayist born Feb. 21, 1961, Ithaca, N.Y. found dead Sept. 12, 2008, Claremont, Calif. produced dense works ...
Wallace, DeWitt
▪ American publisher and philanthropist born Nov. 12, 1889, St. Paul, Minn., U.S. died March 30, 1981, Mount Kisco, N.Y.       American publisher and philanthropist ...
Wallace, Edgar
▪ British writer in full  Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace  born April 1, 1875, Greenwich, London, Eng. died Feb. 10, 1932, Hollywood, Calif., U.S.       British ...
Wallace, George C(orley)
born Aug. 25, 1919, Clio, Ala., U.S. died Sept. 13, 1998, Montgomery, Ala. U.S. politician. He served in the Alabama state legislature (1947–53). As a circuit court judge ...
Wallace, George C.
▪ American politician in full  George Corley Wallace   born Aug. 25, 1919, Clio, Ala., U.S. died Sept. 13, 1998, Montgomery  U.S. Democratic Party politician and four-time ...
Wallace, George Corley
▪ 1999       U.S. politician (b. Aug. 25, 1919, Clio, Ala.—d. Sept. 13, 1998, Montgomery, Ala.), was a four-term Democratic governor of Alabama and a persistent ...
Wallace, Henry A(gard)
born Oct. 7, 1888, Adair county, Iowa, U.S. died Nov. 18, 1965, Danbury, Conn. U.S. politician. An agricultural expert, he succeeded his father as editor of Wallace's Farmer ...
Wallace, Henry A.
▪ vice president of United States in full  Henry Agard Wallace  born Oct. 7, 1888, Adair county, Iowa, U.S. died Nov. 18, 1965, Danbury, Conn.  33rd vice president of the ...
Wallace, Lew(is)
born April 10, 1827, Brookville, Ind., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1905, Crawfordsville, Ind. U.S. writer. The son of Indiana's governor, he served in the Mexican War and in the ...
Wallace, Lewis
▪ American author byname  Lew Wallace   born April 10, 1827, Brookville, Ind., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1905, Crawfordsville, Ind.  American soldier, lawyer, diplomat, and author ...
Wallace, Mike
orig. Myron Leon Wallace born May 9, 1918, Brookline, Mass., U.S. U.S. television interviewer and reporter. After graduating from the University of Michigan (1939), he worked ...
Wallace, Sir Richard, Baronet
▪ British art collector born June 21, 1818, London, Eng. died July 20, 1890, Paris, France       British art collector and philanthropist whose name is perpetuated by ...
Wallace, Sir William
▪ Scottish hero born c. 1270, , probably near Paisley, Renfrew, Scot. died Aug. 23, 1305, London, Eng.  one of Scotland's greatest national heroes, leader of the Scottish ...
Wallace, William, Sir
born 1279, probably near Paisley, Renfrew, Scot. died Aug. 23, 1305, London, Eng. Scottish national hero. Son of a small landowner, he began his attacks on English settlements ...
Wallace,Alfred Russel
Wal·lace (wŏlʹĭs), Alfred Russel. 1823-1913. British naturalist who developed a concept of evolution that paralleled the work of Charles Darwin. His works include The ...
Wallace,De Witt
Wallace, De Witt. 1889-1981. American publisher who with his wife Lila Bell Acheson Wallace (1889-1984) founded Reader's Digest in 1922. * * *
Wallace,George Corley
Wallace, George Corley. 1919-1998. American politician. A three-time governor of Alabama (1963-1967, 1971-1979, and 1983-1987), he first came to national attention as an ...
Wallace,Henry Agard
Wallace, Henry Agard. 1888-1965. Vice President of the United States (1941-1945) under Franklin D. Roosevelt. He ran for President in 1948 on the Progressive Party ticket. * * *
Wallace,Lewis
Wallace, Lewis. Known as “Lew.” 1827-1905. American general, diplomat, and writer known especially for his novel Ben Hur (1880). * * *
Wallace,Sir William
Wallace, Sir William. 1272?-1305. Scottish patriot who led resistance against the English and briefly gained control of Scotland in 1298. * * *
Wallaceburg
/wol"is berrg', waw"lis-/, n. a town in SE Ontario, in S Canada. 11,506. * * * ▪ Ontario, Canada       town, Kent county, southern Ontario, Canada. It lies at the ...
Wallach
/wol"euhk/; Ger. /vahl"ahkh/, n. Otto /ot"oh/; Ger. /awt"oh/, 1847-1931, German chemist: Nobel prize 1910. * * *
Wallach, John Paul
▪ 2003       American journalist and peace activist (b. June 18, 1943, Scarsdale, N.Y.—d. July 9, 2002, New York, N.Y.), worked for Hearst Newspapers from 1968 to ...
Wallach, Otto
▪ German chemist born March 27, 1847, Königsberg, Prussia [now Kaliningrad, Russia] died Feb. 26, 1931, Göttingen, Ger.  German chemist awarded the 1910 Nobel Prize for ...
Wallachia
—Wallachian, adj., n. /wo lay"kee euh/, n. a former principality in SE Europe: united with Moldavia (Moldova) to form Rumania in 1861. 29,569 sq. mi. (76,585 sq. km). Cap.: ...
Wallachian
See Wallachia. * * *
Wallack, Henry John
▪ American actor born 1790, London, Eng. died Aug. 30, 1870, New York, N.Y., U.S.       leading British-American actor and theatrical manager.       Born into a ...
Wallack, James William
born Aug. 24, 1795, London, Eng. died Dec. 25, 1864, New York, N.Y., U.S. British-U.S. actor-manager. Born into a London stage family, he acted in Shakespearean roles from age ...
Wallack, James William, II
▪ American actor born Feb. 24, 1818, London, Eng. died May 24, 1873, Aiken, S.C., U.S.       outstanding British-American actor of tragedy and melodrama, best known for ...
Wallack, Lester
▪ American actor original name  John Johnstone Wallack   born Jan. 1, 1820, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 6, 1888, Stamford, Conn.       actor, playwright, and ...
wallah
/wah"lah, -leuh/, n. Anglo-Indian. a person in charge of, employed at, or concerned with a particular thing (used in combination): a book wallah; a ticket wallah. [1770-80; < ...
wallaroo
/wol'euh rooh"/, n., pl. wallaroos, (esp. collectively) wallaroo. any of several large kangaroos of the genus Macropus (Osphranter), of the grassy plains of Australia, esp. M. ...
Wallas, Graham
▪ British political scientist born May 31, 1858, Sunderland, Eng. died Aug. 10, 1932, London       British educator, public official, and political scientist known for ...
Wallasey
/wol"euh see/, n. a city in Merseyside, in W England, on the Mersey estuary, opposite Liverpool. 97,061. * * *
wallboard
/wawl"bawrd', -bohrd'/, n. material manufactured in large sheets for use in making or covering walls, ceilings, etc., as a substitute for wooden boards or plaster. [1905-10; WALL ...
wallcovering
/wawl"kuv'euhr ing/, n. a flexible sheet of sized paper, fabric, plastic, etc., usually laminated and printed with a repeat pattern, for pasting on a wall as decoration and ...
wallcreeper
wallcreeper [wôl′krē΄pər] n. a small, Eurasian passerine bird (Tichodroma muraria) with red-and-black wings, living in cliffs and town walls: in the same family (Sittidae) ...
walled
/wawld/, adj. 1. having walls (sometimes used in combination): a high-walled prison. 2. enclosed or fortified with a wall: a walled village. [bef. 1000; ME; OE geweallod; see ...
walled plain
a circular or almost circular area on the moon, sometimes with a floor that is depressed, usually partially enclosed by walls that rise to varying heights and that are usually ...
Wallenberg, Raoul
born Aug. 4, 1912, Stockholm, Swed. died July 17, 1947?, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R Swedish businessman and humanitarian. The scion of a family of bankers, industrialists, and ...
Wallenda
/wo len"deuh/; Ger. /vah len"dah/, n. Karl /kahrl/; Ger. /kahrddl/, 1905-78, German circus aerialist. * * *
Wallenda, Angel
▪ 1997       (ELIZABETH PINTYE WALLENDA; b. March 20, 1968—d. May 3, 1996, Sayre, Pa.), Gunther (b. 1927—d. March 16, 1996, Sarasota, Fla.), and Helen Kreis (b. ...
Wallenda, Karl
born 1905, Magdeburg, Ger. died March 22, 1978, San Juan, P.R. German-born U.S. circus acrobat. He founded the Great Wallendas acrobatic troupe, which achieved fame in Europe ...
Wallensis
/wo len"sis/, n. Sir William. See Wallace, Sir William. * * *
Wallenstein
/wol"euhn stuyn'/; for 1 also Ger. /vahl"euhn shtuyn'/, n. 1. Also, Waldstein. Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von /ahl"brddekht ven"tseuhl oy zay"bee oos' feuhn/, Duke of Friedland ...
Wallenstein, Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von, duke von Friedland
later Duke von Mecklenburg born Sept. 24, 1583, Heřmanice, Bohemia died Feb. 25, 1634, Eger Austrian general. A noble of Bohemia, he served with the future Habsburg emperor ...
Wallenstein, Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von, Herzog von Friedland, Herzog von Mecklenburg, Fürst Von Sagen
▪ Bohemian military commander Introduction Wallenstein also spelled  Waldstein , Czech  Albrecht Václav Eusebius z Valdštejna , or  Valštejna  born Sept. 24 [Sept. ...
Wallenstein,Albrecht Eusebius Wenzel von
Wal·len·stein (wŏlʹən-stīn', välʹən-shtīn'), Albrecht Eusebius Wenzel von. Duke of Friedland and Mecklenburg. 1583-1634. Austrian military leader who fought for the ...
Waller
/wol"euhr, waw"leuhr/, n. 1. Edmund, 1607-87, English poet. 2. Thomas ("Fats"), 1904-43, U.S. jazz pianist and songwriter. * * * (as used in expressions) Waller Edmund Waller ...
Waller, Calvin Agustine Hoffman
▪ 1997       lieutenant general (ret.), U.S. Army, who was one of the highest-ranking African-Americans in the army and during the Persian Gulf War served under Gen. ...
Waller, Charlie
▪ 2005 Charles Otis Waller        American bluegrass vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter (b. Jan. 19, 1935, Joinerville, Texas—d. Aug. 18, 2004, Gordonsville, Va.), ...
Waller, Edmund
born March 3, 1606, Coleshill, Hertfordshire, Eng. died Oct. 21, 1687, Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire English poet. As a member of Parliament during the political turmoil of the ...
Waller, Fats
orig. Thomas Wright Waller born May 21, 1904, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 15, 1943, Kansas City, Mo. U.S. jazz pianist, singer, and composer. Waller was influenced early by ...
Waller, Max
▪ Belgian poet pseudonym of  Léopold-Nicolas-Maurice-Édouard Warlomont  born Feb. 24, 1860, Brussels, Belg. died March 6, 1889, Saint-Gilles, near ...
Waller, Sir William
▪ English commander born c. 1598, Knole, Kent, Eng. died Sept. 19, 1668, London       a leading Parliamentary commander in southern England during the first three years ...
Waller, Willard Walter
▪ American sociologist and educator born July 30, 1899, Murphysboro, Ill., U.S. died July 26, 1945, New York City       U.S. sociologist and educator who did much to ...
Waller,Edmund
Wal·ler (wŏlʹər), Edmund. 1606-1687. English poet known for his harmonious love lyrics, including “Go, Lovely Rose” (1645). * * *
Waller,Thomas Wright
Waller, Thomas Wright. Known as “Fats.” 1904-1943. American jazz musician and composer whose many songs include “Honeysuckle Rose” and “Ain't Misbehaving” (both ...
wallet
/wol"it, waw"lit/, n. 1. a flat, folding pocketbook, esp. one large enough to hold paper money, credit cards, driver's license, etc., and sometimes having a compartment for ...
walleye
/wawl"uy/, n., pl. walleyes, (esp. collectively for 1, 2) walleye. 1. Also called walleyed pike, jack salmon. a large game fish, Stizostedion vitreum, inhabiting the lakes and ...
walleye pollock
a cod, Theragra chalcogramma, ranging the northern Pacific, that is related to and resembles the pollock. * * *
walleye surfperch
☆ walleye surfperch n. a common black and silvery surfperch (Hyperprosopon argenteum) found off the coast of California * * *
walleyed
/wawl"uyd'/, adj. 1. having eyes in which there is an abnormal amount of the white showing, because of divergent strabismus. 2. having large, staring eyes, as some fishes. 3. ...
walleyed pike
walleye (def. 1). [1865-70, Amer.] * * * also called  Walleye,    fish that is a type of pikeperch (pike perch) (q.v.). * * *
walleyedpike
walleyed pike n. See walleye. * * *
walleyedpollack
walleyed pollack n. A food fish (Theragra chalcogramma) of the northern Pacific related to the pollack. * * *
wallfern
wall fern n. A low-growing Eurasian fern (Polypodium vulgare) characterized by creeping stems that form dense mats. * * *
wallflower
/wawl"flow'euhr/, n. 1. a person who, because of shyness, unpopularity, or lack of a partner, remains at the side at a party or dance. 2. any person, organization, etc., that ...
wallhanging
wall hanging n. A flat decorative object, such as a tapestry, rug, or antique map, hung against a wall. * * *
Wallingford
/wol"ing feuhrd/, n. a town in S Connecticut. 37,274. * * * ▪ Connecticut, United States       urban town (township), New Haven county, south-central Connecticut, U.S. ...
Wallington
/wol"ing teuhn/, n. a town in NE New Jersey. 10,741. * * *
Wallis
/wol"is, waw"lis/, n. 1. Harold Brent /brent/, (Hal), 1899-1986, U.S. film producer. 2. John, 1616-1703, English mathematician. 3. a male given name, form of Wallace. 4. a female ...
Wallis and Futuna
Wallis and Futuna [wô′lis] French overseas territory in the South Pacific, northeast of the Fiji Islands: it consists of two groups of islands (Wallis Islands and Futuna ...
Wallis and Futuna Islands
Island group, South Pacific Ocean. It is a self-governing overseas territory (pop., 2000 est.: 15,283) of France; it includes Wallis Island (also known as Uvea), the Futuna ...
Wallis Islands
Island group (pop., 1996: 9,528), forming the northeastern part of the French overseas territory of Wallis and Futuna, South Pacific Ocean. It comprises the main island of Uvea ...
Wallis Simpson
➡ Simpson (II) * * *
Wallis, Hal B
▪ American film producer born Sept. 14, 1899, Chicago died Oct. 5, 1986, Rancho Mirage, Calif.       American motion-picture producer, associated with more than 400 ...
Wallis, John
▪ English mathematician born Nov. 23, 1616, Ashford, Kent, Eng. died Oct. 28, 1703, Oxford, Oxfordshire  English mathematician who contributed substantially to the origins of ...
Wallis, Sir Barnes
▪ British military engineer born Sept. 26, 1887 died Oct. 30, 1979, Leatherhead, Surrey, Eng.       British aeronautical designer and military engineer who invented the ...
Wallis, Sir Barnes (Neville)
born Sept. 26, 1887, Ripley, Derbyshire, Eng. died Oct. 30, 1979, Leatherhead, Surrey British aeronautical designer and military engineer. He invented the innovative ...
Wallis, Wilson D.
▪ American anthropologist in full  Wilson Dallam Wallis  born March 7, 1886, Forest Hill, Md., U.S. died March 15, 1970, South Woodstock, Conn.       American ...
Wallisand Futuna Islands
Wal·lis and Fu·tu·na Islands (wŏlʹĭs; fo͞o-to͞oʹnə) A French overseas territory consisting of two groups of islands in the southwest Pacific Ocean west of Samoa and ...
wallless
See wall. * * *
Wallonia
Wal·lo·ni·a (wä-lōʹnē-ə) A French-speaking region of southern Belgium. It was granted limited autonomy in 1980. * * * ▪ region, Belgium French  Wallonie , ...
Walloon
/wo loohn"/, n. 1. one of a people inhabiting chiefly the southern and southeastern parts of Belgium and adjacent regions in France. 2. the French dialect spoken by the ...
Walloon literature
      the body of written works produced by Belgians in the local dialects of French and Latin origin known as Walloon, which is spoken in the modern Belgian provinces of ...
Walloon sword
pappenheimer. * * *
wallop
—walloper, n. /wol"euhp/, v.t. 1. to beat soundly; thrash. 2. Informal. to strike with a vigorous blow; belt; sock: After two strikes, he walloped the ball out of the park. 3. ...
walloper
See wallop. * * *
walloping
/wol"euh ping/, Informal. n. 1. a sound beating or thrashing. 2. a thorough defeat. adj. 3. impressively big or good; whopping. adv. 4. extremely; immensely: We ran up a ...
wallow
/wol"oh/, v.i. 1. to roll about or lie in water, snow, mud, dust, or the like, as for refreshment: Goats wallowed in the dust. 2. to live self-indulgently; luxuriate; revel: to ...
WallowaMountains
Wal·low·a Mountains (wä-louʹə) A range of mountains in northeast Oregon rising to 3,013.4 m (9,880 ft) at Sacajawea Peak. * * *
wallower
/wol"oh euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that wallows. 2. (in a windmill) a horizontal gear driven off the brake wheel. [1540-50; WALLOW + -ER1] * * *
wallpaper
/wawl"pay'peuhr/, n. 1. paper, usually with printed decorative patterns in color, for pasting on and covering the walls or ceilings of rooms, hallways, etc. 2. any fabric, foil, ...
wallplate
wall plate n. 1. A horizontal timber situated along the top of a wall at the level of the eaves for bearing the ends of joists or rafters. 2. A plate used to attach a bracket or ...
wallplug
wall plug n. An electric socket, usually located in a wall, that is connected to and used as a source of electric power. * * *
wallposter
/wawl"poh'steuhr/, n. (in China) a usually lengthy notice, complaint, personal opinion, etc., handwritten in large characters and hung on walls in cities, as a means of ...
Wallraf-Richartz Museum
▪ museum, Cologne, Germany       art collection now housed in a modern building in Cologne, Ger. The strength of the collection, which dates from 1824, lies chiefly in ...
wallrock
wall rock n. The rock that forms the walls of a vein or lode. * * *
wallrue
wall rue n. A small, delicate fern (Asplenium ruta-muraria) that grows on rocks or in rocky crevices. * * *
Wallsend
/wawlz"end'/, n. 1. a city in Tyne and Wear, NE England, near the mouth of the Tyne River. 45,793. 2. a type of coal widely used in Great Britain, esp. for domestic purposes. * * ...
WallStreet
Wall Street (wôl) n. The controlling financial interests of the United States.   [After Wall Street in New York City.]   Wallʹ-Street'er (wôlʹstrē'tər) n. * * *
wally
/way"lee/, adj. Scot. 1. fine; splendid. 2. strong. [1490-1500; WALE2 + -Y1] * * *
wallyball
/wol"ee bawl', waw"lee-/, n. a game similar to volleyball played in a walled court so that the ball may be bounced against the walls. [1985-90; b. WALL and VOLLEYBALL] * * *
wallydrag
/way"lee drag', -drahg', wol"ee-/, n. Scot. a feeble, dwarfed animal or person. Also called wallydraigle /way"lee dray"geuhl, wol"ee-/. [1500-10; perh. wally (var. of WALLOW) + ...
Wall’s
a British company known for making ice cream. It is owned by Unilever. * * *
Walmart{™}
a US company which opened its first store in 1962 and is now said to be the biggest retailer (= a business that sells goods to the public) in the world. It has thousands of ...
walnut
/wawl"nut', -neuht/, n. 1. the edible nut of trees of the genus Juglans, of the North Temperate Zone. Cf. walnut family. 2. the tree itself. 3. the wood of such a tree. 4. ...
Walnut Canyon National Monument
National monument, north-central Arizona, U.S. Established in 1915 and covering an area of 3 sq mi (8 sq km), it preserves more than 300 pre-Columbian dwellings built by the ...
Walnut Creek
a town in W California. 53,643. * * * ▪ California, United States       city, Contra Costa county, northwestern California, U.S. It lies in the San Ramon Valley, east ...
walnut family
the plant family Juglandaceae, characterized by deciduous trees having alternate, pinnately compound leaves, male flowers in tassellike catkins and female flowers in clusters, ...
walnut husk fly
any of several fruit flies, as Rhagoletis completa, the larvae of which feed on and discolor walnut husks. * * *
WalnutCreek
Wal·nut Creek (wôlʹnŭt', -nət) A city of western California northeast of Oakland. It is an industrial center. Population: 60,569. * * *
Walpi
▪ Indian pueblo, Arizona, United States       pueblo (pueblo architecture) (village), Navajo county, northeastern Arizona, U.S., on the edge of a high mesa in the Hopi ...
Walpole
/wawl"pohl', wol"-/, n. 1. Horace, 4th Earl of Orford /awr"feuhrd/, (Horatio Walpole), 1717-97, English novelist and essayist (son of Sir Robert Walpole). 2. Sir Hugh Seymour, ...
Walpole Island
▪ island, New Caledonia       small, uninhabited coralline limestone island in the French overseas country of New Caledonia, southwestern Pacific Ocean, at the ...
Walpole, Horace, 4th earl of Orford
orig. Horatio Walpole born Sept. 24, 1717, London, Eng. died March 2, 1797, London English writer, connoisseur, and collector. The son of prime minister Robert Walpole, he had ...
Walpole, Robert, 1st earl of Orford
born Aug. 26, 1676, Houghton Hall, Norfolk, Eng. died March 18, 1745, London English statesman generally regarded as the first British prime minister. Elected to the House of ...
Walpole, Sir Hugh
▪ British writer born March 13, 1884, Auckland, N.Z. died June 1, 1941, near Keswick, Cumberland, Eng.       British novelist, critic, and dramatist, a natural ...
Walpole, Sir Hugh (Seymour)
born March 13, 1884, Auckland, N.Z. died June 1, 1941, near Keswick, Cumberland, Eng. British novelist, critic, and dramatist. A natural storyteller, Walpole turned to writing ...
Walpole,Horace
Wal·pole (wôlʹpōl', wŏlʹ-), Horace or Horatio.Fourth Earl of Orford. 1717-1797. British writer and historian whose correspondence and memoirs provide valuable information ...
Walpole,Sir Robert
Walpole, Sir Robert. First Earl of Orford. 1676-1745. English politician who as first lord of the treasury and Chancellor of the Exchequer (1715-1717 and 1721-1742) led the Whig ...
Walpurgis
/vahl poor"gis/, n. Saint, A.D. c710-780, English missionary and abbess in Germany: feast day May 1. Also, Walburga, Walpurga /vahl poor"gah/. * * *
Walpurgis Night
(esp. in medieval German folklore) the evening preceding the feast day of St. Walpurgis, when witches congregated, esp. on the Brocken. German, Walpurgisnacht /vahl poordd"gis ...
WalpurgisNight
Wal·pur·gis Night (väl-po͝orʹgĭs) n. 1. a. The eve of May Day, observed in some European countries and in some Scandinavian communities in the United States in ...
Walras
/vannl rddann"/, n. (Marie Esprit) Léon /mann rddee" e sprddee" lay awonn"/, 1834-1910, French economist. * * *
Walras, (Marie-Esprit-) Léon
born Dec. 16, 1834, Évreux, France died Jan. 5, 1910, Clarens, near Montreux, Switz. French-Swiss economist. An advocate of cooperatives as an alternative to revolution, he ...
Walras, Léon
▪ French-Swiss economist in full  Marie-Esprit-Léon Walras  born December 16, 1834, Évreux, France died January 5, 1910, Clarens, near Montreux, ...
Walrond, Eric
▪ Caribbean author in full  Eric Derwent Walrond  born 1898, Georgetown, British Guiana [now Guyana] died 1966, London, England       Caribbean writer who was ...
walrus
/wawl"reuhs, wol"-/, n., pl. walruses, (esp. collectively) walrus. a large marine mammal, Odobenus nosmarus, of arctic seas, related to the seals, and having flippers, a pair of ...


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