Слова на букву unre-work (15990) Universalium
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Universalium →  !kun-arti arti-boom boom-chri chri-de k de k-enol enol-gano gano-hipp hipp-john john-lowe lowe-moth moth-oik oil-pius pius-ramp ramp-schw schw-stag stag-tils tils-unre unre-work


Слова на букву unre-work (15990)

<< < 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 > >>
Wels
▪ Austria       city, north-central Austria. It lies along the Traun River at the foothills of the Eastern Alps, southwest of Linz. The site has been occupied since ...
wels
▪ fish also called  waller (species Silurus glanis)   large, voracious catfish of the family Siluridae, native to large rivers and lakes from central Europe to western ...
Welsbach burner
/welz"bak, -bahk/; Ger. /vels"bahkh/, Trademark. a brand of gaslight consisting essentially of a Bunsen burner on which an incombustible mantle (Welsbach mantle) composed of ...
Welsbach, Carl Auer, Freiherr von
▪ Austrian chemist and engineer (baron of) born Sept. 1, 1858, Vienna died Aug. 4, 1929, Treibach, Austria       Austrian chemist and engineer who invented the gas ...
Welsbachburner
Wels·bach burner (wĕlzʹbăk', -bäk') A trademark used for a lamp consisting of a gas burner and a gauze mantle impregnated with cerium and thorium compounds that becomes ...
Welser Family
▪ German bankers family of German merchants, most prominent from the 15th to the 17th century. It first became important in the 15th century, when the brothers Bartholomew ...
welsh
—welsher, n. /welsh, welch/, v.i. Informal (sometimes offensive). 1. to cheat by failing to pay a gambling debt: You aren't going to welsh on me, are you? 2. to go back on ...
Welsh
/welsh, welch/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to Wales, its people, or their language. n. 2. the inhabitants of Wales and their descendants elsewhere. 3. Also called Cymric, Kymric. ...
Welsh Administration Ombudsman
➡ Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration * * *
Welsh Assembly
(also fml the National Assembly for Wales) a separate parliament for Wales, based in Cardiff. It is made up of 60 Assembly Members. Forty of them are directly elected to ...
Welsh cob
Welsh cob n. any of a breed of medium-sized riding horse, developed in Wales, with a thickset body and relatively short legs * * *
Welsh corgi
one of either of two Welsh breeds of dogs having short legs, erect ears, and a foxlike head. Cf. Cardigan (def. 2), Pembroke (def. 3). [1925-30] * * * Either of two breeds of ...
Welsh dragon
a red dragon which is the official symbol of Wales and appears on the Welsh flag. * * *
Welsh dresser
Eng. Furniture. a sideboard having drawers or compartments below and open, shallow shelves above. [1905-10] * * *
Welsh Guards
a regiment in the British Army. It is one of the Guards regiments and was established in 1915 from a group of Welshmen in the Grenadier Guards. * * *
Welsh language
Celtic language of Wales. Besieged for centuries by the English language, Welsh continues to be spoken by 18–20% of the population of Wales, or more than half a million ...
Welsh Language Board
an organization appointed by the Welsh Assembly to encourage the use of Welsh in Wales. * * *
Welsh law
      the native law of Wales. Although increasingly superseded by English law after the 13th century, Welsh law has been preserved in lawbooks that represent important ...
Welsh literary renaissance
Literary activity in Wales and England in the mid-18th century that attempted to stimulate interest in the Welsh language and in the classical bardic verse forms of Wales. It ...
Welsh literature
      body of writings in the Welsh language with a rich and unbroken history stretching from the 6th century to the present.       A brief treatment of Welsh ...
Welsh National Opera
an opera company based in Cardiff. It first performed in Cardiff in 1946 and became fully professional in the 1970s. The company makes regular tours in Wales and parts of ...
Welsh pony
one of a breed of small, sturdy ponies raised originally in Wales. [1765-75] * * * ▪ breed of horse     breed of small horse popular as a child's or an adult's mount. A ...
Welsh poppy
a poppy, Meconopsis cambrica, of western Europe, having pale-green, slightly hairy foliage and pale-yellow flowers. [1735-45] * * *
Welsh rabbit
a dish of melted cheese, usually mixed with ale or beer, milk, and spices, served over toast. Also called Welsh rarebit. [1715-25; prob. of jocular orig.; later Welsh rarebit by ...
Welsh rarebit
➡ Welsh rabbit * * *
Welsh springer spaniel
one of a Welsh breed of springer spaniels having a red and white coat. [1925-30] * * *
Welsh terrier
one of a Welsh breed of terriers having a wiry, black-and-tan coat, resembling an Airedale but smaller. [1885-90] * * * ▪ breed of dog       breed of terrier native to ...
Welsh valleys
(also infml the valleys) the industrial region of south Wales, especially the Rhondda Valley. The main industries there were coal and steel, and coal mines were first established ...
Welsh vault.
See underpitch vault. [1840-50] * * *
Welshcorgi
Welsh corgi n. pl. Welsh cor·gis Either of two breeds of dog that originated in Wales, having a long body, short legs, and a foxlike head. * * *
welsher
See welsh. * * *
Welshman
/welsh"meuhn, welch"-/, n., pl. Welshmen. a native or inhabitant of Wales. Also, Welchman. [bef. 900; ME Welische man, OE Wilisc mon; see WELSH, MAN1] * * *
Welshpool
▪ Wales, United Kingdom Welsh  Y Trallwng        town, Powys county, historic county of Montgomeryshire, Wales, in the valley of the River Severn. Its charter, ...
Welshrabbit
Welsh rabbit n. A dish made of melted cheese, milk or cream, seasonings, and sometimes ale, served hot over toast or crackers. * * *
Welshrarebit
Welsh rare·bit (rârʹbĭt) n. Welsh rabbit. * * *
Welshspringer spaniel
Welsh springer spaniel n. Any of a breed of medium-sized hunting dog that originated in Wales and has a silky red and white coat. * * *
Welshterrier
Welsh terrier n. Any of a breed of terrier originating in Wales and having a wiry black and tan coat. * * *
Welshwoman
/welsh"woom'euhn, welch"-/, n., pl. Welshwomen. a woman who is a native or inhabitant of Wales. [1400-50; late ME Walsshwoman; see WELSH, WOMAN] * * *
welt
/welt/, n. 1. a ridge or wale on the surface of the body, as from a blow of a stick or whip. 2. a blow producing such a ridge or wale. 3. Shoemaking. a. a strip, as of leather, ...
Welt, Die
▪ German newspaper       (German: “The World”), daily newspaper, one of the most influential in Germany and the only one of national scope and stature published in ...
Weltanschauung
/velt"ahn'show'oong/, n. German. a comprehensive conception or image of the universe and of humanity's relation to it. [lit., world-view] * * *
welter
welter1 /wel"teuhr/, v.i. 1. to roll, toss, or heave, as waves or the sea. 2. to roll, writhe, or tumble about; wallow, as animals (often fol. by about): pigs weltering about ...
welterweight
/wel"teuhr wayt'/, n. 1. a boxer or other contestant intermediate in weight between a lightweight and a middleweight, esp. a professional boxer weighing up to 147 pounds (67 ...
Welti, Emil
▪ Swiss statesman born April 23, 1825, Zurzach, Switz. died Feb. 24, 1899, Bern       statesman, six times president of the Swiss Confederation, and a champion of ...
Welting, Ruth
▪ 2000       American opera singer who was admired for the ease in which she used her lilting soprano to perform for more than 20 years, primarily at the Metropolitan ...
Weltschmerz
/velt"shmerddts'/, n. German. sorrow that one feels and accepts as one's necessary portion in life; sentimental pessimism. Also, weltschmerz. [lit., world-pain] * * * ▪ ...
Welty
/wel"tee/, n. Eudora /yooh dawr"euh, -dohr"euh/, born 1909, U.S. short-story writer and novelist. * * *
Welty, Eudora
born April 13, 1909, Jackson, Miss., U.S. died July 23, 2001, Jackson U.S. short-story writer and novelist. Welty focused her work on a small town that resembled her birthplace ...
Welty, Eudora Alice
▪ 2002       American short-story writer and novelist (b. April 13, 1909, Jackson, Miss.—d. July 23, 2001, Jackson), was known for the lyricism, perception, wit, and ...
Welty,Eudora
Wel·ty (wĕlʹtē), Eudora. Born 1909. American writer known for her tales of rural Southern life. Her works include collections of stories, such as The Golden Apples (1949), ...
Welwitschiaceae
▪ gnetophyte family       a family of southwestern African desert plants in the gymnosperm order Gnetales, named for its single genus, Welwitschia. tumboa plants (W. ...
Welwyn Garden City
➡ garden city * * * ▪ England, United Kingdom also called  Welwyn         new town in Welwyn Hatfield district, administrative and historic county of ...
Welwyn Hatfield
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       district, administrative and historic county of Hertfordshire, southeastern England, directly north of the metropolitan county ...
welə-
To strike, wound. Oldest form *welə₂-. 1. Suffixed o-grade form *wol(ə)-o-. a. Valhalla, from Old Norse Valhöll, Valhalla; b. Valkyrie, from Old Norse Valkyrja, “chooser ...
Wembley
/wem"blee/, n. a former borough, now part of Brent, in SE England, near London. * * *
Wembley Arena
➡ Wembley * * *
Wembley National Stadium
➡ Wembley * * *
Wembley Stadium
➡ Wembley * * *
Wemyss
/weemz/, n. a parish in central Fife, in E Scotland, on the Firth of Forth: castle. 10,593. * * *
wemə-
To vomit. Oldest form *wemə₁-. 1. wamble, from Middle English wam(e)len, to feel nausea, stagger, from a Scandinavian source probably akin to Old Norse vamla, qualm, and ...
wen
wen1 /wen/, n. 1. Pathol. a benign encysted tumor of the skin, esp. on the scalp, containing sebaceous matter; a sebaceous cyst. 2. Brit. a large, crowded city or a crowded urban ...
Wen Jiabao
born Sept. 1942, Tianjin, China Premier of China (from 2003). While studying at the Beijing Institute of Geology, Wen joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). In 1985 he was ...
Wen Jiabo
Wen Jiabo [wen jē ä′bō] 1942- ; premier of China (2002- ) * * *
Wen Ti
▪ Chinese deity also called  Wen Ch'ang , or  Wen Ch'ang Ti-Chün , Pinyin  Wen Di,  Wen Chang , or  Wen Chang Dijun        the Chinese god of literature, ...
Wen Tingyun
▪ Chinese poet Wade-Giles romanization  Wen T'ing-yün , original name  Wen Qi , courtesy name (zi)  Feiqing  born 812, Qi county, Shanxi province, China died 866, ...
Wen Zhengming
or Wen Cheng-ming born 1470, Suzhou, Jiangsu province, China died 1559 Chinese painter, calligrapher, and scholarly figure. Born to an established family, Wen Zhengming was by ...
wen-
I. wen-1 To desire, strive for. Derivatives include win, wont, wish, venerate, venereal, venom, and venison. 1. Suffixed form *wen-w-. win, from Old English winnan, to win, from ...
wen-yen
/wun"yun"/, n. the formal, literary variety of written Chinese, as used in classical literature. Cf. pai-hua. [ < Chin wényán] * * *
Wenatchee
/weuh nach"ee/, n. a city in central Washington. 17,257. * * * ▪ Washington, United States  city, seat (1899) of Chelan county, central Washington, U.S., in the foothills ...
Wences, Senor
▪ 2000 Wenceslao Moreno        Spanish-born ventriloquist who delighted audiences with his simple puppets—most often Johnny, whose head was a decorated and bewigged ...
Wenceslas
born Feb. 26, 1361, Nürnberg died Aug. 16, 1419, Prague King of Bohemia (as Wenceslas IV, 1363–96) and German king and Holy Roman emperor (1378–1400). The son of the ...
Wenceslas I
born 1205 died Sept. 32, 1253 King of Bohemia (1230–53). He prevented Mongol armies from attacking Bohemia in 1241 but could not defend Moravia. He gained control of Austria ...
Wenceslas II
born Sept. 17, 1271 died June 21, 1305 King of Bohemia (1278–1305). He inherited the throne from his father at age seven, but his cousin Otto IV of Brandenburg served as his ...
Wenceslas III
▪ king of Bohemia and Hungary born Oct. 6, 1289 died Aug. 4, 1306, Olomouc, Moravia, Bohemia       last king of the Přemyslid dynasty of Bohemia, king of Hungary from ...
Wenceslas,Saint
Wen·ce·slas also Wen·ce·slaus (wĕnʹsĭ-slôs'), Saint In German Wenzel. c. 907-929. Duke of Bohemia who encouraged Christianization and was martyred by his brother ...
Wenceslaus
/wen"sis laws'/, n. 1. Also, Wenceslas. 1361-1419, emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1378-1400; as Wenceslaus IV, king of Bohemia 1378-1419. 2. Saint ("Good King Wenceslaus"), ...
wench
—wencher, n. /wench/, n. 1. a country lass or working girl: The milkmaid was a healthy wench. 2. Usually facetious. a girl or young woman. 3. Archaic. a strumpet. v.i. 4. to ...
wencher
See wench. * * *
Wenchow
/wen"chow"/; Chin. /wun"joh"/, n. Older Spelling. Wenzhou. Also, Wade-Giles, Wenchou. * * *
wend
/wend/, v., wended or (Archaic) went; wending. v.t. 1. to pursue or direct (one's way). v.i. 2. to proceed or go. [bef. 900; ME wenden, OE wendan; c. D, G wenden, Goth wandjan, ...
Wend
/wend/, n. a member of a Slavic people of E Germany; Sorb. [1780-90; < G Wende, OHG Winida; c. OE Winedas (pl.)] * * * Any member of a group of Slavic tribes that by the 5th ...
Wendat
▪ people       among North American Indians, a confederacy of four Iroquois-speaking bands of the Huron nation—the Rock, Bear, Cord, and Deer bands—together with a ...
Wendel, Heinrich
▪ German theatrical designer born March 9, 1915, Bremen, Ger. died May 1980, Düsseldorf, W.Ger. [now Germany]       German theatrical designer who pioneered new ...
Wendell
/wen"dl/, n. a male given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Bontemps Arnaud Wendell Holmes Oliver Wendell Holmes Oliver Wendell Jr. Phillips Wendell Stanley Wendell ...
Wenders, Wim
orig. Ernst Wilhelm Wenders born Aug. 14, 1945, Düsseldorf, Ger. German film director. He directed short films from 1967 and made features from 1973, including Alice in the ...
Wendi
I or Wen Ti Chinese god of literature. His chief heavenly task is to keep a register of men of letters so that he can mete out rewards and punishments to each according to ...
Wendish
/wen"dish/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to the Wends or their language; Sorbian. n. 2. Sorbian (def. 2). [1605-15; < G wendisch, equiv. to Wende WEND + -isch -ISH1] * * *
Wendt, Albert
▪ Samoan writer born October 27, 1939, Apia, Western Samoa [now Samoa]       Samoan novelist and poet who wrote about present-day Samoan life. Perhaps the best-known ...
Wendy
/wen"dee/, n. a female given name, form of Gwendolyn. Also, Wendie. * * *
Wendy house
Brit. a child's playhouse. [1945-50; after the house that Peter Pan builds around Wendy in J. Barrie's Peter Pan] * * *
Wendy’s{™}
any of a group of US fast-food restaurants that serve mostly hamburgers. The company has over 6 000 restaurants around the world. It was established in 1969 by Dave Thomas who ...
Wenlock Series
▪ geology       the second of four main divisions (in ascending order) of the Silurian (Silurian Period) System, representing those rocks deposited worldwide during the ...
wenny
/wen"ee/, adj., wennier, wenniest. 1. of the nature of or resembling a wen. 2. having a wen or wens. [1590-1600; WEN1 + -Y1] * * *
Wenonah
/wi noh"neuh/, n. a female given name. Also, Wenona. * * *
wenrenhua
▪ Chinese painting Chinese“literati painting”Wade-Giles romanization  wen-jen-hua        ideal form of the Chinese scholar-painter who was more interested in ...
Wenrohronon
▪ people       Iroquois-speaking North American Indians whose name means “people of the place of the floating film,” probably after the oil spring at what is now ...
Wensleydale
/wenz"lee dayl'/, n. a rich, medium-hard, white cheese with blue veins, somewhat strong in flavor. Also called Wensleydale cheese. [1880-85; after Wensleydale, Yorkshire, ...
went
/went/, v. 1. pt. of go. 2. Nonstandard. a pp. of go1. 3. Archaic. a pt. and pp. of wend. * * *
Went, F.A.F.C.
▪ Austrian botanist in full  Friedrich August Ferdinand Christian Went   born June 18, 1863, Amsterdam, Neth. died July 24, 1935, Wassenaar       Dutch botanist who ...
wentletrap
/wen"tl trap'/, n. any of several marine gastropods of the family Epitonii (Scalariidae), having a whitish, spiraled shell. [1750-60; < D wenteltrap, earlier wendeltrap spiral ...
Wentworth
/went"werrth'/, n. 1. Thomas, 1st Earl of Strafford. See Strafford, 1st Earl of. 2. William Charles, 1793-1872, Australian political leader, author, and journalist. * * * (as ...
Wentworth, Cecile de
▪ American artist original name  Cecile Smith  born ?, New York, New York, U.S. died August 28, 1933, Nice, France  American painter who established a reputation in Europe ...
Wentworth, Peter
▪ English politician born 1524–30 died Nov. 10, 1596, London       prominent Puritan (Puritanism) member of the English Parliament in the reign of Elizabeth I, whom ...
Wentworth, W.C.
▪ Australian politician in full  William Charles Wentworth   born 1790, Norfolk Island, New South Wales [Australia] died March 20, 1872, Wimborne, Dorset, ...
Wenwang
or Wen-wang or Xibo flourished 12th century BC, China Father of Wuwang (founder of the Zhou dynasty) and one of the sage rulers regarded by Confucian historians as a model ...
Wenxiang
▪ Chinese statesman Wade-Giles romanization  Wen-hsiang  born Oct. 16, 1818, Liaoyang, Liaoning province, China died May 26, 1876, Beijing       official and ...
Wenzel
Ger. /ven"tseuhl/, n. German form of Wenceslaus. * * * (as used in expressions) Stamitz Johann Wenzel Anton Wenzel Anton prince von Kaunitz Rietberg Metternich Winneburg ...
Wenzel Anton, prince von Kaunitz -Rietberg
born Feb. 2, 1711, Vienna, Austria died June 27, 1794, Vienna Austrian state chancellor (1753–92). He entered the Austrian foreign service in 1740 and was responsible for the ...
Wenzel, Hanni
▪ Liechtensteiner skier born Dec. 14, 1956, Staubirnen, W.Ger.       Liechtenstein Alpine skier who was the first athlete from her country to win an Olympic medal, ...
Wenzhou
/wuen"joh"/, n. Pinyin. a seaport in SE Zhejiang province, in E China. 250,000. Also, Wenchou, Wenchow. Formerly, Yongjia. * * * ▪ China Wade-Giles romanization  Wen-chou , ...
Wenzong
▪ emperor of Tang dynasty Wade-Giles romanization  Wen-tsung , personal name (xingming)  Li Ang  born 809, China died 840, China       temple name (miaohao) of the ...
Weöres, Sándor
▪ Hungarian author born June 22, 1913, Szombathely, Hung. died Jan. 22, 1989, Budapest       Hungarian poet who wrote imaginative lyrical verse that encompassed a wide ...
wept
/wept/, v. pt. and pp. of weep1. * * *
wer-
I. wer-1 To raise, lift, hold suspended. Oldest form *ə₂wer-. 1. Basic form *awer-. aorta, arsis, arterio-, arteriole, artery; meteor, from Greek āeirein, to raise, and ...
Werbőczi, István
▪ Hungarian statesman born c. 1458 died 1542, Buda, Hung.  statesman and jurist, whose codification of Hungarian law served as his country's basic legal text for more than ...
were
/werr/; unstressed /weuhr/; Brit. also /wair/, v. a 2nd pers. sing. pt. indic., pl. pt. indic., and pt. subj. of be. [bef. 1000; ME; OE waere past subj., waere past ind. 2nd ...
weregild
were·gild (wûrʹgĭld') n. Variant of wergeld. * * *
weren't
/werrnt, werr"euhnt/ contraction of were not: Weren't you surprised? Usage. See contraction. * * *
werewolf
/wair"woolf', wear"-, werr"-/, n., pl. werewolves /-woolvz'/. (in folklore and superstition) a human being who has changed into a wolf, or is capable of assuming the form of a ...
Werfel
Ger. /verdd"feuhl/, n. Franz Ger. /frddahnts/, 1890-1945, Austrian novelist, poet, and dramatist, born in Czechoslovakia: in the U.S. after 1939. * * *
Werfel, Franz
▪ German writer born Sept. 10, 1890, Prague [now in Czech Republic] died Aug. 26, 1945, Hollywood, Calif., U.S.       German-language writer who attained prominence as ...
werg-
To do. Oldest form *werg̑-, becoming *werg- in centum languages. Derivatives include work, allergy, surgery, wrought, and orgy. I. Suffixed form *werg-o-. 1. a. work; ...
Wergeland, Henrik Arnold
▪ Norwegian poet born June 17, 1808, Kristiansand, Nor. died July 12, 1845, Christiania       Norway's great national poet, symbol of Norway's independence, whose ...
wergeld
wergeld [wʉr′geld΄, wer′geld΄] n. 〚ME weregylt < OE wergild < wer, man (see WEREWOLF) + geld, payment: see GELD2〛 in early Germanic and Anglo-Saxon law, a price paid ...
wergild
/werr"gild, wer"-/, n. 1. (in Anglo-Saxon England and other Germanic countries) 2. money paid to the relatives of a murder victim in compensation for loss and to prevent a blood ...
Werner
/werr"neuhr/; for 1 also Ger. /verdd"neuhrdd/, n. 1. Alfred /al"fred, -frid/; Ger. /ahl"frddayt/, 1866-1919, Swiss chemist: Nobel prize 1913. 2. a male given name. * * * (as ...
Werner'ssyndrome
Wer·ner's syndrome (vĕrʹnərz) n. A hereditary disease of young adults that is characterized by short stature, early graying, cataracts, vascular disorders, and generally ...
Werner, Abraham Gottlob
born Sept. 25, 1750, Wehrau, Saxony died June 30, 1817, Freiberg German geologist. In opposition to the Plutonists, or Vulcanists, who argued that granite and many other rocks ...
Werner, Alfred
▪ Swiss chemist Introduction born Dec. 12, 1866, Mulhouse, France died Nov. 15, 1919, Zürich, Switz.  Swiss chemist and winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1913 for ...
Werner, Pierre
▪ 2003       Luxembourgian politician (b. Dec. 29, 1913, near Lille, France—d. June 24, 2002, Luxembourg), was hailed as the “father of the euro”; he used his ...
Werner, Ruth
▪ 2001 Ursula Ruth Kuczynski        German-born Soviet espionage agent and writer (b. May 15, 1907, Berlin, Ger.—d. July 7, 2000, Berlin), was a committed communist ...
Werner, Wendelin
▪ French mathematician born Sept. 23, 1968, Cologne, W.Ger. [now Germany]       German-born French mathematician awarded a Fields Medal in 2006 “for his ...
Wernerian
/werr near"ee euhn, ver-/, adj. pertaining to or characteristic of the views or the classificatory system of Alfred Werner. [WERNER + -IAN] * * *
wernerite
/werr"neuh ruyt'/, n. Mineral. a variety of scapolite. [1805-15; named after A. G. Werner (1750-1817), German mineralogist; see -ITE1] * * *
Wernher von Braun
➡ Braun * * *
Wernicke's aphasia
/vair"ni keez, -keuhz/, Pathol. a type of aphasia caused by a lesion in Wernicke's area of the brain and characterized by grammatical but more or less meaningless speech and an ...
Wernicke's area
/vair"ni keuhz, -keez/, Anat. a portion of the left posterior temporal lobe of the brain, involved in the ability to understand words. [named after Karl Wernicke (1848-1905), ...
Wernicke'sarea
Wer·nick·e's area (vĕrʹnĭ-kēz, -kəz) n. An area in the posterior temporal lobe of the left hemisphere of the brain involved in the recognition of spoken words.   [After ...
Wernicke'sencephalopathy
Wernicke's encephalopathy n. An acute disease of the brain caused by a deficiency of thiamine, usually associated with chronic alcoholism and characterized by loss of muscular ...
Wernicke, Carl
▪ German neurologist born May 15, 1848, Tarnowitz, Pol., Prussia died June 15, 1905, Thüringer Wald, Ger.       German neurologist who related nerve diseases to ...
Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome
/vair"ni keuh kawr"seuh kawf', -kof'/ a disorder of the central nervous system characterized by abnormal eye movements, incoordination, confusion, and impaired memory and ...
Wernicke-Korsakoffsyndrome
Wer·nick·e-Kor·sa·koff syndrome (vĕrʹnĭ-kē-kôrʹsə-kôf', -kŏf', -nĭ-kə-) n. A syndrome consisting of Wernicke's encephalopathy in the acute phase and followed by ...
Wernigerode
▪ Germany       city, Saxony-Anhalt Land (state), central Germany. It lies at the confluence of the Holtemme and Zillierbach rivers, north of the Harz Mountains and ...
Werra
Wer·ra (vĕrʹə) A river rising in central Germany and flowing about 291 km (181 mi) generally northward to join the Fulda River and form the Weser. * * *
Werribee
▪ Victoria, Australia       town and shire in southern Victoria, Australia, situated on the Werribee River about 19 mi (29 km) southwest by rail from Melbourne and ...
wers-
To confuse, mix up. Compare ers-. I. Suffixed basic form. 1. a. war, from Old North French werre, war; b. guerrilla, from Spanish guerra, war. Both a and b from Germanic *werra-, ...
werste
/verrst, verst/, n. verst. * * *
wert
/werrt/; unstressed /weuhrt/, v. Archaic. a 2nd pers. sing. pt. indic. and subj. of be. * * *
Wertenbaker
(1951– ) a US writer of plays who works mainly in Britain. Her plays include The Grace of Mary Traverse (1985), Our Country’s Good (1988) and Three Birds Alighting on a Field ...
Wertheimer, Max
(b. April 15, 1880, Prague, Czech. d. Oct. 12, 1943, New Rochelle, N.Y., U.S.) German psychologist. He taught at the Universities of Frankfurt and Berlin (1916–29) before ...
Wertmüller, Lina
orig. Arcangela Wertmüller von Elgg born Aug. 14, 1928, Rome, Italy Italian film director. After working as a puppeteer and stage actress and director, she became an ...
Wertmüller,Lina
Wert·mül·ler (vĕrtʹmyo͞o'lər), Lina. Born c. 1926. Italian filmmaker whose works, such as The Seduction of Mimi (1972) and Swept Away (1974), often concern the struggles ...
werwolf
/wair"woolf', wear"-, werr"-/, n., pl. werwolves /-woolvz'/. werewolf. * * *
werə-
See wer-. * * *
wērə-o-
True, trustworthy. Oldest form *wērə₁-o-. Derivatives include warlock and verdict. 1. warlock, from Old English wǣr, faith, pledge, from Germanic *wēra-. 2. veracious, ...
Wes
/wes/, n. a male given name, form of Wesley. * * *
wes-
I. wes-1 To live, dwell, pass the night, with derivatives meaning “to be.” Oldest form *ə₂wes-. 1. O-grade (perfect tense) form *wos-. was, from Old English wæs, was, ...
wes-pero-
Evening, night. I. Reduced form *wes-. 1. Suffixed form *wes-to-. a. west, from Old English west, west; b. western, from Old English westerne, western; c. westerly, from Old ...
Wesak
▪ Buddhist festival also spelled  Vesak,  Sanskrit  Vaishakha,  Pali  Vesakha        most important of the Theravada Buddhist festivals, commemorating the birth, ...
Wesel
▪ Germany       town, North Rhine-Westphalia (North Rhine–Westphalia) Land (state), northwestern Germany. It lies along the Rhine and Lippe rivers and the Lippe-Seiten ...
Weser
/vay"zeuhr/, n. a river in Germany, flowing N from S Lower Saxony into the North Sea. ab. 300 mi. (485 km) long. * * *
Weser River
River, western Germany. Formed by the union of the Fulda and Werra rivers at Münden, it flows northward into the North Sea through a large estuary. It is 273 mi (440 km) long. ...
Wesermünde
Ger. /vay"zeuhrdd myuun'deuh/, n. former name of Bremerhaven. * * *
Wesker
(1932– ) an English writer of plays. He grew up in a left-wing Jewish family in London and many of his plays reflect this background and the problems created by class divisions ...
weskit
/wes"kit/, n. a vest or waistcoat. [1855-60; phoneticized sp. of WAISTCOAT] * * *
Weslaco
/wes"leuh koh'/, n. a city in S Texas. 19,331. * * *
Wesley
/wes"lee, wez"-/, n. 1. Charles, 1707-88, English evangelist and hymnist. 2. his brother John, 1703-91, English theologian and evangelist: founder of Methodism. 3. a male given ...
Wesley, Charles
▪ English clergyman born Dec. 18, 1707, Epworth, Lincolnshire, Eng. died March 29, 1788, London       English clergyman, poet, and hymn writer, who, with his elder ...
Wesley, John
(1703–1791) Anglican clergyman, evangelist, and cofounder of Methodism. The 15th child of a former Nonconformist minister, he graduated from Oxford University and became a ...
Wesley, Samuel
▪ English composer born Feb. 24, 1766, Bristol, Gloucestershire, Eng. died Oct. 11, 1837, London       composer and organist who helped introduce the music of J.S. Bach ...
Wesley, Samuel Sebastian
▪ English composer born Aug. 14, 1810, London died April 19, 1876, Gloucester, Eng.       composer and organist, one of the most distinguished English church musicians ...
Wesley,John
Wes·ley (wĕsʹlē, wĕzʹ-), John. 1703-1791. British religious leader who founded Methodism (1738). His brother Charles (1707-1788) wrote thousands of hymns, including ...
Wesleyan
/wes"lee euhn, wez"-/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to John Wesley, founder of Methodism. 2. pertaining to Methodism. n. 3. a follower of John Wesley. 4. Chiefly Brit. a ...
Wesleyan Church
▪ American Protestantism       U.S. Protestant church, organized in 1968 by the merger of the Wesleyan Methodist Church of America and the Pilgrim Holiness Church. The ...
Wesleyan Methodist
a member of any of the churches founded on the evangelical principles of John Wesley. [1790-1800] * * *
Wesleyan University
Private university in Middletown, Conn. It was founded in 1831 by Methodists, who named the institution for John Wesley. Its formal ties to the Methodist church ended in 1937. ...
Wesleyanism
/wes"lee euh niz'euhm, wez"-/, n. the evangelical principles taught by John Wesley; Methodism. Also, Wesleyism. [1765-75; WESLEYAN + -ISM] * * *
wesr̥
Spring. vernal; primavera1, from Latin vēr, spring (phonologically irregular).   [Pokorny u̯es-r̥ 1174.] * * *
Wessel Islands
▪ islands, Northern Territory, Australia       chain of small islands extending 75 miles (120 km) northeast from the Napier Peninsula in northeastern Northern Territory, ...
Wessel, Horst
▪ German Nazi martyr born Sept. 9, 1907, Bielefeld, Ger. died Feb. 23, 1930, Berlin       martyr of the German Nazi movement, celebrated in the song “Horst Wessel ...
Wessel, Johan Herman
▪ Danish author born Oct. 6, 1742, Jonsrud, near Vestby, Nor. died Dec. 29, 1785, Copenhagen       Norwegian-born Danish writer and wit, known for his epigrams and ...
Wesselényi Conspiracy
▪ Hungarian history       (c. 1664–71), group of Hungarians, organized by Ferenc Wesselényi, that unsuccessfully plotted to overthrow the Habsburg (Habsburg, House ...
Wessely, Paula
▪ 2001       Austrian actress (b. Jan. 20, 1907, Vienna, Austria—d. May 11, 2000, Vienna), reigned as Austria's most distinguished and beloved stage and screen actress ...
Wessex
/wes"iks/, n. 1. (in the Middle Ages) a kingdom, later an earldom, in S England. Cap.: Winchester. See map under Mercia. 2. the fictional setting of the novels of Thomas Hardy, ...
Wessex culture
Archaeol. an early Bronze Age culture of southern England, 1800-1400 B.C., known only from grave sites, grave goods, and megaliths and considered responsible for erecting the ...
Wessex, Prince Edward, earl of and Viscount Severn
▪ British prince in full  Edward Anthony Richard Louis  born March 10, 1964, London, Eng.       youngest child of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, duke of ...
Wessex, Sophie, countess of
▪ British royal née  Sophie Helen Rhys-Jones  born Jan. 20, 1965, Oxford, Eng.       British consort (1999– ) of Prince Edward (Wessex, Prince Edward, earl of and ...
west
/west/, n. 1. a cardinal point of the compass, 90° to the left when facing north, corresponding to the point where the sun is seen to set. Abbr.: W 2. the direction in which ...
West
/west/, n. 1. Benjamin, 1738-1820, U.S. painter, in England after 1763. 2. Mae, 1892?-1980, U.S. actress. 3. Nathanael (Nathan Wallenstein Weinstein), 1902?-40, U.S. novelist. 4. ...
West Allis
/al"is/ a city in SE Wisconsin, near Milwaukee. 63,982. * * * ▪ Wisconsin, United States       city, western suburb of Milwaukee, Milwaukee county, southeastern ...
West Atlantic
a group of languages of W Africa constituting a branch of the Niger-Congo subfamily of languages, and including Fulani and Wolof. * * *
West Australian Current
▪ ocean current       relatively cold surface current of the southeast Indian Ocean, part of the general counterclockwise movement in the southern section of that ocean. ...
West Babylon
a city on S Long Island, in SE New York. 41,699. * * *
West Bank
an area in the Middle East, between the W bank of the Jordan River and the E frontier of Israel: occupied in 1967 and subsequently claimed by Israel; formerly held by Jordan. * * ...
West Bend
a town in SE Wisconsin. 21,484. * * * ▪ Wisconsin, United States       city, seat (1853) of Washington county, southeastern Wisconsin, U.S. It lies on a bend in the ...
West Bengal
a state in E India: formerly part of the province of Bengal. 50,900,000; 33,805 sq. mi. (87,555 sq. km). Cap.: Calcutta. Cf. Bengal (def. 1). * * * State (pop., 2001 prelim.: ...
West Bengal Duars
▪ region, India       physiographic region in extreme northeastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It is bounded by Sikkim state and Bhutan to the north, ...
West Berkshire
▪ unitary authority, England, United Kingdom  unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Berkshire, England. The unitary authority extends westward from the ...
West Berlin
West Berlin see BERLIN2 * * *       the western half of the German city of Berlin (q.v.), which until the reunification of the German state in 1990 was treated as a city ...
West Berlin.
See under Berlin (def. 2). * * *
West Bridgewater
▪ Massachusetts, United States       town (township), Plymouth county, eastern Massachusetts, approximately 25 miles (40 km) south of Boston. The area was deeded by ...
West Bridgford
▪ England, United Kingdom       town, Rushcliffe district, administrative and historic county of Nottinghamshire, England. The town now functions largely as a ...
West Bromwich
/brum"ij, -ich, brom"-/ a city in West Midlands, in central England, near Birmingham. 166,626. * * * ▪ England, United Kingdom       locality in the metropolitan ...
west by north
Navig., Survey. a point on the compass 11°15prime; north of west. Abbr.: WbN * * *
west by south
Navig., Survey. a point on the compass 11°15prime; south of west. Abbr.: WbS * * *
West Caldwell
a town in NE New Jersey. 11,407. * * *
West Carrollton
a town in W Ohio. 13,148. * * *
West Chester
a city in SE Pennsylvania. 17,435. * * * ▪ Pennsylvania, United States       borough (town), seat (1786) of Chester county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S. It lies 27 ...
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
▪ university, West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of ...
West Chicago
a town in NE Illinois. 12,550. * * *
West Coast
—West-Coast, adj. the western coast of the U.S., bordering the Pacific Ocean and comprising the coastal areas of California, Oregon, and Washington. * * * ▪ region, New ...
West Coast jazz.
See cool jazz. [1950-55] * * *
West Columbia
a town in central South Carolina. 10,409. * * *
West Country
the name often used to refer to the south-west of Britain, particularly the counties of Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and Dorset. * * *
West Covina
a city in SW California, E of Los Angeles. 80,094. * * * ▪ California, United States       city, Los Angeles county, southern California, U.S. It lies at the eastern ...
West Des Moines
a city in S central Iowa, near Des Moines. 21,894. * * * ▪ Iowa, United States       city and suburb of Des Moines (which lies immediately to the east), Polk county, ...
West Devon
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. The borough lies directly north of the ...
West Dorset
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       district, administrative county of Dorset, southern England. The district lies almost entirely within the historic county of ...
West Dunbartonshire
▪ council area, Scotland, United Kingdom       council area, west-central Scotland, along the north bank of the lower River Clyde, northwest of Glasgow. It extends ...
West End
West End W section of London, England: center of theater and fashion * * * the area of west central London that contains the city’s most famous streets for shopping, theatres ...
West Falkland
▪ island, Atlantic Ocean       one of the two major islands of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is 80 miles (130 km) long and 45 miles (70 km) wide ...
West Fargo
a city in SE North Dakota: suburb of Fargo. 10,099. * * *
West Flanders
a province in W Belgium. 1,071,604; 1249 sq. mi. (3235 sq. km). Cap.: Bruges. * * *
West Florida Controversy
Dispute over status of American territory in a region on the Gulf of Mexico between the Apalachicola and Mississippi rivers. First claimed by Spain in 1492, it was occupied by ...
West Frisian Islands
▪ island, The Netherlands Dutch  West Friese Eilanden,         part of the chain of Frisian Islands (q.v.), which lie in the North Sea just off the coast of ...
West Frisian Islands.
See under Frisian Islands. * * *
West Frisians.
See under Frisian Islands. * * *
West Germanic
1. a subbranch of Germanic that includes English, Frisian, Flemish, Dutch, Plattdeutsch, Yiddish, and German. Abbr.: WGmc 2. of or pertaining to this subbranch of ...
West Germanic languages
Introduction   group of Germanic languages that developed in the region of the North Sea, Rhine-Weser, and Elbe. Out of the many local West Germanic dialects the following six ...
West Germany
—West German. a former republic in central Europe: created in 1949 by the coalescing of the British, French, and U.S. zones of occupied Germany established in 1945. 62,080,000; ...
West Glamorgan
a county in S Wales. 371,700; 315 sq. mi. (815 sq. km). * * *
West Goth
a Visigoth. [erroneous trans. of LL Visigothus VISIGOTH] * * *
West Greenland Current
an ocean current flowing northward along the west coast of Greenland. * * *       cool flow of water proceeding northward along the west coast of Greenland. See ...
West Ham
/ham/ a former borough, now part of Newham, in SE England, near London. * * *
West Ham United
➡ West Ham * * *
West Hartford
a town in central Connecticut. 61,301. * * * ▪ Connecticut, United States       urban town (township), Hartford county, central Connecticut, U.S. Founded in 1679 as an ...
West Hartlepool
/hahr"tl poohl', hahrt"lee-/ a former borough, now part of Hartlepool, in Cleveland County, in NE England, at the mouth of the Tees. * * *
West Haven
a town in S Connecticut, near New Haven. 53,184. * * * ▪ Connecticut, United States       city, coextensive with the town (township) of West Haven, New Haven county, ...
West Helena
/hel"euh neuh/ a city in E Arkansas. 11,367. * * *
West Hempstead
a city on W Long Island, in SE New York. 18,536. * * *
West Highland
any of a breed of small, hardy, usually dun-colored, shaggy-haired beef cattle with long, widespread horns, able to withstand the cold and sparse pasturage of its native western ...
West Highland white terrier
one of a Scottish breed of small compact terriers having a white coat, erect ears and tail, originally developed as a hunting dog for small game. [1900-05] * * * ▪ breed of ...
West Hollywood
a city in SW California, near Los Angeles. 35,703. * * *
West Indian
➡ West Indies * * *
West Indian cedar.
See Spanish cedar. * * *
West Indian gherkin
gherkin (def. 2). * * *
West Indian kale
malanga. * * *
West Indians
➡ Caribbean * * *
West Indies
—West Indian. 1. Also called the Indies. an archipelago in the N Atlantic between North and South America, comprising the Greater Antilles, the Lesser Antilles, and the ...
West Indies Associated States
a former group (1967-81) of territorial islands in the West Indies in association with the United Kingdom: original members included Antigua, Dominica, Grenada, St. ...
West Irian
/ear"ee ahn'/ a former name of Irian Jaya. * * *
West Islip
a city on S Long Island, in SE New York. 29,533. * * *
West Jordan
a town in N central Utah. 26,794. * * *
West Lafayette
a city in central Indiana: suburb of Lafayette. 21,247. * * * ▪ Indiana, United States       city, Tippecanoe county, west-central Indiana, U.S. It lies along the ...
West Lancashire
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       district, administrative and historic county of Lancashire, northwestern England, north of the city of Liverpool. West ...
West Liberty State College
▪ college, West Liberty, West Virginia, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in West Liberty, West Virginia, U.S. It is a four-year ...
West Lindsey
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       district, administrative and historic county of Lincolnshire, east-central England, north of the city of Lincoln. West Lindsey ...
West Linn
/lin/ a town in NW Oregon. 12,956. * * *
West Lothian
/loh"dhee euhn/ a historic county in S Scotland. Formerly, Linlithgow. * * * ▪ council area, Scotland, United Kingdom       council area and historic county, ...
West Lothian Question
a question originally asked by Labour MP Tam Dalyell, whose constituency in Scotland used to be called West Lothian. Before devolution, he asked how it could be right that a ...
West Memphis
a city in E Arkansas, on the Mississippi. 28,138. * * * ▪ Arkansas, United States       city, Crittenden county, eastern Arkansas, U.S. It lies along the west bank of ...
West Midlands
a metropolitan county in central England. 2,777,500; 347 sq. mi. (899 sq. km). * * * Metropolitan county (pop., 2001: 2,555,596), west-central England. Its main centre is ...
West Mifflin
/mif"lin/ a city in W Pennsylvania, on the Monongahela River. 26,279. * * *
West Monroe
a city in N Louisiana. 14,993. * * *


© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.097 c;