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battered child syndrome
the array of physical injuries exhibited by young children who have been beaten repeatedly or otherwise abused by their parents or guardians. [1960-65] * * *
battered woman syndrome
Psychological and behavioral pattern displayed by female victims of domestic violence. Explanations that have evolved since the late 1970s include learned helplessness, a "cycle ...
batteredchild syndrome
bat·tered child syndrome (bătʹərd) n. A combination of physical injuries or conditions, such as broken bones, bruises, burns, and malnutrition, experienced by a child as a ...
batteredwoman syndrome
battered woman syndrome n. A pattern of signs and symptoms, such as fearfulness and a feeling of helplessness, commonly appearing in women who are physically and mentally abused ...
batterer
/bat"euhr euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that batters. 2. a person who inflicts violent physical abuse upon a child, spouse, or other person. [1605-15; BATTER1 + -ER1] * * *
batterie
/bat"euh ree/; Fr. /bannteu rddee"/, n., pl. batteries /bat"euh reez/; Fr. /bannteu rddee"/. Ballet. 1. a beating together of the calves or feet during a leap. 2. (in tap ...
batterie de cuisine
/bannteu rddeedeu kwee zeen"/, pl. bat teries de cuisine /bannteu rddeedeu kwee zeen"/. French. kitchen utensils. * * *
battering ram
1. an ancient military device with a heavy horizontal ram for battering down walls, gates, etc. 2. any of various similar devices, usually machine-powered, used in demolition, by ...
battering rams
➡ castles * * *
batteringram
bat·ter·ing ram (bătʹər-ĭng) n. 1. A very heavy metal bar used by firefighters and law enforcement officers to break down walls and doors. 2. A heavy beam used in ancient ...
Battersea
/bat"euhr see/, n. 1. a former borough of London, England, now part of Wandsworth, on the Thames. 2. an enameling technique in which designs are either painted or printed on a ...
Battersea Dog’s Home
a temporary home for dogs and cats in Battersea, London. It finds new homes for dogs and cats whose owners do not want them, and returns lost pets to their owners. * * *
Battersea enamelware
Painted enamelware made by Stephen Theodore Janssen at York House in London's Battersea district from 1753 to 1756. The ware is composed of soft white enamel over a copper ...
Battersea Power Station
a very large building in Battersea, London, with four tall chimneys. It was built in 1937 to produce electricity for south London, but since it was closed down in the 1980s it ...
battery
/bat"euh ree/, n., pl. batteries. 1. Elect. a. Also called galvanic battery, voltaic battery. a combination of two or more cells electrically connected to work together to ...
Battery
/bat"euh ree/, n. The, a park at the S end of Manhattan, in New York City. Also called Battery Park. * * * Any of a class of devices, consisting of a group of electrochemical ...
battery eliminator
eliminator (def. 2). * * *
battery jar
a rather large cylindrical container of heavy glass with an open top, used in laboratories. * * *
Battery Park
a park at the southern end of Manhattan(1) Island, New York, opposite the Statue of Liberty. Boats take tourists, etc. from the park to the statue, Ellis Island and Staten ...
Batthyány, Lajos, Count
▪ Hungarian statesman born Feb. 14, 1806, Pozsony, Hung., Austrian Empire [now in Bratislava, Slovakia] died Oct. 6, 1849, Pest [now in Budapest], Hung.       statesman ...
Batticaloa
/but'i keuh loh"euh/, n. a seaport in E Sri Lanka. 24,000. * * * ▪ Sri Lanka       town, eastern Sri Lanka. Lying on an island off the eastern coast, it is linked to ...
battik
/beuh teek", bat"ik/, n., v.t. batik. * * *
battiness
See batty. * * *
batting
/bat"ing/, n. 1. the act or manner of using a bat in a game of ball. 2. cotton, wool, or synthetic fibers in batts or sheets, used as filling for quilts or bedcovers. [1605-15; ...
batting average
1. Baseball. a measure of the batting ability of a player, obtained by dividing the number of base hits by the number of official times at bat and carrying out the result to ...
batting cage
batting cage n. Baseball a screen with three sides and a top, in which batters practice: it keeps missed and fouled pitches within its enclosure * * *
batting eye
Baseball. the batter's visual appraisal of balls pitched toward home plate. * * *
batting helmet
batting helmet n. Baseball a rigid plastic cap with a sidepiece extending down over the ear, worn for protection while batting * * *
batting order
Baseball. the sequence in which hitters will bat in a given game, determined in advance by the team manager. * * *
battingaverage
batting average n. Baseball A measure of a batter's performance obtained by dividing the total of base hits by the number of times at bat, not including walks. * * *
Battishill, Jonathan
▪ British composer born May 1738, London, Eng. died Dec. 10, 1801, Islington, London       English composer of church music and popular songs.       Battishill ...
Battista
(as used in expressions) Alberti Leon Battista Guarini Giovanni Battista Giovanni Battista Lulli Giovanni Battista Montini Pergolesi Giovanni Battista Piazzetta Giovanni ...
battle
battle1 —battler, n. /bat"l/, n., v., battled, battling. n. 1. a hostile encounter or engagement between opposing military forces: the battle of Waterloo. 2. participation in ...
battle clasp
clasp (def. 4). * * *
Battle Creek
a city in S Michigan. 35,724. * * * ▪ Michigan, United States  city, Calhoun county, south-central Michigan, U.S. It lies at the juncture of Battle Creek with the Kalamazoo ...
battle cruiser
a warship of maximum speed and firepower, but with lighter armor than a battleship. [1910-15] * * *
battle cry
1. a cry or shout of troops in battle. 2. the phrase or slogan used in any contest or campaign. [1805-15] * * *
battle dress
military field uniform and accouterments, generally camouflaged and stripped of all ornamentation. [1935-40] * * *
battle fatigue
—battle-fatigued, adj. Psychiatry. a posttraumatic stress disorder occurring among soldiers engaged in active combat, characterized by excessive autonomic arousal, psychic ...
battle group
U.S. Mil. a planning or command unit within a division of the army. [1950-55] * * *
Battle Hymn of the Republic
an American religious song, written by Julia Ward Howe for the North during the Civil War. It is sung to the tune of John Brown’s Body. It was also used during marches for ...
battle jacket
1. U.S. Mil. a close-fitting waist-length woolen jacket with snugly fitting cuffs and waist, formerly worn as part of the service uniform. 2. any of various adaptations of this ...
battle lantern
a portable, battery-operated light for emergency use aboard a warship. [1820-30] * * *
battle line
the line along which warring troops meet. [1805-15] * * *
Battle of Balaclava
➡ Balaclava * * *
Battle of Blenheim
➡ Blenheim * * *
Battle of Britain
(in World War II) the series of aerial combats that took place between British and German aircraft during the autumn of 1940 and that included the severe bombardment of British ...
Battle of Britain Day
➡ Battle of Britain * * *
Battle of Brunanburh, The
▪ Old English poem Brunanburh also spelled  Brunnanburh        Old English poem of 73 lines included in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the year 937. It relates the ...
Battle of Maldon, The
▪ Old English poem       Old English heroic poem describing a historical skirmish between East Saxons and Viking (mainly Norwegian) raiders in 991. It is incomplete, ...
Battle of the Atlantic
the long struggle for control of the Atlantic between the navies of Germany and the Allies. The phrase can refer to this struggle in either of the two World Wars. * * *
Battle of the Boyne
a victory in Ireland in 1690 for the English king William III over the Jacobite armies of the former King James II. About 35 000 Protestants under William defeated about 25 000 ...
Battle of the Bulge
a strong but unsuccessful attack by German forces against the Allies in southern Belgium in 1944. The word bulge means a swelling, so the phrase is also used in a humorous way to ...
Battle of the Bulge.
See Bulge, Battle of the. * * *
battle plan
1. the strategy to be used in a military engagement. 2. the plan for accomplishing a goal or dealing with a problem or difficult situation: the President's battle plan for ...
battle royal
pl. battles royal. 1. a fight in which more than two combatants are engaged. 2. a heated argument: After a while the discussion turned into a battle royal. [1665-75] * * *
battle star
U.S. Mil. 1. a small bronze star worn on a campaign ribbon by members of organizations taking part in certain battles or other wartime operations. 2. a small silver star ...
battle station
Mil., Navy. the place or position that one is assigned to for battle or in an emergency. * * *
battle stations
battle stations n. the places to which soldiers, sailors, warships, etc. are assigned for a battle or an emergency * * *
battle wagon
Informal. a battleship. [1925-30, Amer.] * * *
Battle, Kathleen
▪ 1995       In February 1994 New York City's Metropolitan Opera issued the terse announcement that it had fired Kathleen Battle, considered by many to be one of the ...
battle-ax
/bat"l aks'/, n. 1. a broadax formerly used as a weapon of war. 2. Slang. a domineering, aggressive, sharp-tempered person, esp. a woman. Also, battle-axe. [1350-1400; ME ...
Battle-Ax culture
a late Neolithic to Copper Age culture of northern Europe marked esp. by the production of pottery bearing the imprint of cord and by the use of battle-axes as burial ...
battle-scarred
/bat"l skahrd'/, adj. 1. bearing scars or damages received in battle: a battle-scarred warship. 2. showing the effects of hard wear or use: a sale of battle-scarred ...
BattleCreek
Battle Creek A city of southern Michigan east of Kalamazoo. Breakfast cereals and other food products are important to its economy. Population: 53,540. * * *
battlecruiser
battle cruiser n. A large warship with lighter armor but greater maneuverability than a battleship. * * *
battlecry
battle cry n. 1. A rallying cry uttered in combat, especially while attacking. 2. A slogan used by the proponents of a cause. * * *
battledore
/bat"l dawr', -dohr'/, n., v., battledored, battledoring. n. 1. Also called battledore and shuttlecock. a game from which badminton was developed, played since ancient times in ...
battledore and shuttlecock
▪ game       children's game played by two persons using small rackets called battledores, which are made of parchment, plastic, or rows of gut or nylon stretched across ...
battlefatigue
battle fatigue n. See combat fatigue. * * *
battlefield
/bat"l feeld'/, n. 1. the field or ground on which a battle is fought. 2. an area of contention, conflict, or hostile opposition: During that era the classroom became a ...
battlefield medicine
 field of medicine concerned with the prompt treatment of wounded military personnel within the vicinity of a war zone. Studies of historical casualty rates have shown that ...
battlefront
/bat"l frunt'/, n. the extreme forward area of a battlefield, where troops are in direct contact with the enemy. [1910-15; BATTLE1 + FRONT] * * *
battleground
bat·tle·ground (bătʹl-ground') n. See battlefield. * * *
battlegroup
battle group n. 1. A U.S. army unit usually composed of five companies. 2. A naval force composed of a variable number of warships, escorts, and supply vessels, depending on the ...
battlement
—battlemented /bat"l men'tid/, adj. /bat"l meuhnt/, n. Often, battlements. a parapet or cresting, originally defensive but later usually decorative, consisting of a regular ...
battlemented
See battlement. * * *
battlements
➡ castles * * *
battleplane
/bat"l playn'/, n. an airplane designed for combat; warplane. [1910-15; BATTLE1 + PLANE1] * * *
battler
See battle. * * *
battleroyal
battle royal n. pl. battles royal 1. An intense altercation. 2. A battle involving many combatants. 3. A fight to the finish.   [battle + royal, grand in scale.] * * *
battles
See also Agincourt, Arnhem, Balaclava, Bannockburn, Blenheim, Bosworth Field, Bull Run, Bunker Hill, Chancellorsville, Concord, Copenhagen, Crécy, Culloden, Edgehill, El ...
battleship
/bat"l ship'/, n. 1. any of a class of warships that are the most heavily armored and are equipped with the most powerful armament. 2. See ship of the line. [1785-95, Amer.; ...
battleship gray
—battleship-gray, adj. a subdued bluish gray. [1825-35, Amer.] * * *
battleship-gray
See battleship gray. * * *
battleshipgray
battleship gray n. A medium shade of gray.   bat'tle·ship-grayʹ adj. * * *
battlesome
/bat"l seuhm/, adj. argumentative; quarrelsome. [1875-80; BATTLE1 + -SOME1] * * *
battlewagon
☆ battlewagon [bat′'lwag΄ən ] n. Slang a battleship * * * bat·tle·wag·on (bătʹl-wăg'ən) n. See battleship. * * *
battleworthy
/bat"l werr'dhee/, adj. capable of engaging in combat; ready for battle: a decline in the nation's battleworthy forces. [1885-90; BATTLE1 + -WORTHY] * * *
battologize
/beuh tol"euh juyz'/, v., battologized, battologizing. v.t. 1. to repeat (a word, phrase, mannerism, etc.) excessively. v.i. 2. (of writing or speaking) to repeat words, phrases, ...
battology
—battologist, n. —battological /bat'l oj"i keuhl/, adj. /beuh tol"euh jee/, n. wearisome repetition of words in speaking or writing. [1595-1605; < Gk battología (bátt(os) ...
battue
/ba tooh", -tyooh"/; Fr. /bann tyuu"/, n., pl. battues /-toohz", -tyoohz"/; Fr. /-tyuu"/. Chiefly Brit. 1. Hunting. a. the beating or driving of game from cover toward a ...
battuta
/beuh tooh"teuh/; It. /baht tooh"tah/, n., pl. battutas, battute /-tay/; It. /-te/. Music. 1. a beat. 2. a measure. [1810-20; < It, fem. ptp. of battere to beat < L battuere] * * ...
battuto
/beuh tooh"toh/, n., pl. battutos. Italian Cookery. soffritto. [ < It; masc. of BATTUTA] * * *
batty
—battiness, n. /bat"ee/, adj., battier, battiest. Slang. insane; crazy; eccentric. [BAT2 + -Y1] * * *
Batu
died с 1255, Russia Grandson of Genghis Khan and founder of the Golden Horde. In 1235 Batu was elected commander in chief of the western part of the Mongol empire and given ...
Batu Islands
▪ islands, Indonesia Indonesian  Kepulauan Batu , Dutch  Batoe Eilanden        group of three major islands and 48 islets off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. ...
Batu Khan
/bah"tooh kahn"/ d. 1255, Mongol conqueror: leader of the Golden Horde (grandson of Genghis Khan). * * *
Batu Pahat
▪ Malaysia also called  Bandar Penggaram,         port, West Malaysia (Malaya), on the Strait of Malacca at the mouth of the Batu Pahat River. It is a fishing town ...
Batumi
/bah tooh"mee/, n. a seaport in and the capital of Adzharistan, in the SW Georgian Republic, on the Black Sea. 124,000. Formerly, Batum /bah toohm"/. * * * ▪ Georgia  city ...
batuque
/beuh tooh"keuh/, n. a Brazilian round dance of African origin. [ < Pg, of uncert. orig.] * * *
Batwa
/bah"twah/, n., pl. Batwas, (esp. collectively) Batwa. Twa (def. 1). * * *
batwing
/bat"wing'/, adj. 1. formed, shaped, etc., in the manner of a bat's wing or wings. 2. (of a garment or part of a garment) resembling or conceived of as resembling the wing or ...
Baty, Gaston
▪ French playwright and producer in full  Jean-baptiste-marie-gaston Baty   born May 26, 1885, Pélussin, Loire, France died Oct. 13, 1952, Pélussin       French ...
BatYam
Bat Yam (bät' yämʹ) A city of west-central Israel on the Mediterranean Sea near Tel Aviv-Yafo. It is a resort and an industrial center. Population: 144,200. * * *
Batyushkov, Konstantin Nikolayevich
▪ Russian poet Batyushkov also spelled  Batiushkov   born May 18 [May 29, New Style], 1787, Vologda, Russia died July 7 [July 19], 1855, Vologda       Russian ...
Batz, Jean, baron de
▪ French conspirator born December 26, 1760, Goutz, France died January 10, 1822, Chadieu       royalist conspirator during the French Revolution.       Born of ...
Bau
▪ Mesopotamian deity (Sumerian), also called  Nininsina , Akkadian  Gula  or  Ninkarrak        in Mesopotamian religion, city goddess of Urukug in the Lagash ...
bauble
/baw"beuhl/, n. 1. a showy, usually cheap, ornament; trinket; gewgaw. 2. a jester's scepter. [1275-1325; ME babel, babulle < OF babel, baubel, derivs. of an expressive base with ...
Bauby, Jean-Dominique
▪ 1998       French journalist whose struggle with "locked-in syndrome," a state of almost total paralysis, was recounted in his critically acclaimed memoir, The Diving ...
Bauchau, Henry
▪ Belgian author born January 22, 1913, Mechelen, Belgium       Belgian novelist, poet, and playwright who was also a practicing psychoanalyst. Like his contemporary ...
Bauchi
▪ Nigeria       town, capital of Bauchi state and traditional emirate, northeastern Nigeria. Bauchi town lies on the railroad from Maiduguri to Kafanchan (where it ...
Baucis
/baw"sis/, n. Class. Myth. an aged Phrygian peasant woman who, with her husband Philemon, offered hospitality to the disguised Zeus and Hermes: they were rewarded by being saved ...
baud
/bawd/, n. Telecommunications. a unit used to measure the speed of signaling or data transfer, equal to the number of pulses or bits per second: baud rate. [1925-30; named after ...
baudekin
/baw"dee kin/, n. baldachin (def. 1). [1350-1400; ME < MF < ML baldakinus BALDACHIN] * * *
Baudelaire
/bohd'l air"/; Fr. /bohdeu lerdd"/, n. Charles Pierre /shannrddl pyerdd/, 1821-67, French poet and critic. * * *
Baudelaire, Charles
▪ French author Introduction in full  Charles-Pierre Baudelaire   born April 9, 1821, Paris, France died August 31, 1867, Paris  French poet, translator, and literary and ...
Baudelaire, Charles (-Pierre)
born April 9, 1821, Paris, France died Aug. 31, 1867, Paris French poet. While a law student he became addicted to opium and hashish and contracted syphilis. His early reckless ...
Baudelaire,Charles Pierre
Baude·laire (bōd-lârʹ), Charles Pierre. 1821-1867. French writer, translator, and critic. His only volume of poetry, Les Fleurs du Mal (1857, expanded 1861), was publicly ...
Baudissin, Wolf Heinrich, Graf von
▪ German translator in full  Wolf Heinrich Friedrich Karl, Count Von Baudissin   born Jan. 30, 1789, Copenhagen, Den. died April 4, 1878, Dresden, Ger.       German ...
Baudot, (Jean Maurice) Émile
born 1845, Magneux, France died March 28, 1903, Sceaux French engineer. In 1874 he patented a telegraph code that by the mid 20th century had supplanted Morse code as the ...
Baudot, Jean-Maurice-Émile
▪ French engineer born 1845, Magneux, France died March 28, 1903, Sceaux       engineer who, in 1874, received a patent on a telegraph code that by the mid-20th century ...
Baudouin
Baudouin [bō dwen′] 1930-93; king of Belgium (1951-93): son of Leopold III * * *
Baudouin de Courtenay
/boh dwaonn" deuh koor'teuh nay"/ Jan Ignacy Niecislaw /yahn ig nah"tsi nye"tsis lahf'/, 1845-1929, Polish linguist: pioneer in modern phonology. * * *
Baudouin de Courtenay, Jan Niecisław
▪ Polish linguist born March 13, 1845, Radzymin, Pol., Russian Empire [now in Poland] died Nov. 3, 1929, Warsaw, Pol.       linguist who regarded language sounds as ...
Baudouin I
Fr. /boh dwaonn"/ 1930-93, king of the Belgians 1951-93. * * * born Sept. 7, 1930, Stuyvenberg Castle, near Brussels, Belg. died July 31, 1993, Motril, Spain King of the ...
BaudouinI
Bau·douin I (bō-dwăɴʹ), 1930-1993. King of Belgium (1951-1993). Although he exercised the prerogative of rule after August 11, 1950, when the Belgian parliament accepted ...
Baudrillard, Jean
born 1929, Riems, France French sociologist, philosopher, and social critic. He taught sociology at the University of Paris from 1966 to 1987. He is known for his theories of ...
baudrons
/baw"dreuhnz/, n. Scot. a cat. [1400-50; late ME (Scots) balderonis; perh. akin to ME badde cat] * * *
Bauer
/bow"euhr/; Ger. /bow"euhrdd/, n. Georg /gay awrddk"/. See Agricola, Georgius. * * *
Bauer of Market Ward in the City of Cambridge, Peter Thomas Bauer, Baron
▪ 2003 Péter Tamás Bauer        Hungarian-born British economist (b. Nov. 6, 1915, Budapest, Hung., Austria-Hungary—d. May 3, 2002, London, Eng.), fiercely opposed ...
Bauer, Gustav
▪ chancellor of Germany born Jan. 6, 1870, Darkehmen, East Prussia [now Ozersk, Russia] died Sept. 16, 1944, Berlin, Ger.       German statesman, chancellor of the ...
Bauer, Hank
▪ 2008 Henry Albert Bauer        American baseball player and manager born July 31, 1922, East St. Louis, Ill. died Feb. 9, 2007 , Shawnee Mission, Kan. as an ...
Bauer, Harold
▪ American pianist born April 28, 1873, Kingston-on-Thames, near London, Eng. died March 12, 1951, Miami, Fla., U.S.       British-born American pianist who introduced ...
Bauer, Otto
▪ Austrian political leader born Sept. 5, 1881, Vienna, Austria-Hungary died July 4, 1938, Paris, France       theoretician of the Austrian Social Democratic Party and ...
Bauer, Sebastian Wilhelm Valentin
▪ German inventor born Dec. 23, 1822, Dillingen, Bavaria [Germany] died June 20, 1875, Munich, Ger.       German pioneer inventor and builder of submarines ...
Bauernfeld, Eduard von
▪ Austrian dramatist born Jan. 13, 1802, Vienna, Austria died Aug. 9, 1890, Vienna       Austrian dramatist who dominated the Vienna Burgtheater for 50 years with his ...
Baugh
/baw/, n. Samuel Adrian ("Slinging Sammy"), born 1914, U.S. football player and coach. * * *
Baugh, Cecil Archibald
▪ 2006       Jamaican potter (b. Nov. 22, 1908, Bangor Ridge, Jam.—d. June 28, 2005, Kingston, Jam.), was one of the most influential Caribbean potters of the 20th ...
Baugh, Sammy
in full Samuel Adrian Baugh born March 17, 1914, Temple, Texas, U.S. First outstanding quarterback of U.S. professional football. He led the NFL in forward passing in 6 of 16 ...
Bauhaus
/bow"hows'/, n. 1. a school of design established in Weimar in 1919 by Walter Gropius, moved to Dessau in 1926, and closed in 1933 as a result of Nazi hostility. adj. 2. of or ...
Bauhin, Gaspard
▪ Swiss physician and botanist also called  Casper Bauhin   born Jan. 17, 1560, Basel, Switz. died Dec. 5, 1624, Basel  Swiss physician, anatomist, and botanist who ...
bauhinia
/baw hin"ee euh, boh in"-/, n. any of numerous trees, shrubs, or vines of the genus Bauhinia, native to warm regions, having two-lobed leaves and showy, usually white, purple, or ...
Baul
/bah"ool/, n. a member of a nonconformist Bengalese sect having gurus but no dogmas, rituals, religious institutions, or scriptures. * * * ▪ Hindu music       member of ...
Baule
▪ people       an African people inhabiting Côte d'Ivoire between the Comoé and Bandama rivers. The Baule are an Akan group, speaking a Tano language of the Kwa (Kwa ...
baulk
/bawk/, v.i., v.t., n. balk. * * *
Baum
/bawm, bahm/ for 1; /bowm/ for 2, n. 1. L(yman) Frank /luy"meuhn/, 1856-1919, U.S. journalist, playwright, and author of children's books. 2. Vicki, 1888-1960, U.S. novelist, ...
baum marten
/bowm/ 1. the European pine marten. 2. the fur of this animal. [1875-80; < G Baum(marder) tree marten + MARTEN] * * *
Baum, L(yman) Frank
born May 15, 1856, Chittenango, N.Y., U.S. died May 6, 1919, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. writer of children's books. Baum achieved commercial success with his first book, Father ...
Baum, L. Frank
▪ American author in full  Lyman Frank Baum  born May 15, 1856, Chittenango, New York, U.S. died May 6, 1919, Hollywood, California       American writer known for ...
Baum, Vicki
▪ American author original name  Hedwig Baum   born Jan. 24, 1888, Vienna, Austria-Hungary [now in Austria] died Aug. 29, 1960, Hollywood, Calif., ...
Baum,Lyman Frank
Baum (bôm, bäm), Lyman Frank. 1856-1919. American writer known especially for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and 13 other Oz stories, including Ozma of Oz (1917). * * *
Baumann Peak
▪ mountain, Togo also called  Mount Agou,  French  Pic Baumann, or Mont Agou,        mountain in southwestern Togo, near the border with Ghana. An extreme western ...
Baumbach, Rudolf
▪ German writer born Sept. 28, 1840, Kranichfeld, Thuringia [Germany] died Sept. 21, 1905, Meiningen, Thuringia, Ger.       German writer of popular student drinking ...
Baumé
/boh may", boh"may/, adj. pertaining to, noting, or calibrated according to a Baumé scale. [1835-45] * * *
Baumé scale
a scale for use with a hydrometer, calibrated in such manner that the specific gravity of a given liquid may be easily computed. [named after A. Baumé (1728-1804), French ...
Baumé,Antoine
Bau·mé (bō-māʹ), Antoine. 1728-1804. French pharmacist who invented a process for making sal ammonia and in 1768 devised an improved hydrometer using the scale that now ...
Baumeister
/bow"muy'steuhr/, n. Willi /vil"ee/, 1889-1955,German painter. * * *
Baumes Laws
▪ New York, United States [1926]       several statutes of the criminal code of New York state, U.S., enacted on July 1, 1926—most notably, one requiring mandatory ...
Bauméscale
Baumé scale n. Abbr. B. or Bé A hydrometer scale used to measure the specific gravity of liquids.   [After Baumé, Antoine.] * * *
Baumgarten, Alexander Gottlieb
▪ German philosopher born July 17, 1714, Berlin, Prussia [Germany] died May 26, 1762, Frankfurt an der Oder       German philosopher and educator who coined the term ...
Baumgartner, Bruce
▪ American athlete born Aug. 31, 1962, Haledon, N.J., U.S.       American wrestler who won four Olympic medals and was one of the most successful American ...
Baunsgaard, Hilmar
▪ Danish politician born February 26, 1920, Slagelse, Denmark died June 30, 1989       Denmark's leading nonsocialist politician during the 1960s and '70s. He served as ...
Baur, Ferdinand Christian
▪ German theologian born June 21, 1792, Schmiden, near Stuttgart, Württemberg [Germany] died Dec. 2, 1860, Tübingen  German theologian and scholar who initiated the ...
Bauria
▪ paleontology       extinct genus of mammal-like reptiles found as fossils in South African rocks of the Early Triassic Period (251 million to 245 million years ago). ...
Bauru
/bow rddooh"/, n. a city in E Brazil. 120,178. * * * ▪ Brazil       city, central São Paulo estado (state), Brazil, lying near the Batalha River at 1,640 feet (500 ...
bauson
/baw"seuhn/, n. Archaic. a badger (applied contemptuously to people). [1275-1325; ME bausen, bauson < MF bausen, bauzan, var. of BAUCENT, BALCENT BAUSOND] * * *
bausond
/baw"seuhnd, bos"euhnd/, adj. Brit. Dial. 1. (of animals) having white spots on a black or bay background; piebald. 2. (of horses and cattle) having a white patch or streak on ...
Bauta
▪ Cuba       city, west-central Cuba. It is a commercial and manufacturing centre for the surrounding agricultural lands, known primarily for their tobacco and ...
Bautzen
/bow"tseuhn/, n. a city in E Germany, on the Spree River: scene of defeat of Prussian and Russian armies by Napoleon I, 1813. 47,494. * * * ▪ Germany       city, ...
bauxite
—bauxitic /bawk sit"ik, boh zit"-/, adj. /bawk"suyt, boh"zuyt/, n. a rock consisting of aluminum oxides and hydroxides with various impurities: the principal ore of ...
bauxitic
See bauxite. * * *
Bav.
1. Bavaria. 2. Bavarian. * * *
Bāvand Dynasty
▪ Iranian dynasty also spelled  Bāvend        (665–1349), Iranian dynasty that ruled Ṭabaristān in what is now northern Iran.       The Bāvands ruled, ...
Bavaria
/beuh vair"ee euh/, n. a state in SE Germany: formerly a kingdom. 11,082,600; 27,239 sq. mi. (70,550 sq. km). Cap.: Munich. German, Bayern. * * * German Bayern State (pop., ...
Bavarian
/beuh vair"ee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to Bavaria, its inhabitants, or their dialect. n. 2. a native or an inhabitant of Bavaria. 3. the High German speech of Bavaria and ...
Bavarian Alps
▪ mountains, Europe German  Bayerische Alpen   northeastern segment of the Central Alps along the German-Austrian border. The mountains extend east-northeastward for 70 ...
Bavarian cream
a dessert made with custard, gelatin, and whipped cream. [1875-80] * * * ▪ food       custard enriched with whipped cream and solidified with gelatin. Bavarian creams ...
Bavarian Forest
▪ region, Germany German  Bayerischer Wald,         mountain region in east-central Bavaria Land (state), southeastern Germany. The Bavarian Forest occupies the ...
Bavarian State Picture Galleries
▪ museum, Munich, Germany German  Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen,         in Munich, museum composed of several collections, the major ones being the Neue ...
Bavarian Succession, War of the
(1778–79) Conflict in which Frederick II of Prussia prevented Joseph II of Austria from acquiring Bavaria. After the death of the Bavarian elector Maximilian Joseph ...
BavarianAlps
Bavarian Alps A range of the Alps between southern Bavaria in Germany and the Tyrol in western Austria. It rises to 2,964.9 m (9,721 ft) at Zugspitze on the southern border of ...
Bavariancream
Bavarian cream n. A dessert of custard, whipped cream, gelatin, and often other flavorings, such as puréed fruit or chocolate. * * *
bavarois
Fr. /bann vann rddwann"/, n. French Cookery. See Bavarian cream. [1840-50; < F: lit., Bavarian] * * *
baveux
/bann vue"/, n., pl. baveux /-vue"/. Canadian French Slang. a meanspirited know-it-all. * * *
bavin
/bav"in/, n. Brit. Dial. and Newfoundland. a piece of kindling wood. [1520-30; orig. obscure] * * *
bawbee
/baw bee", baw"bee/, n. 1. an old Scottish bullion coin, originally worth about three halfpence of English coin, later sixpence. 2. a halfpenny. 3. anything of little ...
bawcock
/baw"kok'/, n. Archaic. (used familiarly) a fine fellow. [1590-1600; < F beau coc fine cock] * * *
bawd
/bawd/, n. 1. a woman who maintains a brothel; madam. 2. a prostitute. 3. Archaic. a procuress. [1325-75; ME bawde, n. use of MF baude, fem. of baud jolly, dissolute < WGmc; cf. ...
bawdily
See bawdy. * * *
bawdiness
See bawdily. * * *
bawdry
/baw"dree/, n. 1. Archaic. lewdness; obscenity; bawdiness. 2. Obs. a. the business of a prostitute. b. illicit intercourse; fornication. [1350-1400; ME bawdery. See BAWD, -ERY] * ...
bawdy
—bawdily, adv. —bawdiness, n. /baw"dee/, adj., bawdier, bawdiest, n. adj. 1. indecent; lewd; obscene: another of his bawdy stories. n. 2. coarse or indecent talk or writing; ...
bawdyhouse
/baw"dee hows'/, n., pl. bawdyhouses /-how'ziz/. a brothel. [1545-55; BAWDY + HOUSE] * * *
bawl
—bawler, n. /bawl/, v.i. 1. to cry or wail lustily. v.t. 2. to utter or proclaim by outcry; shout out: to bawl one's dissatisfaction; bawling his senseless ditties to the ...
bawler
See bawl. * * *
bawn
/bawn/, n. Newfoundland. 1. a rocky stretch of foreshore on which caught fish are laid out to dry. 2. a patch of grassland or meadow near a dwelling. [1530-40; Hiberno-E < Ir ...
Bax
/baks/, n. Sir Arnold Edward Trevor, 1883-1953, English composer. * * *
Bax, Sir Arnold
▪ British author and composer original name in full  Arnold Edward Trevor Bax  born November 8, 1883, London died October 3, 1953, Cork, County Cork, Ireland  British ...
Bax, Sir Arnold (Edward Trevor)
born Nov. 8, 1883, London, Eng. died Oct. 3, 1953, Cork, County Cork, Ire. British composer. Born into a wealthy family, he was free to compose throughout his life and ...
Baxian
▪ Daoism Wade-Giles  romanization Pa Hsien , English  Eight Immortals   heterogeneous group of holy Daoists (Daoism), each of whom earned the right to immortality and had ...
Baxter
/bak"steuhr/, n. 1. Richard, 1615-91, English Puritan preacher, scholar, and writer. 2. a male given name. * * *
Baxter, Andrew
▪ Scottish philosopher born 1686/87, Aberdeen, Scot. died April 23, 1750, Whittingehame, East Lothian       Scottish metaphysical rationalist who maintained the ...
Baxter, George
▪ British engraver and printer born July 31, 1804, Lewes, Sussex, Eng. died Jan. 11, 1867, Sydenham, Kent  English engraver and printer who invented a process (patented 1835) ...
Baxter, James K.
▪ New Zealander poet in full  James Keir Baxter  born June 29, 1926, Dunedin, N.Z. died Oct. 22, 1972, Auckland       poet whose mastery of versification and striking ...
Baxter, Richard
▪ English minister born November 12, 1615, Rowton, Shropshire, England died December 8, 1691, London  Puritan minister who influenced 17th-century English Protestantism. ...
bay
bay1 /bay/, n. 1. a body of water forming an indentation of the shoreline, larger than a cove but smaller than a gulf. 2. South Atlantic States. an arm of a swamp. 3. a recess of ...
bay antler
the second prong from the base of a stag's antler. See diag. under antler. Also called bes antler, bez antler. [1860-65; bay for bes, bez, ME bes secondary ( < MF < L bis ...
Bay Area
Bay Area region in W Calif., generally consisting of the counties surrounding San Francisco Bay * * *
Bay Bridge
▪ bridge, California, United States in full  San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge   complex crossing that spans San Francisco Bay from the city of San Francisco to Oakland ...
Bay City
1. a lake port in E Michigan, near the mouth of the Saginaw River. 41,593. 2. a town in SE Texas. 17,837. * * * ▪ Michigan, United States       city, seat (1857) of Bay ...
bay ice
Oceanog. smooth sea ice formed in the sheltered waters of an arctic or antarctic bay. [1810-20] * * *
Bay Islands
a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea, N of Honduras. Spanish, Islas de la Bahía. * * * ▪ islands, Honduras Spanish  Islas de la Bahía        group of small ...
bay leaf
1. the dried leaf of the laurel, used in cookery. 2. the leaf of the bayberry, Pimenta racemosa, used in making bay oil and bay rum. [1630-40] * * * ▪ herb also called ...
bay lynx
bobcat. [1775-85, Amer.] * * *
Bay of Pigs
a bay of the Caribbean Sea in SW Cuba: site of attempted invasion of Cuba by anti-Castro forces April 1961. Spanish, Bahía de Cochinos. * * *
Bay of Pigs invasion
(April 17, 1961) Abortive invasion of Cuba directed by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and carried out by Cuban exiles. The invasion was intended to spark a rebellion that ...
Bay of Plenty
▪ region, New Zealand       regional council, eastern North Island, New Zealand. It encompasses the narrow 100-mile (160-km) stretch of lowlands fronting the Bay of ...
bay oil
a yellow essential oil distilled from the leaves of the tropical American bay, Pimenta racemosa, used in the manufacture of perfumes and bay rum. * * *
bay owl
▪ bird  uncommon and atypical Asian owl classified with the barn owls (family Tytonidae). It has a heart-shaped facial disk, which has two earlike extensions that aid sound ...
bay poplar
the tupelo, Nyssa aquatica. * * *
Bay Psalm Book
a translation of the Psalms by John Eliot and others: the first book published (1640) in America. * * * ▪ work by Ravenscroft byname of  The Whole Booke of Psalmes ...
bay rum
a fragrant liquid used chiefly as an aftershaving lotion, prepared by distilling the leaves of the tropical American bay, Pimenta racemosa, with rum or by mixing oil from the ...
bay rum tree
bay4 (def. 2). * * *
Bay Saint Louis
▪ Mississippi, United States       city, seat (1860) of Hancock county, southern Mississippi, U.S. It lies along Mississippi Sound (an embayment of the Gulf of Mexico ...
bay salt
salt derived by evaporating seawater in the sun. [1425-75; late ME] * * *
bay scallop
1. a small scallop, Pecten irradians, inhabiting shallow waters and mud flats from southeastern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, esp. eastern Long Island Sound. 2. the edible ...
Bay Shore
a town on the S shore of Long Island, in SE New York. 10,784. * * *
Bay State
—Bay Stater. Massachusetts (used as a nickname). [1780-90, Amer.] * * *
bay tree
1. laurel (def. 1). 2. See California laurel (def. 1). [1520-30] * * * ▪ Laurus genus       any of several small trees with aromatic leaves, especially the sweet bay, ...
Bay Village
a city in N central Ohio. 17,846. * * *
bay window
1. an alcove of a room, projecting from an outside wall and having its own windows, esp. one having its own foundations. Cf. bow window, oriel. 2. Informal. a large, protruding ...
Bay, Josephine Holt Perfect
▪ American financier née  Josephine Holt Perfect  born Aug. 10, 1900, Anamosa, Iowa, U.S. died Aug. 6, 1962, New York, N.Y.       American financier, the first woman ...
Bay, Laguna de
Lake, central Luzon, Philippine Islands. Located southeast of Manila, the lake, about 32 mi (52 km) long, is the largest in the Philippines. Its outlet is the Pasig River. It is ...
Bay, Table
▪ bay, South Africa  bay of the Atlantic Ocean, located near the southern tip of Africa and forming the harbour of Cape Town. Extending north from Cape Town to ...
bay-head bar
/bay"hed'/ a sand bar at the head of a bay. * * *
baya
/bah"yeuh, bah yah"/, n. a common weaverbird, Ploceus philippinus, of India. [ < Hindi ba(i)ya] * * *
bayadere
/buy"euh dear', -der'/, n. a fabric with horizontal stripes of brilliant colors. [1855-60; < F: a professional female dancer of India < Pg bailadeira, fem. of bailador dancer ...
Bayamo
/bah yah"maw/, n. a city in S Cuba. 71,660. * * * ▪ Cuba       city, eastern Cuba. Lying on the Bayamo River, it was founded as San Salvador de Bayamo in 1513. In ...
Bayamón
/bah'yah mawn"/, n. a city in N Puerto Rico, near San Juan. 205,800. * * * Municipality (pop., 2000: 224,044), northeastern Puerto Rico, part of the metropolitan area of San ...
Bayan
▪ Mongolian minister flourished 14th century, China died 1340, Nanchang, Jiangxi province       powerful Mongol minister in the last years of the Yuan (Mongol) dynasty ...
Bayar
/bah yahrdd"/, n. Celâl /je lahl"/, 1884-1986, Turkish statesman: president 1950-60. * * *
Bayar, Celâl
▪ president of Turkey born , May 15, 1882/83, Umurbey, near Bursa, Ottoman Empire [now in Turkey] died Aug. 22, 1986, Istanbul       third president of the Turkish ...
Bayard
/bay"euhrd/, n. 1. a magical legendary horse in medieval chivalric romances. 2. a mock-heroic name for any horse. 3. (l.c.) Archaic. a bay horse. [1275-1325; ME < MF; see BAY5, ...
Bayard, Pierre Terrail, seigneur de
▪ French soldier born c. 1473, Château Bayard, near Pontcharra, France died April 30, 1524, Italy  French soldier known as le chevalier sans peur et sans reproche (“the ...
Bayard, Thomas Francis
born Oct. 29, 1828, Wilmington, Del., U.S. died Sept. 28, 1898, Dedham, Mass. U.S. statesman, diplomat, and lawyer. Born into a prominent political family, he succeeded his ...
Bayard,Seigneur de
Bay·ard (bāʹərd, bīʹ-, bä-yärʹ), Seigneur de Originally Pierre Terrail. 1473-1524. French military hero known for his fearlessness and chivalry in the Italian campaigns ...
Bayati, Abdul Wahab al-
▪ 2000       Iraqi modernist poet who was a pioneer in the use of free verse rather than classical Arabic poetic forms; although al-Bayati spent a decade (1980–90) as ...
Baybars I
or Baibars born с 1223, north of the Black Sea died July 1, 1277, Damascus, Syria Most eminent sultan of the Mamlūk dynasty. A Kipchak Turk, he was sold as a slave (mamlūk) ...
bayberry
/bay"ber'ee, -beuh ree/, n., pl. bayberries. 1. any of several often aromatic trees or shrubs of the genus Myrica, as M. pensylvanica, of northeastern North America, and M. ...
BayCity
Bay City (bā) A city of eastern Michigan on Saginaw Bay north-northwest of Detroit. It is a port of entry and industrial center. Population: 38,936. * * *
Baycol
Bay·col (bāʹkôl', -kōl', -kŏl') A trademark used for the drug cerivastatin. * * *
Bayḍāʾ, Al-
▪ Yemen also spelled  Beidha, or Beida,         town, south-central Yemen. It is situated on a high plateau and, until the unification of the two Yemen states in ...
Bayer AG
German chemical and pharmaceutical company. Founded in 1863 by Friedrich Bayer (1825–1880), it now operates plants in more than 30 countries. Bayer has originated scores of ...
Bayer, Friedrich
▪ German businessman [1825-80] born June 6, 1825, Barmen, Rhine province, Prussia [Germany] died May 6, 1880, Wurzburg, Ger.       German businessman who founded the ...
Bayer, Herbert
▪ American artist born April 5, 1900, Haag, Austria died Sept. 30, 1985, Montecito, Calif., U.S.       German-American graphic artist, painter, and architect, ...
Bayer, Johann
▪ German astronomer born 1572, Rain, Bavaria [Germany] died March 7, 1625, Augsburg [Germany]       German astronomer whose book Uranometria (1603) promulgated a system ...
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG
▪ German automaker       German automaker noted for quality sports sedans and motorcycles. Headquarters are in Munich.       It originated in 1916 as Bayerische ...
Bayern
/buy"euhrddn/, n. German name of Bavaria. * * *
Bayes' theorem
/bayz, bay"ziz/, Statistics. a theorem describing how the conditional probability of each of a set of possible causes, given an observed outcome, can be computed from knowledge ...
Bayes's theorem
▪ probability       in probability theory, a means for revising predictions in light of relevant evidence, also known as conditional probability or inverse probability. ...
Bayes, Nora
▪ American singer original name  Dora Goldberg   born 1880, Joliet, Ill., U.S. died March 19, 1928, Brooklyn, N.Y.       American singer in vogue in the early 1900s ...
Bayes, Thomas
▪ English theologian and mathematician born 1702, London, England died April 17, 1761, Tunbridge Wells, Kent       English Nonconformist theologian and mathematician ...
Bayesian
/bay"zee euhn, -zheuhn/, adj. Statistics. of or pertaining to statistical methods that regard parameters of a population as random variables having known probability ...


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