Слова на букву unre-work (15990) Universalium
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Universalium →  !kun-arti arti-boom boom-chri chri-de k de k-enol enol-gano gano-hipp hipp-john john-lowe lowe-moth moth-oik oil-pius pius-ramp ramp-schw schw-stag stag-tils tils-unre unre-work


Слова на букву unre-work (15990)

<< < 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 > >>
war story
1. an account or anecdote concerning one's personal experiences, esp. in military combat, during a war. 2. Informal. a story about hardships, ordeals, or adventures one has ...
war surplus
equipment, supplies, etc., originally used by or manufactured for the armed forces, but disposed of cheaply as surplus or obsolete: He made his fortune in war ...
war vessel
warship. * * *
war whoop
a yell uttered in making an attack: the war whoop of the American Indian. [1705-15, Amer.] * * *
war zone
(during wartime) a combat area in which the rights of neutrals are suspended, as such an area on the high seas, where ships flying a neutral flag are subject to ...
war, law of
Introduction       that part of international law dealing with the inception, conduct, and termination of warfare. Its aim is to limit the suffering caused to combatants ...
war-game
war-game [wôr′gām΄] vt. war-gamed, war-gaming to examine or plan by a war game vi. to engage in a war game * * * war-game (wôrʹgām') v. war-·gamed, war-·gam·ing, ...
war-horse
/wawr"hawrs'/, n. 1. a horse used in war; charger. 2. Informal. a veteran, as a soldier or politician, of many struggles and conflicts. 3. a musical composition, play, etc., that ...
war-weary
—war-weariness, n. /wawr"wear'ee/, adj. 1. utterly exhausted and dejected by war, esp. after a prolonged conflict. 2. (of an airplane) damaged beyond use except as scrap or as ...
war.
warrant. * * *
Warabi
▪ Japan       city, Saitama ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan. It lies on the alluvial plain of the Ara River. An early post town, it has long been a centre of cotton ...
Warangal
/wawr"euhng geuhl/, n. a city in N Andhra Pradesh, in SE India. 207,520. * * * ▪ India  city, northern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies along the ...
Warao
▪ people also spelled  Warrau  or  Guarauno,         nomadic South American Indians speaking a language of the Macro-Chibchan group and, in modern times, inhabiting ...
warbaby
war baby n. A child born during wartime, especially during World War I or World War II. * * *
Warbeck
/wawr"bek/, n. Perkin /perr"kin/, 1474-99, Flemish imposter who pretended to the throne of England. * * *
Warbeck, Perkin
born 1474?, Tournai, Flanders died Nov. 23, 1499, London, Eng. Flemish impostor, pretender to the throne of Henry VII. The son of a local official in Flanders, while working as ...
Warbeck,Perkin
War·beck (wôrʹbĕk'), Perkin. 1474?-1499. Flemish pretender to the English throne. Posing as Richard, Duke of York, the murdered son of Edward IV, he landed in Cornwall ...
WarBetween the States
War Between the States (wôr) n. See civil war. * * *
warble
warble1 /wawr"beuhl/, v., warbled, warbling, n. v.i. 1. to sing or whistle with trills, quavers, or melodic embellishments: The canary warbled most of the day. 2. to yodel. 3. ...
warble fly
any of several stout, woolly flies of the family Oestridae, the larvae of which produce warbles in cattle and other animals. [1875-80] * * * Any of several dipteran species ...
warblefly
warble fly n. Any of several large hairy flies of the family Oestridae having larvae that form warbles under the skin of cattle and certain other animals. * * *
warbler
/wawr"bleuhr/, n. 1. any of several small, chiefly Old World songbirds of the subfamily Sylviidae. Cf. blackcap (def. 1), reed warbler. 2. Also called wood warbler. any of ...
warbling vireo
a grayish-green American vireo, Vireo gilvus, characterized by its melodious warble. [1830-40, Amer.] * * *
warblingvireo
war·bling vireo (wôrʹblĭng) n. A small vireo (Vireo gilvus) with a whitish breast, noted for its pleasant warble. * * *
warbonnet
war bonnet n. A ceremonial headdress used by some Plains Indians consisting of a cap or band and a trailing extension decorated with erect feathers. * * *
warbride
war bride n. A woman who marries a serviceman during wartime. * * *
Warburg
/vahrdd"boorddk'/; Eng. /wawr"berrg/, n. Otto Heinrich /awt"oh huyn"rddikh/, 1883-1970, German physiologist: Nobel prize for medicine 1931. * * *
Warburg family
orig. Del Banco family Family of eminent bankers, philanthropists, and scholars. A Jewish family apparently of Italian origin, they settled in the German town of Warburgum in ...
Warburg, Otto
▪ German biochemist in full  Otto Heinrich Warburg  born October 8, 1883, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany died August 1, 1970, West Berlin, West Germany       German ...
Warburg, Otto (Heinrich)
born Oct. 8, 1883, Freiburg im Breisgau, Ger. died Aug. 1, 1970, West Berlin, W.Ger. German biochemist. In the 1920s, after earning doctorates in chemistry and medicine, he ...
Warburg,Otto Heinrich
War·burg (wôrʹbərg, värʹbo͝ork'), Otto Heinrich. 1883-1970. German biochemist. He won a 1931 Nobel Prize for research on the respiration of cells. * * *
Warburton, William
▪ British clergyman born Dec. 24, 1698, Newark, Nottinghamshire, Eng. died 1779, Gloucester, Gloucestershire  Anglican bishop of Gloucester, literary critic and ...
warchest
war chest n. 1. An accumulation of funds to finance a war effort. 2. A fund reserved for a particular purpose such as a political campaign. * * *
warcorrespondent
war correspondent n. A journalist, reporter, or commentator assigned to report directly from a war or combat zone. * * *
warcrime
war crime n. Any of various crimes, such as genocide or the mistreatment of prisoners of war, committed during a war and considered in violation of the conventions of ...
warcriminal
See war crime. * * *
warcry
war cry n. 1. A cry uttered by combatants as they attack; a battle cry. 2. A phrase or slogan used to rally people to a cause. * * *
ward
—wardless, adj. /wawrd/, n. 1. a division or district of a city or town, as for administrative or political purposes. 2. one of the districts into which certain English and ...
Ward
/wawrd/, n. 1. (Aaron) Montgomery, 1843-1913, U.S. merchant and mail-order retailer. 2. Artemas /ahr"teuh meuhs/, 1727-1800, American general in the American Revolution. 3. ...
ward eight
a mixed drink containing whiskey, lemon juice, grenadine, and often soda water, served in a tall glass with crushed ice and sometimes garnished with an orange slice and a ...
ward heeler
U.S. Politics. a minor politician who canvasses voters and does other chores for a political machine or party boss. [1885-90, Amer.] * * *
Ward, (Aaron)Montgomery
Ward (wôrd), (Aaron) Montgomery. 1843-1913. American merchant who established (1872) the mail-order business that bears his name. * * *
Ward, Artemus
▪ American humorist pseudonym of  Charles Farrar Browne   born April 26, 1834, Waterford, Maine, U.S. died March 6, 1867, Southampton, Hampshire, Eng.       one of ...
Ward, Barbara (Mary), Baroness Jackson (of Lodsworth)
born May 23, 1914, York, Eng. died May 31, 1981, Lodsworth British economist and writer. After studying economics at the University of Oxford, she became a writer and editor at ...
Ward, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
▪ American author original name  Mary Gray Phelps , also called  (1852–88) Elizabeth Stuart Phelps  born Aug. 31, 1844, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Jan. 28, 1911, Newton, ...
Ward, Frederick Townsend
▪ American adventurer born November 29, 1831, Salem, Massachusetts, U.S. died September 21, 1862, Tzeki [now Cixi], Zhejiang province, China       adventurer who ...
Ward, Hortense Sparks Malsch
▪ American lawyer and reformer née  Hortense Sparks   born July 20, 1872, near Simpsonville, Texas, U.S. died Dec. 5, 1944, Houston, Texas       American lawyer and ...
Ward, James
▪ British philosopher and psychologist born Jan. 27, 1843, Hull, Yorkshire, Eng. died March 4, 1925, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire       philosopher and psychologist who ...
Ward, John
▪ English composer baptized September 8, 1571, Canterbury, England died before August 1638, Great Ilford, Essex?       composer of instrumental and choral music known ...
Ward, Lester Frank
▪ American sociologist born June 18, 1841, Joliet, Illinois, U.S. died April 18, 1913, Washington, D.C.       American sociologist who was instrumental in establishing ...
Ward, Montgomery
▪ American merchant born Feb. 17, 1844, Chatham, N.J., U.S. died Dec. 7, 1913, Highland Park, Ill.       U.S. merchant who introduced the mail-order (mail-order ...
Ward, Mrs. Humphry
▪ British writer née  Mary Augusta Arnold  born June 11, 1851, Tasmania died March 24, 1920, London       English novelist whose best-known work, Robert Elsmere, ...
Ward, Nancy
▪ Native American leader original name  Nanye'hi,  Cherokee title (from 1775)  Agi-ga-u-e (“Beloved Woman”)   born c. 1738, probably at Chota village [now in Monroe ...
Ward, Nathaniel
▪ American writer born c. 1578, , Haverhill, Suffolk, Eng. died October 1652, Shenfield, Essex       Puritan minister and writer.       Forced to leave his ...
Ward, Rodger
▪ 2005       American race car driver (b. Jan. 10, 1921, Beloit, Kan.—d. July 5, 2004, Anaheim, Calif.), won the Indianapolis 500 twice and was a racing star in the ...
Ward, Samuel Ringgold
▪ American abolitionist born Oct. 17, 1817, Md., U.S. died c. 1866, , St. George Parish, Jam.       black American abolitionist known for his oratorical ...
Ward, Sir Joseph
▪ prime minister of New Zealand born April 26, 1856, Melbourne died July 8, 1930, Wellington, N.Z.       New Zealand statesman, prime minister (1906–12, 1928–30), ...
Ward, Sir Leslie
▪ British caricaturist pseudonym  Spy   born November 21, 1851, London, England died May 15, 1922, London  English caricaturist noted for his portraits of the prominent ...
Ward, William George
▪ British theologian born March 21, 1812, London, Eng. died July 6, 1882, London  English author and theologian, one of the leaders of the Oxford movement, which sought to ...
Ward,Artemus
I. Ward1, Artemus. 1727-1800. American Revolutionary general who directed Massachusetts troops in the siege of Boston, until George Washington relieved him of the command and ...
Ward,Mary Augusta Arnold
Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold. Known as Mrs. Humphry Ward. 1851-1920. British writer whose novels include Robert Elsmere (1888). * * *
Ward,Nathaniel
Ward, Nathaniel. Pen name Theodore de la Guard. 1578?-1652. English clergyman and writer in America. He codified Massachusetts law (1641) and is primarily known for his satire ...
wardance
war dance n. A tribal dance performed before a battle or as a celebration after a victory. * * *
warded
/wawr"did/, adj. having notches, slots, or wards, as in locks and keys. [1565-75; WARD (n.) + -ED3] * * *
warden
—wardenship, n. /wawr"dn/, n. 1. a person charged with the care or custody of persons, animals, or things; keeper. 2. the chief administrative officer in charge of a prison. 3. ...
Warden
/wawr"dn/, n. Brit. any of several pears having a crisp, firm flesh, used in cookery. * * *
warden housing
➡ old age * * *
Warden, Jack
▪ 2007 John H. Lebzelter        American actor (b. Sept. 18, 1920, Newark, N.J.—d. July 19, 2006, New York, N.Y.), specialized in character roles on the large and ...
wardenry
/wawr"dn ree/, n., pl. wardenries. the office, jurisdiction, or district of a warden. [1325-75; ME; see WARDEN, -RY] * * *
wardenship
See warden. * * *
warder
warder1 —wardership, n. /wawr"deuhr/, n. 1. a person who guards something, as a doorkeeper or caretaker. 2. a soldier or other person set to guard an entrance. 3. Chiefly Brit. ...
warders
➡ prisons * * *
wardership
See warder1. * * *
Wardha
▪ India       city, eastern Maharashtra (Mahārāshtra) state, western India, lying near the Wardha River southwest of Nagpur. Situated on major routes between Nagpur ...
wardheeler
ward heeler n. Informal A worker for the ward organization of a political machine. * * *
Wardian case
/wawr"dee euhn/ 1. a type of terrarium having a top and sides of glass. 2. a case used for transporting plants, having wood sides and a glass top protected by wood ...
Wardour Street
a street in the Soho district of central London, England, known mainly as the place where a lot of film companies have their offices. The name Wardour Street is sometimes used to ...
wardress
/wawr"dris/, n. a woman who is a warder. [1815-25; WARD(E)R1 + -ESS] Usage. See -ess. * * *
wardrobe
/wawr"drohb/, n., v., wardrobed, wardrobing. n. 1. a stock of clothes or costumes, as of a person or of a theatrical company. 2. a piece of furniture for holding clothes, now ...
wardrobe mistress
a woman in charge of keeping theatrical costumes cleaned, pressed, and in wearable condition. [1895-1900] * * *
wardrobe trunk
a large, upright trunk, usually with space on one side for hanging clothes and drawers or compartments on the other for small articles, shoes, etc. [1885-90, Amer.] * * *
wardroom
/wawrd"roohm', -room'/, n. (on a warship) 1. the area serving as the living quarters for all commissioned officers except the commanding officer. 2. the dining saloon and lounge ...
wardship
/wawrd"ship/, n. 1. guardianship; custody. 2. Law. the guardianship over a minor or ward. [1425-75; late ME; see WARD, -SHIP] * * *
wardship and marriage
▪ law       in feudal law, rights belonging to the lord of a fief with respect to the personal lives of his vassals (vassal). The right of wardship allowed the lord to ...
ware
ware1 /wair/, n. 1. Usually, wares. a. articles of merchandise or manufacture; goods: a peddler selling his wares. b. any intangible items, as services or products of artistic or ...
Ware, Lancelot Lionel
▪ 2001       British barrister (b. June 5, 1915, Mitcham, Surrey, Eng.—d. Aug. 15, 2000, Surrey), was cofounder (1946), with Australian barrister Roland Berrill, of ...
warehouse
n. /wair"hows'/; v. /wair"howz', -hows'/, n., pl. warehouses /-how'ziz/, v., warehoused, warehousing. n. 1. a building, or a part of one, for the storage of goods, merchandise, ...
warehouse receipt
a receipt for goods placed in a warehouse. [1885-90] * * *
warehouseman
/wair"hows'meuhn/, n., pl. warehousemen. 1. a person who stores goods for others for pay. 2. a person who is employed in or who manages a warehouse. [1625-35; WAREHOUSE + -MAN] * ...
warehouser
/wair"how'zeuhr/, n. 1. warehouseman. 2. a person or company operating a warehouse or its services. 3. a wholesaler with a large building for display and sale of goods. [1925-30; ...
warehousing
/wair"how'zing/, n. 1. an act or instance of a person or company that warehouses something. 2. the pledging as security, to a commercial bank, of a long-term mortgage for a ...
Warens, Louise-Éléanore de la Tour du Pil, baronne de
▪ Swiss aristocrat (baroness of) born 1700, Vevey, Switz. died 1762, Chambéry, Savoy       benevolent aristocrat who engaged the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau ...
wareroom
/wair"roohm', -room'/, n. a room in which goods are stored or are displayed for sale. [1805-15; WARE1 + ROOM] * * *
Wareru
▪ king of Hanthawaddy also called Mogado, or Chao Fa Rua flourished 1300       famous king of Hanthawaddy (Hansavadi, or Pegu), who ruled (1287–96) over the Mon ...
warfare
/wawr"fair'/, n. 1. the process of military struggle between two nations or groups of nations; war. 2. armed conflict between two massed enemies, armies, or the like. 3. ...
Warfare in the 21st Century
▪ 2003 Introduction by Peter Saracino       The war that began in Afghanistan on Oct. 7, 2001, demonstrated both the capabilities and the limitations of modern military ...
warfarin
/wawr"feuh rin/, n. Chem. 1. a colorless, crystalline, water-insoluble anticoagulant, C19H16O4, used chiefly as a rodenticide. 2. Pharm. a preparation of this used in the ...
Warfield
/wawr"feeld'/, n. David, 1866-1951, U.S. actor. * * *
Warfield, David
▪ American actor born Nov. 28, 1866, San Francisco died June 27, 1951, New York City  one of the few American pre-motion-picture actors who became a millionaire. He made his ...
Warfield, Paul
born Nov. 28, 1942, Warren, Ohio, U.S. U.S. football player. He compiled an outstanding record at Ohio State University. As a wide receiver for the Cleveland Browns (1964–69, ...
Warfield, William Caesar
▪ 2003       American concert and opera singer (b. Jan. 22, 1920, West Helena, Ark.—d. Aug. 25, 2002, Chicago, Ill.), had a powerful warm and elegant bass-baritone ...
wargame
war game n. 1. An often physical or electronic simulation of a military operation involving two or more forces and using rules, data, and procedures designed to depict an actual ...
wargamer
See war-game. * * *
Wargla
▪ Algeria formerly  Ouargla        city, east-central Algeria. It is situated on the western edge of a sabkha (large, enclosed basin) in the Sahara. One of the oldest ...
Warhaftig, Zerach
▪ 2003       Israeli rabbi, lawyer, and politician (b. Feb. 2, 1906, Volkovysk, Russian Empire (now in Belarus)—d. Sept. 26, 2002, Jerusalem, Israel), was one of the ...
Warham, William
▪ archbishop of Canterbury born c. 1450, , Malshanger, Hampshire, Eng. died Aug. 22, 1532, Canterbury, Kent       last of the pre-Reformation archbishops of Canterbury, ...
warhawk
war hawk n. 1. A member of the 12th U.S. Congress (1811-1813) who advocated war with Great Britain. 2. One who advocates war; a hawk. * * *
warhead
/wawr"hed'/, n. the forward section of a self-propelled missile, bomb, torpedo, or the like, containing the explosive, chemical, or atomic charge. [1895-1900; WAR1 + HEAD] * * *
Warhol
/wawr"hawl, -hol/, n. Andy, 1928-87, U.S. artist. * * *
Warhol, Andy
orig. Andrew Warhola born Aug. 6, 1928?, Pittsburgh?, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 22, 1987, New York, N.Y. U.S. artist and filmmaker. The son of Czech immigrants, Warhol graduated ...
Warhol,Andy
War·hol (wôrʹhôl', -hōl'), Andy. 1930?-1987. American artist. A leader of the pop art movement, he produced paintings and silk-screen prints of commonplace images, such as ...
warhorse
war·horse also war-horse (wôrʹhôrs') n. 1. A horse used in combat; a charger. 2. Informal. One who has been through many battles, struggles, or fights. 3. Informal. A ...
Wari
Wa·ri or Hua·ri (wäʹrē) n. A pre-Incan empire with links to the contemporaneous civilization at Tiahuanaco, developing around the 10th century in the Peruvian highlands and ...
warily
/wair"euh lee/, adv. in a wary manner. [1545-55; WARY + -LY] * * *
wariness
/wair"ee nis/, n. the state or quality of being wary. [1545-55; WARY + -NESS] * * *
Waring, Edward
▪ English mathematician born 1734, Old Heath, near Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England died August 15, 1798, Pontesbury, Shropshire       English mathematician whose ...
Waring, Laura Wheeler
▪ American artist original name  Laura Wheeler  born May 16, 1887, Hartford, Connecticut, U.S. died February 3, 1948, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania       American ...
warison
/war"euh seuhn/, n. a bugle call to assault. [1805; Walter Scott's misinterpretation of now obs. waryson reward, wealth, possessions, ME < AF warison defense, possessions, OF ...
Warkworth
▪ England, United Kingdom       village (parish) in Alnwick district, administrative and historic county of Northumberland, England. It lies along the River Coquet, ...
warless
—warlessly, adv. —warlessness, n. /wawr"lis/, adj. unmarked by war: The international conflict was followed by a warless decade. [1400-50; late ME; see WAR1, -LESS] * * *
warlike
/wawr"luyk'/, adj. 1. fit, qualified, or ready for war; martial: a warlike fleet; warlike tribes. 2. threatening or indicating war: a warlike tone. 3. of or pertaining to war: a ...
warlock
/wawr"lok'/, n. 1. a man who practices the black arts; a male witch; sorcerer. 2. a fortuneteller or conjurer. [bef. 900; ME warloghe, -lach, OE waerloga oathbreaker, devil, ...
Warlock, Peter
▪ British composer byname of  Philip Heseltine   born Oct. 30, 1894, London died Dec. 17, 1930, London       English composer, critic, and editor known for his songs ...
warlord
—warlordism, n. /wawr"lawrd'/, n. 1. a military leader, esp. of a warlike nation. 2. a military commander who has seized power, esp. in one section of a country. 3. ...
warlordism
See warlord. * * *
Warlpiri
Warl·pi·ri (wälʹbə-rē) n. pl. Warlpiri or Warl·pi·ris 1. A member of a traditionally nomadic Aboriginal people of north-central and central Australia. 2. The ...
warm
—warmer, n. —warmish, adj. —warmly, adv. —warmness, n. /wawrm/, adj., warmer, warmest, v., n. adj. 1. having or giving out a moderate degree of heat, as perceived by the ...
warm front
Meteorol. a transition zone between a mass of warm air and the colder air it is replacing. [1920-25] * * *
warm sector
Meteorol. the region of warmest air bounded by the cold and warm fronts of a cyclone. * * *
warm spot
1. Physiol. a sensory area in the skin that responds to an increase in temperature. 2. Informal. a memory or group of memories that one regards with affection: The good old days ...
warm spring
a thermal spring having a temperature of up to 98°F (37°C). Cf. hot spring. [1740-50, Amer.] * * *
Warm Springs
a town in W Georgia: resort; site of foundation for treatment of poliomyelitis. 425. * * * ▪ resort, Georgia, United States       health resort, Meriwether county, ...
warm tone
Photog. a yellow, brown, olive, or reddish tinge in a black-and-white print. Cf. cold tone. * * *
warm-blooded
—warm-bloodedness, n. /wawrm"blud"id/, adj. 1. Also, endothermic. designating or pertaining to animals, as mammals and birds, whose blood ranges in temperatures from about 98° ...
warm-bloodedness
See warm-blooded. * * * ▪ physiology also called  Homoiothermy,  also spelled  Homeothermy,         in animals, the ability to maintain a relatively constant ...
warm-down
/wawrm"down'/, n. a tapering off or recovery from strenuous physical exercise, esp. running or racing, by slowing down or doing light stretches. [by analogy with WARMUP] * * *
warm-hearted
—warm-heartedly, adv. —warm-heartedness, n. /wawrm"hahr"tid/, adj. having or showing sympathy, affection, kindness, cordiality, etc.: a warm-hearted welcome. Also, ...
warm-up
☆ warm-up [wôrm′up΄ ] n. the act or an instance of warming up adj. designating a garment, as a jacket, worn for exercising: also warmup * * * warm-up or warm·up ...
warmblooded
warmblooded [wôrm′blud΄id] adj. 1. having a body temperature that remains relatively constant, independent of and usually higher than that of the surroundings [mammals and ...
warmboot
warm boot n. The act or process of restarting a computer without turning off the power. A warm boot erases everything in RAM and then reloads the operating system into RAM. * * *
warmed-over
/wawrmd"oh"veuhr/, adj. 1. (of cooked foods) heated again: warmed-over stew. 2. reworked or repeated without enthusiasm or introduction of new ideas; stale: a warmed-over version ...
warmed-up
/wawrmd"up"/, adj. warmed-over (def. 1). * * *
warmer
See warm. * * *
warmer-upper
/wawr"meuhr up"euhr/, n. Informal. 1. something that provides one with invigorating warmth: Hot soup is a good warmer-upper after skiing. 2. something that serves to warm up an ...
Warmerdam, Cornelius
▪ American athlete byname  Dutch Warmerdam   born June 22, 1915, Long Beach, California, U.S. died November 13, 2001, Fresno       American pole-vaulter (pole vault), ...
Warmerdam, Cornelius Anthony
▪ 2002 “Dutch”        American pole-vaulter (b. June 22, 1915, Long Beach, Calif.—d. Nov.13, 2001, Fresno, Calif.), was the first in his sport to clear 4.57 m (15 ...
warmfront
warm front n. A front along which an advancing mass of warm air rises over a mass of cold air. * * *
warmhearted
warmhearted [wôrm′härt΄id] adj. kind, sympathetic, friendly, loving, etc. SYN.- TENDER1 warmheartedly adv. warmheartedness n. * * *
warmheartedly
See warm-hearted. * * *
warmheartedness
See warmheartedly. * * *
warming pan
a long-handled, covered pan, usually of brass, filled with live coals or hot water for warming a cold bed. [1565-75] * * *
Warming, Johannes Eugenius Bülow
▪ Danish botanist born Nov. 3, 1841, Manø, Den. died April 2, 1924, Copenhagen       Danish botanist whose work on the relations between living plants and their ...
warmingpan
warm·ing pan (wôrʹmĭng) n. A metal pan with a cover and a long handle, designed to hold hot liquids or coals and used to warm a bed. Also called bedwarmer. * * *
Warmińsko-Mazurskie
▪ province, Poland Introduction Polish  Województwo Warmińsko-Mazurskie        województwo (province), northern Poland. It is bordered by Russia to the north, by ...
warminster broom
/wawr"min'steuhr/ a European shrub, Cytisus praecox, of the legume family, having yellowish-white or yellow, pealike flowers. [after Warminster, England] * * *
warmish
warmish [wôr′mish] adj. somewhat warm * * * See warmer. * * *
warmly
See warmer. * * *
warmness
See warmer. * * *
warmonger
/wawr"mung'geuhr, -mong'-/, n. a person who advocates, endorses, or tries to precipitate war. [1580-90; WAR1 + MONGER] * * *
warmongering
/wawr"mung'geuhr ing, -mong'-/, n. the practices and principles of a warmonger. [WARMONGER + -ING1] * * *
warmouth
/wawr"mowth'/, n., pl. warmouths /-mowdhz', -mowths'/, (esp. collectively) warmouth. a freshwater sunfish, Lepomis gulosus, of the eastern U.S., having a patch of small teeth on ...
warmth
—warmthless, adj. —warmthlessness, n. /wawrmth/, n. 1. the quality or state of being warm; moderate or gentle heat. 2. the sensation of moderate heat. 3. liveliness of ...
warmup
/wawrm"up'/, n. 1. an act or instance of warming up: The spectators came early to watch the players go through their warmups. The dancers went through a quick warmup. 2. the ...
warn
—warner, n. /wawrn/, v.t. 1. to give notice, advice, or intimation to (a person, group, etc.) of danger, impending evil, possible harm, or anything else unfavorable: They ...
Warne, Shane Keith
▪ 1996       If any sportsman could be said to have made his name in an instant, it was cricketer Shane Warne, the Australian leg-spinner whose love of taking wickets ...
Warner
/wawr"neuhr/, n. 1. Charles Dudley /dud"lee/, 1829-1900, U.S. editor and essayist. 2. Glenn Scobey /skoh"bee/, ("Pop"), 1871-1954, U.S. football coach. 3. Jack L(eonard), ...
Warner Bros. Inc.
U.S. film studio. Beginning in Pennsylvania as movie distributors and theatre owners in 1903, the four Warner brothers started producing their own films in 1913 and moved to ...
Warner Brothers
a major Hollywood film company established in 1923 by four brothers, Harry Warner (1881-1958), Albert Warner (1884-1967), Sam Warner (1888-1927) and Jack Warner (1892-1978). It ...
Warner Robins
/rob"inz/ a city in central Georgia. 39,893. * * * ▪ Georgia, United States       city, Houston county, central Georgia, U.S., 10 miles (16 km) south of Macon. It ...
Warner, Jack
▪ American producer in full  Jack Leonard Warner  born Aug. 2, 1882, London, Ont., Can. died Sept. 9, 1978, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.       American motion-picture ...
Warner, Kurt
▪ 2001       With 1 minute 54 seconds left to play and the score tied 16–16 in Super Bowl XXXIV on Jan. 30, 2000, St. Louis Rams quarterback Kurt Warner lofted a 73-yd ...
Warner, Pop
orig. Glenn Scobey Warner born April 5, 1871, Springfield, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 7, 1954, Palo Alto, Calif. U.S. college football coach. At the Carlisle (Pa.) Indian School ...
Warner, Rex
▪ British writer born March 9, 1905, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died June 24, 1986, Wallingford, Oxfordshire       British novelist, Greek scholar, poet, ...
Warner, Susan Bogert; and Warner, Anna Bartlett
▪ American authors Respectively,   born July 11, 1819, New York, N.Y., U.S. died March 17, 1885, Highland Falls, N.Y. born Aug. 31, 1827, New York City died Jan. 22, 1915, ...
Warner, Sylvia Townsend
▪ British author born Dec. 6, 1893, Harrow, Middlesex, Eng. died May 1, 1978, Maiden Newton, Dorset       English writer who began her self-proclaimed “accidental ...
Warner, W(illiam) Lloyd
born Oct. 26, 1898, Redlands, Calif., U.S. died May 23, 1970, Chicago, Ill. U.S. sociologist and anthropologist. He studied with Alfred L. Kroeber and A.R. Radcliffe-Brown and ...
Warner, W. Lloyd
▪ American sociologist in full  William Lloyd Warner  born Oct. 26, 1898, Redlands, Calif., U.S. died May 23, 1970, Chicago, Ill.       influential American ...
Warner,Harry Morris
War·ner (wôrʹnər), Harry Morris. 1881-1958. American filmmaker who with his brothers Albert (1884-1967), Samuel Louis (1887-1927), and Jack (1892-1978) founded Warner ...
Warner-Lambert Company
▪ American company       former diversified American corporation that manufactured products ranging from pharmaceuticals to candy. It became part of U.S. pharmaceutical ...
WarnerRobins
Warner Rob·ins (rŏbʹĭnz) A city of central Georgia south of Macon. Incorporated in 1943, it includes one of the largest Air Force bases in the South. Population: 43,726. * ...
warneurosis
war neurosis n. See combat fatigue. * * *
warning
—warningly, adv. /wawr"ning/, n. 1. the act or utterance of one who warns or the existence, appearance, sound, etc., of a thing that warns. 2. something that serves to warn, ...
warning coloration
Biol. a bold, distinctive pattern of color characteristic of a poisonous or unpalatable organism, as the skunk or the monarch butterfly, that functions as a warning to and ...
warning system
▪ military technology Introduction       in military science, any method used to detect the situation or intention of an enemy so that warning can be ...
warning track
Baseball. a strip, often consisting of a cinder or dirt track, bordering the outer edge of the outfield between the outfield turf and the stadium wall that alerts outfielders ...
warningcoloration
warning coloration n. The conspicuously recognizable markings of an animal, such as a skunk, that serve to warn off potential predators. Also called aposematic coloration. * * *
warningly
See warning. * * *
warningtrack
warning track n. Baseball A strip of dirt or gravel along the outfield wall, designed to warn outfielders when they are approaching the wall. * * *
Warnke, Paul Culliton
▪ 2002       American lawyer and government figure (b. Jan. 31, 1920, Webster, Mass.—d. Oct. 31, 2001, Washington, D.C.), while serving as assistant defense secretary ...
warof nerves
war of nerves n. pl. wars of nerves A conflict marked by psychological tactics, such as intimidation and threats, that are intended to confuse, exhaust, and demoralize an ...
Warof the Roses
War of the Roses n. 1. Any of a series of intermittent civil wars in the 15th century between the English royal houses of York and Lancaster and their supporters. The wars began ...
warp
—warpage, n. /wawrp/, v.t. 1. to bend or twist out of shape, esp. from a straight or flat form, as timbers or flooring. 2. to bend or turn from the natural or true direction or ...
warp beam
a roller, located at the back of a loom, on which the warp ends are wound in preparation for weaving. Also called warp roll. [1825-35] * * *
warp ikat.
See under ikat. * * *
warp knit
a fabric or garment so constructed that runs do not occur: knitted from a warp beam that feeds yarn to the knitting frame. * * *
warp knitting
a knitting process in which the yarn is knitted vertically in a flat form. Cf. weft knitting. * * *
warp speed
an extremely rapid rate of speed: rumors traveling at warp speed. [alluding to the use in science fiction of spatial or temporal warps to travel interstellar distances] * * *
warp-knitted
/wawrp"nit"id/, adj. designating a fabric made by warp knitting. [1915-20] * * *
warpaint
war paint n. 1. Pigments applied to the face or body in preparation for battle, as in certain tribal societies. 2. Informal. Cosmetics such as lipstick, rouge, or mascara. * * *
warpand woof
warp and woof n. The underlying structure on which something is built; a base or foundation: “profound dislocations throughout the entire warp and woof of the American ...
warparty
war party n. 1. A band of warriors engaged in fighting or raiding an enemy. Used especially of Native Americans. 2. A usually blatantly patriotic political party supporting a ...
warpath
/wawr"path', -pahth'/, n., pl. warpaths /-padhz', -pahdhz', -paths', -pahths'/. 1. the path or course taken by American Indians on a warlike expedition. 2. on the warpath, a. ...
warper
/wawr"peuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that warps. 2. Textiles. a machine used to wind warp ends in preparation for weaving. [bef. 1000; OE weorpere thrower (in ME only in ...
warping board
a rectangular board containing evenly spaced pegs at each end on which the warp is wound in preparation for weaving. [1905-10] * * *
warping frame
n. a wooden frame containing evenly spaced pegs on which the warp is wound in preparation for weaving. [1680-90] * * *
warplane
/wawr"playn'/, n. an airplane designed for, or used in, warfare. [1910-15; WAR1 + PLANE1] * * *
warpspeed
warp speed n. Informal An extremely rapid speed or state of activity: “A young pronghorn antelope teased a yearling wolf, shifting into warp speed and leaving the wolf in the ...
warpwise
/wawrp"wuyz'/, adv. Textiles. in a vertical direction; at right angles to the filling; lengthwise. [WARP + -WISE] * * *
Warragul
▪ Victoria, Australia       town, south-central Victoria, Australia. It is situated in Gippsland, 64 miles (103 km) east-southeast of Melbourne. European settlement was ...
warrant
—warrantless, adj. /wawr"euhnt, wor"-/, n. 1. authorization, sanction, or justification. 2. something that serves to give reliable or formal assurance of something; guarantee, ...
warrantability
See warrant. * * *
warrantable
/wawr"euhn teuh beuhl, wor"-/, adj. 1. capable of being warranted. 2. (of deer) of a legal age for hunting. [1575-85; WARRANT + -ABLE] * * *
warrantableness
See warrantability. * * *
warrantably
See warrantability. * * *
warrantee
/wawr'euhn tee", wor'-/, n. a person to whom a warranty is made. [1660-70; WARRANT(Y) or WARRANT(OR) + -EE] * * *
warrantless
See warrantability. * * *
warrantor
/wawr"euhn tawr', -teuhr, wor"-/, n. a person who warrants or makes a warranty. Also, warranter /wawr"euhn teuhr, wor"-/. [1675-85; WARRANT + -OR2] * * *
warranty
n. /wawr"euhn tee, wor"-/; v. /wawr'euhn tee", wor'-/, n., pl. warranties, v., warrantied, warrantying. n. 1. an act or an instance of warranting; assurance; authorization; ...
warranty deed
Law. a deed containing a covenant of warranty. Cf. quitclaim deed. [1770-80, Amer.] * * *
Warrau
or Guarauno Group of nomadic South American Indians who in modern times inhabit the swampy Orinoco River delta in Venezuela and areas eastward into Guyana. Some live in ...
warren
/wawr"euhn, wor"-/, n. 1. a place where rabbits breed or abound. 2. a building or area containing many tenants in limited or crowded quarters. [1350-1400; ME warenne < AF; OF ...
Warren
/wawr"euhn, wor"-/, n. 1. Earl, 1891-1974, U.S. lawyer and political leader: Chief Justice of the U.S. 1953-69. 2. Joseph, 1741-75, American physician, statesman, and patriot. 3. ...
Warren Beatty
➡ Beatty * * *
Warren Burger
➡ Burger * * *
Warren Commission
➡ Warren (I) * * * officially President's Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy (1963–64) Group appointed by Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson to investigate ...
Warren G Harding
➡ Harding * * *
Warren G. Harding: Inaugural Address
▪ Primary Source       Friday, March 4, 1921       When one surveys the world about him after the great storm, noting the marks of destruction and yet rejoicing ...
Warren G. Harding: The Return to Normalcy
▪ Primary Source       The Republican Party in 1920 turned its back on a number of strong contenders and—as his friend Harry Daugherty had predicted as early as ...
Warren Gamaliel Harding
➡ Harding * * *
Warren Hastings
➡ Hastings (II) * * *
Warren Mitchell
➡ Mitchell * * *
Warren Report
➡ Warren (I) * * *
Warren, Bertram Eugene
▪ American crystallographer born June 28, 1902, Waltham, Massachusetts, U.S. died June 27, 1991, Arlington       American crystallographer whose X-ray studies ...
Warren, Earl
born March 19, 1891, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died July 9, 1974, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist and politician. He graduated from law school at the University of California, ...
Warren, Harry
orig. Salvatore Guaragna born Dec. 24, 1893, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 22, 1981, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. songwriter. The youngest of 12 children, Warren was self-taught ...
Warren, J. Robin
▪ Australian physician born June 11, 1937, Adelaide, S.Aus., Austl.       Australian pathologist who was corecipient, with Barry J. Marshall (Marshall, Barry J.), of ...
Warren, Joseph
born June 11, 1741, Roxbury, Mass. died June 17, 1775, Bunker Hill, Mass. American Revolutionary leader. He was a physician in Boston. He was active in patriot causes after ...
Warren, Leonard
▪ American singer original name  Leonard Warenoff   born April 21, 1911, Bronx, New York City, N.Y., U.S. died March 4, 1960, New York City       American operatic ...
Warren, Mercy Otis
orig. Mercy Otis born Sept. 25, 1728, Barnstable, Mass. died Oct. 19, 1814, Plymouth, Mass., U.S. U.S. poet, dramatist, and historian. The sister of James Otis, she received ...
Warren, Rick
▪ 2005       The phenomenal influence of a book titled The Purpose-Driven Life won its author, Rick Warren, a reputation in 2004 as perhaps the most influential pastor ...
Warren, Robert Penn
born April 24, 1905, Guthrie, Ky., U.S. died Sept. 15, 1989, Stratton, Vt. U.S. novelist, poet, and critic. Warren attended Vanderbilt University, where he joined the ...
Warren,Earl
Warren, Earl. 1891-1974. American jurist who served as the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1953-1969). * * *
Warren,Joseph
Warren, Joseph. 1741-1775. American physician and patriot who instructed Paul Revere and William Dawes to make their ride to Lexington (April 18, 1775) and was killed in the ...
Warren,Robert Penn
Warren, Robert Penn. 1905-1989. American writer and critic primarily known for his poetry. His works include the novel All the King's Men (1946) and many poetry collections, such ...
warrener
/wawr"euh neuhr, wor"-/, n. the keeper of a rabbit warren. [1250-1300; ME; see WARREN, -ER1] * * *
Warrensburg
/wawr"inz berrg', wor"-/, n. a town in central Missouri. 13,807. * * * ▪ Missouri, United States       city, seat (1836) of Johnson county, west-central Missouri, U.S. ...
Warrensville Heights
/wawr"euhnz vil', wor"-/ a city in NE Ohio. 16,565. * * *
Warri
▪ Nigeria       town and port, Delta state, southern Nigeria. It lies along the Warri River in the western Niger River delta, 30 miles (48 km) upstream from the port of ...
Warrick, Ruth
▪ 2006       American actress (b. June 29, 1916, St. Joseph, Mo.—d. Jan. 15, 2005, New York, N.Y.), had her best screen role in the first of her more than 30 films ...
warrigal
/wawr"i geuhl/, Australian. n. 1. dingo. 2. any large or ferocious dog. 3. a wild horse. adj. 4. wild; ferocious; savage. [1840-50; < Dharuk wa-ri-gal wild dingo] * * *
Warring States
▪ Chinese history also called  Contending States , Chinese (Pinyin)  Zhanguo , or   (Wade-Giles romanization)  Chan-kuo        (475–221 BC), designation ...
Warring States period
Chinese Zhangou (475–221 BC) In Chinese history, a period in which small feuding kingdoms or fiefdoms struggled for supremacy. The period was dominated by seven or more small ...
Warrington
/wawr"ing teuhn, wor"-/, n. 1. a city in Cheshire, in NW England, on the Mersey River. 164,800. 2. a town in W Florida, on the Gulf of Mexico. 15,792. * * * ▪ city and ...
warrior
—warriorlike, adj. /wawr"ee euhr, wawr"yeuhr, wor"ee euhr, wor"yeuhr/, n. 1. a person engaged or experienced in warfare; soldier. 2. a person who shows or has shown great ...
Warriston, Archibald Johnston, Lord
▪ Scottish clergyman Warriston also spelled  Wariston   born 1611 died July 22, 1663, Edinburgh, Scot.       Scottish Presbyterian who was a leading anti-Royalist ...
Warrnambool
▪ Victoria, Australia       city, southwestern Victoria, Australia, on Lady Bay, near the mouth of Hopkins River. The bay, too shallow for modern ships, was first ...
warroom
war room n. A room in which strategic decisions, especially for a military or political campaign, are made. * * *
warrty.
warranty. * * *
Warrumbungle Range
▪ mountains, Australia       mountain chain in northern New South Wales, Australia. Extending northwest for 80 mi (130 km) and volcanic in origin, the massif rises ...
Wars of the Roses
Eng. Hist. the civil struggle between the royal house of Lancaster, whose emblem was a red rose, and the royal house of York, whose emblem was a white rose, beginning in 1455 and ...
Wars of Yahweh, Book of the
▪ biblical literature       lost document referred to and quoted in the Old Testament (Num. 21:14ff.). The book is probably a collection of early Israelite war songs ...
warsaw
/wawr"saw/, n. 1. Also called warsaw grouper. a large grouper, Epinephelus nigritus, found in the warmer waters of the Atlantic Ocean. 2. the jewfish, Epinephelus itajara, found ...
Warsaw
/wawr"saw/, n. 1. Polish, Warszawa. a city in and the capital of Poland, in the E central part, on the Vistula River. 1,436,000. 2. a town in N Indiana. 10,649. * * * I City ...


© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.091 c;