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Слова на букву unre-work (15990)

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Weaver, James B(aird)
born June 12, 1833, Dayton, Ohio, U.S. died Feb. 6, 1912, Des Moines, Iowa U.S. politician. An advocate of the Greenback movement, he was elected to the U.S. House of ...
Weaver, John
born July 21, 1673, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Eng. died Sept. 24, 1760, Shrewsbury English dancer and teacher, known as "the father of English pantomime. " From 1700 to 1736 he ...
Weaver, River
▪ river, England, United Kingdom       river rising on the boundary between the counties of Shropshire and Cheshire, England, and then flowing 45 miles (72 km) north to ...
Weaver, Robert C.
▪ United States government official in full  Robert Clifton Weaver   born December 29, 1907, Washington, D.C., U.S. died July 17, 1997, New York, New York       noted ...
Weaver, Sylvester Laflin, Jr.
▪ 2003 “Pat”        American television executive (b. Dec. 21, 1908, Los Angeles, Calif.—d. March 15, 2002, Santa Barbara, Calif.), revolutionized television ...
Weaver, Warren
born 1894, Reedsburg, Wisc., U.S. died 1978 U.S. mathematician. He studied at the University of Wisconsin, taught there (1920–32), and directed the Rockefeller Foundation's ...
weaver-finch
▪ bird       any of numerous songbirds belonging to the family Estrildidae (order Passeriformes), individually called grass finch, mannikin, and waxbill (qq.v.). They ...
weaverbird
/wee"veuhr berrd'/, n. any of numerous African and Asian finchlike birds of the family Ploceidae, noted for their elaborately woven nests and colonial habits. Also called weaver ...
Weavers, the
▪ American singing group  seminal American folksinging group of the late 1940s and '50s. The original members were Lee Hays (b. 1914, Little Rock, Ark., U.S.—d. Aug. 26, ...
weaving
Production of fabric by interlacing two sets of yarns so that they cross each other, normally at right angles, usually accomplished with a hand-or power-operated loom. In ...
web
—webless, adj. —weblike, adj. /web/, n., v., webbed, webbing. n. 1. something formed by or as if by weaving or interweaving. 2. a thin, silken material spun by spiders and ...
Web 2.0
▪ Internet       next envisioned iteration of the World Wide Web, in which the 2.0 appellation is used in analogy with common computer software naming conventions to ...
web foot
Furniture. a pad foot having the appearance of toes joined by a web. Also called duck foot. * * *
web frame
Naut. a deep transverse frame reinforcing the hull of a ship. Also called transverse. [1895-1900] * * *
web member
Civ. Engin. any of the structural members of a truss between the chords. [1885-90] * * *
web offset
web offset n. 1. a method of offset printing using a web press: cf. LETTERPRESS 2. matter printed by this method * * *
Web page
Computers. 1. a single, usually hypertext document on the World Wide Web that can incorporate text, graphics, sounds, etc. 2. See Web site. * * *
web press
Print. a press into which paper is fed automatically from a large roll. Cf. web (def. 13). [1870-75, Amer.] * * *
Web script
▪ programming language       a computer programming language for adding dynamic capabilities to World Wide Web pages. Web pages marked up with HTML (hypertext markup ...
Web site
Computers. a connected group of pages on the World Wide Web regarded as a single entity, usually maintained by one person or organization and devoted to one single topic or ...
web spinner
any of several slender insects, of the order Embioptera, that nest in colonies in silken webs spun with secretions from the enlarged front legs. Also called embiid. [1905-10] * * ...
web-fed
/web"fed'/, adj. (of a printing press) fed by and designed to print a continuous roll of paper. Cf. sheet-fed. [1945-50] * * *
web-footed
web-foot·ed (wĕbʹfo͝otʹĭd) adj. Having feet with webbed toes. * * *
web-toed
/web"tohd'/, adj. web-footed. * * *
Webb
/web/, n. (Martha) Beatrice (Potter), 1858-1943, and her husband, Sidney (James), 1st Baron Passfield /pas"feeld'/, 1859-1947, English economists, social reformers, authors, and ...
Webb, Chick
▪ American musician byname of  William Henry Webb   born Feb. 10, 1902/09, Baltimore, Md., U.S. died June 16, 1939, Baltimore       black American jazz drummer who ...
Webb, Clement Charles Julian
▪ British philosopher born June 25, 1865, London died Oct. 5, 1954, Pitchcott, Buckinghamshire, Eng.       English scholar and philosopher remembered for his ...
Webb, James Edwin
▪ American space program administrator born Oct. 7, 1906, Tally Ho, N.C., U.S. died March 27, 1992, Washington, D.C.  American public servant and administrator of the ...
Webb, Karrie
▪ 2001       While she was in no immediate danger of being mobbed by throngs of admirers, reporters, and photographers, Australian golfer Karrie Webb gained a reputation ...
Webb, Kate
▪ 2008 Catherine Merrial Webb        New Zealand-born journalist born March 24, 1943, Christchurch, N.Z. died May 13, 2007, Sydney, Australia in her role as a reporter ...
Webb, Mary
▪ British author née  Meredith   born March 25, 1881, Leighton-under-the-Wrekin, Shropshire, Eng. died Oct. 8, 1927, St. Leonards, Sussex  English novelist best known for ...
Webb, Philip Speakman
▪ British architect born Jan. 12, 1831, Oxford died April 17, 1915, Worth, Sussex, Eng.       architect and designer especially known for his unconventional country ...
Webb, Sidney (James) and Beatrice
Beatrice Webb orig. Martha Beatrice Potter born July 13, 1859, London, Eng. died Oct. 13, 1947, Liphook, Hampshire born Jan. 22, 1858, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, Eng. died ...
Webb, Sidney and Beatrice
▪ British economists Introduction in full respectively  Sidney James Webb, Baron Passfield of Passfield Corner , and  Martha Beatrice Webb,  née  Potter  Respectively, ...
Webb, William Henry
▪ American naval architect born June 19, 1816, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 30, 1899, New York, N.Y.       American naval architect, one of the most versatile and ...
Webb,Sidney James
Webb (wĕb), Sidney James. First Baron Passfield. 1859-1947. British sociologist and economist who was a founder of the London School of Economics (1895). He and his wife, ...
Webbe Shebeli
/web"ay shi bay"lee/. See Webi Shebeli. Also, Webbe Shibeli. * * *
webbed
/webd/, adj. 1. having the fingers or toes connected by a web or membrane: the webbed foot of a duck or beaver. 2. connected or joined by a web, as the fingers or toes. 3. formed ...
webbing
/web"ing/, n. 1. a strong, woven material of hemp, cotton, or jute, in bands of various widths, used for belts, carrying straps, harness, etc. 2. such woven bands nailed on ...
webbing clothes moth
a small brown moth, Tineola biselliella, the larva of which feeds on woolens and spins a web when feeding. * * *
webby
/web"ee/, adj., webbier, webbiest. 1. pertaining to, of the nature of, or resembling a web. 2. webbed. [1655-65; WEB + -Y1] * * *
webcam
Webcam [web′kam΄] n. 〚Web (see WEB, n. 8) + CAM(〛 a camera designed for use with a computer, as to transmit images, often, specif., live video images, over a website * * ...
webcast
Webcast [web′kast΄] n. 〚Web (see WEB, n. 8) + (〛 something, as a performance or other public event, transmitted for a large audience over the World Wide Web * * ...
Webcasting
—Webcast, n. /web"kas'ting, -kah'sting/, n. (often l.c.) the broadcasting of news, entertainment, etc., using the Internet, specifically the World Wide Web. [1995-2000; (WORLD ...
weber
/web"euhr, vay"beuhr/, n. Elect. the SI unit of magnetic flux and magnetic pole strength, equal to a flux that produces an electromotive force of one volt in a single turn of ...
Weber
/vay"beuhr/ or, Ger., /vay"beuhrdd/ for 1-3, 5; /web"euhr/ for 4, n. 1. Ernst Heinrich /erddnst huyn"rddikh/, 1795-1878, German physiologist. 2. Baron Karl Maria Friedrich Ernst ...
Weber and Fields
▪ American comedy team       American comedy team that was popular at the turn of the 20th century. Joe Weber (in full Joseph Weber; b. Aug. 11, 1867, New York, N.Y., ...
Weber State University
▪ university, Ogden, Utah, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ogden, Utah, U.S. It is part of the Utah System of Higher ...
Weber's law
or Weber-Fechner law In psychophysics, a historically important law quantifying the perception of change in a given stimulus. Originated by the German physiologist Ernst ...
Weber, Carl Maria (Friedrich Ernst) von
born Nov. 18, 1786, Eutin, Holstein died June 5, 1826, London, Eng. German composer. Son of a musician and a theatre manager, and first cousin to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's ...
Weber, Carl Maria von
▪ German composer and musician in full  Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst, Freiherr (baron) von Weber  born November 18, 1786, Eutin, Holstein [now in Germany] died June 5, 1826, ...
Weber, Dick
▪ 2006 Richard Anthony Weber  American bowler (b. Dec. 23, 1929, Indianapolis, Ind.—d. Feb. 14, 2005, Florissant, Mo.), reigned, along with Don Carter and Earl Anthony, as ...
Weber, Ernst
▪ American engineer born Sept. 6, 1901, Vienna, Austria died Feb. 15, 1996, Columbus, N.C., U.S.       Austrian-born American engineer who was a pioneer in the ...
Weber, Ernst Heinrich
▪ German physiologist born June 24, 1795, Wittenberg [Germany] died Jan. 26, 1878, Leipzig, Ger.       German anatomist and physiologist whose fundamental studies of ...
Weber, Eugen Joseph
▪ 2008       Romanian-born American historian born April 24, 1925, Bucharest, Rom. died May 17, 2007, Los Angeles, Calif. was a noted authority on modern ...
Weber, Joseph
▪ 2001       American physicist (b. May 17, 1919, Paterson, N.J.—d. Sept. 30, 2000, Pittsburgh, Pa.), pioneered research that led to the development of lasers and the ...
Weber, Lois
▪ American actress, producer, and director in full  Florence Lois Weber  born June 13, 1881, Allegheny [now in Pittsburgh], Pa., U.S. died Nov. 13, 1939, Los Angeles, ...
Weber, Max
born April 21, 1864, Erfurt, Prussia died June 14, 1920, Munich, Ger. German sociologist and political economist. Son of a wealthy liberal politician and a Calvinist mother, ...
Weber, Wilhelm Eduard
▪ German physicist born Oct. 24, 1804, Wittenberg, Ger. died June 23, 1891, Göttingen       German physicist who, with his friend Carl Friedrich Gauss (Gauss, Carl ...
Weber,Baron Karl Maria Friedrich Ernst von
Weber, Baron Karl Maria Friedrich Ernst von. 1786-1826. German composer who is considered the founder of German romantic opera. His works include Der Freischütz (1821). * * *
Weber,Ernst Heinrich
We·ber (vāʹbər), Ernst Heinrich. 1795-1878. German physiologist and psychologist who studied sensory response and is considered a founder of experimental psychology. * * *
Weber,Max
I. We·ber1 (vāʹbər), Max. 1864-1920. German sociologist and a pioneer of the modern analytical method of sociology. His works include The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of ...
Weberian apparatus
/vay bear"ee euhn/, n. (in certain fishes) a chain of small bones and ligaments connecting the inner ear with the air bladder. [1885-90; named after E. H. WEBER; see -IAN] * * ...
Webern
/vay"beuhrn/; Ger. /vay"beuhrddn/, n. Anton von /ahn"tohn feuhn/, 1883-1945, Austrian composer. * * *
Webern, Anton
▪ Austrian composer Introduction in full  Anton Friedrich Wilhelm von Webern  born Dec. 3, 1883, Vienna, Austria died Sept. 15, 1945, Mittersill, near ...
Webern, Anton (Friedrich Wilhelm von)
born Dec. 3, 1883, Vienna died Sept. 15, 1945, Mittersill, near Salzburg, Austria Austrian composer. He learned piano and cello as a child and earned a doctorate in musicology ...
Webern,Anton Friedrich Wilheim von
We·bern (vāʹbərn), Anton Friedrich Wilheim von. 1883-1945. Austrian composer whose works, characterized by brevity and tonal dissonance, include two symphonies and a ...
WeberRiver
We·ber River (wēʹbər) A river rising in northern Utah and flowing about 201 km (125 mi) generally northwest to join the Ogden River and empty into the Great Salt Lake. * * *
webfoot
—web-footed, adj. /web"foot'/, n., pl. webfeet. 1. a foot with the toes joined by a web. 2. (cap.) a native or inhabitant of Oregon (used as a nickname). 3. an animal with ...
Webfoot State
Oregon (used as a nickname). * * *
webh-
To weave, also to move quickly. Derivatives include web, weevil, and wobble. 1. weave, woof1, from Old English wefan, to weave, from Germanic *weban. 2. weft, from Old English ...
Webi Shebeli
/way"bee shi bay"lee/ a river in E Africa, flowing SE from central Ethiopia to the Juba River, in the Somali Republic. ab. 700 mi. (1125 km) long. Also, Webbe Shebeli, Webbe ...
Webmaster
/web"mas'teuhr, -mah'steuhr/ n. Computers. (often l.c.) a person who designs or maintains a Web site. [1995-2000; (WORLD WIDE) WEB + MASTER] * * *
webmember
web member n. One of the structural elements connecting the top and bottom flanges of a lattice girder or the outside members of a truss. * * *
webpage
web·page or Web page (wĕbʹpāj') n. A document on the World Wide Web, consisting of an HTML file and any related files for scripts and graphics, and often hyperlinked to ...
webpress
web press n. A rotary press that prints on a continuous roll of paper. * * *
website
website [web′sīt΄] n. [occas.W-] a location on the World Wide Web, consisting of one or more Web pages accessible at a single address: also web (or Web) site * * * web·site ...
webspinner
web spinner n. Any of various social insects of the order Embioptera, having two-winged males and wingless females, both of which produce silk from glands in the front legs. * * ...
webster
/web"steuhr/, n. Archaic. a weaver. [bef. 1100; ME; OE webbestre. See WEB, -STER] * * * (as used in expressions) Webster Benjamin Francis Webster Daniel Webster John Webster ...
Webster
/web"steuhr/, n. 1. Daniel, 1782-1852, U.S. statesman and orator. 2. John, c1580-1625?, English dramatist. 3. Margaret, 1905-72, British stage director, producer, and actress, ...
Webster City
▪ Iowa, United States       city, seat (1856) of Hamilton county, central Iowa, U.S., on the Boone River, 17 miles (27 km) east of Fort Dodge. It was settled in 1850 ...
Webster Groves
a city in E Missouri, near St. Louis. 23,097. * * *
Webster, Ben
▪ American musician in full  Benjamin Francis Webster  born March 27, 1909, Kansas City, Mo., U.S. died Sept. 20, 1973, Amsterdam, Neth.       American jazz ...
Webster, Ben(jamin Francis)
born March 27, 1909, Kansas City, Mo., U.S. died Sept. 20, 1973, Amsterdam, Neth. U.S. tenor saxophonist. Influenced by Coleman Hawkins and Johnny Hodges, he played in several ...
Webster, Daniel
born Jan. 18, 1782, Salisbury, N.H., U.S. died Oct. 24, 1852, Marshfield, Mass. U.S. lawyer and politician. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1813–17). After ...
Webster, Jack
▪ 2000       Scottish-born Canadian broadcaster whose combative interview style made him a huge success on radio and television open-line shows; from the late 1970s to ...
Webster, Jean
▪ American writer original name  Alice Jane Chandler Webster   born July 24, 1876, Fredonia, N.Y., U.S. died June 11, 1916, New York, N.Y.       American writer who ...
Webster, John
born с 1580, London, Eng. died с 1632 British playwright. Little is known of his life, but he may have been an actor who began writing plays later in his career. He ...
Webster, Marie
▪ American quilter née  Marie Daugherty  born July 19, 1859, Wabash, Indiana, U.S. died August 29, 1956, Princeton, New Jersey       American quilt designer and ...
Webster, Michael Lewis
▪ 2003 “Mike”        American football player (b. March 18, 1952, Tomahawk, Wis.—d. Sept. 24, 2002, Pittsburgh, Pa.), anchored a formidable offensive line that ...
Webster, Noah
born Oct. 16, 1758, West Hartford, Conn., U.S. died May 28, 1843, New Haven, Conn. U.S. lexicographer and writer. He attended Yale University and then studied law. While ...
Webster,Daniel
Web·ster (wĕbʹstər), Daniel. 1782-1852. American politician. A U.S. representative from New Hampshire (1813-1817) and later a representative (1823-1827) and senator ...
Webster,John
Webster, John. 1580?-1625?. English playwright whose works include The White Devil (published 1612) and The Duchess of Malfi (c. 1613). * * *
Webster,Noah
Webster, Noah. 1758-1843. American lexicographer whose Spelling Book (1783) helped standardize American spelling. His major work, An American Dictionary of the English Language, ...
Webster-Ashburton Treaty
/web"steuhr ash"berr tn/ U.S. Hist. an agreement between the U.S. and England (1842) defining the boundary between British and American territory from Maine to present-day ...
Websterian
/web stear"ee euhn/, adj. 1. pertaining to or characteristic of Daniel Webster, his political theories, or his oratory. 2. pertaining to or characteristic of Noah Webster or his ...
websterite
/web"steuh ruyt'/, n. Mineral. aluminite. [named after T. Webster, 19th-century Englishman; see -ITE1] * * *
Webster–Ashburton Treaty
▪ United States-United Kingdom [1842]       (1842), treaty between the U.S. and Great Britain establishing the northeastern boundary of the U.S. and providing for ...
webworm
/web"werrm'/, n. the larva of any of several moths, as Hyphantria cunea (fall webworm) or Loxostege similalis (garden webworm), which spins a web over the foliage on which it ...
Wechsler Scales
/weks"leuhr/, Psychol. a group of intelligence tests, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), later revised (WAIS-R); the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children ...
Wechsler, David
▪ American psychologist born January 12, 1896, Lespedi, Romania died May 2, 1981, New York, New York, U.S.       American psychologist and inventor of several widely ...
Wechsler, Herbert
▪ 2001       American lawyer and legal scholar (b. Dec. 4, 1909, New York, N.Y.—d. April 26, 2000, New York), as director of the American Law Institute, he created a ...
wed
/wed/, v., wedded or wed, wedding. v.t. 1. to marry (another person) in a formal ceremony; take as one's husband or wife. 2. to unite (a couple) in marriage or wedlock; marry. 3. ...
wed-
I. wed-1 Water; wet. Derivatives include water, hydrant, redundant, otter, and vodka. 1. Suffixed o-grade form *wod-ōr. a. water, from Old English wæter, water; b. ...
Wed.
Wednesday. * * *
wedded
/wed"id/, adj. 1. united in matrimony; married: the wedded couple; a wedded woman. 2. of or pertaining to marriage or to those married: the wedded state; wedded happiness. 3. ...
Weddell Sea
/wed"l, weuh del"/ an arm of the Atlantic, E of Antarctic Peninsula. * * * ▪ sea, Atlantic Ocean       deep embayment of the Antarctic coastline that forms the ...
Weddell seal
▪ mammal  nonmigratory earless seal (family Phocidae) found around the South Pole, on or near the coast of Antarctica. The Weddell seal is a rotund animal that grows to ...
Weddell, James
▪ British explorer born Aug. 24, 1787, Ostend, Austrian Netherlands died Sept. 9, 1834, London       British explorer and seal hunter who set a record for navigation ...
WeddellSea
Wed·dell Sea (wĭ-dĕlʹ, wĕdʹl) A sea of the southern Atlantic Ocean off western Antarctica east of the Antarctic Peninsula. It is named for James Weddell (1787-1834), a ...
Weddigen, Otto
▪ German naval officer born Sept. 15, 1882, Herford, Westphalia, Ger. died March 18, 1915, at sea off the Moray Firth, Scotland  German submarine commander whose feat of ...
wedding
/wed"ing/, n. 1. the act or ceremony of marrying; marriage; nuptials. 2. the anniversary of a marriage, or its celebration: They invited guests to their silver wedding. 3. the ...
wedding anniversary
the annual commemoration of a couple's marriage: a tenth wedding anniversary. [1690-1700] * * *
wedding cake
1. a white cake, traditionally in tiered layers, covered with white icing and decorated. 2. (in England) a fruit cake, similar in appearance. [1640-50] * * *
wedding chest
an ornamented chest for a trousseau. [1870-75] * * *
wedding day
1. the day of a wedding. 2. the anniversary of a wedding. [1545-55] * * *
wedding march
a musical composition played during a wedding procession. [1840-50] * * *
wedding ring
1. a ring, usually of gold, platinum, or silver, given to the bride by the groom during a marriage ceremony. 2. a ring similarly given to the groom by the bride. Also called ...
wedding-cake
/wed"ing kayk'/, adj. highly ornate or overly elaborate: wedding-cake architecture. [1875-80] * * *
weddingband
wedding band n. See wedding ring. * * *
weddingring
wedding ring n. A ring, often one of a pair of plain gold or platinum bands, given during the wedding ceremony by the groom or bride to his or her future spouse. Also called ...
Wedekind
/vay"deuh kint'/, n. Frank /frddahngk/, 1864-1918, German poet and dramatist. * * *
Wedekind, Frank
orig. Benjamin Franklin Wedekind born July 24, 1864, Hannover, Hanover died March 9, 1918, Munich, Ger. German actor and playwright. He lived in Switzerland (1872–84) and ...
wedel
/vayd"l/, v.i. to engage in wedeln. [1960-65; back formation from WEDELN] * * *
Wedel-Jarlsberg, Herman, Count
▪ Norwegian statesman (Landgreve) born Sept. 2, 1779, Montpellier, Fr. died Aug. 27, 1840, Christiania, Nor.       Norwegian patriot and statesman. He was the leading ...
wedeln
/vayd"ln/, n. a skiing technique first developed in Austria in the 1950s that consists of high-speed turns made in succession with both skis parallel while not noticeably setting ...
Wedemeyer, Albert C(oady)
born July 9, 1897, Omaha, Neb., U.S. died Dec. 17, 1989, Ft. Belvoir, Va. U.S. army officer. He graduated from West Point and served in China, the Philippines, and Europe until ...
Wedemeyer, Albert Coady
▪ United States general and statesman born July 9, 1897, Omaha, Neb., U.S. died Dec. 17, 1989, Ft. Belvoir, Va.       American military leader who was the principal ...
wedge
—wedgelike, adj. /wej/, n., v., wedged, wedging. n. 1. a piece of hard material with two principal faces meeting in a sharply acute angle, for raising, holding, or splitting ...
wedge heel
a heel formed by a roughly triangular or wedgelike piece that extends from the front or middle to the back of the sole, used on women's shoes. * * *
wedge issue
an issue that divides or causes conflict in an otherwise unified group: Abortion is a wedge issue for the Republican party. [1990-95] * * *
wedged
/wejd/, adj. having the shape of a wedge. [1545-55; WEDGE + -ED3] * * *
wedgeissue
wedge issue n. A sharply divisive political issue, especially one that is raised by a candidate or party in hopes of attracting or disaffecting a portion of an opponent's ...
wedgetomb
wedge tomb n. A Neolithic chamber tomb found chiefly in the British Isles that narrows from the entrance to the back. * * *
wedgie
/wej"ee/, n. 1. Often, wedgies. a shoe with a wedge heel. 2. Informal. the condition of having one's underpants or other clothing uncomfortably stuck between the buttocks. [WEDGE ...
Wedgwood
/wej"wood'/, n. 1. Josiah, 1730-95, English potter. 2. Trademark. a brand of ceramic ware made by Josiah Wedgwood and his successors. * * *
Wedgwood blue
—Wedgwood-blue, adj. a blue-gray color, esp. one characteristic of Wedgwood ceramic ware. [1895-1900] * * *
Wedgwood ware
English stoneware made by Staffordshire factories originally established by Josiah Wedgwood. Creamware appealed to the middle class because of its high quality, durability, and ...
Wedgwood, Dame Veronica
▪ 1998       , British historian (b. July 20, 1910, Stocksfield, Northumberland, Eng.—d. March 9, 1997, London. Eng.), was one of Great Britain's most distinguished ...
Wedgwood, Josiah
(baptized July 12, 1730, Burslem, Staffordshire, Eng. died Jan. 3, 1795, Etruria, Staffordshire) British pottery designer and manufacturer. His family had been potters since the ...
Wedgwood,Josiah
Wedgwood, Josiah. 1730-1795. British potter who improved the materials and processes of pottery. The wares from his factory (founded 1759) are among the finest examples of ...
Wedgwood{™}
n [U] fine English pottery and china made by the company established in 1759 by Josiah Wedgwood (1730–95) near Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire. Its most characteristic design ...
wedgy
/wej"ee/, adj., wedgier, wedgiest. resembling a wedge; wedgelike. [1790-1800; WEDGE + -Y1] * * *
wedlock
/wed"lok'/, n. the state of marriage; matrimony. [bef. 1100; ME wedlok, OE wedlac lit., a pledging, equiv. to wed pledge (see WED) + -lac verbal n. suffix] * * *
Wednesday
/wenz"day, -dee/, n. the fourth day of the week, following Tuesday. [bef. 950; ME Wednesdai, OE *Wednesdaeg, mutated var. of Wodnesdaeg Woden's day; c. D Woensdag, Dan onsdag; ...
Wednesdays
/wenz"dayz, -deez/, adv. on or during Wednesdays; every Wednesday. [see WEDNESDAY, -S1] * * *
wee
/wee/, adj., weer, weest. 1. little; very small. 2. very early: in the wee hours of the morning. [bef. 1150 for an earlier sense; ME we, var. of wei (small) quantity, OE weg, ...
Wee Frees
➡ Free Church of Scotland * * *
wee hours
wee hours n. the first few hours after midnight * * *
wee small hours
wee small hours n. the hours just after midnight * * *
Wee Willie Winkie
a character in a traditional nursery rhyme. The words are: Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town, Upstairs and downstairs in his nightgown, Rapping at the window, crying ...
wee-wee
wee-wee [wē′wē΄] vt. wee-weed, wee-weeing 〚baby talk〛 to urinate n. urine: A child's term * * *
weed
weed1 —weedless, adj. —weedlike, adj. /weed/, n. 1. a valueless plant growing wild, esp. one that grows on cultivated ground to the exclusion or injury of the desired ...
Weed
/weed/, n. Thurlow /therr"loh/, 1797-1882, U.S. journalist and politician. * * * Any plant growing where it is not wanted. On land under cultivation, weeds compete with crops ...
weed burner.
See flame cultivator. * * *
weed cutter
a hand implement, often powered by electricity or a gasoline motor, for cutting weeds or trimming grass and often utilizing a rotating nylon cord as the cutting ...
Weed, Thurlow
born Nov. 15, 1797, Cairo, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1882, New York, N.Y. U.S. journalist and politician. He worked on various newspapers in upstate New York and was a leader in ...
weed-killer
/weed"kil'euhr/, n. a herbicide. [1885-90] * * *
weeder
/wee"deuhr/, n. 1. a person who removes weeds, as from a garden or lawn. 2. a device, as a tool or machine, for removing weeds. [1400-50; late ME; see WEED1, -ER1] * * *
weedily
See weedy. * * *
weediness
See weedily. * * *
weedkiller
weedkiller [wēd′kil΄ər] n. HERBICIDE * * *
weedy
—weedily, adv. —weediness, n. /wee"dee/, adj., weedier, weediest. 1. full of or abounding in weeds. 2. consisting of or pertaining to weeds. 3. (of a plant, flower, etc.) ...
Weegee
▪ American photographer byname of  Arthur Fellig , original name  Usher Fellig  born June 12, 1899, Złoczew, Austria-Hungary [now in Poland] died Dec. 26, 1968, New York, ...
Weehawken
▪ New Jersey, United States       township, Hudson county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S. It lies 5 miles (8 km) north of Jersey City and opposite New York City on the ...
week
/week/, n. 1. a period of seven successive days, usually understood as beginning with Sunday and ending with Saturday. 2. a period of seven successive days that begins with or ...
weekday
/week"day'/, n. 1. any day of the week except Sunday or, often, Saturday and Sunday. adj. 2. of or on a weekday: weekday occupations. [bef. 900; ME; OE wicdaeg. See WEEK, DAY] * ...
weekdays
/week"dayz'/, adv. every day, esp. Monday through Friday, during the workweek: Weekdays we're open from nine till five. [see WEEK, DAY, -S1] * * *
weekend
/week"end', -end"/, n. 1. the end of a week, esp. the period of time between Friday evening and Monday morning: We spent the weekend at Virginia Beach. 2. this period as extended ...
weekend bag
weekender (def. 3). [1920-25] * * *
weekend warrior
Slang. a reservist who attends weekend meetings of his or her unit in order to fulfill military obligations. * * *
weekender
/week"en'deuhr/, n. 1. a person who goes on a weekend vacation. 2. a weekend guest. 3. a traveling bag large enough to carry the clothing and personal articles needed for a ...
weekends
/week"endz'/, adv. every weekend; on or during weekends: We go fishing weekends. [1875-80; WEEKEND + -S1] * * *
Weeki Wachee Spring
▪ spring, Florida, United States       spring and tourist attraction in Hernando county, west-central Florida, U.S., 55 miles (90 km) north of St. Petersburg (Saint ...
Weekley
/week"lee/, n. Ernest, 1865-1954, English etymologist and lexicographer. * * *
weeklong
weeklong [wēk′lôŋ′] adj. continuing for a full week * * * week·long (wēkʹlông', -lŏng') adj. Continuing through the week: a weeklong conference. * * *
weekly
/week"lee/, adj., adv., n., pl. weeklies. adj. 1. done, happening, appearing, etc., once a week, or every week: a weekly appointment with an analyst. 2. computed or determined by ...
Weekly Worker
a weekly newspaper published by the Communist Party of Britain since 1993. The party’s original newspaper was the The Daily Worker (1930–1945). See also Morning Star. See ...
weeknight
/week"nuyt'/, n. 1. any night of the week, usually except Saturday and Sunday. adj. 2. Also, weeknightly /week"nuyt'lee/. of, on, or for a weeknight: the weeknight lineup of TV ...
weeknights
See weeknight. * * *
Weelkes, Thomas
(baptized Oct. 25, 1576, Elsted, Sussex?, Eng. died Nov. 30, 1623, London) British composer and organist. He published his first book of madrigals in 1597 and was appointed ...
Weems
/weemz/, n. Mason Locke ("Parson Weems"), 1759-1825, U.S. clergyman and biographer. * * *
Weems, Mason Locke
▪ United States minister and writer byname  Parson Weems   born Oct. 11, 1759, Anne Arundel county, Md. [U.S.] died May 23, 1825, Beaufort, S.C.       American ...
Weems,Mason Locke
Weems (wēmz), Mason Locke. Known as “Parson Weems.” 1759-1825. American clergyman and writer known for his laudatory fictionalized biography of George Washington (1800), a ...
ween
/ween/, v.t., v.i. Archaic. 1. to think; suppose. 2. to expect, hope, or intend. [bef. 900; ME wenen, OE wenan to expect; c. G wähnen to imagine, ON vaena, Goth wenjan to hope, ...
weenie
/wee"nee/, n. 1. Informal. a wiener. 2. Slang. penis. 3. Slang. an insignificant, disliked person. Also, weeny, wienie. [WIEN(ER) + -IE; (def. 3) prob. influenced by or ...
Weenix, Jan Baptist
▪ Dutch painter also spelled  Jan Baptiste Weeninx   born 1621, Amsterdam died Oct. 6, 1663, Doetinchem, Neth.       conventional painter of Italianate landscapes, ...
weeny
/wee"nee/, n., pl. weenies. Informal. weenie. * * *
weep
weep1 /weep/, v., wept, weeping, n. v.i. 1. to express grief, sorrow, or any overpowering emotion by shedding tears; shed tears; cry: to weep for joy; to weep with rage. 2. to ...
weep hole
Building Trades. a hole in a sill, retaining wall, or the like for draining off accumulated moisture, as from condensation or seepage. [1850-55; alter. of weeping-hole] * * *
weeper
/wee"peuhr/, n. 1. a person who weeps. 2. (formerly) a hired mourner at a funeral. 3. something worn as a badge of mourning, as a widow's black veil. 4. a wine bottle that has ...
weepie
/wee"pee/, n. Brit. Informal. a tearjerker; weeper. [1925-30; WEEP1 + -IE] * * *
weeping
—weepingly, adv. /wee"ping/, adj. 1. expressing grief, sorrow, or any overwhelming emotion by shedding tears: weeping multitudes. 2. tearful; weepy: a weeping fit. 3. tending ...
weeping fig
a small tree, Ficus benjamina, of the mulberry family, native to southeastern Asia and Australia, having drooping branches and glossy leaves: widely cultivated as a houseplant. ...
weeping golden bell
a Chinese shrub, Forsythia suspensa, of the olive family, having long, arching, pendulous, hollow branches that root at the tip in age, and golden-yellow flowers. Also called ...
weeping lovegrass.
See under lovegrass. * * *
weeping myall.
See under myall. [1895-1900] * * *
weeping willow
an Asian willow, Salix babylonica, characterized by the drooping habit of its branches. [1725-35] * * *
weepingwillow
weeping willow n. A widely cultivated deciduous tree (Salix babylonica) native to China, having long slender drooping branches and narrow leaves. * * *
weepy
—weepiness, n. /wee"pee/, adj., weepier, weepiest. 1. weeping or tending to weep; tearful; lachrymose. 2. Informal. sad or sentimental, esp. to the point of causing one to ...
weer
we·er (wēʹər) adj. Comparative of wee. * * *
Weese, Harry M.
▪ American architect in full  Harry Mohr Weese  born June 30, 1915, Evanston, Ill., U.S. died Oct. 29, 1998, Manteno, Ill.  American architect of the Chicago school who ...
Weese, Harry Mohr
▪ 1999       American architect (b. June 30, 1915, Evanston, Ill.—d. Oct. 29, 1998, Manteno, Ill.), designed the subway system in Washington, D.C., considered one of ...
weest
we·est (wēʹĭst) adj. Superlative of wee. * * *
Weetabix{™}
n [U, C] (pl Weetabix) a popular breakfast cereal made from processed wheat formed into blocks. These are usually eaten with milk and sugar: Would you like some Weetabix? I ...
weever
/wee"veuhr/, n. 1. either of two small, European, marine fishes of the genus Trachinus, T. draco (greater weever) or T. vipera (lesser weever), having highly poisonous dorsal ...
weevil
/wee"veuhl/, n. 1. Also called snout beetle. any of numerous beetles of the family Curculionidae, which have the head prolonged into a snout and which are destructive to nuts, ...
weevily
/wee"veuh lee/, adj. infested with weevils. Also, weevilly, weeviled, weevilled /wee"veuhld/. [1750-60; WEEVIL + -Y1] * * *
weewee
/wee"wee'/, n., v., weeweed, weeweeing. Baby Talk. n. 1. urine. v.i. 2. to urinate. Also, wee-wee. [1925-30] * * *
Wefers, Bernard J., Sr.
▪ American athlete byname  Bernie Wefers   born Feb. 19, 1873, Lawrence, Mass., U.S. died April 18, 1957, New York, N.Y.       American sprinter who held the world ...
weft
/weft/, n. 1. Textiles. filling (def. 5). 2. a woven fabric or garment. [bef. 900; ME, OE; akin to WEAVE] * * *
weft ikat.
See under ikat. * * *
weft knitting
a knitting process in which the yarn is knitted horizontally and in a circular form. Also called filling knitting. Cf. warp knitting. * * *
weft-knitted
/weft"nit'id/, adj. noting or pertaining to a fabric made by weft knitting. Also, weft-knit. [1940-45] * * *
weftwise
/weft"wuyz'/, adv. Textiles. in a horizontal direction; from selvage to selvage; crosswise. [WEFT + -WISE] * * *
weg-
To be strong, be lively. Oldest form *weg̑-, becoming *weg- in centum languages. Derivatives include watch, vigilante, reveille, and velocity. 1. Suffixed o-grade form *wog-ē-. ...
Wegener
/vay"geuh neuhrdd/, n. Alfred Lothar /ahl"frddayt loh"tahrdd, loh tahrdd"/, 1880-1930, German meteorologist and geophysicist: originated theory of continental drift. * * *
Wegener granulomatosis
▪ pathology       uncommon disorder characterized by inflammation and degeneration of small blood vessels (blood vessel). The disease usually occurs in mid-adult life. ...
Wegener, Alfred (Lothar)
born Nov. 1, 1880, Berlin, Ger. died Nov. 1930, Greenland German meteorologist and geophysicist. After earning a Ph.D. in astronomy (1905), he became interested in ...
Wegener, Alfred Lothar
▪ German scientist born Nov. 1, 1880, Berlin, Ger. died November 1930, Greenland       German meteorologist and geophysicist who formulated the first complete statement ...
Wegener,Alfred Lothar
We·ge·ner (vāʹgə-nər), Alfred Lothar. 1880-1930. German geophysicist, meteorologist, and explorer who proposed the theory of continental drift. * * *
wegh-
To go, transport in a vehicle. Oldest form *weg̑h-, becoming *wegh- in centum languages. Derivatives include weight, away, wagon, earwig, devious, trivial, and vex. 1. weigh1, ...
Wegner, Hans Jorgen
▪ 2008       Danish furniture designer born April 2, 1914 , Tønder, Jutland, Den. died Jan. 26, 2007, Copenhagen, Den. designed sculpturally elegant yet functional ...
Wehlau, Treaty of
▪ Poland [1657] Wehlau also spelled  Welawa        (Sept. 19, 1657), agreement in which John Casimir, king of Poland from 1648 to 1668, renounced the suzerainty of ...
Wehling, Ulrich
▪ German skier born July 8, 1952, East Germany       German skier who was the only three-time winner of the Nordic combined (two ski jumps totaled, plus a 15-km race) ...
Wehrmacht
/vair"mahkht'/; Ger. /vayrdd"mahkht'/, n. the German armed forces of the years prior to and during World War II. [ < G, equiv. to Wehr defense + Macht force] * * *
Wei
/way/, n. any of several dynasties that ruled in North China, esp. one ruling A.D. 220-265 and one ruling A.D. 386-534. * * * (as used in expressions) wei ch'i Jiang Wei K'ang ...
Wei dynasty
▪ Chinese history [386-534/535] Chinese in full (Pinyin)  Bei Wei , or  (Wade-Giles romanization)  Pei Wei , English  Northern Wei , also called  Tabgatch , or ...
Wei River
River, north-central China. It rises in the mountains of southeastern Gansu province and flows east through Shaanxi province to join the Huang He (Yellow River). It is 537 mi ...
Wei Yuan
▪ Chinese historian Wade-Giles romanization  Wei Yüan  born April 23, 1794, Shaoyang, Hunan province, China died March 26, 1857, Hangzhou, Zhejiang ...
Wei Zhongxian
or Wei Chung-hsien born 1568, Suning, Heibei province, China died 1627, Anhui province Eunuch who dominated the Chinese government in 1624–27. As a close companion to the ...
wei-
To turn, twist; with derivatives referring to suppleness or binding. Also weiə- (earlier *weiə₁-). Derivatives include wire, vise, and iris. I. Form *wei-. 1. a. wire, from ...
Weichsel
/vuyk"seuhl/, n. Vistula. * * *
Weichsel Glacial Stage
▪ paleontology also called  Vistula Glacial Stage,         major division of late Pleistocene deposits and time in western Europe (the Pleistocene Epoch began about ...
weid-
To see. Derivatives include guide, wisdom, kaleidoscope, Hades, unwitting, envy, idea, history, and penguin. I. Full-grade form *weid-. 1. a. twit, from Old English wītan, to ...
Weidenreich, Franz
▪ German anthropologist born June 7, 1873, Edenkoben, Ger. died July 11, 1948, New York, N.Y., U.S.       German anatomist and physical anthropologist whose ...
Weider, Ben
▪ 2009       Canadian bodybuilding entrepreneur born Feb. 1, 1923, Montreal, Que. died Oct. 17, 2008, Montreal cofounded (1946) the International Federation of Body ...
Weidman
/wuyd"meuhn/, n. 1. Charles Edward, Jr., 1901-75, U.S. dancer, choreographer, and teacher. 2. Jerome, born 1913, U.S. author. * * *
Weidman, Charles
orig. Charles Edward Weidman, Jr. born July 22, 1901, Lincoln, Neb., U.S. died July 15, 1975, New York, N.Y. U.S. modern dancer, teacher, and choreographer. He studied at the ...
Weidman, Jerome
▪ 1999       American author (b. April 4, 1913, New York, N.Y.—d. Oct. 6, 1998, New York), created novels, short stories, and plays in which he presented a harsh and ...
Weierstrass
/vuy"euhr strahs', -shtrahs'/; Ger. /vuy"euhrdd shtrddahs'/, n. Karl Theodor /kahrddl tay"oh dawrdd'/, 1815-97, German mathematician. * * *
Weierstrass approximation theorem
Math. the theorem that for any continuous function on a closed interval, there is a polynomial such that the difference in values of the function and the polynomial at each point ...
Weierstrass, Karl
▪ German mathematician born October 31, 1815, Ostenfelde, Bavaria [Germany] died February 19, 1897, Berlin       German mathematician, one of the founders of the modern ...
Weierstrass, Karl (Theodor Wilhelm)
born Oct. 31, 1815, Ostenfelde, Bavaria died Feb. 19, 1897, Berlin German mathematician. He taught principally at the University of Berlin (from 1856). After many years of ...
Weierstrass,Karl Theodor Wilhelm
Wei·er·strass (vīʹər-sträs' -shträs'), Karl Theodor Wilhelm. 1815-1897. German mathematician. Noted for his contributions to real and complex analysis, he was the first ...
Weifang
/way"fahng"/, n. Wade-Giles, Pinyin. a city in N Shandong province, in NE China. 260,000. * * * ▪ China Wade-Giles romanization  Wei-fang        city, east-central ...
weig-
See weik-2. * * *
weigela
/wuy gee"leuh, -jee"-, wuy"geuh leuh/, n. any of various shrubby, eastern Asian plants belonging to the genus Weigela, of the honeysuckle family, having funnel-shaped white, ...
weigh
weigh1 —weighable, adj. —weigher, n. /way/, v.t. 1. to determine or ascertain the force that gravitation exerts upon (a person or thing) by use of a balance, scale, or other ...
weigh-in
/way"in'/, n. Sports. the act or an instance of weighing in: After the weigh-in the fighters posed for photographers. [1865-70; n. use of v. phrase weigh in] * * *
weighable
See weigh1. * * *
weighbridge
/way"brij'/, n. a platform scale that stands flush with a road and is used for weighing trucks, livestock, etc. [1790-1800; WEIGH + BRIDGE1] * * *
weigher
See weighable. * * *
weighman
/way"meuhn/, n., pl. weighmen. 1. a person whose occupation is weighing goods, produce, etc. 2. Mining. a person who weighs coal extracted from a mine, esp. in mines where miners ...
weight
—weighter, n. /wayt/, n. 1. the amount or quantity of heaviness or mass; amount a thing weighs. 2. Physics. the force that gravitation exerts upon a body, equal to the mass of ...
weight belt
Scuba Diving. a belt worn to control a diver's buoyancy under water, on which slotted lead weights can be slipped according to the diver's body size and weight and having a ...
weight density
the weight per unit volume of a substance or object. * * *
weight for age
Horse Racing. the poundage assigned to be borne by a horse in a race, based on the age of the horse. * * *
weight lifting
weight lifting n. the athletic exercise or competitive sport of lifting barbells: also written weightlifting weight lifter n. weightlifter * * * Sport in which barbells are ...
weight room
weight room n. any room equipped with weights, exercise machines, etc., as for athletes in a school * * *
weight throw
▪ sport       sport of throwing a weight for distance or height. Men have long matched strength and skill at hurling objects. The roth cleas, or wheel feat, reputedly ...
weight training
weightlifting done as a conditioning exercise. * * * System of conditioning involving lifting weights, especially for strength and endurance. It may include the use of barbells ...
Weight Watchers{™}
an organization in both Britain and the US that gives advice and special classes for people who are worried that they are too fat and want to lose weight. It advises customers on ...
weight-watcher
—weight-watching, adj., n. /wayt"woch'euhr/, n. a person who is dieting to control his or her weight. [1965-70] * * *
weighted
—weightedly, adv. —weightedness, n. /way"tid/, adj. 1. having additional weight. 2. burdened: weighted with sorrow. 3. adjusted or adapted to a representative value, esp. in ...


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