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Williams, Smokey Joe
▪ American baseball player byname of  Joseph Williams  born April 6, 1886?, Seguin, Texas, U.S. died Feb. 25, 1951?, New York, N.Y.  American baseball player who was an ...
Williams, Ted
orig. Theodore Samuel Williams born Aug. 30, 1918, San Diego, Calif., U.S. died July 5, 2002, Inverness, Fla. U.S. baseball player, one of the greatest hitters of all ...
Williams, Tennessee
orig. Thomas Lanier Williams born March 26, 1911, Columbus, Miss., U.S. died Feb. 25, 1983, New York, N.Y. U.S. playwright. The son of a traveling salesman and a clergyman's ...
Williams, Theodore Samuel
▪ 2003 “Ted”; “The Splendid Splinter”        American baseball player (b. Aug. 30, 1918, San Diego, Calif.—d. July 5, 2002, Inverness, Fla.), was the last ...
Williams, Venus
▪ American tennis player in full  Venus Ebony Starr Williams  born June 17, 1980, Lynwood, Calif., U.S.       American tennis player who—along with her sister ...
Williams, Venus and Serena
born June 17, 1980, Lynwood, Cal., U.S. born Sept. 26, 1981, Saginaw, Mich. U.S. tennis players. The sisters were introduced to the sport by their father, who early on ...
Williams, Walter Ray, Jr.
▪ 1998       In the summer of 1997, bowling champion Walter Ray Williams, Jr., said, "This year might be the best year I've ever had"; considering his accomplishments, ...
Williams, Wendy Orlean
▪ 1999       American punk rock singer and musician who was the leader of the shock-rock punk band the Plasmatics during the late 1970s and early '80s (b. 1949, ...
Williams, William
▪ British religious leader also called Williams Pantycelyn born 1717, Cefn Coed, Llanfair-ar-y-bryn, Carmarthenshire, Wales died Jan. 11, 1791, Pantycelyn       leader ...
Williams, William Carlos
born Sept. 17, 1883, Rutherford, N.J., U.S. died March 4, 1963, Rutherford U.S. poet. Trained as a pediatrician, Williams wrote poetry and practiced medicine in his hometown. ...
Williams,Charles Melvin
Wil·liams (wĭlʹyəmz), Charles Melvin. Known as “Cootie.” 1911-1985. American jazz trumpeter noted for his inventive muting techniques. He spent the majority of his ...
Williams,Elizabeth
Williams, Elizabeth. Known as “Betty.” Born 1943. Irish peace activist. She shared the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize for work in Northern Ireland's peace movement. * * *
Williams,Eric
Williams, Eric. 1911-1981. Trinidadian politician and intellectual who led his country to independence from Britain and became its first prime minister (1962-1981). A noted ...
Williams,John Towner
Williams, John Towner. Born 1932. American composer and conductor best known for his film scores, including Jaws (1975) and Star Wars (1977). * * *
Williams,Roger
Williams, Roger. 1603?-1683. English cleric in America. After being expelled from Massachusetts for his criticism of Puritanism, he founded Providence (1636), a community based ...
Williams,Tennessee
Williams, Tennessee. Originally Thomas Lanier Williams. 1911-1983. American playwright whose works often concern family tensions and sexual anxiety. They include A Streetcar ...
Williams,Theodore Samuel
Williams, Theodore Samuel. Known as “Ted.” Born 1918. American baseball player. Among the best hitters in the history of the game, he accrued 521 home runs and a.344 batting ...
Williams,William Carlos
Williams, William Carlos. 1883-1963. American poet whose verse is marked by a lucid, spare style and vivid observations of the everyday. His works include Collected Poems (1934) ...
Williamsburg
/wil"yeuhmz berrg'/, n. a city in SE Virginia: colonial capital of Virginia; now restored to its original pre-Revolutionary style. 9870. * * * City (pop., 2000: 11,998), ...
WilliamsF1
➡ Williams (I) * * *
Williamson
▪ West Virginia, United States       city, seat (1896) of Mingo county, southwestern West Virginia, U.S. It lies on Tug Fork, opposite South Williamson, Kentucky (to ...
Williamson, Alexander William
▪ British chemist born May 1, 1824, London died May 6, 1904, Hindhead, Surrey, Eng.       English chemist whose research on alcohols and ethers clarified organic ...
Williamson, David
▪ Australian author in full  David Keith Williamson  born Feb. 24, 1942, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia       Australian dramatist and screenwriter known for topical ...
Williamson, Henry
▪ British writer born Dec. 1, 1895, Bedfordshire, Eng. died Aug. 13, 1977, Berkshire       English novelist who is known for his sensitive but unsentimental handling of ...
Williamson, Jack
▪ 2007 John Stewart Williamson        American science-fiction writer (b. April 29, 1908, Bisbee, Arizona territory [now Arizona]—d. Nov. 10, 2006, Portales, N.M.), ...
Williamson, Malcolm Benjamin Graham Christopher
▪ 2004       Australian-born composer (b. Nov. 21, 1931, Sydney, Australia—d. March 2, 2003, Cambridge, Eng.), was an astonishingly prolific and versatile composer as ...
Williamson, Sonny Boy
▪ American musician byname of  John Lee Williamson  born March 30, 1914, Jackson, Tennessee, U.S. died June 1, 1948, Chicago, Illinois  American blues vocalist and the ...
Williamson, William Crawford
▪ English naturalist born , Nov. 24, 1816, Scarborough, Yorkshire, Eng. died June 23, 1895, London  English naturalist, a founder of modern ...
Williamson,Mount
Wil·liam·son (wĭlʹyəm-sən), Mount A peak, 4,382.9 m (14,370 ft) high, in the Sierra Nevada of east-central California. * * *
Williamsport
/wil"yeuhmz pawrt', -pohrt'/, n. a city in central Pennsylvania, on the Susquehanna River. 33,401. * * * ▪ Pennsylvania, United States       city, seat (1796) of ...
Williamstown
▪ Massachusetts, United States       town (township), Berkshire county, northwestern Massachusetts, U.S., on the Hoosic River 21 miles (34 km) north of Pittsfield. ...
Williamthe Conqueror
William the Conqueror See William I1. * * *
Willibrord, Saint
▪ Anglo-Saxon missionary also called  Willibrord of Utrecht , Willibrord also spelled  Wilbrord  born 658?, Northumbria, probably near York, Eng. died Nov. 7, 739, ...
Willie
/wil"ee/, n. 1. a male given name, form of William. 2. a female given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Dixon Willie Hoppe Willie Lanier Willie Edward Mays Willie ...
Willie Carson
➡ Carson (V) * * *
Willie Nelson
➡ Nelson (III) * * *
Willie Shoemaker
➡ Shoemaker * * *
willies
/wil"eez/, n. (used with a pl. v.) Informal. nervousness or fright; jitters; creeps (usually prec. by the): That horror movie gave me the willies. [1895-1900, Amer.; orig. ...
Willimantic
/wil'euh man"tik/, n. a city in NE Connecticut. 14,652. * * * ▪ Connecticut, United States       city and principal community in the town (township) of Windham, ...
willing
—willingly, adv. —willingness, n. /wil"ing/, adj. 1. disposed or consenting; inclined: willing to go along. 2. cheerfully consenting or ready: a willing worker. 3. done, ...
Willingboro
Wil·ling·bo·ro (wĭlʹĭng-bûr'ō, -bŭr'ō) A community of south-central New Jersey northeast of Camden. It is a residential and industrial town. Population: 36,291. * * ...
Willingdon
/wil"ing deuhn/, n. Freeman Freeman-Thomas /free"meuhn tom"euhs/, 1st Marquis of, 1866-1941, British colonial official: governor general of Canada 1926-31; viceroy and governor ...
Willingham
/wil"ing ham', -euhm/, n. Calder, 1922-95, U.S. novelist and short-story writer. * * *
Willingham, Calder
▪ 1996       U.S. novelist and screenwriter (b. Dec. 22, 1922, Atlanta, Ga.—d. Feb. 19, 1995, Laconia, N.H.), was lionized at the age of 24 after the publication of ...
willingly
See willing. * * *
willingness
See willingly. * * *
Willis
/wil"is/, n. a male given name, form of William. * * * (as used in expressions) Carrier Willis Haviland Reed Willis Scripps Edward Willis Young Lester Willis * * *
Willis, Bill
▪ 2008 William Karnet Willis        American football player born Oct. 5, 1921, Columbus, Ohio died Nov. 27, 2007, Columbus became one of the first African American ...
Willis, Bruce
▪ American actor in full  Walter Bruce Willis  born March 19, 1955, Idar-Oberstein, W.Ger. [now Germany]       American actor best known for his performances in ...
Willis, Ellen Jane
▪ 2007       American feminist and journalist (b. Dec. 14, 1941, New York, N.Y.—d. Nov. 9, 2006, Queens, N.Y.), agitated for women's rights, especially abortion ...
Willis, Henry
▪ British organ maker born April 27, 1821, London died Feb. 11, 1901, London       British organ builder, a meticulous craftsman and designer whose splendid ...
Willis, Thomas
▪ British physician born Jan. 27, 1621, Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire, Eng. died Nov. 11, 1675, London  British physicians, leader of the English iatrochemists, who attempted to ...
Williston
/wil"euh steuhn/, n. a city in NW North Dakota, on the Missouri River. 13,336. * * * ▪ North Dakota, United States  city, seat (1891) of Williams county, northwestern North ...
williwaw
/wil"ee waw'/, n. a violent squall that blows in near-polar latitudes, as in the Strait of Magellan, Alaska, and the Aleutian Islands. [1835-45; orig. uncert.] * * *
Willkie
/wil"kee/, n. Wendell Lewis, 1892-1944, U.S. executive, lawyer, and political leader. * * *
Willkie, Wendell L(ewis)
born Feb. 18, 1892, Elwood, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 8, 1944, New York, N.Y. U.S. politician. He moved to New York City in 1929 to become an attorney for the Commonwealth and ...
Willkie, Wendell L.
▪ American politician in full  Wendell Lewis Willkie  born Feb. 18, 1892, Elwood, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 8, 1944, New York City  U.S. Republican presidential candidate in ...
Willkie,Wendell Lewis
Will·kie (wĭlʹkē), Wendell Lewis. 1892-1944. American politician who was the Republican nominee for President in 1940. * * *
Willmar
▪ Minnesota, United States       city, seat (1871) of Kandiyohi county, southwest-central Minnesota, U.S. It is situated on Foot and Willmar lakes, in a lake region ...
Willmar City
/wil"mahr, -meuhr/ a city in SW Minnesota. 15,895. * * *
Willmott, Peter
▪ 2001       British sociologist (b. Sept. 18, 1923, Oxford, Eng.—d. April 8, 2000, London, Eng.), examined patterns of kinship and the changing networks of familial ...
Willoughby
/wil"euh bee/, n. 1. a city in NE Ohio, near Cleveland. 19,329. 2. a male given name. * * *
Willoughby, Francis Willoughby, 5th Baron
▪ governor of Barbados born c. 1613, , England died July 1666, at sea between Barbados and St. Kitts       governor of Barbados who in 1651 brought about the ...
willow
—willowlike, adj. —willowish, adj. /wil"oh/, n. 1. any tree or shrub of the genus Salix, characterized by narrow, lance-shaped leaves and dense catkins bearing small flowers, ...
willow family
the plant family Salicaceae, characterized by deciduous trees and shrubs having simple, alternate leaves, hairy catkins of male and female flowers on separate plants, and ...
willow flycatcher.
See under alder flycatcher. * * *
willow herb
any of numerous plants belonging to the genus Epilobium, of the evening primrose family, having terminal clusters of purplish or white flowers. Cf. fireweed. [1570-80] * * * Any ...
willow oak
an oak, Quercus phellos, of the southwestern U.S., having entire, narrow leaves, yielding a hard, heavy wood used in the construction of buildings. [1700-10, Amer.] * * * ▪ ...
Willow Palisade
▪ wall, China Chinese (Pinyin)  Liutiaobian  or  (Wade-Giles romanization)  Liu-t'iao Pien (“Willow Branch Barrier”)        ditch and embankment built across ...
willow pattern
a decorative design in English ceramics, depicting chiefly a willow tree, small bridge, and two birds, derived from Chinese sources and introduced in approximately 1780: often ...
willow ptarmigan
a ptarmigan, Lagopus lagopus, of arctic and subarctic regions of the New and Old Worlds, having brown, mottled plumage in summer and white plumage in winter. Cf. red ...
Willow Run
a suburban area W of Detroit, Michigan, near Ypsilanti: airport. * * *
willow warbler
any of several usually grayish-green leaf warblers, esp. Phylloscopus trochilus, of Europe. [1840-50] * * *
willow-leaved jessamine
/wil"oh leevd'/ a Chilean shrub, Cestrum parqui, of the nightshade family, having willowlike leaves and clusters of whitish or yellowish flowers that are very fragrant at ...
Willowbrook
/wil"oh brook'/, n. a city in SW California. 30,845. * * *
willower
/wil"oh euhr/, n. 1. a person or a thing that willows. 2. willow (def. 4). [1880-85; alter. of willyer; see WILLY, -ER1] * * *
willowherb
willow herb n. See fireweed. * * *
Willowick
/wil"euh wik/, n. a city in NE Ohio, near Cleveland. 17,834. * * *
willowoak
willow oak n. A deciduous timber tree (Quercus phellos) of the southern and central United States, having narrow, linear to oblong willowlike leaves. * * *
willowptarmigan
willow ptarmigan n. The common ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) of Arctic regions, having brownish plumage that turns white in winter. * * *
willowwacks
/wil"oh waks'/, n. New Eng. a wooded, uninhabited area. Also, willywacks. [of uncert. orig.] * * *
willowware
/wil"oh wair'/, n. china using the willow pattern. [1850-55, Amer.; WILLOW + WARE1] * * *
willowy
/wil"oh ee/, adj., willowier, willowiest. 1. pliant; lithe. 2. (of a person) tall, slender, and moving gracefully. 3. abounding with willows. [1760-70; WILLOW + -Y1] * * *
willpower
willpower [wil′pou΄ər] n. strength of will, mind, or determination; self-control * * * will·pow·er or will pow·er (wĭlʹpou'ər) n. The strength of will to carry out ...
Wills
/wilz/, n. Helen Newington /nooh"ing teuhn, nyooh"-/, born 1906, U.S. tennis player. * * *
Wills, Bob
orig. James Robert Wills born March 6, 1905, near Kosse, Texas, U.S. died May 13, 1975, Fort Worth, Texas U.S. country music fiddler, singer, and songwriter. Wills learned ...
Wills, Helen
▪ 1999       American tennis player (b. Oct. 6, 1905, Berkeley, Calif.—d. Jan. 1, 1998, Carmel, Calif.), dominated women's tennis in the 1920s and '30s, winning 31 ...
Wills, Helen (Newington)
or Helen Wills Moody in full Helen Newington Wills Moody Roark born Oct. 6, 1905, Centerville, Calif., U.S. died Jan. 1, 1998, Carmel, Calif. U.S. tennis player. She won the ...
Wills, Maury
▪ American baseball player byname  of Maurice Morning Wills   born Oct. 2, 1932, Washington, D.C.    U.S. professional baseball player and manager, who set base-stealing ...
Wills,Helen Newington
Wills (wĭlz), Helen Newington. Also Helen Wills Moo·dy (mo͞oʹdē) 1906-1998. American tennis player who was the dominant woman player in the 1920s and 1930s. * * *
Willstätter
/vil"shtet'euhrdd/, n. Richard /rddikh"ahrddt/, 1872-1942, German chemist: Nobel prize 1915. * * *
Willstätter, Richard
▪ German chemist born Aug. 13, 1872, Karlsruhe, Ger. died Aug. 3, 1942, Locarno, Switz.       German chemist whose study of the structure of chlorophyll and other plant ...
willy
/wil"ee/, n., pl. willies, v., willied, willying. n. 1. willow (def. 4). v.t. 2. to willow (cotton). Also, willey. [1825-35; special use of dial. willy, OE wilige basket (orig. ...
Willy
/wil"ee/, n. 1. a male given name, form of William. 2. a female given name. * * *
willy wagtail
a large black-and-white bird, Rhipidura leucophrys, of Australia and New Guinea, having bristles around the upper bill and a long, fanlike tail. * * *
willy-nilly
/wil"ee nil"ee/, adv. 1. in a disorganized or unplanned manner; sloppily. 2. whether one wishes to or not; willingly or unwillingly: He'll have to do it willy-nilly. adj. 3. ...
willy-willy
/wil"ee wil'ee/, n., pl. willy-willies. Australian. a severe tropical cyclone. [1890-95; of obscure orig.] * * *
willyard
/wil"yeuhrd/, adj. Scot. and North Eng. obstinate; willful. Also, willyart /wil"yeuhrt/. [1580-90; (earlier) wild, awkward, bewildered, deriv. of Scots, dial. will gone astray, ...
willywacks
/wil"ee waks'/, n. willowwacks. * * *
Wilma
/wil"meuh/, n. a female given name, form of Wilhelmina. * * *
Wilmer
/wil"meuhr/, n. a male given name. * * *
Wilmette
/wil met"/, n. a city in NE Illinois, near Chicago. 28,229. * * * ▪ Illinois, United States  village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. Lying on Lake Michigan ...
Wilmington
—Wilmingtonian /wil'ming toh"nee euhn/, n. /wil"ming teuhn/, n. 1. a seaport in N Delaware, on the Delaware River. 70,195. 2. a seaport in SE North Carolina, on the Cape Fear ...
Wilmington, Spencer Compton, earl of, Viscount Pevensey
▪ English noble also called (1728–30) Baron Wilmington born 1673? died July 2, 1743  British politician, favourite of King George II and nominal prime minister of Great ...
Wilmot
/wil"meuht/, n. 1. David, 1814-68, U.S. politician and jurist: congressman 1845-51; senator 1861-63. 2. John. See Rochester, John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of. * * *
Wilmot Proviso
(1846) Proposal in the U.S. Congress to prohibit the extension of slavery to the territories. Offered by Rep. David Wilmot (1814–68) as an amendment to a bill that purchased ...
Wilms'tumor
Wilms' tumor (wĭlmz) n. A malignant tumor of the kidney that is associated with certain genetic abnormalities and chiefly affects young children. Also called ...
Wilno
/veel"naw/, n. Polish name of Vilnius. * * *
Wilson
/wil"seuhn/, n. 1. Sir Angus (Frank Johnstone) /jon"steuhn, -seuhn/, 1913-91, English writer. 2. August, born 1945, U.S. playwright. 3. Charles Thomson Rees /tom"seuhn rees/, ...
Wilson cloud chamber
Physics. See cloud chamber. Also called Wilson chamber. [named after Charles T. R. WILSON] * * *
Wilson Dam
a dam on the Tennessee River, in NW Alabama, at Muscle Shoals: a part of the Tennessee Valley Authority. 4862 ft. (1482 m) long; 137 ft. (42 m) high. * * *
Wilson disease
or hepatolenticular degeneration Recessive hereditary defect (see recessiveness) that impairs one's ability to metabolize copper. In affected persons, copper accumulates in the ...
Wilson of Rievaulx, Harold Wilson
▪ 1996       BARON, British politician (b. March 11, 1916, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England—d. May 24, 1995, London, England), as the pragmatic leader of the British ...
Wilson Pickett
➡ Pickett * * *
Wilson's Creek, Battle of
▪ American Civil War  (Aug. 10, 1861), in the American Civil War, successful Southern engagement fought between 5,400 Union troops under General Nathaniel Lyon and a combined ...
Wilson's disease
Pathol. a rare hereditary disease in which copper accumulates in the brain and liver, gradually leading to tremors, muscular rigidity, kidney malfunction, and cognitive ...
Wilson's phalarope
a phalarope, Phalaropus tricolor, that breeds in the prairie regions of North America and winters in Argentina and Chile. [1820-30, Amer.; see WILSON'S STORM PETREL] * * *
Wilson's Promontory
Southernmost point of the Australian mainland, southern Victoria. The peninsula, 22 mi (35 km) long with a maximum width of 14 mi (23 km), projects into the Bass Strait and is ...
Wilson's snipe
a North American common snipe, Gallinago (Capella) gallinago delicata. See illus. under snipe. [1855-60, Amer.; see WILSON'S STORM PETREL] * * *
Wilson's storm petrel
a small petrel, Oceanites oceanicus, that breeds in the Southern Hemisphere but ranges into the North Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Also, Wilson's storm-petrel. Also called ...
Wilson's thrush
veery. [1830-40, Amer.; see WILSON'S STORM PETREL] * * *
Wilson's warbler
a North American warbler, Wilsonia pusilla, having yellow plumage and a black patch on top of the head. Cf. pileolated warbler. [1900-05, Amer.; see WILSON'S STORM PETREL] * * *
Wilson'sdisease
Wil·son's disease (wĭlʹsənz) n. A rare hereditary disease caused by a defect in the body's ability to metabolize copper that results in an accumulation of copper deposits in ...
Wilson'sphalarope
Wilson's phalarope n. A grayish American wading bird (Phalaropus tricolor) with white underparts and a needlelike bill.   [After Alexander Wilson (1766-1813), Scottish-born ...
Wilson'ssnipe
Wilson's snipe n. A common North American snipe (Capella gallinago subsp. delicata.)   [After Alexander Wilson (1766-1813), Scottish-born American ornithologist.] * * *
Wilson'sthrush
Wilson's thrush n. See veery.   [After Alexander Wilson (1766-1813), Scottish-born American ornithologist.] * * *
Wilson'swarbler
Wilson's warbler n. A North American warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) with olive-green plumage, yellow underparts, and a black patch on top of the head.   [After Alexander Wilson ...
Wilson, (James) Harold, Baron Wilson (of Rievaulx)
born March 11, 1916, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, Eng. died May 24, 1995, London British politician and prime minister (1964–70, 1974–76). The son of an industrial chemist, he ...
Wilson, (James)Harold.
Wilson, (James) Harold. Baron Wilson of Rievaulx. 1916-1995. British politician who served as prime minister (1964-1970 and 1974-1976). His administration was marked by turmoil ...
Wilson, (Thomas) Woodrow
born Dec. 28, 1856, Staunton, Va., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1924, Washington, D.C. 28th president of the U.S. (1913–21). He earned a law degree and later received his doctorate from ...
Wilson, (Thomas)Woodrow
Wilson, (Thomas) Woodrow. 1856-1924. The 28th President of the United States (1913-1921), whose administration was marked by World War I and the introduction of prohibition. At ...
Wilson, A.N.
▪ British essayist, journalist, and author in full  Andrew Norman Wilson  born Oct. 27, 1950, Stone, Staffordshire, Eng.       English essayist, journalist, and ...
Wilson, Alexander
born July 6, 1766, Paisley, Renfrew, Scot. died Aug. 23, 1813, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. Scottish-born U.S. ornithologist. In Scotland he wrote poetry while working as a weaver ...
Wilson, August
born April 27, 1945, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S. U.S. playwright. He was largely self-educated. A participant in the black aesthetic movement, he cofounded and directed Pittsburgh's ...
Wilson, Augusta Jane Evans
▪ American author née  Augusta Jane Evans   born May 8, 1835, Wynnton [now part of Columbus], Ga., U.S. died May 9, 1909, Mobile, Ala.       American author whose ...
Wilson, Bertha
▪ 2008 Bertha Wernham        Canadian jurist born Sept. 18, 1923, Kirkcaldy, Fifeshire, Scot. died April 28, 2007, Ottawa, Ont. reached the pinnacle of her profession ...
Wilson, C(harles) T(homson) R(ees)
born Feb. 14, 1869, Glencorse, Midlothian, Scot. died Nov. 15, 1959, Carlops, Peeblesshire Scottish physicist. His invention of the Wilson cloud chamber, a device that became ...
Wilson, C.T.R.
▪ British physicist in full  Charles Thomson Rees Wilson  born Feb. 14, 1869, Glencorse, Midlothian, Scot. died Nov. 15, 1959, Carlops, Peeblesshire  Scottish physicist ...
Wilson, Carl Dean
▪ 1999       American guitarist, singer, and songwriter (b. Dec. 21, 1946, Hawthorne, Calif.—d. Feb. 6, 1998, Los Angeles, Calif.), was one of the founders of the ...
Wilson, Cassandra
▪ 2000       For those music lovers wondering whether American vocalist Cassandra Wilson should be considered a jazz, folk, blues, or pop singer, the answer was yes. ...
Wilson, Colin (Henry)
born June 26, 1931, Leicester, Leicestershire, Eng. British writer. Born into a working-class family, he initially thought of a career in science, then gravitated toward ...
Wilson, Dover
▪ British scholar and educator born July 13, 1881, London, Eng. died Jan. 15, 1969, Balerno, Midlothian, Scot.       British Shakespearean scholar (Shakespeare, ...
Wilson, Edith
▪ American first lady née  Edith Bolling,  also called (1896–1915)  Edith Bolling Galt  born October 15, 1872, Wytheville, Virginia, U.S. died December 28, 1961, ...
Wilson, Edmund
born May 8, 1895, Red Bank, N.J., U.S. died June 12, 1972, Talcottville, N.Y. U.S. critic and essayist. He attended Princeton University and initially worked as a reporter and ...
Wilson, Edmund B(eecher)
born Oct. 19, 1856, Geneva, Ill., U.S. died March 3, 1939, New York, N.Y. U.S. cell biologist. He joined the Columbia University faculty in 1891, where he became established as ...
Wilson, Edmund Beecher
▪ American biologist born Oct. 19, 1856, Geneva, Ill., U.S. died March 3, 1939, New York, N.Y.  American biologist known for his researches in embryology and ...
Wilson, Edward O(sborne)
born June 10, 1929, Birmingham, Ala., U.S. U.S. biologist. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University, where he taught from 1956. Recognized as the world's leading authority ...
Wilson, Edward O.
▪ 1996       A worldwide erosion of biological diversity is occurring that bodes ill for the Earth's remaining inhabitants—so warned Harvard University biologist ...
Wilson, Ellen
▪ American first lady née  Ellen Louise Axson  born May 15, 1860, Savannah, Georgia, U.S. died August 6, 1914, Washington, D.C.  American first lady (1913–14), the ...
Wilson, Flip
▪ 1999       American comedian (b. Dec. 8, 1933, Jersey City, N.J.—d. Nov. 25, 1998, Malibu, Calif.), delighted audiences during the 1970s with his outrageous comedy ...
Wilson, Godfrey
▪ British anthropologist born 1908 died May 19, 1944       British anthropologist and analyst of social change in Africa.       In 1938 Wilson was appointed the ...
Wilson, Harold, Baron Wilson Of Rievaulx
▪ prime minister of United Kingdom originally  James Harold Wilson   born March 11, 1916, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, Eng. died May 24, 1995, London   Labour Party politician ...
Wilson, Harriet E.
orig. Harriet E. Adams born 1828?, Milford, N.H.?, U.S. died 1863?, Boston, Mass.? U.S. writer, probably the first African American to publish a novel in English in the U.S. ...
Wilson, Henry
▪ vice president of United States original name  Jeremiah Jones Colbath  born Feb. 16, 1812, Farmington, N.H., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1875, Washington, D.C.  18th vice ...
Wilson, Henry Maitland Wilson, 1st Baron
▪ British field marshal born September 5, 1881, London, England died December 31, 1964, Chilton, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England       British field marshal, ...
Wilson, J Tuzo
▪ 1994       Canadian geophysicist (b. Oct. 24, 1908, Ottawa, Ont.—d. April 15, 1993, Toronto, Ont.), helped rekindle the concept of plate tectonics with his important ...
Wilson, J(ohn) Tuzo
born Oct. 24, 1908, Ottawa, Ont., Can. died April 15, 1993, Toronto, Ont. Canadian geologist and geophysicist. He was the first graduate of a Canadian university in the field ...
Wilson, J. Tuzo
▪ Canadian geologist in full  John Tuzo Wilson   born Oct. 24, 1908, Ottawa, Ont., Can. died April 15, 1993, Toronto, Ont.       Canadian geologist and geophysicist ...
Wilson, Jackie
▪ American singer Introduction byname of  Jack Wilson  born June 9, 1934, Detroit, Mich., U.S. died Jan. 21, 1984, Mount Holly, N.J.       American singer who was a ...
Wilson, James
born Sept. 14, 1742, Fife, Scot. died Aug. 21, 1798, Edenton, N.C., U.S. American colonial lawyer, politician, and jurist. Immigrating to North America in 1765, he taught Greek ...
Wilson, Justin
▪ 2002       American Cajun humorist and chef (b. 1914?, Amite, La.—d. Sept. 5, 2001, Baton Rouge, La.), appeared on public television for some 30 years, showcasing ...
Wilson, Kemmons
▪ 2004       American businessman (b. Jan. 5, 1913, Osceola, Ark.—d. Feb. 12, 2003, Memphis, Tenn.), transformed the motel industry when in the early 1950s he founded ...
Wilson, Kenneth Geddes
▪ American physicist born June 8, 1936, Waltham, Mass., U.S.       American physicist who was awarded the 1982 Nobel Prize for Physics for his development of a general ...
Wilson, Lanford
▪ American playwright in full  Lanford Eugene Wilson  born April 13, 1937, Lebanon, Mo., U.S.       American playwright, a pioneer of the Off-Off-Broadway and ...
Wilson, Lanford (Eugene)
born April 13, 1937, Lebanon, Mo., U.S. U.S. playwright. He began writing plays in 1962 and became cofounder and director of the Circle Repertory Company (1969–95), a ...
Wilson, Mount
▪ mountain, California, United States       peak (5,710 feet [1,740 metres]) in the San Gabriel Mountains of the Angeles National Forest, southern California, U.S. It ...
Wilson, Richard
born Aug. 1, 1714, Penegoes, Montgomeryshire, Wales died May 15, 1782, Llanberis, Carnarvonshire Welsh landscape painter. He worked as a portraitist for many years, but after a ...
Wilson, Robert
▪ 1997       In one sense the opening in June 1996 of Robert Wilson's Time Rocker in the Thalia Theatre in Hamburg, Ger., marked the culmination of the controversial ...
Wilson, Robert Rathbun
▪ 2001       American physicist (b. March 4, 1914, Frontier, Wyo.—d. Jan. 16, 2000, Ithaca, N.Y.), was one of the leading scientists on the Manhattan Project, working ...
Wilson, Robert W(oodrow)
born Jan. 10, 1936, Houston, Texas, U.S. U.S. radio astronomer. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1963 and headed its Radio Physics Research Department (1976–94). With his ...
Wilson, Robert Woodrow
▪ American astronomer born January 10, 1936, Houston, Texas, U.S.    American radio astronomer who shared, with Arno Penzias (Penzias, Arno), the 1978 Nobel Prize for ...
Wilson, Sallie
▪ 2009       American ballerina born April 18, 1932, Fort Worth, Texas died April 27, 2008, New York, N.Y. as a leading dancer with American Ballet Theatre, had an ...
Wilson, Sir Angus
▪ British author born , Aug. 11, 1913, Bexhill, East Sussex, Eng. died May 31, 1991, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, Eng.       British writer whose fiction—sometimes ...
Wilson, Sir Henry Hughes, Baronet
▪ British field marshal born May 5, 1864, near Edgeworthstown, County Longford, Ire. died June 22, 1922, London, Eng.       British field marshal, chief of the British ...
Wilson, Sir Robert
▪ 2003       British astrophysicist (b. April 16, 1927, South Shields, Durham, Eng.—d. Sept. 2, 2002, Chelmsford, Essex, Eng.), was the guiding force behind the ...
Wilson, Sloan
▪ 2004       American novelist (b. May 8, 1920, Norwalk, Conn.—d. May 25, 2003, Colonial Beach, Va.), launched a catchphrase with the title of his best-selling novel ...
Wilson, Teddy
orig. Theodore Shaw Wilson born Nov. 24, 1912, Austin, Texas, U.S. died July 31, 1986, New Britain, Conn. U.S. pianist and bandleader. He began recording as the leader of ...
Wilson, Tony
▪ 2008 Anthony Howard Wilson        British music industry entrepreneur born Feb. 20, 1950, Salford, Lancashire, Eng. died Aug. 10, 2007, Manchester, Eng. as cofounder ...
Wilson, William Julius
born Dec. 20, 1935, Derry Township, Pa., U.S. U.S. sociologist. He spent 24 years on the University of Chicago faculty before moving to Harvard University in 1996. In The ...
Wilson, Woodrow
▪ president of United States Introduction in full  Thomas Woodrow Wilson  born December 28, 1856, Staunton, Virginia, U.S. died February 3, 1924, Washington, D.C.  28th ...
Wilson,August
Wilson, August. Born 1945. American playwright who won a Pulitzer Prize for Fences (1985) and The Piano Lesson (1987). * * *
Wilson,Charles Thomson Rees
Wilson, Charles Thomson Rees. 1869-1959. British physicist. He shared a 1927 Nobel Prize for devising the cloud chamber. * * *
Wilson,Edith Bolling
Wilson, Edith Bolling. 1872-1961. First Lady of the United States (1915-1921) as the second wife of President Woodrow Wilson. She was actively involved in government during the ...
Wilson,Edmund
Wilson, Edmund. 1895-1972. American literary critic whose influential works include Axel's Castle (1931), a study of the symbolist movement, and Patriotic Gore (1962), a critique ...
Wilson,Ellen Louise Axson
Wilson, Ellen Louise Axson. 1860-1914. First Lady of the United States (1913-1914) as the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson. She died during Wilson's first term. * * *
Wilson,Harriet
Wilson, Harriet. 1808-1870?. American author whose work Our Nig (1859) was the first novel by an African American published in the United States. * * *
Wilson,James
Wilson, James. 1742-1798. American Revolutionary patriot and jurist. A signer of the Declaration of Independence, he later served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme ...
Wilson,Mount
Wilson, Mount 1. A mountain, 1,741.6 m (5,710 ft) high, in the San Gabriel Mountains of southwest California northeast of Pasadena. Its observatory was established in 1904. 2. A ...
Wilsoncycle
Wilson cycle n. The cyclical opening and closing of ocean basins caused by movement of the earth's plates.   [After John TuzoWilson (1908-1993), Canadian geophysicist.] * * *
Wilsonian
/wil soh"nee euhn/, adj. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Woodrow Wilson. [1915-20, Amer.; WILSON + -IAN] * * *
Wilsonism
/wil"seuh niz'euhm/, n. the theories, methods, or practices of Woodrow Wilson. Also, Wilsonianism /wil soh"nee euh niz'euhm/. [WILSON + -ISM] * * *
wilt
wilt1 /wilt/, v.i. 1. to become limp and drooping, as a fading flower; wither. 2. to lose strength, vigor, assurance, etc.: to wilt after a day's hard work. v.t. 3. to cause to ...
Wilt Chamberlain
➡ Chamberlain (IV) * * *
Wilton
/wil"tn/, n. a carpet woven like Brussels carpet, on a Jacquard loom but having the loops cut to form a velvet pile. Also called Wilton carpet, Wilton rug. [named after Wilton, ...
Wilton Manor
a town in S Florida. 12,742. * * *
Wiltshire
/wilt"shear, -sheuhr/, n. 1. Also, Wilts /wilts/. a county in S England. 511,600; 1345 sq. mi. (3485 sq. km). Co. seat: Salisbury. 2. one of an English breed of white sheep ...
wily
—wilily, adv. —wiliness, n. /wuy"lee/, adj., wilier, wiliest. full of, marked by, or proceeding from wiles; crafty; cunning. [1250-1300; ME; see WILE, -Y1] Syn. artful, sly, ...
Wiman
▪ Chinese general Chinese  Wei Man  flourished c. 190 BC       Chinese general, or possibly a Korean in Chinese service, who took advantage of the confusion that ...
wimble
/wim"beuhl/, n., v., wimbled, wimbling. n. 1. a device used esp. in mining for extracting the rubbish from a bored hole. 2. a marbleworker's brace for drilling. 3. any of various ...
Wimbledon
/wim"beuhl deuhn/, n. a former borough, now part of Merton, in SE England, near London: international tennis tournaments. * * * Municipal center in the Greater London borough of ...
Wimbledon Championships
Introduction byname of  All-England Championships        internationally known tennis championships played annually in London at Wimbledon.  The tournament, held in ...
Wimborne Minster
▪ England, United Kingdom       town (“parish”), East Dorset district, administrative and historic county of Dorset, England, on the River Allen. Cuthburga and ...
Wimmera
▪ region, Victoria, Australia       region, west-central Victoria, Australia. Thomas Mitchell first surveyed the area in 1836 and named it for an Aboriginal term ...
wimmin
/wim"in/, n.pl. Eye Dialect. women (sometimes also used as a feminist spelling to avoid the sequence m-e-n). [1910-15] * * *
wimp
/wimp/, Informal. n. 1. a weak, ineffectual, timid person. v. 2. wimp out, a. to be or act like a wimp. b. to show timidity or cowardice; chicken out. [1915-20, Amer.; orig. ...
WIMP
/wimp/, n. any of a group of weakly interacting elementary particles predicted by various unified field theories, as the W particle and Z-zero particle, that are characterized by ...
wimpish
See wimp. * * *
wimple
/wim"peuhl/, n., v., wimpled, wimpling. n. 1. a woman's headcloth drawn in folds about the chin, formerly worn out of doors, and still in use by some nuns. 2. Chiefly Scot. a. a ...
wimpy
—wimpiness, n. /wim"pee/, adj., wimpier, wimpiest. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a wimp. Also, wimpish. [1965-70; WIMP + -Y1] * * *
Wimsey
a character in several crime novels by Dorothy Sayers. He is an English lord who is a very good amateur detective. * * *
Wimshurst machine
/wimz"herrst/, Elect. a device for the production of electric charge by electrostatic induction, consisting of two oppositely rotating glass or mica disks carrying metal strips ...
Wimshurstmachine
Wims·hurst machine (wĭmzʹhûrst') n. An electrostatic generator having oppositely rotating mica or glass disks with metal carriers on which charges are produced by induction, ...
win
win1 —winnable, adj. /win/, v., won, winning, n. v.i. 1. to finish first in a race, contest, or the like. 2. to succeed by striving or effort: He applied for a scholarship and ...
win possession
➡ Rugby * * *
win-win
/win"win"/, adj. advantageous to both sides, as in a negotiation: a win-win proposal; a win-win situation. [1980-85] * * *
Winam Gulf
▪ bay, Kenya formerly  Kavirondo Gulf,         gulf of the northeastern corner of Lake Victoria, southwestern Kenya, East Africa. It is a shallow inlet, 35 mi (56 km) ...
Winbergh, Gosta
▪ 2003       Swedish opera singer (b. Dec. 30, 1943, Stockholm, Swed.—d. March 18, 2002, Vienna, Austria), abandoned a career in structural engineering for one in ...
wince
wince1 —wincer, n. —wincingly, adv. —wincingness, n. /wins/, v., winced, wincing, n. v.i. 1. to draw back or tense the body, as from pain or from a blow; start; ...
wincer
See wince. * * *
winceyette
winceyette [win΄sē et′] n. 〚wincey, a kind of fabric, altered
winch
winch1 —wincher, n. /winch/, n. 1. the crank or handle of a revolving machine. 2. a windlass turned by a crank, for hoisting or hauling. 3. any of various devices for ...
Winchcombe
▪ England, United Kingdom       village (“parish”), Tewkesbury borough, administrative and historic county of Gloucestershire, England, on the River Isbourne, near ...
Winchell
/win"cheuhl/, n. Walter, 1897-1972, U.S. newspaper columnist and radio and television broadcaster. * * *
Winchell, Paul
▪ 2006 Paul Wilchin        American ventriloquist and voice-over artist (b. Dec. 21, 1922, New York, N.Y.—d. June 24, 2005, Moorpark, Calif.), was a familiar presence ...
Winchell, Walter
orig. Walter Winchel born April 7, 1897, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 20, 1972, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. journalist and broadcaster. He entered vaudeville at age 13 and ...
Winchell,Walter
Win·chell (wĭnʹchəl), Walter. 1897-1972. American journalist whose newspaper column “On Broadway” (1924-1963) and radio newscasts (1932-1953) reported on entertainment ...
Winchelsea
▪ historic place, England, United Kingdom       place in Rother district, administrative county of East Sussex, historic county of Sussex, England, with historical ...
Winchelsey, Robert
▪ archbishop of Canterbury died 1313, Otford, Kent, Eng.       archbishop of Canterbury who was a champion of clerical privilege and a leading opponent of kings Edward ...
wincher
See winch. * * *
Winchester
/win"ches'teuhr, -cheuh steuhr/, n. 1. a city in Hampshire, in S England: cathedral; capital of the early Wessex kingdom and of medieval England. 88,700. 2. a town in E ...
Winchester bushel.
See under bushel1 (def. 1). [1695-1705; after WINCHESTER, England] * * *
Winchester College
➡ Winchester (I) * * * ▪ school, Winchester, England, United Kingdom       one of the oldest of the great public schools of England, in Winchester, Hampshire. Its ...
Winchester disk
Computers. a hard disk that is permanently mounted in its unit. Also called Winchester. [1970-75; orig. an IBM code name; the designation for a device containing two such disks ...
Winchester rifle
a type of magazine rifle, first made in about 1866. [1870-75; named after D. F. Winchester (1810-80), American manufacturer] * * *
Winchester school
▪ English art  painting style of English illuminated manuscripts produced primarily at Winchester but also at Canterbury and in various southern monasteries in the 10th and ...
Winchester, Oliver (Fisher)
born Nov. 30, 1810, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Dec. 11, 1880, New Haven, Conn. U.S. manufacturer of guns and ammunition. He initially set up a factory to manufacture dress ...
Winchester, Oliver Fisher
▪ American manufacturer born Nov. 30, 1810, Boston died Dec. 11, 1880, New Haven, Conn., U.S.       U.S. manufacturer of guns and ammunition who developed the ...
Winchesterdisk
Winchester disk n. An early type of hard disk.   [After the Winchester, tradename for a.30-30 rifle, a rifle shooting a.30-caliber bullet with a powder grain size designation of ...
Winckelmann
/ving"keuhl mahn'/, n. Johann Joachim /yoh"hahn yoh"ah khim/, 1717-68, German archaeologist and art historian. * * *
Winckelmann, Johann
▪ German art historian born , Dec. 9, 1717, Stendal, Prussia died June 8, 1768, Trieste       German archaeologist and art historian whose writings directed popular ...
Winckelmann, Johann (Joachim)
born Dec. 9, 1717, Stendal, Prussia died June 8, 1768, Trieste, Austria German archaeologist and art historian. The son of a cobbler, he studied theology and medicine before he ...
Winckelmann,Johann Joachim
Winck·el·mann (vĭngʹkəl-män'), Johann Joachim. 1717-1768. German archaeologist and art historian. His book History of Ancient Art (1764) is a seminal work of modern ...
Winckler, Hugo
▪ German archaeologist born July 4, 1863, Gräfenhainchen, Saxony [Germany] died April 19, 1913, Berlin, Ger.       German archaeologist and historian whose excavations ...
wind
wind1 n. /wind/, Literary /wuynd/; v. /wind/, n. 1. air in natural motion, as that moving horizontally at any velocity along the earth's surface: A gentle wind blew through the ...
WInd
West Indian. Also, W.Ind. * * * I Movement of air relative to the surface of the Earth. Wind is an important factor in determining and controlling climate and weather. It is ...
Wind Cave National Park
/wind/ a national park in SW South Dakota. 411/2 sq. mi. (107 sq. km). * * * National park, southwestern South Dakota, U.S. Established in 1903 to preserve limestone caverns and ...
wind chill
Still-air temperature that would have the same cooling effect on exposed skin as a given combination of temperature and wind speed. As the wind speed increases, the wind chill ...
wind chimes
/wind/ an arrangement of bells, bamboo pipes, or glass or ceramic fragments hung so as to strike each other and tinkle when moved by the wind or, in orchestration, touched by the ...
wind colic
/wind/, Vet. Pathol. (esp. in horses) flatulence caused by gases that result from the eating of fermenting vegetation; bloat. [1585-95] * * *
wind cone
/wind/ windsock. [1915-20] * * *
wind energy
/wind/. See wind power. * * *
wind erosion
/wind/ the erosion, transportation, and deposition of topsoil by the wind, esp. in dust storms. [1900-05] * * *
wind farm
wind farm n. a network of densely packed, high-speed, modern windmills, for generating electricity * * *
wind gap
/wind/ a cut that indents only the upper part of a mountain ridge, usually a former water gap. [1760-70, Amer.] * * *
wind gauge
/wind/ 1. anemometer. 2. a scale on the rear sight of a rifle by which the sight is adjusted to correct for windage. [1645-55] * * *
wind generator
/wind/ 1. an electric generator situated on a tower and driven by the force of wind on blades or a rotor. 2. a wind plant. * * *
wind harp
/wind/. See aeolian harp. [1805-15] * * *
Wind in the Willows
a children’s novel (1908) by Kenneth Grahame. It describes the adventures and relationships of a group of small animals, including a mole, a rat, a toad and a badger, who live ...
wind indicator
/wind/ a large weather vane used at airports to indicate wind direction. * * *
wind instrument
/wind/ a musical instrument sounded by the breath or other air current, as the trumpet, trombone, clarinet, or flute. [1575-85] * * * ▪ music Introduction       any ...
wind plant
/wind/ a grouping of devices, consisting of a tower, propellers, alternator, generator, and storage batteries, designed to produce electricity by converting the mechanical force ...
wind poppy
/wind/ a Californian plant, Stylomecon heterophylla, of the poppy family, having satiny, brick-red flowers with purple centers. * * *
wind power
/wind/ power derived from wind: used to generate electricity or mechanical power. Also called wind energy. [1900-05] * * * Use of the energy in winds to produce power. Though ...
wind pump
/wind/ a pump driven by a windmill. [1650-60] * * *
Wind River
▪ river, Wyoming, United States       river in west-central Wyoming, U.S. It rises in several branches at the northern edge of the Wind River Range in the Shoshone ...


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