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Слова на букву arti-boom (15990)

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Babson
/bab"seuhn/, n. Roger Ward, 1875-1967, U.S. statistician and businessman. * * *
Babson College
▪ college, Wellesley, Massachusetts, United States       private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Wellesley, Massachusetts, U.S. Business management ...
babu
/bah"booh/, n. 1. a Hindu title of address equivalent to Sir, Mr., or Esquire. 2. a Hindu gentleman. 3. a native Indian clerk who writes English. 4. Usually Disparaging. any ...
Babu Chhiri Sherpa
▪ 2002       Nepalese mountaineer (b. June 22, 1965, Taksindu, Nepal—d. April 29, 2001, Mt. Everest), was a legendary guide who reached the summit of Mt. Everest 10 ...
Babu, Abdul Rahman Mohammed
▪ 1997       Tanzanian politician who, as left-wing champion of the anticolonial Pan-African movement of the mid-20th century, laid the ideological groundwork for the ...
babul
/beuh boohl", bah"boohl/, n. 1. any of several leguminous trees of the genus Acacia that yield a gum, esp. A. nilotica, of tropical Africa. 2. the gum, pods, or bark of such a ...
Babur
/bah"beuhr/, n. Baber. * * * orig. Ẓahīr al-Dīn Muḥammad born Feb. 15, 1483, principality of Fergana died Dec. 26, 1530, Agra, India Emperor (1526–30) and founder of ...
Baburen, Dirck van
▪ Dutch painter original name  Theodor Baburen,  Theodor also spelled  Theodoor  born c. 1595, Utrecht, Neth. died Feb. 21, 1624, Utrecht       Dutch painter who ...
babushka
/beuh boosh"keuh, -boohsh"-/, n. 1. a woman's scarf, often triangular, used as a hood with two of the ends tied under the chin. 2. an elderly Russian woman, esp. an elderly ...
Babuyan Islands
/bah'booh yahn"/ a group of islands in the Philippines, N of Luzon. 225 sq. mi. (580 sq. km). * * * Island group, northern Philippines. Lying north of Luzon, it consists of ...
BabuyanIslands
Ba·bu·yan Islands (bä'bo͞o-yänʹ) An island group of the Philippines separated from the northern coast of Luzon by the narrow Babuyan Channel. The group comprises 24 ...
baby
—babyhood, n. —babyish, adj. —babyishly, adv. —babyishness, n. —babylike, adj. /bay"bee/, n., pl. babies, adj., v., babied, babying. n. 1. an infant or very young ...
baby beef
1. a young beef animal that has been fattened for marketing when 12 to 20 months old. 2. the meat of a baby beef. [1885-90, Amer.] * * *
Baby Bell
one of the seven regional telephone companies formed after the breakup of the Bell system in 1983. [1985-90, Amer.] * * *
baby blue
—baby-blue, adj. 1. a very light blue. 2. baby blues, Informal. a person's blue eyes: His charm lies largely in the way he bats his baby blues. [1885-90, Amer.] * * *
baby blue-eyes
☆ baby blue-eyes [blo͞o′īz΄ ] n. a native Calif. wildflower (Nemophila menziesii) of the waterleaf family with bell-shaped flowers * * *
baby book
an album for mounting pictures and other memorabilia of a baby and for keeping a record of its growth from infancy. * * *
baby boom
a period of sharp increase in the birthrate, as that in the U.S. following World War II. [1950-55] * * * In the U.S., increase in the birth rate between 1946 and 1964; also, the ...
baby boomer
a person born during a baby boom, esp. one born in the U.S. between 1946 and 1965. [1970-75; BABY BOOM + -ER1] * * *
Baby Boomers
➡ Baby Boom * * *
baby bust
—baby buster. a period of sharp decrease in the birthrate, as that in the United States after 1965. [1970-75, Amer.] * * *
baby carriage
a conveyance similar to an infant's crib set on four wheels and meant to be pushed. Also called baby buggy, carriage. [1865-70] * * *
baby coach
Chiefly Eastern Pennsylvania and Chesapeake Bay. a baby carriage. * * *
baby doll
1. a doll, esp. one resembling a human baby. 2. Often, baby dolls. Also called baby doll nightgown, baby doll pajamas. a garment for women or girls consisting of a hip-length top ...
baby face
—baby-faced, adj. 1. a face having a bland babyish or childish appearance, esp. a plump, small-featured face unmarked by characteristic lines. 2. a person having such a ...
baby farm
—baby farmer. —baby farming. Informal. 1. a place that houses and takes care of babies for a fee. 2. a residence for unwed pregnant girls or women that also arranges ...
baby food
food, as vegetables, fruits, or meat, puréed or minced for easy ingestion by infants. [1895-1900] * * *
baby grand
the smallest form of the grand piano. Also called baby grand piano. [1900-05] * * *
baby primrose
a tender primrose, Primula forbesii, native to China and Burma, having white, hairy leaves and rose- or lilac-colored flowers with a yellow center. * * *
Baby Ruth{™}
a popular make of US chocolate bar that is filled with peanuts. * * *
baby sitter
☆ baby sitter n. a person hired to take care of a child or children, as when the parents are away for the evening: also baby-sitter or babysitter * * *
baby split
Bowling. a split in which the two and seven pins or the three and ten pins remain standing. * * *
baby spot
a small spotlight, usually 250-400 watts, used to highlight a specific section of a stage setting or acting area. Also called baby spotlight. * * *
baby step
(in the game of giant steps) the shortest step permitted a player, executed by placing the heel of one foot against the toe of the other and drawing the back foot up to the front ...
baby talk
1. the speech of children learning to talk, marked by syntactic differences from adult speech and by phonetic modifications like lisping, lalling, omission and substitution of ...
baby tooth
baby tooth n. MILK TOOTH * * *
baby tooth.
See milk tooth. * * *
Baby Yar
Large ravine near Kiev, Ukraine, the site of a mass grave of some 100,000 people killed by German Nazi SS squads between 1941 and 1943. Most of the victims were Jews, but some ...
baby's breath
baby's breath n. any of a genus (Gypsophila) of the pink family, having small, delicate, white or pink flowers * * * Either of two species of herbaceous plants of the genus ...
baby's-breath
/bay"beez breth'/, n. a tall plant, Gypsophila paniculata, of the pink family, having lance-shaped leaves and numerous small, fragrant, white or pink flowers. Also, ...
baby's-tears
/bay"beez tearz'/, n., pl. baby's-tears. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) a mosslike plant, Soleirolia (or Helxine) soleirolii, of the nettle family, native to Corsica and Sardinia, ...
baby'sbreath
ba·by's breath (bāʹbēz) n. Any of several Eurasian plants of the genus Gypsophila, such as G. paniculata, having numerous small, white flowers in profusely branched panicles. ...
baby'stears
baby's tears also ba·by-tears (bāʹbē-tîrz') pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) An evergreen, mat-forming perennial (Soleirolia soleirolii) native to Corsica and ...
baby-blue-eyes
/bay"bee blooh"uyz'/, n., pl. baby-blue-eyes. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) any of several plants of the genus Nemophila, of western North America, esp. N. menziesii, a ...
baby-boom
See baby boom. * * *
baby-bust
See baby bust. * * *
baby-sit
—baby-sitter, babysitter, n. /bay"bee sit'/, v., baby-sat, baby-sitting. v.i. 1. to take charge of a child while the parents are temporarily away. v.t. 2. to baby-sit for (a ...
BabyBell
Ba·by Bell (bāʹbē) n. Any of the seven regional telephone companies created in 1984 when AT&T was ordered to divest itself of its local telephone service ...
babyblue
baby blue n. A very light to very pale greenish or purplish blue. * * *
babybond
baby bond n. A bond issued in an amount less than $1,000. * * *
babyboom
baby boom n. A sudden large increase in the birthrate, especially the one in the United States from the later 1940s through the early 1960s.   baʹby-boom' (bāʹbē-bo͞om') ...
babyboomer
baby boomer also ba·by-boom·er (bāʹbē-bo͞o'mər) n. A member of a baby-boom generation. * * *
babyboomlet
baby boomlet n. An increase in the birthrate that is smaller than a baby boom, especially that in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s. * * *
babybuggy
baby buggy n. See baby carriage. * * *
babybust
baby bust n. A sudden decline in the birthrate, especially the one in the United States from about 1961 to 1981.   baʹby-bust' (bāʹbē-bŭst') adj. * * *
babybuster
baby buster also ba·by-bust·er (bāʹbē-bŭs'tər) n. A member of a baby-bust generation. * * *
babycarriage
baby carriage n. A four-wheeled carriage, often having a hood that folds back and a handle for pushing, used for wheeling an infant about. Also called baby buggy. * * *
Babycham{™}
n [C, U] a British fizzy alcoholic drink made from pears. It is advertised with a picture of a small deer with a blue ribbon round its neck. * * *
babygrand
baby grand n. A small grand piano about 1.5 meters (5 feet) long. * * *
babyhood
See baby. * * *
babyish
See babyhood. * * *
Babylon
/bab"euh leuhn, -lon'/, n. 1. an ancient city of SW Asia, on the Euphrates River, famed for its magnificence and culture: capital of Babylonia and later of the Chaldean ...
Babylonia
/bab'euh loh"nee euh, -lohn"yeuh/, n. an ancient empire in SW Asia, in the lower Euphrates valley: its greatest period was 2800-1750 B.C. Cap.: Babylon. * * * Ancient cultural ...
Babylonian
/bab'euh loh"nee euhn, -lohn"yeuhn/, adj. Also, Babylonish. 1. of or pertaining to Babylon or Babylonia. 2. extremely luxurious. 3. wicked; sinful. n. 4. an inhabitant of ancient ...
Babylonian calendar
▪ chronology       chronological system used in ancient Mesopotamia (Mesopotamia, history of), based on a year of 12 synodic months; i.e., 12 complete cycles of phases ...
Babylonian captivity
1. the period of the exile of the Jews in Babylonia, 597-538 B.C. 2. the exile of the popes at Avignon, 1309-77. * * *
Babylonian Exile
Babylonian Exile n. the exile of the Jews, deported by Nebuchadnezzar into Babylonia in 597 B.C. and permitted to return by Cyrus in 538 B.C. * * * or Babylonian ...
Babylonian Talmud
▪ Judaism also called  Talmud Bavli        one of two compilations of Jewish religious teachings and commentary that was transmitted orally for centuries prior to its ...
Babylonish
/bab"euh lon'ish, -loh'nish, bab'euh loh"nish, bab"euh leuh nish/, adj. Babylonian. [1525-35; BABYLON(IA) + -ISH1] * * *
babyproof
/bay"bee proohf'/, adj., v.t. childproof. Also, baby-proof. [BABY + -PROOF] * * *
babysitter
ba·by·sit·ter also ba·by-sit·ter (bāʹbē-sĭt'ər) n. 1. A person engaged to care for one or more children in the temporary absence of parents or guardians. 2. A person ...
babytee
baby tee n. 1. A T-shirt designed for a baby or young child. 2. A close-fitting, often short T-shirt worn especially by young women and teenage girls. * * *
babytooth
baby tooth n. See milk tooth. * * *
BAC
blood-alcohol concentration: the percentage of alcohol in the bloodstream: under the laws of most states, a BAC of 0.10 is the legal definition of intoxication, although a few ...
Bac Lieu
▪ Vietnam       city, eastern Ca Mau Peninsula, southern Vietnam. It has a hospital and a commercial airport and is linked by highway to Ho Chi Minh City, 120 miles (195 ...
Bacab
▪ Mayan mythology       in Mayan mythology, any of four gods, thought to be brothers, who, with upraised arms, supported the multilayered sky from their assigned ...
Bacabal
/bah'kah bawl"/, n. a city in NE Brazil. 111,753. * * *
bacalao
/bah'keuh low", bak'euh-/; Sp. /bah'kah lah"aw/, n., pl. bacalaos /-lowz"/; Sp. /-lah"aws/. Spanish or Spanish-American Cookery. 1. codfish, esp. when dried and salted. 2. a dish ...
Bacall
/beuh kawl"/, n. Lauren (Betty Joan Perske), born 1924, U.S. actress. * * *
Bacall, Lauren
orig. Betty Joan Perske born Sept. 6, 1924, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. actress. She worked as a model while seeking Broadway roles; her photograph on a magazine cover led to ...
Bacan
▪ island, Indonesia also spelled  Bachan , or  Batjan        island, North Maluku propinsi (province), Indonesia. One of the northern Moluccas, in the Molucca Sea, ...
Bacardi
/beuh kahr"dee/ 1. Trademark. a brand of dry rum of the West Indies. n. 2. a cocktail made with Bacardi rum, grenadine, and lime juice. * * *
Bacau
/bah ku"oo/; Eng. /beuh kow"/, n. a city in E Rumania. 141,981. * * * ▪ Romania       city, capital of Bacău județ (county), eastern Romania, near the confluence of ...
bacca
/bak"euh/, n., pl. baccae /bak"ee/. Bot. a berry. [ < L bacca, baca olive, any round fruit, berry] * * *
baccalaureate
/bak'euh lawr"ee it, -lor"-/, n. 1. See bachelor's degree. 2. a religious service held at an educational institution, usually on the Sunday before commencement day. 3. See ...
baccalaureate sermon
a farewell sermon addressed to a graduating class in some U.S. colleges and schools. [1860-65] * * *
baccarat
/bah"keuh rah', bak"euh-; bah'keuh rah", bak'euh-/; Fr. /bann kann rddann"/, n. a gambling game at cards played by a banker and two or more punters who bet against the ...
Baccarat glass
Glassware manufactured since 1765 in Baccarat, France. The firm originally produced soda glass for windows and industrial use. In 1816 it was acquired by a Belgian manufacturer ...
baccate
/bak"ayt/, adj. Bot. 1. berrylike. 2. bearing berries. [1820-30; < L baca, bacca berry + -ATE1] * * *
Bacchae
/bak"ee/, n.pl. Class. Myth. 1. the female attendants of Bacchus. 2. the priestesses of Bacchus. 3. the women who took part in the Bacchanalia. [ < L < Gk Bákkhai, pl. of ...
bacchanal
n. /bah'keuh nahl", bak'euh nal", bak"euh nl/; adj. /bak"euh nl/, n. 1. a follower of Bacchus. 2. a drunken reveler. 3. an occasion of drunken revelry; orgy; bacchanalia. adj. 4. ...
Bacchanalia
—bacchanalian, adj., n. —bacchanalianism, n. /bak'euh nay"lee euh, -nayl"yeuh/, n., pl. Bacchanalia, Bacchanalias. 1. (sometimes used with a pl. v.) a festival in honor of ...
bacchanalian
See Bacchanalian. * * *
Bacchanalian
See Bacchanalia. * * *
bacchant
—bacchantic, adj. /bak"euhnt, beuh kant", -kahnt"/, n., pl. bacchants, bacchantes /beuh kan"teez, -kahn"-/, adj. n. 1. a priest, priestess, or votary of Bacchus; bacchanal. 2. ...
bacchante
/beuh kan"tee, -kahn"-, beuh kant", -kahnt"/, n. a female bacchant. Also called maenad, menad, Thyiad. [1790-1800; back formation from L bacchantes, fem. pl. of BACCHANS ...
bacchantes
bac·chan·tes (bə-kănʹtēz, -känʹ-, -kăntsʹ, -käntsʹ) n. A plural of bacchant. * * *
bacchantic
See bacchant. * * *
Bacchelli, Riccardo
▪ Italian author born April 19, 1891, Bologna, Italy died Oct. 8, 1985, Monza       Italian poet, playwright, literary critic, and novelist who championed the literary ...
Bacchic
/bak"ik/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or honoring Bacchus. 2. (l.c.) riotously or jovially intoxicated; drunken. [1660-70; < L Bacchicus < Gk Bakkhikós. See BACCHUS, -IC] * * *
bacchius
/beuh kuy"euhs, ba-/, n., pl. bacchii /-kuy"uy/. Pros. a foot of three syllables that in quantitative meter consists of one short syllable followed by two long ones, and that in ...
Bacchus
/bak"euhs/, n. Class. Myth. the god of wine; Dionysus. [ < L < Gk Bákkhos] * * *
Bacchus Marsh
▪ Victoria, Australia       town in southern Victoria, Australia. It is located 32 miles (51 km) northwest of Melbourne (to which a growing proportion of its residents ...
Bacchylides
/beuh kil"i deez'/, n. fl. 5th century B.C., Greek poet. * * * ▪ Greek lyric poet born c. 510 BC, Ceos [Cyclades, Greece]    Greek lyric poet, nephew of the poet Simonides ...
bacci-
a combining form meaning "berry," used in the formation of compound words: baccivorous. [ < L, comb. form of bacca, baca] * * *
bacciferous
/bak sif"euhr euhs/, adj. Bot. bearing or producing berries. [1650-60; < L baccifer (see BACCI-, -FER) + -OUS] * * *
bacciform
bacciform [bak′sə fôrm΄] adj. shaped like a berry * * *
Baccio d'Agnolo
▪ Italian architect byname of  Bartolomeo d'Agnolo Baglioni   born May 15, 1462 died March 6, 1543, Florence [Italy]       wood-carver, sculptor, and architect who ...
baccivorous
/bak siv"euhr euhs/, adj. feeding on berries. [1655-65; BACCI- + -VOROUS] * * *
baccy
/bak"ee/, n., pl. baccies. Older Use. tobacco. [1825-35; by aphesis and alter. of final schwa to folk regional -y] * * *
bach
/bach/, Informal. v. 1. bach it, to live alone or share living quarters with someone of the same sex, usually doing one's own housework, cooking, laundry, etc. n. 2. a ...
Bach
/bahkh/, n. 1. Johann Sebastian /yoh"hahn si bas"cheuhn/; Ger. /yoh"hahn zay bahs"tee ahn'/, 1685-1750, German organist and composer. 2. his sons: Carl Philipp Emanuel /kahrl ...
Bach Long Vi
▪ island, Vietnam       island of northern Vietnam in the Gulf of Tonkin, halfway between the mouth of the Red River (Song Hong) near Nam Dinh and the Chinese island of ...
Bach trumpet
a three-valved trumpet designed especially for playing the high, florid trumpet parts in the works of J. S. Bach and other baroque composers. Cf. clarino. * * *
Bach, Alexander, baron von
born Jan. 4, 1813 died 1893 Austrian politician noted for instituting a system of centralized control. He served as minister of the interior (1849–59); after the death of ...
Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel
born March 8, 1714, Weimar, Saxe-Weimar died Dec. 14, 1788, Hamburg German composer. Second son of Johann Sebastian Bach, he received a superb musical education from his ...
Bach, Johann Christian
born Sept. 5, 1735, Leipzig died Jan. 1, 1782, London, Eng. German-born British composer. Youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach, he studied with his brother Carl Philipp ...
Bach, Johann Christoph Friedrich
▪ German composer born June 21, 1732, Leipzig died Jan. 26, 1795, Bückeburg, Prussia       longest surviving son of J.S. and Anna Magdalena Bach.       Probably ...
Bach, Johann Sebastian
born March 21, 1685, Eisenach, Thuringia, Ernestine Saxon Duchies died July 28, 1750, Leipzig German composer. Born to a musical family, he became a superbly well-rounded ...
Bach, Wilhelm Friedemann
born Nov. 22, 1710, Weimar, Saxe-Weimar died July 1, 1784, Berlin German composer and organist. Eldest son of Johann Sebastian Bach, he was trained by his father. One of the ...
Bach,Johann Sebastian
Bach (bäKH, bäk), Johann Sebastian. 1685-1750. German composer and organist of the late baroque period. Among the greatest composers in history, he wrote more than 200 ...
Bacharach
/bak"euh rak', bak"rak/, n. Burt, born 1929, U.S. songwriter. * * *
Bacharach, Burt
born May 12, 1928, Kansas City, Mo., U.S. U.S. songwriter and pianist. He studied under Darius Milhaud, Bohuslav Martinů, and Henry Cowell. In the 1950s he wrote arrangements ...
Bachchan Rai, Aishwarya
▪ Indian actress née  Aishwarya Rai  born Nov. 1, 1973, Mangalore, Karnataka state, India    Indian actress whose classic beauty made her one of Bollywood's premier ...
Bachchan, Amitabh
(b. Oct. 11, 1942, Allahabad, India) Indian film actor. Bachchan's first film success was Zanjeer (1973); by the end of the 1970s he was something of a cultural phenonemon in ...
Bachchan, Harivansh Rai
▪ 2004       Indian poet (b. Nov. 27, 1907, Allahabad, United Provinces [now Uttar Pradesh], India—d. Jan. 18, 2003, Mumbai [Bombay], Maharashtra, India), was one of ...
Bachelet, Michelle
▪ 2007  On March 11, 2006, Michelle Bachelet was sworn in as the first woman president of Chile. Although she represented the ruling centre-left Concertación coalition, ...
Bacheller, Irving
▪ American writer born Sept. 26, 1859, Pierpont, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 24, 1950, White Plains, N.Y.  journalist and novelist whose books, generally set in upper New York ...
bachelor
—bachelorlike, adj. —bachelorly, adj. /bach"euh leuhr, bach"leuhr/, n. 1. an unmarried man. 2. a person who has been awarded a bachelor's degree. 3. a fur seal, esp. a young ...
bachelor apartment
bachelor apartment n. EFFICIENCY APARTMENT * * *
bachelor chest
Eng. Furniture. a low chest of drawers of the 18th century, having a top inclining to form a writing surface. * * *
bachelor girl
an unmarried woman, esp. a young one, who supports herself and often lives alone. [1890-95] Usage. See girl. * * *
Bachelor of Arts
1. a bachelor's degree in the liberal arts, usually awarded for studies in the social sciences or humanities. 2. a person having this degree. Abbr.: A.B., B.A. [1570-80] * * *
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
➡ bachelor’s degree * * *
Bachelor of Science
1. a bachelor's degree, usually awarded for studies in natural science, pure science, or technology. 2. a person having this degree. Abbr.: B.S., B.Sc., S.B., Sc.B. [1850-55, ...
Bachelor of Science (BSc)
➡ bachelor’s degree * * *
bachelor party.
See stag party (def. 2). [1920-25] * * *
bachelor's
/bach"euh leuhrz, bach"leuhrz/, n. Informal. See bachelor's degree. * * *
bachelor's button
bachelor's button n. any of several plants of a genus (Centaurea) of the composite family, that have scaly, vase-shaped bracts below the white, pink, or blue flowers; esp., the ...
bachelor's degree
a degree awarded by a college or university to a person who has completed undergraduate studies. Also called baccalaureate. * * *
bachelor's-button
/bach"euh leuhrz but'n, bach"leuhrz-/, n. any of various plants with round flower heads, esp. the cornflower. [1570-80] * * *
bachelor'sbutton
bachelor's button n. 1. See cornflower. 2. Any of several plants that have buttonlike flowers or flower heads. * * *
bachelor'sdegree
bachelor's degree n. An academic degree conferred by a college or university upon those who complete the undergraduate curriculum. Also called baccalaureate. * * *
bachelor-at-arms
/bach"euh leuhr euht ahrmz", bach"leuhr-/, n., pl. bachelors-at-arms. bachelor (def. 4). * * *
bachelordom
See bachelor. * * *
bachelorette
/bach'euh leuh ret", bach'leuh-/, n. an unmarried young woman. [1900-05; BACHELOR + -ETTE] Usage. See -ette. * * *
bachelorhood
/bach"euh leuhr hood', bach"leuhr-/, n. the state of being a bachelor. Also, bachelordom. [1825-35; BACHELOR + -HOOD] * * *
bachelorism
/bach"euh leuh riz'euhm, bach"leuh-/, n. 1. state of being a bachelor. 2. a characteristic or peculiarity of a bachelor: Excessive tidiness had been added to his ...
bachelorship
See bachelordom. * * *
bachelor’s degree
n (fml) the first degree that you get when you study at a university. Bachelor’s degrees include Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BSc). Compare master’s ...
Bachman, John
▪ American naturalist and minister born Feb. 4, 1790, Rhinebeck, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 24, 1874, Columbia, S.C.       naturalist and Lutheran minister who helped write ...
Bachmann, Ingeborg
▪ Austrian author born June 25, 1926, Klagenfurt, Austria died Oct. 17, 1973, Rome, Italy       Austrian author whose sombre, surreal writings often deal with women in ...
Bachofen, Johann Jakob
▪ Swiss jurist and anthropologist born Dec. 22, 1815, Basel, Switz. died Nov. 25, 1887, Basel       Swiss jurist and early anthropological writer whose book Das ...
Baciccio
▪ Italian painter byname of  Giovanni Battista Gaulli   born May 8, 1639, Genoa [Italy] died April 2, 1709, Rome  leading Roman Baroque painter of the second half of the ...
bacill-
a combining form of bacillus: bacillary. * * *
Bacillariophyceae
      class of fuccous algae, commonly known as diatoms, in the division Chromophyta. See diatom. * * *
bacillary
/bas"euh ler'ee, beuh sil"euh ree/, adj. 1. Also, bacilliform /beuh sil"euh fawrm'/. of or like a bacillus; rod-shaped. 2. Bacteriol. characterized by bacilli. Also, bacillar ...
bacillary dysentery
Pathol. shigellosis. [1905-10] * * *
bacillemia
/bas'euh lee"mee euh/, n. Pathol. the presence of bacilli in the blood. [BACILL- + -EMIA] * * *
bacilli
bacilli [bə sil′ī΄] n. pl. of BACILLUS * * *
bacilliform
bacilliform [bə sil′ə fôrm′] adj. rod-shaped; shaped like a bacillus * * *
bacillite
      in geology, a type of crystallite (q.v.). * * *
bacilluria
/bas'euh loor"ee euh/, n. Pathol. the presence of bacilli in the urine. [1880-85; BACILL- + -URIA] * * *
bacillus
/beuh sil"euhs/, n., pl. bacilli /-sil"uy/. 1. any rod-shaped or cylindrical bacterium of the genus Bacillus, comprising spore-producing bacteria. See diag. under bacteria. 2. ...
bacillus Calmette-Guérin
/kal met"gay raonn", -ran"/ a weakened strain of the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium bovis, used in the preparation of BCG vaccine. [named after Albert L. C. Calmette ...
Bacillus Calmette-Guérinvaccine
Ba·cil·lus Cal·mette-Gué·rin vaccine (bə-sĭlʹəs kăl-mĕtʹgā-rănʹ) n. The BCG vaccine.   [After Albert L.C. Calmette (1863-1933) and Camille Guérin (1872-1961), ...
Bacillus thuringiensis
/thoo rin'jee en"sis/ a bacterium used in genetically altered form in the biological control of budworms, gypsy moth larvae, Japanese beetles, and other insect pests. Abbr.: ...
bacitracin
/bas'i tray"sin/, n. Pharm. an antibiotic polypeptide derived by the hydrolytic action of Bacillus subtilis on protein, primarily used topically in the treatment of superficial ...
back
back1 —backless, adj. /bak/, n. 1. the rear part of the human body, extending from the neck to the lower end of the spine. 2. the part of the body of animals corresponding to ...
back anchor
Naut. a small anchor for backing a larger one. * * *
back and to
New Eng. and South Atlantic States. back-and-forth; to and fro. * * *
back bacon
Canadian. Canadian bacon. * * *
Back Bay
a prosperous residential and commercial area of Boston, Massachusetts. * * *
back bench
any of the rows of seats occupied by the backbenchers. Cf. front bench. [1870-75] * * *
back burner
a condition of low priority or temporary deferment (usually used in the phrase on the back burner): Put other issues on the back burner until after the election. [1945-50; from ...
back channel
back channel n. an unofficial, often secret, means of communication * * *
back clearance
runout (def. 1b). * * *
back clipping
a word formed by omitting the last part of the form from which it is derived. Also called hind clipping. Cf. apocope, clipped form, fore clipping. * * *
back country
—back-country, adj. 1. a sparsely populated rural region remote from a settled area. 2. Australian. a remote, undeveloped part of a large farm or cattle station. [1740-50] * * *
back dive
a dive in which the diver stands on the springboard with the back to the water and jumps up, arching backward to land either feetfirst facing the springboard or headfirst facing ...
back door
1. a door at the rear of a house, building, etc. 2. a secret, furtive, or illicit method, manner, or means. [1520-30] * * *
back electromotive force
Elect. See counter electromotive force. [1890-95] * * *
back float
Swimming. a floating position on one's back with arms extended out to the sides and face upward. [‡1975-80] * * *
back focus
Photog. the distance between the back surface of a lens and the focal plane when the lens is focused at infinity. [1895-1900] * * *
back formation
Ling. 1. the analogical creation of one word from another word that appears to be a derived or inflected form of the first by dropping the apparent affix or by modification. 2. a ...
back forty
remote, usually uncultivated acreage on a large piece of land, as on a farm or ranch. Also, back 40. [appar. because forty acres was a typical size for such a piece of land] * * *
back gear
—backgeared, adj. (in a lathe) one of several gears for driving the headstock at various speeds. * * *
back judge
back judge n. Football an official who makes rulings regarding pass receptions, field goals, etc. * * *
back lot
Motion Pictures. an outdoor area, usually adjoining a studio, used for the shooting of exterior scenes. Also, backlot. [1795-1805, Amer.] * * *
back matter
Print. the parts of a book that appear after the main text, as bibliography, index, and appendixes. Also called end matter. Cf. front matter. [1945-50] * * *
back molding
a molding, as a backband, applied to interior window and door trim to conceal the edge of the wall surface. * * *
back mutation
Genetics. a mutation of an existing mutant gene that restores it to its previous form. Also called reverse mutation. [1935-40] * * *
back nine
Golf. the final nine holes on an eighteen-hole course. * * *
back number
1. an out-of-date issue of a serial publication. 2. Informal. anything out-of-date. [1805-15, Amer.] * * *
back o' beyond
Australian Informal. remote; out-of-the-way; isolated. * * *
back of Bourke
/berrk/, Australian Informal. a remote area or place. [1915-20; Bourke, a town in far NW New South Wales] * * *
back order
Com. an order or part of an order waiting to be filled. * * *
back plastering
Building Trades. 1. the introduction of partitions of lath and plaster between the inner and outer surfaces of a stud wall in order to improve the insulating properties of the ...
back projection.
See background projection. * * *
back road
a little-used secondary road, esp. one through a rural or sparsely populated area. [1780-90, Amer.] * * *
back room
1. a room located in the rear, esp. one used only by certain people. 2. a place where powerful or influential persons, esp. politicians, meet to plan secretly or from which they ...
back run
1. a period during which a particular process, as the flow of materials in manufacturing, is reversed. 2. Australian. a tract of dry land in the public domain used as an ...
back score
Curling. a line at each end of the rink parallel to and equidistant from the foot score and the sweeping score. * * *
back scratcher
—back scratching. 1. a long-handled device for scratching one's own back. 2. a person who exchanges favors or services for mutual advantage. Also, back-scratcher, ...
back seat
back seat a secondary or inconspicuous position: also written backseat n. * * *
back shaft
Mach. a spindle carrying back gears. [1875-80] * * *
back staff
an obsolete instrument for determining the altitude of the sun by facing away from the sun, sighting upon the horizon, adjusting a cursor until its shadow falls upon the sight ...
back stairs
1. stairs at the back of a house, as for use by servants. 2. a means of intrigue. [1620-30] * * *
back story
back story n. background information provided, often in narrative form, to give help in understanding something, as the behavior of a character in a film: also written backstory ...
back street
a street apart from the main or business area of a town. Cf. side street. [1630-40] * * *
back swimmer
▪ insect  any of about 200 species of insects (order Heteroptera) that occur worldwide and are named for their ability to swim on their backs, which are shaped like the keel ...
back talk
an impudent response; impudence. [1855-60] Syn. rudeness, insolence, impertinence, cheek, sass. * * *
back to back
—back-to-back, adj. 1. adjacent or contiguous but oppositely oriented; having the backs close together or adjoining: The seats in the day coach are back to back. 2. (of two ...
back to basics
a phrase used by politicians and others who are concerned about standards in education, government, public life, etc. to suggest that modern developments have made people forget ...
Back to the Future
a US comedy science fiction film (1985) that made a star of Michael J Fox. He plays a boy in high school who, helped by a funny scientist, travels back in time from 1985 to 1955 ...
back vent
(in plumbing) a vent situated on the sewer side of a trap. * * *
back walkover
Gymnastics. See under walkover (def. 4). * * *
Back, Sir George
▪ British explorer born November 1796, Stockport, Cheshire, Eng. died June 23, 1878, London  naval officer who helped to trace the Arctic coastline of North America. He ...
back-alley
/bak"al"ee/, adj. dirty, unprepossessing, sordid, or clandestine: back-alley morals; back-alley political schemes. [1860-65, Amer.] * * *
back-and-forth
/bak"euhn fawrth", -fohrth", -euhnd-/, adj. 1. backward and forward; side to side; to and fro: a back-and-forth shuttling of buses to the stadium; the back-and-forth movement of ...
back-channel
See back channel. * * *
back-check
/bak"chek'/, v.i. Ice Hockey. 1. to skate back toward one's defensive zone obstructing or impeding the movement or progress of one or more opponents on attack. Cf. check1 (def. ...
back-checker
See back-check. * * *
back-cloth
/bak"klawth', -kloth'/, n., pl. back-cloths /-klawdhz', -klodhz', -klawths', -kloths'/. Chiefly Brit. Theat. backdrop (def. 1). [1870-75] * * *
back-formation
back-formation [bak′fôr mā΄shən] n. 1. a word actually formed from, but seeming to be the base of, another word (Ex.: burgle from burglar) 2. the process of forming such a ...
back-load
/bak"lohd'/, v.t. to defer to a later date, as wages, benefits, or costs: The union agreed to back-load pay raises. Cf. front-load. * * *
back-mutate
/bak"myooh'tayt/, v.i., back-mutated, back-mutating. Genetics. to undergo back mutation. [1960-65] * * *
back-order
/bak"awr'deuhr/, v.t. to treat as a back order: We have to back-order your sofa until the new fabric arrives. * * *
back-paddle
/bak"pad'l/, v.i., back-paddled, back-paddling. to propel a boat by paddling backward, as by using a stroke in the direction of stern to bow. * * *
back-patting
/bak"pat'ing/, n. an act or instance of offering praise or congratulation: The winners indulged in a certain amount of mutual back-patting. * * *
back-pedal
/bak"ped'l/, v.i., back-pedaled, back-pedaling or (esp. Brit.) back-pedalled, back-pedalling. 1. to retard the forward motion by pressing backward on the pedal, esp. of a bicycle ...
back-scratching
back-scratching [bak′skrach΄iŋ] n. Informal a reciprocal exchange of favors, aid, or compliments * * *
back-seat driver
☆ back-seat driver [bak′sēt΄ ] n. a passenger in an automobile who offers unwanted advice about driving * * *
back-seatdriver
back-seat driver (băkʹsēt') n. 1. A passenger who constantly advises, corrects, or nags the driver of a motor vehicle. 2. A person who persists in giving unsolicited advice. * ...
back-street
/bak"street'/, adj. taking place in secrecy and often illegally: back-street political maneuvering; back-street drug dealing. [1895-1900] * * *
back-talk
/bak"tawk'/, v.i., v.t. to answer back. [1855-60] * * *
back-to-back
back-to-back [bak′tə bak′] adj. 〚from use in stud poker to describe a pair dealt consecutively, one face down and the next face up 〛 ☆ 1. Informal one right after ...
back-to-basics
/bak"teuh bay"siks/, adj. 1. stressing simplicity and adherence to fundamental principles: The movement suggests a back-to-basics approach to living for those whose lives have ...
back-trail
/bak"trayl'/, v.i. to backtrack. [1905-10] * * *
backache
/bak"ayk'/, n. a pain, esp. in the lumbar region of the back, usually caused by the strain of a muscle or ligament. [1595-1605; BACK1 + ACHE] * * *
backand forth
back and forth adv. 1. Backward and forward; to and fro. 2. From side to side.   backʹ-and-forth' (băkʹăn-fôrth', -fōrth') n. & adj. * * *
backband
/bak"band'/, n. 1. Carpentry. a piece of millwork surrounding the trim at the top and sides of a door or window. 2. a broad band passing over the back of a horse, for supporting ...
backbar
/bak"bahr'/, n. 1. Shipbuilding. a short length of angle iron fitted over flanges of two angle irons butted together side by side to connect or reinforce them. 2. a construction ...
BackBay
Back Bay (băk) An area of Boston, Massachusetts, largely consisting of filled-in land reclaimed from mud flats after the 1850s. It is noted for its many residences, long ...
backbeat
/bak"beet'/, n. Popular Music. a secondary or supplementary beat, as by a jazz drummer. [BACK1 + BEAT] * * *
backbench
back·bench (băkʹbĕnch') n. 1. Chiefly British. The rear benches in the House of Commons where junior members of Parliament sit behind government officeholders and their ...
backbencher
/bak"ben"cheuhr, -ben'-/, n. any of the members of a legislature, esp. of the House of Commons of Great Britain, but not including the leaders of the parties. [1905-10; BACK ...
backbenches
➡ backbencher * * *
backbend
/bak"bend'/, n. an acrobatic feat in which one bends backward from a standing position until one's hands touch the floor. [BACK1 + BEND1] * * *
backbite
—backbiter, n. /bak"buyt'/, v., backbit, backbitten or (Informal) backbit; backbiting. v.t. 1. to attack the character or reputation of (a person who is not present). v.i. 2. ...
backbiter
See backbite. * * *
backblocks
/bak"bloks'/, n. (used with a pl. v.) Australian. the outback: They live in the backblocks. [1870-75; BACK1 + BLOCK + -S3] * * *
backboard
/bak"bawrd', -bohrd'/, n. 1. a board placed at or forming the back of anything. 2. Basketball. a board or other flat vertical surface to which the basket is attached. [1755-65; ...
backbone
—backboned, adj. —backboneless, adj. /bak"bohn'/, n. 1. Anat. the spinal column; spine. 2. strength of character; resolution. 3. something resembling a backbone in ...
Backbone Mountain
▪ mountain, Maryland, United States       highest point in Maryland, U.S., reaching an elevation of 3,360 feet (1,024 metres). It is located on a ridge of the Allegheny ...
backboned
See backbone. * * *
backbreaker
See backbreaking. * * *
backbreaking
—backbreaker, n. /bak"bray'king/, adj. demanding great effort, endurance, etc.; exhausting: a backbreaking job. Also, back-breaking. [1780-90; BACK1 + BREAK + -ING2] * * *
backcast
/bak"kast', -kahst'/, n. a short backward and often upward swing of a fishing rod, its line, and its lure in preparation for the cast that immediately follows. [1570-80, for an ...
backchannel
back channel n. A means by which actions, especially in government and diplomacy, are carried out secretly rather than through regular avenues of ...
backchat
/bak"chat'/, n. Informal. 1. repartee. 2. back talk. [1895-1900; BACK2 + CHAT1] * * *
backcheck
backcheck [bak′chek΄] vt. Hockey to check (an opponent) in the area around one's own goal, usually in an effort to prevent that player from joining others in developing an ...
backcloth
backcloth [bak′klôth΄] n. Chiefly Brit. BACKDROP * * * back·cloth (băkʹklôth,-klŏth) n. See backdrop. * * *

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