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Слова на букву boom-chri (15990)

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brown hyena
a hyena, Hyaena brunnea, of southern Africa, having a blackish-gray coat: its dwindling population is now protected. Also called strand wolf. * * *
brown lung
Pathol. a debilitating lung disease resembling emphysema, occurring among textile workers from inhalation of cotton dust. Also called byssinosis. * * *
brown lung (disease)
brown lung (disease) or brown lung n. a chronic disease of the lungs caused by inhalation of fine textile fibers, esp. cotton; byssinosis * * *
brown pelican
 (Pelecanus occidentalis), pelican species common along the southern U.S. coast. See pelican. * * *
brown rat
brown rat n. a common, omnivorous large rat (Rattus norvegicus) that swims and dives well, usually lives in underground burrows, and spreads various diseases: the mutant form, a ...
brown rat.
See Norway rat. [1820-30] * * *
brown recluse
▪ spider also called  violin spider   venomous light tan or yellow spider most common in the western and southern United States. It has a body length of about 7 mm (0.25 ...
brown recluse spider
a small, pale-brown, venomous North American spider, Loxosceles reclusa, distinguished by a violin-shaped marking near the head, found outdoors in rock niches or indoors in ...
brown rice
rice from which the bran layers and germs have not been removed by polishing. [1915-20] * * *
brown rot
Plant Pathol. any plant disease, esp. of apples, peaches, plums, and cherries, characterized by browning and decay of tissues, caused by various fungi and bacteria. [1890-95] * * ...
brown sauce
a simple sauce made from reduced meat stock; espagnole. Also called sauce espagnole. * * *
brown snake
▪ reptile       any of several species of snakes named for their usual predominating colour. In New Guinea and Australia the name brown snake is applied to seven species ...
brown soils
a zonal group of soils with a brown surface horizon, developed on cool to temperate grasslands. Cf. mollisol. * * *
brown spot
Plant Pathol. a disease of many plants, characterized by irregular, brownish lesions on the fruit and foliage and by stem cankers, caused by any of several fungi, as Ceratophorum ...
brown stem rot
Plant Pathol. a disease of soybeans, characterized by brown discoloration and decay of internal tissues of the stem and leaf, caused by a fungus, Cephalosporium gregatum. * * *
brown study
deep, serious absorption in thought: Lost in a brown study, she was oblivious to the noise. [1525-35] * * *
brown sugar
1. unrefined or partially refined sugar that retains some molasses. 2. a commercial product consisting of white, refined sugar to which molasses has been added. 3. Slang. ...
Brown Swiss
one of a breed of brownish dairy cattle raised originally in Switzerland. [1900-05] * * * ▪ breed of cattle   cattle breed native to Switzerland and probably one of the ...
brown thrasher
a common large songbird, Toxostoma rufum, of the eastern U.S., having reddish-brown plumage. Also called brown thrush. [1800-10, Amer.] * * *
brown trout
a common trout, Salmo trutta, of northern European streams. [1885-90] * * * Prized and wary European game fish (Salmo trutta, family Salmonidae) that is favoured for food. The ...
Brown University
Private university in Providence, Rhode Island, U.S., a traditional member of the Ivy League. It was founded in 1764 as Rhode Island College and renamed in 1804 for a ...
Brown v Board of Education
an important US Supreme Court case (1954) which made segregation in public schools illegal. It was held after a school for white children in Topeka, Kansas, refused to accept a ...
Brown v. Board of Education (of Topeka)
(1954) U.S. Supreme Court case in which the court ruled unanimously that racial segregation in public schools violated the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment ...
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
▪ law case  case in which, on May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court (Supreme Court of the United States) ruled unanimously that racial segregation (segregation, racial) in ...
Brown, Alice
▪ American author born Dec. 5, 1856, Hampton Falls, N.H., U.S. died June 21, 1948, Boston, Mass.  American novelist, short-story writer, and biographer who gained some note ...
Brown, Alice Van Vechten
▪ American educator born June 7, 1862, Hanover, New Hampshire, U.S. died October 16, 1949, Middletown, New Jersey       art educator known for initiating art history ...
Brown, Bill
▪ 2009 William Alfred Brown        Australian cricketer born July 31, 1912, Toowoomba, Queens., Australia died March 16, 2008, Brisbane, Australia was the last ...
Brown, Capability
orig. Lancelot Brown born 1715, Kirkharle, Northumberland, Eng. died Feb. 6, 1783, London British master of naturalistic garden design. He worked for years at Stowe, ...
Brown, Charles
▪ 2000       American blues singer-songwriter whose smooth, sophisticated vocals—his timbre and phrasing resembled Nat King Cole's—and masterful piano playing were a ...
Brown, Charles Brockden
born Jan. 17, 1771, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 22, 1810, Philadelphia U.S. writer. Brown left his law studies to devote himself to writing. His gothic novels in American ...
Brown, Charlotte Emerson
▪ American clubwoman née  Charlotte Emerson  born April 21, 1838, Andover, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 5, 1895, East Orange, N.J.  American clubwoman, a founder and the first ...
Brown, Claude
▪ 2003       American author (b. Feb. 23, 1937, New York, N.Y.—d. Feb. 2, 2002, New York City), wrote a landmark work in African American literature, Manchild in the ...
Brown, Clifford
born Oct. 30, 1930, Wilmington, Del., U.S. died June 26, 1956, Pennsylvania U.S. jazz trumpeter. He became the most influential trumpeter of his generation, inspired by Fats ...
Brown, Dan
▪ 2005       The phenomenal success of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code (2003) showed no signs of slowing in 2004 as the thriller remained a fixture on best-seller lists ...
Brown, David M.
▪ 2004       American astronaut (b. April 16, 1956, Arlington, Va.—d. Feb. 1, 2003, over Texas), was a mission specialist and flight surgeon on the space shuttle ...
Brown, Dennis
▪ 2000       Jamaican reggae singer who began recording as a child and eventually released more than 75 albums; his sweet voice and lively style drew the attention of ...
Brown, Dorris Alexander
▪ 2003 “Dee”        American writer and academic (b. Feb. 29, 1908, near Alberta, La.—d. Dec. 12, 2002, Little Rock, Ark.), while serving as a librarian at the ...
Brown, Earle
▪ 2003       American composer (b. Dec. 26, 1926, Lunenburg, Mass.—d. July 2, 2002, Rye, N.Y.), used graphic notation to convey the sense of the passage of sounds ...
Brown, Edmund Gerald
▪ 1997       ("PAT"), U.S. politician who instituted civil rights laws, public works programs, and consumer-protection measures while serving (1959-67) as two-term ...
Brown, Ernest William
▪ British mathematician and astronomer born Nov. 29, 1866, Hull, Yorkshire, Eng. died July 22, 1938, New Haven, Conn., U.S.       British-born American mathematician ...
Brown, Ford Madox
born April 16, 1821, Calais, Fr. died Oct. 6, 1893, London, Eng. British painter. He studied in Bruges, Antwerp, Paris, and Rome. In Italy (1845) he met Peter von Cornelius, a ...
Brown, Gatemouth
▪ 2006 Clarence Brown  American musician (b. April 18, 1924, Vinton, La.—d. Sept. 10, 2005, Orange, Texas), synthesized blues, country, zydeco, jazz, and rhythm and blues ...
Brown, George
born Nov. 29, 1818, Edinburgh, Scot. died May. 9, 1880, Toronto, Ont., Can. Canadian journalist and politician. He immigrated to New York in 1837 and in 1843 moved to Toronto, ...
Brown, George Harold
▪ American engineer born Oct. 14, 1908, North Milwaukee, Wis., U.S. died Dec. 11, 1987, Princeton, N.J.       American electrical engineer who made major contributions ...
Brown, George Mackay
▪ 1997       Scottish writer (b. Oct. 17, 1921, Stromness, Orkney Islands, Scot.—d. April 13, 1996, Kirkwall, Orkney Islands), celebrated Orkneyan life and its ancient ...
Brown, Gordon
▪ 2008 born Feb. 20, 1951, Glasgow, Scot.       On June 27, 2007, after serving 10 years as one of the U.K.'s most successful chancellors of the Exchequer (equivalent ...
Brown, Hallie Quinn
▪ American educator born March 10, 1850, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S. died Sept. 16, 1949, Wilberforce, Ohio       American educator and elocutionist who pioneered in the ...
Brown, Harrison
▪ American geochemist born Sept. 26, 1917, Sheridan, Wyo., U.S. died Dec. 8, 1986, Albuquerque, N.M.       American geochemist known for his role in isolating plutonium ...
Brown, Helen Gurley
▪ American writer née  Helen Gurley  born Feb. 18, 1922, Green Forest, Ark., U.S.       American writer and editor whose upbeat, stylish publications, beginning in ...
Brown, Henry Billings
▪ United States jurist born March 2, 1836, South Lee, Mass., U.S. died Sept. 4, 1913, Bronxville, N.Y.       associate justice of the United States Supreme Court ...
Brown, Herbert
▪ 2005 Herbert Brovarnik        British-born American chemist (b. May 22, 1912, London, Eng.—d. Dec. 19, 2004, Lafayette, Ind.), did extensive research into the ...
Brown, Herbert Charles
▪ American chemist Introduction original name  Herbert Brovarnik  born May 22, 1912, London, Eng. died Dec. 19, 2004, Lafayette, Ind., U.S.       one of the leading ...
Brown, Iona
▪ 2005       British violinist and conductor (b. Jan. 7, 1941, Salisbury, Wiltshire, Eng.—d. June 5, 2004, Salisbury), directed (1974–80) London's Academy of St. ...
Brown, J Carter
▪ 2003       American museum director (b. Oct. 8, 1934, Providence, R.I.—d. June 17, 2002, Boston, Mass.), transformed the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., ...
Brown, Jacob Jennings
▪ United States general born May 9, 1775, Bucks County, Pa. [U.S.] died Feb. 24, 1828, Washington, D.C., U.S.       U.S. general during the War of 1812 (1812, War of), ...
Brown, James
born May 3, 1933, Barnwell, S.C., U.S. U.S. singer and songwriter. Growing up in Georgia during the Depression, Brown first sang and danced on street corners for money. He ...
Brown, James Richard
▪ 2003 “Buster”        American dancer and teacher (b. March 17, 1913, Baltimore, Md.—d. May 7, 2002, New York, N.Y.), was one of the last of the legendary tap ...
Brown, Jim
orig. James Nathaniel Brown born Feb. 17, 1936, St. Simons, Ga., U.S. U.S. football player, often considered the greatest running back of all time. He was an All-American in ...
Brown, John
I born 1735, Buncle, Berwickshire, Scot. died Oct. 17, 1788, London, Eng. British physician. He propounded the "excitability" theory published in Elementa medicinae (1780), ...
Brown, John Robert
▪ 1994       U.S. judge (b. Dec. 10, 1909, Funk, Neb.—d. Jan. 22, 1993, Houston, Texas), as a federal judge (1955-67) and chief justice (1967-79) of the U.S. Court of ...
Brown, Joseph Emerson
▪ governor of Georgia, United States born April 15, 1821, Pickens District, S.C., U.S. died Nov. 30, 1894, Atlanta, Ga.       Confederate governor of Georgia during the ...
Brown, Joseph Rogers
born Jan. 26, 1810, Warren, R.I., U.S. died July 23, 1876, Isles of Shoals, N.H. U.S. inventor and manufacturer. He perfected and produced a highly accurate linear dividing ...
Brown, Lancelot
▪ English landscape architect byname  Capability Brown   born 1715, Kirkharle, Northumberland, Eng. died Feb. 6, 1783, London  the foremost English master of garden design, ...
Brown, Lester Raymond
▪ 2002 “Les”        American bandleader (b. March 14, 1912, Reinerton, Penn.—d. Jan. 4, 2001, Pacific Palisades, Calif.), led a top swing-era dance band that went ...
Brown, Margaret Wise
▪ American writer born May 23, 1910, Brooklyn, New York, U.S. died November 13, 1952, Nice, France       prolific American writer of children's literature whose books, ...
Brown, Martha McClellan
▪ American activist née  Martha McClellan  born April 16, 1838, Baltimore, Md., U.S. died Aug. 31, 1916, Dayton, Ohio       American temperance leader who is ...
Brown, Michael S.
▪ American geneticist in full  Michael Stuart Brown   born April 13, 1941, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American molecular geneticist who, along with Joseph L. ...
Brown, Molly
orig. Margaret Tobin born July 18, 1867, Hannibal, Mo, U.S. died Oct. 26, 1932, New York, N.Y. U.S. philanthropist, social reformer, and socialite. The daughter of Irish ...
Brown, Norman Oliver
▪ 2003       American philosopher and critic (b. Sept. 25, 1913, El Oro, Mex.—d. Oct. 2, 2002, Santa Cruz, Calif.), was educated in the classics, but his thought drew ...
Brown, Olympia
▪ American activist and minister born Jan. 5, 1835, Prairie Ronde, Mich., U.S. died Oct. 23, 1926, Baltimore, Md.  minister and social reformer, an active campaigner for ...
Brown, Oscar Cicero, Jr.
▪ 2006       American jazz artist, actor, and activist (b. Oct. 10, 1926, Chicago, Ill.—d. May 29, 2005, Chicago), became noted during the civil rights movement for ...
Brown, Paul
▪ American football coach in full  Paul Eugene Brown  born September 7, 1908, Norwalk, Ohio, U.S. died August 5, 1991, Cincinnati, Ohio       American gridiron ...
Brown, Ray
▪ American musician byname of  Raymond Matthews Brown   born October 13, 1926, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. died July 2, 2002, Indianapolis, Indiana  American string ...
Brown, Raymond Edward
▪ 1999       American theologian (b. May 22, 1928, New York, N.Y.—d. Aug. 8, 1998, Redwood City, Calif.), was a highly regarded Roman Catholic biblical scholar. His ...
Brown, Raymond Matthews
▪ 2003 “Ray”        American jazz musician (b. Oct. 13, 1926, Pittsburgh, Pa.— d. July 2, 2002, Indianapolis, Ind.), played bass with a long parade of swing- and ...
Brown, Robert
born Dec. 21, 1773, Montrose, Angus, Scot. died June 10, 1858, London, Eng. Scottish botanist. The son of a clergyman, he studied medicine in Aberdeen and Edinburgh before ...
Brown, Robert Hanbury
▪ 2003       British astronomer (b. Aug. 31, 1916, Aravankadu, India—d. Jan. 16, 2002, Andover, Hampshire, Eng.), overcame scientific hurdles and the skepticism of his ...
Brown, Ron
▪ American politician in full  Ronald Harmon Brown  born August 1, 1941, Washington, D.C. died April 3, 1996, near Dubrovnik, Croatia       American politician, the ...
Brown, Ronald Harmon
▪ 1997       U.S. politician (b. Aug. 1, 1941, Washington, D.C.—d. April 3, 1996, near Dubrovnik, Croatia), was regarded as an adroit deal maker and political ...
Brown, Roosevelt
▪ 2005       American football player (b. Oct. 20, 1932, Charlottesville, Va.—d. June 9, 2004, Columbus, N.J.), manned the left-tackle position on the offensive line ...
Brown, Ruth
▪ 2007 Ruth Alston Weston        American singer and actress (b. Jan. 12, 1928, Portsmouth, Va.—d. Nov. 17, 2006, Las Vegas, Nev.), earned the sobriquet “Miss ...
Brown, Sir Arthur Whitten
▪ British aviator born July 23, 1886, Glasgow died Oct. 4, 1948, Swansea, Glamorgan, Wales  British aviator who, with Captain John W. Alcock (Alcock, Sir John William), made ...
Brown, Sir John
▪ British manufacturer born Dec. 6, 1816, Sheffield, Yorkshire [now South Yorkshire], Eng. died Dec. 27, 1896, Bromley, Kent [now Greater London]       British ...
Brown, Sterling
▪ American educator, literary critic and poet in full  Sterling Allen Brown   born May 1, 1901, Washington, D.C., U.S. died Jan. 13, 1989, Takoma Park, ...
Brown, Thomas
▪ British physician and philosopher born Jan. 9, 1778, Kilmabreck, Kirkcudbright, Scot. died April 2, 1820, Brompton, near London  British metaphysician whose work marks a ...
Brown, Tom
▪ British author byname of  Thomas Brown  born 1663, Shifnal, Shropshire, Eng. died June 16, 1704, London       British satirist best known for his reputedly ...
Brown, Trisha
▪ American choreographer born Nov. 25, 1936, Aberdeen, Wash., U.S.       American dancer and choreographer whose avant-garde and postmodernist work explores and ...
Brown, William Hill
▪ American author born November 1765, Boston died Sept. 2, 1793, Murfreesboro, N.C., U.S.       novelist and dramatist whose anonymously published The Power of ...
Brown, William Wells
born 1814?, near Lexington, Ky., U.S. died Nov. 6, 1884, Chelsea, Mass. U.S. writer. Born into slavery, Brown escaped and educated himself, settling in the Boston area. He ...
Brown, Willie
▪ American politician in full  Willie Lewis Brown, Jr.  born March 20, 1934, Mineola, Texas, U.S.       American politician who was the first African American speaker ...
Brown,Charles Brockden
Brown (broun), Charles Brockden. 1771-1810. American writer and editor who is considered America's first professional novelist. Brown is best known for his Gothic romances, such ...
Brown,Clifford
Brown, Clifford. Known as “Brownie.” 1930-1956. American jazz trumpeter whose work, especially as a member of the quintet he formed with Max Roach (1954-1956), influenced ...
Brown,Herbert Charles
Brown, Herbert Charles. Born 1912. British-born American chemist. He shared a 1979 Nobel Prize for discoveries in the chemistry of boron and phosphorus. * * *
Brown,James
Brown, James. Born 1933. American singer. First popular in the 1950s with hits like “Please, Please, Please,” he is often called the “Godfather of Soul.” * * *
Brown,James Nathaniel
Brown, James Nathaniel. Known as “Jim.” Born 1936. American football player. A running back with the Cleveland Browns (1957-1971), he led the National Football League in ...
Brown,John
Brown, John. 1800-1859. American abolitionist. In 1859 Brown and 21 followers captured the U.S. arsenal at Harper's Ferry as part of an effort to liberate Southern slaves. His ...
Brown,Margaret Wise
Brown, Margaret Wise. 1910-1952. American author of children's picture books, including the Noisy Book series (1939) and Goodnight Moon (1947). * * *
Brown,Olympia
Brown, Olympia. 1835-1926. American minister and suffragist who was the first woman in the United States to be ordained in the ministry of an established denomination (1863). * * ...
Brown,Robert
Brown, Robert. 1773-1858. Scottish botanist known for his investigation of the sexual behavior of plants. His discovery of the irregular movement of pollen grains led to the ...
brown-and-serve
/brown"euhn serrv"/, adj. (of baked or cooked packaged foods) requiring only a brief period of browning, as in an oven, before being ready to serve: brown-and-serve rolls. * * *
brown-bag
—brown-bagger, n. /brown"bag"/, v., brown-bagged, brown-bagging, adj. v.t. 1. to bring (one's own liquor) to a restaurant or club, esp. one that has no liquor license. 2. to ...
brown-bagger
See brown-bag. * * *
brown-eyed Susan
/brown"uyd'/ a composite plant, Rudbeckia triloba, of the southeastern U.S., having a single flower with yellow rays darkening to an orange orbrown at the base and a ...
brown-nose
/brown"nohz'/, v., brown-nosed, brown-nosing, n. Slang. v.i. 1. to curry favor; behave obsequiously. v.t. 2. to seek favors from (a person) in an obsequious manner; fawn ...
Brown-Séquard, Charles-Édouard
▪ French physiologist born April 8, 1817, Port Louis, Mauritius died April 1, 1894, Paris, France  French physiologist and neurologist, a pioneer endocrinologist and ...
brown-tail moth
/brown"tayl'/ a white moth, Nygmia phaerrhoea, having a brown tuft at the end of the abdomen, the larvae of which feed on the foliage of various shade and fruit trees. Also ...
brown-tailmoth
brown-tail moth (brounʹtāl') n. A small white and brown tussock moth (Euproctis phaeorrhoea) whose caterpillars defoliate shade trees and produce a poison capable of causing a ...
brownalga
brown alga n. Any of a large group of chiefly marine plants of the division Phaeophyta, including the rockweeds and the kelps, having brown and yellow pigments that mask the ...
Brownback, Sam
▪ American politician in full  Samuel Dale Brownback  born Sept. 12, 1956, Garnett, Kan., U.S.    American politician, who served as a member of the U.S. House of ...
brownbear
brown bear n. Any of several large bears of the genus Ursus, such as the grizzly and Kodiak bears, inhabiting western North America and northern Eurasia and having brown to ...
brownBetty
brown Bet·ty (bĕtʹē) n. A baked pudding of chopped or sliced apples, bread crumbs, raisins, sugar, butter, and spices. * * *
brownbread
brown bread n. 1. A bread made of a dark flour, such as graham or whole-wheat flour. 2. A steamed bread usually made of cornmeal, flour, and molasses. * * *
brownbul
      any of certain bird species of the bulbul family. See bulbul. * * *
browncoal
brown coal n. See lignite. * * *
browndwarf
brown dwarf n. A celestial body that resembles a star but does not emit light because it is too small to ignite internal nuclear fusion. The planet Jupiter is a small brown ...
Browne
/brown/, n. 1. Charles Farrer /far"euhr/, ("Artemus Ward"), 1834-67, U.S. humorist. 2. Sir Thomas, 1605-82, English physician and author. * * *
Browne, E Martin
▪ British director and producer born Jan. 29, 1900, Zeals, Wiltshire, Eng. died April 27, 1980, London       British theatrical director and producer who was a major ...
Browne, Hablot Knight
▪ British artist pseudonym  Phiz   born June 15, 1815, Lambeth, near London died July 8, 1882, Brighton, East Sussex, Eng.       British artist, preeminent as an ...
Browne, Jackson
▪ American musician in full  Clyde Jackson Browne  born October 9, 1948, Heidelberg, Germany       German-born American singer, songwriter, pianist, and guitarist, ...
Browne, Maximilian Ulysses, Reichsgraf
▪ Austrian field marshal born October 23, 1705, Basel died June 26, 1757, Prague       field marshal, one of Austria's ablest commanders during the War of the Austrian ...
Browne, Robert
▪ English church leader born c. 1550 died October 1633, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Eng.       Puritan Congregationalist church leader, one of the original ...
Browne, Roscoe Lee
▪ 2008       American character actor born May 2, 1925 , Woodbury, N.J. died April 11, 2007, Los Angeles, Calif. had a regal bearing and a sonorous voice that he used ...
Browne, Sir John
▪ 2001       With its $27 billion acquisition of Atlantic Richfield Co. in 2000, BP Amoco became the world's second largest producer of oil and natural gas. At the helm ...
Browne, Sir Thomas
born Oct. 19, 1605, London, Eng. died Oct. 19, 1682, Norwich, Norfolk British physician and author. While practicing medicine, he began a parallel career as a writer. His ...
Browne, William
▪ English poet born 1591?, Tavistock, Devonshire, Eng. died 1645?       English poet, author of Britannia's Pastorals (1613–16) and other pastoral and miscellaneous ...
Browne, William George
▪ British explorer born July 25, 1768, London died June 1813, Iran       British traveler in Central Africa and the Middle East and the first European to describe ...
Browne,Charles Farrar
Browne (broun), Charles Farrar. Pen name Artemus Ward (wôrd) 1834-1867. American humorist who used backwoods characters and local dialect to comment on current events in his ...
Browne,Sir Thomas
Browne, Sir Thomas. 1605-1682. English physician and writer known for the richness of his prose in works such as Religio Medici (1642), an attempt to reconcile Christian faith ...
Brownell, W C
▪ American critic born Aug. 30, 1851, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 22, 1928, Williamstown, Mass.       critic who sought to expand the scope of American literary ...
Browner, Carol M.
▪ American attorney and politician in full  Carol Martha Browner  born Dec. 16, 1955, Miami, Fla., U.S.       American attorney and politician who served as director ...
brownfat
brown fat n. A dark-colored, mitochondrion-rich adipose tissue in many mammals that generates heat to regulate body temperature, especially in hibernating animals. * * *
Brownfield
/brown"feeld'/, n. a city in NW Texas. 10,387. * * *
brownfield
/brown"feeld'/, n. an industrial or commercial site that is idle or underused because of real or perceived environmental pollution. [1975-80; BROWN + FIELD] * * *
Brownian motion
Any of various physical phenomena in which some quantity is constantly undergoing small, random fluctuations. It was named for Robert Brown, who was investigating the ...
Brownian movement
/brow"nee euhn/, Physics. the irregular motion of small particles suspended in a liquid or a gas, caused by the bombardment of the particles by molecules of the medium: first ...
Brownianmovement
Brown·i·an movement (brouʹnē-ən) n. The random movement of microscopic particles suspended in a liquid or gas, caused by collisions with molecules of the surrounding ...
brownie
/brow"nee/, n. 1. a tiny, fanciful, good-natured brown elf who secretly helps at night with household chores. 2. a small, chewy, cakelike cookie, usually made with chocolate and ...
Brownie Girl Scouts
➡ Brownie * * *
Brownie Guide
➡ Brownie * * *
Brownie point
Informal. a credit toward advancement or good standing gained esp. by currying favor. [1960-65; from the point system based on good behavior and performance used by Brownies for ...
Browniepoint
Brownie point also brownie point n. An amount of credit considered as earned, especially by favorably impressing a superior. Often used in the plural.   [From the practice of ...
Browning
/brow"ning/, n. 1. Elizabeth Barrett /bar"it/, 1806-61, English poet. 2. John Moses, 1885-1926, U.S. designer of firearms. 3. Robert, 1812-89, English poet (husband of Elizabeth ...
Browning automatic rifle
an air-cooled, fully automatic rifle capable of firing 200 to 350 rounds per minute. Abbr.: BAR [1900-05; named after J. M. BROWNING] * * * ▪ weapon       automatic ...
Browning, Elizabeth Barrett
orig. Elizabeth Barrett born March 6, 1806, near Durham, Durham, Eng. died June 29, 1861, Florence British poet. Though she was an invalid who was afraid to meet strangers, ...
Browning, John Moses
▪ American gun designer born Jan. 21, 1855, Ogden, Utah, U.S. died Nov. 26, 1926, Herstal, Belg.       U.S. designer of small arms and automatic weapons, best known for ...
Browning, Robert
born May 7, 1812, London, Eng. died Dec. 12, 1889, Venice, Italy British poet. His early works include verse dramas, notably Pippa Passes (1841), and long poems, including ...
Browning, Tod
orig. Charles Albert Browning born July 12, 1880, Louisville, Ky., U.S. died Oct. 6, 1962, Malibu, Calif. U.S. film director. He was a circus performer and vaudeville comic ...
Browning,Elizabeth Barrett
Brown·ing (brouʹnĭng), Elizabeth Barrett. 1806-1861. British poet. Overcoming ill health and the jealous objections of her tyrannical father, she eloped to Italy with Robert ...
Browning,John Moses
Browning, John Moses. 1855-1926. American firearms inventor whose designs include repeating rifles, automatic pistols, and a machine gun dubbed “the Peacemaker” that was used ...
Browning,Robert
Browning, Robert. 1812-1889. British poet best known for dramatic monologues such as “My Last Duchess,” “Fra Lippo Lippi,” and “The Bishop Orders His Tomb.” His work, ...
Browningautomatic rifle
Browning automatic rifle n. Abbr. BAR A.30-caliber air-cooled, automatic or semiautomatic, gas-operated, magazine-fed rifle used by U.S. troops in World Wars I and II and the ...
Browningmachine gun
Browning machine gun n. A.30- or.50-caliber automatic belt-fed, air-cooled or water-cooled machine gun capable of firing ammunition at a rate of more than 500 rounds per minute, ...
brownish
See brown. * * *
Brownlow, William G.
▪ American journalist and politician in full  William Gannaway Brownlow   born Aug. 29, 1805, Wythe county, Va., U.S. died April 29, 1877, Knoxville, ...
brownlung disease
brown lung disease n. See byssinosis. * * *
brownmustard
brown mustard n. 1. See Indian mustard. 2. The black mustard. * * *
brownness
See brownish. * * *
brownnose
brown·nose or brown-nose (brounʹnōz') tr.v. Informal brown·nosed, brown·nos·ing, brown·nos·es To curry favor with in an obsequious manner; fawn on.   [From the image ...
brownnoser
See brownnose. * * *
brownout
/brown"owt'/, n. 1. the elimination of some or reduction of all electric lights of a city, esp. as a precaution against attack in time of war. 2. any curtailment of electric ...
brownpatch
brown patch n. A disease of turf grasses caused by a fungus of the genus Rhizoctonia and resulting in circular patches of dead leaves. * * *
brownprint
/brown"print'/, n. a process of photographic reproduction using a mixture of iron and silver salts to produce a white image on a sepia ground. [BROWN + PRINT, on the model of ...
brownrat
brown rat n. See Norway rat. * * *
brownrecluse spider
brown recluse spider n. A venomous spider (Loxosceles reclusa) having an hourglass-shaped mark on the cephalothorax, introduced into the southern United States from South ...
brownrice
brown rice n. The whole grain of rice, from which the germ and outer layers containing the bran have not been removed; unpolished rice. * * *
brownrot
brown rot n. Any of several plant diseases, especially a disease of peach, plum, apricot, cherry, and related plants, characterized by wilting and browning of the flowers and ...
brownsauce
brown sauce n. A sauce made from butter and flour browned together and stock. * * *
brownshirt
/brown"sherrt'/, n. (often cap.) 1. a Nazi. 2. a Nazi storm trooper. [1930-35; BROWN + SHIRT so called from the color of the shirt worn as part of the uniform] * * *
Brownson
/brown"seuhn/, n. Orestes Augustus, 1803-76, U.S. writer. * * *
Brownson, Orestes Augustus
▪ American writer born Sept. 16, 1803, Stockbridge, Vt., U.S. died April 17, 1876, Detroit, Mich.  American writer on theological, philosophical, scientific, and sociological ...
brownstone
/brown"stohn'/, n. 1. a reddish-brown sandstone, used extensively as a building material. 2. Also called brownstone front. a building, esp. a row house, fronted with this ...
brownstoner
/brown"stoh'neuhr/, n. a person who lives in or owns a brownstone house. [BROWNSTONE + -ER1] * * *
brownstudy
brown study n. A state of deep thought.   [brown, gloomy + study, mental state.] * * *
brownsugar
brown sugar n. 1. Unrefined or incompletely refined sugar that still retains some molasses, which gives it a brownish color. 2. A commercial product made by the addition of ...
Brownsville
/brownz"vil/, n. a seaport in S Texas, near the mouth of the Rio Grande. 84,997. * * * ▪ Texas, United States       city, seat (1848) of Cameron county, extreme ...
Brownsville Affair
Racial incident in 1906 in Brownsville, Texas, involving white citizens of Brownsville and African American soldiers stationed at nearby Fort Brown. On the evening of August ...
BrownSwiss
Brown Swiss n. One of a hardy breed of large brown dairy cattle that originated in Switzerland. * * *
browntail moth
browntail moth [broun′tāl΄] n. a white moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoea) whose larvae are harmful to trees and cause an irritating skin rash: also brown-tail moth * * *
brownthrasher
brown thrasher n. A North American bird (Toxostoma rufum) related to the mockingbird and having a reddish-brown back and a dark-streaked breast. * * *
browntrout
brown trout n. A European freshwater game fish (Salmo trutta) that is dark olive to purple-black above and yellow-brown with reddish spots on the sides. It is naturalized in ...
brownwater
brown water n. Shallow water. * * *
Brownwood
/brown"wood'/, n. a city in central Texas. 19,203. * * *
browridge
/brow"rij'/, n. Anat. the bony prominence above the eye. Also, brow ridge. Also called supraorbital ridge, superciliary ridge. [1895-1900; BROW + RIDGE] * * * ▪ anatomy also ...
browsable
/brow"zeuh beuhl/, adj. enabling or encouraging one to browse: a browsable book; a browsable store. [BROWSE + -ABLE] * * *
browse
—browser, n. /browz/, v., browsed, browsing, n. v.t. 1. to eat, nibble at, or feed on (leaves, tender shoots, or other soft vegetation). 2. to graze; pasture on. 3. to look ...
browser
/brow"zeuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that browses. 2. Computers. an application program that allows the user to examine encoded documents in a form suitable for display, esp. ...
Broxbourne
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative and historic county of Hertfordshire, England. The borough comprises the valley of the ...
Broxtowe
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative and historic county of Nottinghamshire, England. The borough covers the heavily ...
Broz
Serbo-Croatian. /brddawz/, n. Josip /yaw"sip/. See Tito, Marshal. * * *
Broz,Josip
Broz (brōz, brôz), Josip. See Tito, Marshal. * * *
brr
/berr/, interj. (used to express sensations of cold). * * *
brrr
brrr or brr [bʉr] interj. used to signify that one feels cold * * *
Brú, Hedin
▪ Faroese writer original name  Hans Jakob Jacobsen  born Aug. 17, 1901, Sklevig, Faroe Islands, Den. died May 18, 1987, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands       Faroese ...
Bruant
/brddyuu ahonn"/, n. Libéral /lee bay rddannl"/, c1635-1697, French architect. * * *
Bruant, Libéral
▪ French architect Bruant also spelled  Bruand   born c. 1635 died Nov. 22, 1697, Paris, France  builder of the Hôtel des Invalides in Paris, a French architect noted for ...
Brubeck
/brooh"bek/, n. David Warren (Dave), born 1920, U.S. jazz pianist and composer. * * *
Brubeck, Dave
orig. David Warren Brubeck born Dec. 6, 1920, Concord, Calif., U.S. U.S. jazz pianist and composer. Brubeck studied composition with Darius Milhaud before working as a jazz ...
Brubeck,David Warren
Bru·beck (bro͞oʹbĕk), David Warren. Known as “Dave.” Born 1920. American jazz pianist and composer considered to be one of the foremost exponents of progressive jazz. * ...
Bruce
/broohs/, n. 1. Blanche Kelso, 1841-98, U.S. politician: first black to serve a full term as U.S. senator 1875-81. 2. Sir David, 1855-1931, Australian physician. 3. Lenny ...
Bruce family
▪ Scottish family also spelled  Bruis,  Brix,  or  Broase,         an old Scottish family of Norman French descent, to which two kings of Scotland belonged. The ...
Bruce Forsyth
➡ Forsyth (I) * * *
Bruce Peninsula
▪ peninsula, Ontario, Canada also called  Saugeen Peninsula,         extension of the Niagara Escarpment, southeastern Ontario, Canada. The peninsula juts ...
Bruce Series
▪ geology       division of Precambrian rocks in North America that is well-developed northeast of the Lake Huron region (the Precambrian began about 3.8 billion years ...
Bruce Springsteen
➡ Springsteen * * *
Bruce Willis
➡ Willis * * *
Bruce, Blanche K
▪ United States senator born March 1, 1841, Prince Edward county, Va., U.S. died March 17, 1898, Washington, D.C.  black senator from Mississippi during the Reconstruction ...
Bruce, Blanche K(elso)
born March 1, 1841, Prince Edward county, Va., U.S. died March 17, 1898, Washington, D.C. U.S. senator from Mississippi during Reconstruction. Born to a slave mother and a ...
Bruce, James
▪ Scottish explorer born Dec. 14, 1730, Larbert, Stirling, Scot. died April 27, 1794, Larbert  explorer who, in the course of daring travels in Ethiopia, reached the ...
Bruce, Lenny
orig. Leonard Alfred Schneider born Oct. 13, 1925, Mineola, N.Y., U.S. died Aug. 3, 1966, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. stand-up comedian. He studied acting and began performing ...
Bruce, Michael
▪ Scottish poet born March 27, 1746, Kinnesswood, Kinross-shire [now Perth and Kinross], Scot. died July 5, 1767, Kinnesswood       Scottish poet whose works were ...
Bruce, Robert Arthur
▪ 2005       American cardiologist (b. Nov. 20, 1916, Boston, Mass.—d. Feb. 12, 2004, Seattle, Wash.), invented the treadmill cardiac stress test used to diagnose ...
Bruce, Stanley Melbourne Bruce, Viscount
▪ prime minister of Australia born April 15, 1883, ,Melbourne, Victoria [Australia] died August 25, 1967, London, England  statesman and diplomat who was prime minister of ...
Bruce,Blanche Kelso
Bruce (bro͞os), Blanche Kelso. 1841-1898. American political leader who was the first African-American politician to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate (1875-1881). * * *
Bruce,Lenny
Bruce, Lenny. Originally Leonard Alfred Schneider. 1926-1966. American comedian whose scathing, often obscene humor strongly influenced later comics. * * *
Bruce,Robert the
Bruce, Robert the. See Robert I2. * * *
Bruce,Sir David
Bruce, Sir David. 1855-1931. Australian physician and bacteriologist known for his description (1887) of the bacterium that causes undulant fever, or brucellosis. * * *
Bruce,Stanley Melbourne
Bruce, Stanley Melbourne. First Viscount Bruce of Melbourne. 1883-1967. Australian politician who was prime minister (1923-1929) and a delegate (1933-1936) to the League of ...
brucella
/brooh sel"euh/, n., pl. brucellae /-sel"ee/, brucellas. Bacteriol. any of several rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria of the genus Brucella, certain species of which, as B. melitensis, ...
brucellosis
/brooh'seuh loh"sis/, n. Pathol., Vet. Pathol. infection with bacteria of the Brucella genus, frequently causing spontaneous abortions in animals and remittent fever in humans. ...
brucellosis spondylitis
▪ pathology       arthritis of the spine caused by infection with Brucella, the organism of undulant fever. Arthritis generally occurs several weeks after the initial ...
Bruch
/brook/; Ger. /brddookh/, n. Max /maks/; Ger. /mahks/, 1838-1920, German composer and conductor. * * *
Bruch, Max
▪ German composer born Jan. 6, 1838, Cologne, Prussia [now in Germany] died Oct. 2, 1920, Friedensau, near Berlin, Ger.  German composer remembered chiefly for his virtuoso ...
Bruch, Max (Karl August)
born Jan. 6, 1838, Cologne, Prussia died Oct. 2, 1920, Friedensau, near Berlin, Ger. German composer. Bruch held many conducting positions and taught for 20 years at the Berlin ...
Bruchmüller, Georg
▪ German artillery officer born Dec. 11, 1863, Berlin [Ger.] died Jan. 26, 1948, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, W. Ger.       German artillery officer who revolutionized ...
Bruchsal
▪ Germany       city, Baden-Württemberg Land (state), southwestern Germany. It lies along the Saalbach (Saal Stream), just northeast of Karlsruhe. First mentioned in ...
brucine
/brooh"seen, -sin/, n. Chem. a white, crystalline, bitter, slightly water-soluble, very poisonous alkaloid, C23H26N2O4, obtained from the nux vomica tree Strychnos nux-vomica, ...
Brucioli, Antonio
▪ Italian humanist born 1495, Florence [Italy] died 1566, Venice       Italian Humanist whose controversial translation of the Bible led to his being tried three times ...
brucite
/brooh"suyt/, n. a mineral, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH)2, occurring in tabular, foliated crystals: used in magnesia refractories. [1865-70; named after A. Bruce (1777-1818), ...
Bruck
▪ Austria also called  Bruck An Der Mur,         town, southeast-central Austria. It lies at the junction of the Mur and Mürz rivers north of Graz. First mentioned ...
Brücke, Die
(German; "The Bridge") Organization of German Expressionist artists. It was founded in 1905 by four architectural students at the Dresden Technical School, including Ernst ...
Brücke, Ernst Wilhelm von
▪ German physiologist born June 6, 1819, Berlin, Prussia [now in Germany] died Jan. 7, 1892, Vienna, Austria  German physiologist who helped to introduce physical and ...
Bruckheimer, Jerry
▪ 2006  Already one of Hollywood's most successful movie producers—his explosion-laden, action-packed films had grossed some $3 billion at the U.S. box office—Jerry ...
Bruckner
/brook"neuhr, bruk"-/; Ger. /brddook"neuhrdd/, n. Anton /an"teuhn, -ton, -tohn/; Ger. /ahn"tawn/, 1824-96, Austrian composer and organist. * * *
Bruckner, (Josef) Anton
born Sept. 4, 1824, Ansfelden, Austria died Oct. 11, 1896, Vienna Austrian composer. Son of a rural schoolmaster who died in Anton's youth, he was taken into a monastery as a ...
Bruckner, Anton
▪ Austrian composer Introduction in full  Josef Anton Bruckner   born Sept. 4, 1824, Ansfelden, Austria died Oct. 11, 1896, Vienna       Austrian composer of a number ...
Bruckner,Anton
Bruck·ner (bro͝okʹnər), Anton. 1824-1896. Austrian organist and composer whose major works include nine symphonies, a Requiem (1848-1849), and a Te Deum (1881). * * *
Bruegel
Bruegel or Brueghel [brü′gəl, broi′gəl] 1. Jan [yän] 1568-1625; Fl. painter: son of Pieter 2. Pieter [pē′tər] 1525?-69; Fl. painter of peasant life * * *
Bruegel, Jan, The Elder
▪ Flemish painter byname  Velvet Bruegel,  Dutch  Jan Bruegel De Oudere, or Fluwelen Bruegel, Bruegel  also spelled  Brueghel, or Breughel  born 1568, Brussels [now in ...
Bruegel, Pieter, II, The Younger
▪ Flemish artist byname  Hell Bruegel,  Dutch  Pieter Bruegel Ii De Jongere, or Helse Bruegel, Bruegel  also spelled  Brueghel, or Breughel  born 1564, Brussels [now in ...
Bruegel, Pieter, the Elder
born с 1525, probably Breda, duchy of Brabant died Sept. 5/9, 1569, Brussels Greatest Netherlandish painter of the 16th century. Not much is known of his early life, but in ...
Brueghel
/broy"geuhl, brooh"-/; Flemish /brddue"geuhl/, n. Breughel. Also, Bruegel. * * *
Brueghel, Jan, the Elder
born с 1525, probably Breda, duchy of Brabant died Sept. 5/9, 1569, Brussels Flemish painter and draftsman, second son of Pieter Bruegel. Early in his career he went to Italy, ...
Brueghel,Pieter
Brue·ghel or Brue·gel also Breu·ghel (broiʹgəl, bro͞oʹ-, brœʹ-), Pieter. Known as “the Elder.” 1525?-1569. Flemish painter noted for his landscapes and his lively ...
Bruges
/brooh"jiz, broohzh/; Fr. /brddyuuzh/, n. a city in NW Belgium: connected by canal with its seaport, Zeebrugge. 119,718. Flemish, Brugge /brdduekh"euh/. * * *
Brugge
Brugge [brüzhbroog′ə] city in NW Belgium: pop. 116,000: Fr. name Bruges [brüzh] * * * or Bruges City (pop., 2000 est.: 116,200), northwestern Belgium. First mentioned in ...
Brugge-Zeebrugge Canal
▪ canal, Belgium       waterway built between 1896 and 1907 to connect Brugge (Bruges) in Belgium with the North Sea, thus restoring Brugge's ancient status as an ocean ...
Brugger, Kenneth C.
▪ 1999       American amateur naturalist who on Jan. 2, 1975, discovered the long-sought winter home of the monarch butterfly in the mountains of Mexico (b. 1918?—d. ...
Brugmann
/broog"meuhn/; Ger. /brddoog"mahn/, n. (Friedrich) Karl /free"drik kahrl/; Ger. /frddee"drddikh kahrddl/, 1849-1919. German philologist. * * *
Brugmann, (Friedrich) Karl
born March 16, 1849, Wiesbaden, Nassau died June 29, 1919, Leipzig, Ger. German linguist. A professor of Sanskrit and comparative linguistics, he belonged to the Neogrammarian ...
Brugmann, Karl
▪ German linguist in full  Friedrich Karl Brugmann   born , March 16, 1849, Wiesbaden, Nassau [Germany] died June 29, 1919, Leipzig, Ger.       German linguist who ...
Brugnon, Jacques
▪ French tennis player byname  Toto Brugnon   born June 11, 1895, Paris, Fr. died March 20, 1978, Paris       French tennis champion, one of the world's greatest ...
Brugsch, Heinrich Karl
▪ German Egyptologist born Feb. 18, 1827, Berlin, Prussia [Germany] died Sept. 9, 1894, Charlottenburg, near Berlin       German Egyptologist who pioneered in ...
Brühl
▪ Germany       city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), northwestern Germany. It lies near the left bank of the Rhine River, south of Cologne. It was a ...
Brühl, Heinrich, Graf von
▪ prime minister of Saxony born August 13, 1700, Gangloffsömmern, Thuringia [Germany] died October 28, 1763, Dresden, Saxony  prime minister and virtual ruler of electoral ...
Bruhn
/broohn/, n. Erik (Belton Evers), 1928-86, Danish ballet dancer. * * *
Bruhn, Erik
orig. Belton Evers born Oct. 3, 1928, Copenhagen, Den. died April 1, 1986, Toronto, Ont., Can. Danish ballet dancer. From 1937 he studied at the Royal Danish Ballet training ...
bruin
/brooh"in/, n. a bear, esp. a European brown bear. [1475-85; < MD bruyn, bruun lit., the brown one, name of the bear in the fable of Reynard the Fox] * * *
bruise
/broohz/, v., bruised, bruising, n. v.t. 1. to injure by striking or pressing, without breaking the skin: The blow bruised his arm. Her pinching bruised the peaches. 2. to injure ...
bruiser
/brooh"zeuhr/, n. Informal. a strong, tough person: The football player was over six feet tall and weighed 285 pounds - a real bruiser. [1580-90; BRUISE + -ER1] * * *
bruit
—bruiter, n. /brooht/, v.t. 1. to voice abroad; rumor (used chiefly in the passive and often fol. by about): The report was bruited through the village. n. 2. Med. any ...
brulé
/brooh lay", brooh"lee/; Fr. /brddyuu lay"/, n., pl. brulés /-layz", -leez/; Fr. /-lay"/. 1. (in the Pacific Northwest) an area of forest destroyed by fire. 2. Canadian. land ...
Brulé
/brooh lay"/, n., pl. Brulés, (esp. collectively) Brulé. a member of a North American Indian people belonging to the Teton branch of the Dakota. * * *
Brûlé, Étienne
▪ Canadian explorer born c. 1592, Champigny-sur-Marne, Fr. died June 1633, New France [Canada]       French-born Canadian explorer who emigrated in 1608 and was the ...
Brum
(BrE) an informal name for Birmingham, England, used especially by people living there. See also Brummie. * * *
Brum, Baltasar
▪ Uruguayan statesman born June 18, 1883, Salto, Uruguay died March 31, 1933, Montevideo  statesman noted for his reform of the educational and welfare systems in Uruguay and ...

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