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Слова на букву unre-work (15990)

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Walrus and the Carpenter
a famous nonsense poem in the children’s book Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll. It describes how the walrus and the carpenter persuade some young oysters (= a type of ...
walrus mustache
a thick, shaggy mustache hanging down loosely at both ends. * * *
walrusmustache
walrus mustache n. A bushy, drooping mustache. * * *
Walsall
/wawl"sawl/, n. a city in West Midlands, in central England, near Birmingham. 271,000. * * * ▪ district, England, United Kingdom       metropolitan borough, ...
Walsenburg
▪ Colorado, United States       city, seat (1874) of Huerfano county, southern Colorado, U.S., on the Cucharas River, east of the Sangre de Cristo Range (Sangre de ...
Walsh, Bill
▪ 2008 William Ernest Walsh  American football coach born Nov. 30, 1931, Los Angeles, Calif. died July 30, 2007, Woodside, Calif. was the architect of the “West Coast ...
Walsh, Courtney
▪ 2001       On March 27, 2000, appropriately enough at Sabina Park cricket ground in his hometown of Kingston, Jam., Courtney Walsh became the highest wicket-taker in ...
Walsh, David Gordon
▪ 1999       Canadian stock promoter whose company, Bre-X Minerals Ltd., sold shares on the basis of claims that the Busang gold deposit in Indonesia was the richest ...
Walsh, James Patrick
▪ 1999       American actor whose roles in the David Mamet plays American Buffalo and Glengarry Glen Ross led to a successful motion picture career during which, in some ...
Walsh, Raoul
born March 11, 1887, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 31, 1980, Simi Valley, near Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. film director. Walsh began acting for the stage in 1910 and on film in ...
Walsh, Thomas J
▪ United States senator born June 12, 1859, Two Rivers, Wis., U.S. died March 2, 1933, en route by train from Florida to Washington, D.C.  U.S. Democratic senator ...
Walsh, Thommie
▪ 2008       American choreographer and dancer born March 15, 1950, Auburn, N.Y. died June 16, 2007, Auburn debuted on Broadway as a dancer (in Seesaw [1973]) but was ...
Walsingham
/wawl"sing euhm/, n. Sir Francis, c1530-90, English statesman: Secretary of State 1573-90. * * *
Walsingham, Sir Francis
born с 1532, probably Footscray, Kent, Eng. died April 6, 1590, London English statesman and adviser to Queen Elizabeth I (1573–90). A member of Parliament from 1563, he ...
Walsingham, Thomas
▪ English monk died c. 1422       English Benedictine monk and chronicler of the abbey at St. Albans (Hertfordshire).       Walsingham continued the work of ...
Walston, Ray
▪ 2002       American actor (b. Nov. 22, 1914?, New Orleans, La.—d. Jan. 1, 2001, Beverly Hills, Calif.), had a long career filled with quirky, endearingly cranky ...
Walt Disney
➡ Disney (II) * * *
Walt Disney Company
(also Disney) a large US company started in 1923 by Walt Disney which is best known for its animated children’s films. Today it owns a number of film companies including Walt ...
Walt Disney Pictures
➡ Walt Disney Company * * *
Walt Disney World Resort
▪ resort complex, Florida, United States       resort complex near Orlando, Fla., envisioned by Walt Disney (Disney, Walt) and featuring attractions based on stories ...
Walt Whitman
➡ Whitman * * *
Waltari, Mika
▪ Finnish author in full Mika Toimi Waltari  born Sept. 19, 1908, Helsinki, Finland died Aug. 26, 1979, Helsinki  Finnish author whose historical novels were international ...
Walter
/vahl"teuhr/ for 1; /wawl"teuhr/ for 2, 3, n. 1. Bruno /brooh"noh/, (Bruno Schlesinger), 1876-1962, German opera and symphony conductor, in U.S. after 1939. 2. Thomas Ustick ...
Walter Crane
➡ Crane (II) * * *
Walter Cronkite
➡ Cronkite * * *
Walter de la Mare
➡ de la Mare * * *
Walter Lippmann
➡ Lippmann * * *
Walter Mitty
—Walter Mittyish. pl. Walter Mittys. an ordinary, timid person who is given to adventurous and self-aggrandizing daydreams or secret plans as a way of glamorizing a humdrum ...
Walter Of Coventry
▪ English historian flourished 1290–1300       English monk or friar, compiler of historical materials, best known for his collection Memoriale Fratris Walteri de ...
Walter Raleigh
➡ Raleigh (II) * * *
Walter Reed Army Medical Center
a large hospital and medical centre in Washington, DC, that provides medical care for members of the US armed forces and their families. The US President often goes there for ...
Walter Scott
➡ Scott (X) * * *
Walter Sickert
➡ Sickert * * *
Walter Winchell
➡ Winchell * * *
Walter, Bruno
orig. Bruno Walter Schlesinger born Sept. 15, 1876, Berlin, Ger. died Feb. 17, 1962, Beverly Hills, Calif., U.S. German-born U.S. conductor. An associate of Gustav Mahler, he ...
Walter, Fritz
▪ 2003       German association football (soccer) player (b. Oct. 31, 1920, Kaiserslautern, Ger.—d. June 17, 2002, Enkenbach-Alsenborn, Ger.), was the captain and ...
Walter, John
born 1739, probably in London, Eng. died Nov.16, 1812, Teddington, Middlesex English newspaper publisher. Initially a coal dealer and marine-insurance underwriter, Walter ...
Walter, John, I
▪ English publisher born 1739, probably in London, England died November 16, 1812, Teddington, Middlesex       English founder of The Times (Times, The), London, and of ...
Walter, John, II
▪ English journalist born February 23, 1776, Battersea, London, England died July 28, 1847, London       English journalist, second son of John Walter I, founder of The ...
Walter, John, III
▪ English publisher born Oct. 8, 1818, London died Nov. 3, 1894, near Wokingham, Berkshire, Eng.       English proprietor of The Times (Times, The), London, from the ...
Walter, Lucy
▪ mistress of Charles II born 1630?, Roch Castle, near Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, Wales died , September/October 1658, Paris       mistress of the British king ...
Walter, Thomas Ustick
▪ American architect born Sept. 4, 1804, Philadelphia died Oct. 30, 1887, Philadelphia       architect important in American architecture for the quality and influence ...
Walter,Bruno
Wal·ter (välʹtər), Bruno. 1876-1962. German conductor noted for his interpretations of Mozart and Mahler. * * *
WalterMitty
Wal·ter Mit·ty (wôl'tər mĭtʹē) n. An ordinary, often ineffectual person who indulges in fantastic daydreams of personal triumphs.   [After the main character in “The ...
Walters
I. Barbara Walters (1931– ) a US television journalist known especially for her series Barbara Walters Special, in which she has conversations with famous people. She began on ...
Walters, Barbara
born Sept. 25, 1931, Boston, Mass., U.S. U.S. television journalist. After brief employment in an advertising agency, she became assistant to the publicity director for New ...
Walters, Vernon Anthony
▪ 2003       American diplomat and military officer (b. Jan. 3, 1917, New York, N.Y.—d. Feb. 10, 2002, West Palm Beach, Fla.), served as U.S. ambassador to the UN from ...
Walters,Barbara
Wal·ters (wôl'tərz), Barbara. Born 1931. American television newscaster and reporter. After working for the National Broadcasting Company (1963-1976), she joined the American ...
Waltham
/wawl"theuhm/ or, locally, /-tham/, n. a city in E Massachusetts. 58,200. * * * ▪ Massachusetts, United States       city, Middlesex county, eastern Massachusetts, ...
Waltham Forest
/wawl"teuhm, -theuhm/ a borough of Greater London, England. 228,200. * * * ▪ borough, London, United Kingdom       outer borough of London. It lies on the ...
Walthamstow
/wawl"teuhm stoh', -theuhm-/, n. a former borough, now part of Waltham Forest, in SE England. * * *
Waltharius
▪ Latin poem       a Latin heroic poem of the 9th or 10th century dealing with Germanic hero legend. Its author was once thought to be the Swiss monk Ekkehard I the ...
Waltheof
▪ earl of Northumbria died May 31, 1076, Winchester       earl of Northumbria and ancestor of the Scottish kings through the marriage of his daughter Matilda to King ...
Walther
(as used in expressions) Brauchitsch Heinrich Alfred Walther von Nernst Walther Hermann Rathenau Walther Walther von der Vogelweide * * *
Walther von der Vogelweide
/vahl"teuhr fawn deuhr foh"geuhl vuy'deuh/ c1170-c1230, German minnesinger and poet. * * * born с 1170 died с 1230, Würzburg? Greatest German lyric poet of the Middle ...
Walther, Carl Ferdinand Wilhelm
▪ American theologian born Oct. 25, 1811, Langenchursdorf, Saxony [Germany] died May 7, 1887, St. Louis, Mo., U.S.       Lutheran theologian whose conservative views ...
Walther, Johann Gottfried
▪ German composer born Sept. 18, 1684, Erfurt, Mainz [Germany] died March 23, 1748, Weimar, Weimar       German organist and composer who was one of the first musical ...
Walthervon der Vogelweide
Wal·ther von der Vo·gel·wei·de (välʹtər fôn dər fōʹgəl-vī'də), 1170?-1230?. German minnesinger whose lyrics reflected his religious and political views. The German ...
Walton
—Waltonian /wawl toh"nee euhn/, n., adj. /wawl"tn/, n. 1. Ernest Thomas Sinton /sin"tn/, 1903-95, Irish physicist: Nobel prize 1951. 2. Izaak /uy"zeuhk/, 1593-1683, English ...
Walton, Ernest Thomas Sinton
▪ 1996       Irish physicist (b. Oct. 6, 1903, Dungarvan, County Waterford, Ireland—d. June 25, 1995, Belfast, Northern Ireland), was corecipient, with Sir John ...
Walton, Izaak
born Aug. 9, 1593, Stafford, Staffordshire, Eng. died Dec. 15, 1683, Winchester, Hampshire English biographer and author. A prosperous ironmonger with only a few years of ...
Walton, Sam
▪ American businessman in full  Samuel Moore Walton   born March 29, 1918, Kingfisher, Oklahoma, U.S. died April 5, 1992, Little Rock, Arkansas  American retail magnate who ...
Walton, Sam(uel Moore)
born March 29, 1918, Kingfisher, Okla., U.S. died April 5, 1992, Little Rock, Ark. U.S. retail magnate, founder of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. He attended the University of Missouri ...
Walton, Sir William
▪ British composer in full  Sir William Turner Walton   born March 29, 1902, Oldham, Lancashire, Eng. died March 8, 1983, Ischia, Italy  English composer especially known ...
Walton, Sir William (Turner)
born March 29, 1902, Oldham, Lancashire, Eng. died March 8, 1983, Ischia, Italy British composer. His parents were musicians, and he learned to sing and play piano and violin ...
Walton,Ernest Thomas Sinton
Wal·ton (wôlʹtən), Ernest Thomas Sinton. 1903-1995. Irish physicist who with Sir John Cockcroft succeeded in splitting the atom (1931). They shared a 1951 Nobel Prize for ...
Walton,Izaak
Walton, Izaak. 1593-1683. English writer primarily known for The Compleat Angler (1653), a literary treatise on fishing. * * *
Walton,Samuel Moore
Walton, Samuel Moore. Known as “Sam.” 1918-1992. American business executive. In 1962 he founded Wal-Mart, which he built into one of America's most successful discount ...
Walton,Sir William Turner
Walton, Sir William Turner. 1902-1983. British composer of orchestral works and chamber music, including Façade (1923), an extravaganza accompanying poems by Edith Sitwell. * * *
Walton-le-Dale
▪ neighbourhood, Preston, England, United Kingdom       town, industrial suburb of the town of Preston, South Ribble district, administrative and historic county of ...
Waltonand Weybridge
Walton and Wey·bridge (wāʹbrĭj) A district of southeast England, a residential suburb of London. Population: 50,031. * * *
Waltons
a US television series (1972–81) about a large family in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia during the Great Depression. It was very popular, but some people made jokes about ...
waltz
—waltzer, n. —waltzlike, adj. /wawlts/, n. 1. a ballroom dance, in moderately fast triple meter, in which the dancers revolve in perpetual circles, taking one step to each ...
waltz time.
See three-quarter time. * * *
waltz-length
/wawlts"lengkth', -length', -lenth'/, adj. having the hemline at mid calf: a waltz-length nightgown. [1955-60] * * *
waltzer
See waltz. * * *
Walvis Bay
/wawl"vis/ 1. an inlet of the S Atlantic Ocean, on the coast of Namibia, in SW Africa. 2. a seaport on this inlet. 3. an exclave of the Republic of South Africa around this ...
WalvisBay
Wal·vis Bay (wôlʹvĭs) An inlet of the Atlantic Ocean on the western coast of Namibia. The town of Walvis Bay (Population 11,600) and the surrounding area constituted an ...
WAM
wraparound mortgage. * * *
Wambaugh, Sarah
▪ American political scientist born March 6, 1882, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. died Nov. 12, 1955, Cambridge, Mass.       American political scientist who was recognized as ...
wamble
—wambliness, n. —wambly, adj. /wom"beuhl, -euhl, wam"-/, v., wambled, wambling, n. v.i. 1. to move unsteadily. 2. to feel nausea. 3. (of the stomach) to rumble; growl. n. 4. ...
wambliness
See wamble. * * *
wamblingly
See wambliness. * * *
wambly
See wambliness. * * *
wame
/waym/, n. Scot. and North Eng. belly. [1325-75; ME (north and Scots) wayme, var. of WOMB] * * *
wammus
/wom"euhs/, n., pl. wammuses. wamus (def. 2). * * *
Wampanoag
/wahm'peuh noh"ag/, n., pl. Wampanoags, (esp. collectively) Wampanoag. 1. a member of a once-powerful North American Indian people who inhabited the area east of Narragansett Bay ...
wampish
/wam"pish, wahm"-/, v.i. Scot. to wave about or flop to and fro. [1810-20; appar. of expressive orig.] * * *
wampum
/wom"peuhm, wawm"-/, n. 1. Also called peag, seawan, sewan. cylindrical beads made from shells, pierced and strung, used by North American Indians as a medium of exchange, for ...
wampumpeag
/wom"peuhm peeg', wawm"-/, n. wampum. [1620-30, Amer.; earlier also wampampeak, wampompeage < Massachusett (c. Eastern Abenaki wápapayak wampum beads; equiv. to Proto-Algonquian ...
wampus
wampus1 /wom"peuhs/, n., pl. wampuses. a strange or objectionable person; lout. [perh. extracted from CATAWAMPUS] wampus2 /wom"peuhs/, n., pl. wampuses. wamus (def. 2). * * *
wamus
/waw"meuhs, wom"euhs/, n., pl. wamuses. 1. a heavy cardigan jacket, loosely knit and belted. 2. Also, wammus, wampus. a durable, coarse, outer jacket. [1795-1805, Amer.; < D ...
wan
wan1 —wanly, adv. —wanness, n. /won/, adj., wanner, wannest, v., wanned, wanning. adj. 1. of an unnatural or sickly pallor; pallid; lacking color: His wan face suddenly ...
WAN
/wan/, n. See wide-area network. * * *
Wanaka Lake
▪ lake, New Zealand       lake in west-central South Island, New Zealand. The lake occupies 75 square miles (193 square km) of a valley that is dammed by a moraine ...
Wanaka, Lake
Lake, west-central South Island, New Zealand. It covers an area of 75 sq mi (193 sq km) and is some 1,000 ft (300 m) deep. Fed by the Makarora and Matukituki rivers, the lake is ...
Wanamaker
/won"euh may'keuhr/, n. John, 1838-1922, U.S. merchant and philanthropist. * * *
Wanamaker, John
▪ American merchant born July 11, 1838, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Dec. 12, 1922, Philadelphia  merchant and founder of one of the first American department ...
Wanamaker,John
Wan·a·ma·ker (wŏnʹə-mā'kər), John. 1838-1922. American merchant whose men's clothing business grew into one of the first department stores. He also served as U.S. ...
Wanaque
/won"euh kyooh', -kee', weuh nah"kwee, -kee/, n. a town in NE New Jersey. 10,025. * * *
Wanchüan
Chin. /wahn"chyuuahn"/, n. Wade-Giles. former name of Zhangjiakou. * * *
wand
—wandlike, adj. /wond/, n. 1. a slender stick or rod, esp. one used by a magician, conjurer, or diviner. 2. a rod or staff carried as an emblem of one's office or authority. 3. ...
wand reader
wand (def. 6). * * *
Wand, Gunter
▪ 2003       German conductor (b. Jan. 7, 1912, Elberfeld, Ger.—d. Feb. 14, 2002, Ulmiz, Switz.), was notable for his rigorous rehearsals and his strong ...
Wanda
/won"deuh/, n. a female given name. * * *
wander
—wanderer, n. /won"deuhr/, v.i. 1. to ramble without a definite purpose or objective; roam, rove, or stray: to wander over the earth. 2. to go aimlessly, indirectly, or ...
Wanderer
/won"deuhr euhr/, n. Scot. Hist. a Covenanter persecuted by Charles II and James II, esp. one who fled home to follow rebellious Presbyterian ministers who refused to accept ...
wandering
—wanderingly, adv. —wanderingness, n. /won"deuhr ing/, adj. 1. moving from place to place without a fixed plan; roaming; rambling: wandering tourists. 2. having no permanent ...
wandering albatross
a large albatross, Diomedea exulans, of southern waters, having the plumage mostly white with dark markings on the upper parts. See illus. under albatross. * * *
Wandering Jew
1. a legendary character condemned to roam without rest because he struck Christ on the day of the Crucifixion. 2. Also, wandering Jew, Wandering-jew /won"deuhr ing jooh"/. Also ...
wandering spider
      any member of the family Ctenidae (order Araneida), a small group of large spiders of mainly tropical and subtropical regions, commonly found on foliage and on the ...
wanderingalbatross
wan·der·ing albatross (wŏnʹdər-ĭng) n. A large, mostly white albatross (Diomedea exulans) of southern seas, having long narrow wings whose spread is regarded as the largest ...
wanderingJew
wandering Jew n. Any of three trailing plants, Tradescantia albiflora, T. fluminensis, or Zebrina pendula, native to tropical America, having usually variegated foliage and ...
WanderingJew
Wan·der·ing Jew (wŏnʹdər-ĭng) n. A Jew of medieval legend condemned to wander until the Day of Judgment for having mocked Jesus on the day of the Crucifixion. * * *
wanderingly
See wanderer. * * *
Wanderjahr
/vahn"deuhrdd yahrdd'/, n., pl. Wanderjahre /-yah'rddeuh/. German. 1. a year or period of travel, esp. following one's schooling and before practicing a profession. 2. (formerly) ...
wanderlust
/won"deuhr lust'/, n. a strong, innate desire to rove or travel about. [1850-55; < G, equiv. to wander(n) to WANDER + Lust desire; see LUST] * * *
wanderoo
/won'deuh rooh"/, n., pl. wanderoos. 1. any of several purple-faced langurs, of Sri Lanka. 2. a macaque, Macacus silenus, of southern India, having its face surrounded by long ...
wandflower
wand·flow·er (wŏndʹflou'ər) n. See galax. * * *
Wandiwāsh, Battle of
▪ Indian history       (Jan. 22, 1760), in the history of India, a confrontation between the French, under the Count de Lally (Lally, Thomas-Arthur, comte de), and the ...
wandjina style
▪ painting also spelled  Wondjina,         type of depiction in Australian cave paintings of figures that represent mythological beings associated with the creation ...
wandoo
/won dooh"/, n., pl. wandoos. 1. an Australian tree, Eucalyptus redunca, having hard, heavy wood valued as timber. 2. the wood of this tree. [1880-85; < Nyungar wando] * * *
Wandorobo
/wahn'deuh roh"boh/, n., pl. Wandorobos, (esp. collectively) Wandorobo. Dorobo. * * *
wandsman
/wondz"meuhn/, n., pl. wandsmen. Brit. verger (def. 2). [1860-65; WAND + 'S1 + -MAN] * * *
Wandsworth
/wondz"weuhrth, -werrth/, n. a borough of Greater London, England. 288,400. * * * ▪ borough, London, United Kingdom       inner borough of London, lying west of ...
wane
/wayn/, v., waned, waning, n. v.i. 1. to decrease in strength, intensity, etc.: Daylight waned, and night came on. Her enthusiasm for the cause is waning. 2. to decline in power, ...
Waner, Paul and Lloyd
▪ American athletes in full  Paul Glee Waner  and  Lloyd James Waner , respective bynames  Big Poison  and  Little Poison  Respectively,   born April 16, 1903, ...
waney
/way"nee/, adj., wanier, waniest. 1. wany (def. 1). 2. (of a timber) having a wane or wanes. [1655-65; WANE + -Y1] * * *
wang
(as used in expressions) Wen wang Wu wang Hsi Wang Mu To wang Wang Anshi Wang An shih Wang Chong Wang Ch'ung Wang Hui Wang Jingwei Wang Ching wei Wang Mang Wang Xiaotong Wang ...
Wang Anshi
or Wang An-shih born 1021, Linchuan, Jiangsu province, China died 1086, Jiangning, Jiangsu Chinese poet and government reformer of the Song dynasty. His "New Policies" of ...
Wang Bi
▪ Chinese philosopher Wade-Giles romanization  Wang Pi   born 226 CE, China died 249, China       one of the most brilliant and precocious Chinese philosophers of his ...
Wang Ching-wei
/wahng" jing"way"/ 1883-1944, Chinese political leader. Also, Pinyin, Wang Jingwei. * * * ▪ Chinese revolutionary Pinyin  Wang Jingwei , original name  Wang Chao-ming , ...
Wang Chong
or Wang Ch'ung born AD 27, Kuiji, China died 100?, Kuiji Chinese philosopher of the Han dynasty. A rationalistic naturalist, he paved the way for the critical spirit of the ...
Wang Daohan
▪ 2006       Chinese politician (b. March 27, 1915, Jiashan, Anhui province, China—d. Dec. 24, 2005, Shanghai, China), served as vice-mayor (1980–81) and mayor ...
Wang Fu-chih
▪ Chinese historian Pinyin  Wang Fuzhi   born Oct. 7, 1619, Heng-yang, Hunan province, China died Feb. 18, 1692, Heng-yang       Chinese nationalistic historian and ...
Wang Guangmei
▪ 2007       Chinese first lady (b. Sept. 26, 1921, China—d. Oct. 13, 2006, Beijing, China), was renowned for her beauty and her bourgeois lifestyle as the fifth wife ...
Wang Guowei
▪ Chinese scholar Wade-Giles romanization  Wang Kuo-wei , original name  Wang Guozhen , courtesy name (zi)  Jing'an , literary name (hao)  Guantang  born December 3, ...
Wang Hui
born 1632, Jiangsu province, China died 1717 Chinese artist who was the paramount member of the group of Chinese painters known as the Four Wangs (including Wang Shimin, Wang ...
Wang Jingwei
or Wang Ching-wei born May 4, 1883, Sanshui, Guangdong province, China died Nov. 10, 1944, Nagoya, Japan Chinese leader, head of the regime established by the Japanese in 1940 ...
Wang Junxia
▪ Chinese athlete born January 19, 1973, Jiaohe, Jilin province, China    Chinese middle- and long-distance runner, who in 1993 set world records for women in the ...
Wang Li
▪ 1997       Chinese revolutionary and ardent supporter of Chairman Mao Zedong and his Cultural Revolution of the late 1960s who nonetheless was imprisoned, 1967-82, on ...
Wang Mang
born 45 BC, China died Oct 6, AD 23, Chang'an Founder of the short-lived Xin dynasty (AD 9–25), an interlude between the two halves of the Han dynasty in China. Wang's family ...
Wang Meng
▪ Chinese painter Wade-Giles romanization  Wang Meng   born 1308, Wuxing [now Huzhou], Zhejiang province, China died 1385       Chinese painter who is placed among ...
Wang Shifu
▪ Chinese dramatist Wade-Giles romanization  Wang Shih-fu , also called  Wang Dexin  born c. 1250, Dadu [now Beijing], China died 1337?, China       leading ...
Wang Tao
▪ Chinese journalist Wade-Giles romanization  Wang T'ao , original name  Wang Libing  born Nov. 10, 1828, Luzhi, near Suzhou, Jiangsu province, China died autumn 1897, ...
Wang Wei
▪ Chinese author and artist Wade-Giles romanization  Wang Wei , also called  Wang Youcheng , courtesy name (zi)  Mojie  born 701, Qi county, Shanxi province, China died ...
Wang Xiaotong
flourished early 7th century Chinese mathematician who made important advances in the solution of problems involving cubic equations. In 626 he took part in the revision of the ...
Wang Xizhi
▪ Chinese calligrapher Wade-Giles romanization  Wang Hsi-chih , also called  Wang Youjun  born c. 303, Linyi, Shangdong province, China died c. 361       the most ...
Wang Yang-ming
/wahng" yahng"ming"/, Wade-Giles, Pinyin. (Wang Shou-jen, Wang Shouren) 1472-1529, Chinese scholar and philosopher. * * * ▪ Chinese philosopher Introduction Pinyin  Wang ...
Wang Yangming
or Wang Yang-ming born 1472, Yuyao, Zhejiang province, China died 1529, Nanen, Jiangxi Chinese scholar and official whose idealistic interpretation of Neo-Confucianism ...
Wang Yung-ching
▪ 2009       Taiwanese industrialist born Jan. 18, 1917, Hsin-tien, Taiwan died Oct. 15, 2008, Livingston, N.J. was founder and chairman of the Formosa Plastics Group, ...
Wang Zhen
▪ 1994       Chinese politician and military leader (b. 1908, Liuyang [Liu-yang] county, Hunan province, China—d. March 12, 1993, Guangzhou [Canton], Guangdong ...
Wang, An
▪ American electrical engineer and executive born Feb. 7, 1920, Shanghai, China died March 24, 1990, Boston, Mass., U.S.       Chinese-born American executive and ...
Wang, Nina
▪ 2008 “Little Sweetie”        Chinese businesswoman born Sept. 29, 1937 , Shanghai, China died April 3, 2007, Hong Kong, China became Asia's richest woman after ...
Wanganui
▪ New Zealand       city (“district”) and port, southwestern North Island, New Zealand, near the mouth of the Wanganui River. The site lies within a tract bought by ...
Wanganui River
▪ river, New Zealand       river in central North Island, New Zealand. It rises on the western slopes of Mount Ngauruhoe and flows northwest to Taumarunui and then south ...
Wangaratta
▪ Victoria, Australia       city, northern Victoria, Australia. It lies at the confluence of the Ovens and King rivers, northeast of Melbourne. The site was first ...
Wangchuk
/wahng"chook/, n. Jigme Dorji /jig"may dawr"jee/, 1929-72, king of Bhutan 1952-72. * * *
WangJingwei
Wang Jing·wei (wängʹ jēngʹwāʹ) also Wang Ching-wei (chēngʹ-), 1883-1944. Chinese politician. An assistant to Sun Yat-sen, he abandoned the Nationalists (1938) and was ...
wangle
—wangler, n. /wang"geuhl/, v., wangled, wangling, n. v.t. 1. to bring about, accomplish, or obtain by scheming or underhand methods: to wangle an invitation. 2. to falsify or ...
wangler
See wangle. * * *
Wanhal
/vahn"hahl/, n. Johann Baptist. See Vanhal, Jan Krtitel. * * *
Wanhsien
Chin. /wahn"shyen"/, n. Wade-Giles. Wanxian. * * *
wanigan
/won"i geuhn/, n. 1. a lumberjack's trunk. 2. a lumber camp's supply chest. 3. a small house on wheels or tractor treads, used as an office or shelter in temporary lumber ...
waning moon
the moon at any time after full moon and before new moon (so called because its illuminated area is decreasing). Also called old moon. Cf. waxing moon. See diag. under ...
wanion
/won"yeuhn/, n. Archaic. curse; vengeance. [1540-50; alter. of waniand, ME: prp. of wanien to WANE (see -ING2), from the phrase in the waniand (mone) in the time of the waning ...
wank
/wangk/, Chiefly Brit. and Australian Slang (vulgar). v.i. 1. (of a male) to masturbate (often fol. by off). n. 2. an act of masturbation by a male. [1945-50; perh. b. WHACK and ...
Wankel
/wahng"keuhl, wang"-/; Ger. /vahng"keuhl/, n. Felix /fee"liks/; Ger. /fay"liks/, born 1902, German engineer: inventor of rotary engine. * * *
Wankel engine
an internal-combustion rotary engine that utilizes a triangular rotor that revolves in a chamber (rather than a conventional piston that moves up and down in a cylinder): it has ...
Wankel, Felix
born Aug. 13, 1902, Lahr, Ger. died Oct. 9, 1988, Lindau, W.Ger. German engineer and inventor. In 1954 he completed the design of his distinctive engine, with an orbiting rotor ...
Wankelengine
Wan·kel engine (vängʹkəl, wängʹ-, wăngʹ-) n. A rotary internal-combustion engine in which a triangular rotor turning in a specially shaped housing performs the functions ...
wanker
/wang"keuhr/, Chiefly Brit. and Australian Slang (vulgar). n. 1. a contemptible person; jerk. 2. a male masturbator. [1945-50] * * *
Wanli
▪ emperor of Ming dynasty Wade-Giles romanization  Wan-li , personal name (xingming)  Zhu Yijun , posthumous name (shi)  Xiandi , temple name (miaohao)   (Ming) ...
wanly
See wan. * * *
wanna
/won"euh, waw"neuh/, Pron. Spelling. 1. want to: I wanna get out of here. 2. want a: Wanna beer? * * *
wannabe
/won"euh bee', waw"neuh-/, n., pl. wannabes. Informal. one who aspires, often vainly, to emulate another's success or attain eminence in some area. [1980-85; der. of (I) wanna ...
wannabee
/won"euh bee', waw"neuh-/, n., pl. wannabees. wannabe. * * *
Wanne-Eickel
/vah"neuh uy"keuhl/, n. a city in the Ruhr region in W Germany. 100,300. * * *
wanness
See wanly. * * *
wannish
/won"ish/, adj. somewhat wan. [1375-1425; late ME; see WAN1, -ISH1] * * *
Wanns, Sadall a h
▪ 1998       Syrian playwright, producer, and critic (b. 1941, Hosain al-Bahr [near Tartus], Syria—d. May 15, 1997, Damascus, Syria), was widely regarded as one of the ...
Wannsee Conference
(Jan. 20, 1942) Meeting of Nazi officials in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to plan the "final solution" to the "Jewish question. " It was attended by 15 Nazi senior bureaucrats ...
Wansbeck
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       district, administrative and historic county of Northumberland, northern England, along the North Sea in the southeastern part ...
want
—wanter, n. —wantless, adj. —wantlessness, n. /wont, wawnt/, v.t. 1. to feel a need or a desire for; wish for: to want one's dinner; always wanting something new. 2. to ...
want ad
☆ want ad n. Informal a classified advertisement in a newspaper or magazine stating that one wants a job, an apartment to rent, a specified type of employee, etc., or that one ...
want ad.
See classified ad. [1885-90, Amer.] * * *
want list
a list of desired items, as stamps, coins, or books, circulated among dealers by a hobbyist, museum, or collector seeking to locate and purchase them. * * *
wantad
want ad n. Informal A classified advertisement. * * *
wantage
/won"tij, wawn"-/, n. something, as an amount that is lacking, desired, or needed. [1820-30, Amer.; WANT + -AGE] * * * ▪ England, United Kingdom       town (parish), ...
Wantagh
/won"taw/, n. a town on S Long Island, in SE New York. 19,817. * * *
wanter
See want. * * *
wanting
/won"ting, wawn"-/, adj. 1. lacking or absent: a motor with some of the parts wanting. 2. deficient in some part, thing, or respect: to be wanting in courtesy. prep. 3. lacking; ...
wanton
—wantonly, adv. —wantonness, n. /won"tn/, adj. 1. done, shown, used, etc., maliciously or unjustifiably: a wanton attack; wanton cruelty. 2. deliberate and without motive or ...
wantonly
See wanton. * * *
wantonness
See wantonly. * * *
Wanxian
/wahn"shyahn"/, n. Pinyin. a city in E Sichuan province, in S central China, on the Chang Jiang. 175,000. Also, Wanhsien. * * *
wany
/way"nee/, adj., wanier, waniest. 1. Also, waney. waning; decreasing; diminished in part. 2. waney (def. 2). [WANE + -Y1] * * *
Wanzhou
▪ former city, Chongqing, China Wade-Giles romanization  Wan-chou , formerly (until 1998)  Wanxian        former city, northeastern Chongqing (Sichuan) shi ...
wap
/wop, wap/, v.t., v.i., wapped, wapping, n. whop. * * *
WAP
Wireless Application Protocol: a protocol for transferring documents, esp. Web pages, over a computer network to handheld wireless devices. [1995-2000] * * *
wap-
Bad, evil. Oldest form *ə₂wap-. Suffixed zero-grade form *up-elo-. evil, from Old English yfel, evil, from Germanic *ubilaz, evil.   [Not in Pokorny; compare Hittite ...
wapatoo
/wop"euh tooh'/, n., pl. wapatoos. an arrowhead plant, Sagittaria latifolia. [1805, Amer.; < Chinook Jargon; ulterior orig. uncert.] * * *
wapentake
/wop"euhn tayk', wap"-/, n. (formerly in N England and the Midlands) a subdivision of a shire or county corresponding to a hundred. [bef. 1000; ME < ON vapnatak (cf. OE ...
wapiti
/wop"i tee/, n., pl. wapitis, (esp. collectively) wapiti. elk (def. 2). [1806, Amer.; < Shawnee wa·piti lit., white rump (equiv. to Proto-Algonquian *wa·p- white + *-etwiy- ...
wappenschawing
wappenschawing [wä′pən shô΄iŋ] n. 〚ME wapynschawing < wapen, WEAPON + schawing, a showing: see SHOW〛 Scot. History a review or mustering of men under arms, held at ...
wappenshaw
/wop"euhn shaw', wap"-/, n. a periodic muster or review of troops or persons under arms, formerly held in certain districts of Scotland to satisfy military chiefs that their men ...
wapperjaw
/wop"euhr jaw'/, n. Informal. a projecting underjaw. [wapper ( < ?) + JAW1] * * *
Wapping
an area of Docklands in London, England. It is known especially as the British base of News International, the newspaper company owned by Rupert Murdoch. When the company moved ...
Wappinger
Wap·pin·ger (wäʹpĭn-jər) n. pl. Wappinger or Wap·pin·gers 1. A Native American people formerly inhabiting the east bank of the Hudson River from Poughkeepsie to ...
Wapsipinicon
Wap·si·pin·i·con (wŏp'sə-pĭnʹĭ-kən) A river rising in southern Minnesota and flowing about 410 km (255 mi) generally southeast through eastern Iowa to the Mississippi ...
Wāqidī, al-
▪ Arabian historian in full  Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn ʿUmar al-Wāqidī   born 747, Medina, Arabia [now in Saudi Arabia] died 823, Baghdad, Iraq       Arab ...
war
war1 /wawr/, n., v., warred, warring, adj. n. 1. a conflict carried on by force of arms, as between nations or between parties within a nation; warfare, as by land, sea, or ...
War and Peace
a novel (1862-69) by Leo Tolstoy. * * *
war baby
1. a child born or conceived in wartime. 2. an illegitimate child born in wartime of a father in the armed forces. [1900-05] * * *
War Between the States
the American Civil War: used esp. in the South. * * *
war bonnet
an American Indian headdress consisting of a headband with a tail of ornamental feathers. [1800-10] * * *
war bride
1. a woman who marries a serviceman about to go overseas in wartime. 2. a woman who marries a foreign serviceman and goes to live in his country. [1915-20] * * *
war chest
money set aside or scheduled for a particular purpose or activity, as for a political campaign or organizational drive. [1900-05, Amer.] * * *
war cloud
something that threatens war; a harbinger of conflict. [1820-30] * * *
War Communism
(1918–21) Soviet economic policy applied by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War. Its chief features were the expropriation of private business and the nationalization ...
war correspondent
a reporter or commentator assigned to send news or opinions directly from battle areas. [1860-65, Amer.] * * *
war crime
—war criminal. Usually, war crimes. crimes committed against an enemy, prisoners of war, or subjects in wartime that violate international agreements or, as in the case of ...
war cry
1. a cry, word, phrase, etc., shouted in charging or in rallying to attack; battle cry. 2. a slogan, phrase, or motto used to unite a political party, rally support for a cause, ...
war dance
a dance preliminary to going into battle or in celebration of a victory, as formerly among American Indians. [1705-15, Amer.] * * *
War Democrat
▪ American political faction       in the history of the United States, any of the Northern Democrats who supported the continued prosecution of the American Civil ...
War Department
U.S. Hist. the department of the federal government that, from 1789 until 1947, was responsible for defense and the military establishment: in 1947 it became the Department of ...
war finance
▪ economics       the fiscal and monetary methods that are used in meeting the costs of war, including taxation, compulsory loans, voluntary domestic loans, foreign ...
war footing
the condition or status of a military force or other organization when operating under a state of war or as if a state of war existed. [1890-95] * * *
war game
Mil. a simulated military operation, carried out to test the validity of a war plan or operational concept: in its simplest form, two opposing teams of officers take part, and ...
War Graves Commission
an organization, started in 1917, that cares for the graves of members of the British and Commonwealth armed forces who died in both world wars. It looks after over a million ...
war hammer.
See pole hammer. * * *
war hat
Armor. See chapel de fer. * * *
war hawk
1. hawk1 (def. 4). 2. (caps.) U.S. Hist. any of the congressmen from the South and West, led by Henry Clay and John Calhoun, who wanted war against Britain in the period leading ...
war horse
war horse 1. a horse used in battle; charger 2. Informal a person who has been through many battles or struggles; veteran 3. Informal a symphony, play, opera, etc. that has been ...
War Labor Board.
See National War Labor Board. * * *
War Manpower Commission
U.S. Govt. the board (1942-45) that regulated the most efficient use of labor during World War II. Abbr.: WMC * * *
war nose
the explosive forward section of a projectile, as of a torpedo or shell; warhead. * * *
War of 1812
the war between the United States and Great Britain from 1812 to 1815. * * * U.S.-British conflict arising from U.S. grievances over oppressive British maritime practices in the ...
War of American Independence
Brit. See American Revolution. * * *
War of Independence
War of Independence n. AMERICAN REVOLUTION * * *
War of Independence.
See American Revolution. * * *
war of nerves
a conflict using psychological techniques, as propaganda, threats, and false rumors, rather than direct violence, in order to confuse, thwart, or intimidate an enemy. [1935-40] * ...
War of Secession
War of Secession or War between the States n. the U.S. Civil War: also called WAR BETWEEN THE STATES or War of the Rebellion * * *
War of Secession.
See American Civil War. * * *
War of the Austrian Succession
the war (1740-48) in which Austria, England, and the Netherlands opposed Prussia, France, and Spain over the selection of rulers for territories within the Austrian Empire. Cf. ...
War of the Grand Alliance
the war (1689-97) in which England, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the Holy Roman Empire in league with Bavaria, Brandenburg, Savoy, and the Palatinate opposed France. Cf. ...
War of the Nations.
See World War I. * * *
War of the Rebellion.
See American Civil War. * * *
War of the Sons of Light Against the Sons of Darkness, The
▪ Hebrew document Hebrew  Megillat Milḥamat B'ne, or Beb'ne Ḥoshekh,  also called  War Rule, or War Scroll,         a Dead Sea Scroll, and one of the most ...
War of the Spanish Succession
a war (1701-14) fought by Austria, England, the Netherlands, and Prussia against France and Spain, arising from disputes about the succession in Spain after the death of Charles ...
War of the Worlds
a science fiction novel (1898) by H G Wells. It is about an attack on Earth by creatures from the planet Mars. The creatures have powerful weapons and technology, but are finally ...
War on Drugs
the name given to the US government programme started by Ronald Reagan in the 1980s to try to stop the use of illegal drugs. It has continued ever since and includes public ...
War on Terror
➡ neoconservative * * *
War on Terrorism
➡ Fahrenheit 9/11 * * *
War on Want
a British organization, established in 1951, which campaigns against the causes of poverty throughout the world. * * *
war paint
1. paint applied by American Indians to their faces and bodies before going to war. 2. Informal. makeup; cosmetics. 3. Informal. full dress; regalia. [1820-30, Amer.] * * *
war party
1. U.S. Hist. a group of American Indians prepared for war. 2. any political party or group that advocates war. [1745-55, Amer.] * * *
War pensions
➡ pensions * * *
war powers
the powers exercised by the president or by Congress during a war or a crisis affecting national security. [1760-70] * * *
War Powers Act
a US law passed in 1973 which allows Congress to limit the President’s use of military forces. It states that the President must tell Congress within 48 hours if he sends armed ...
War Production Board
U.S. Govt. the board (1942-45) that supervised and regulated the production and sale of matériel essential to the logistics of World War II. Abbr.: WPB, W.P.B. * * *
War Refugee Board
▪ United States government agency       United States agency established January 22, 1944, to attempt to rescue victims of the Nazis (Nazi Party)—mainly Jews—from ...
war risk insurance
life insurance for members of the armed forces. * * *
war room
1. a room at a military headquarters in which strategy is planned and current battle situations are monitored. 2. any room of similar function, as in a civilian or business ...


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