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Слова на букву boom-chri (15990)

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carnal abuse
1. Law. any lascivious contact with the sexual organs of a child by an adult, esp. without sexual intercourse. 2. rape, esp. of a young girl. * * *
carnal knowledge
Chiefly Law. sexual intercourse. * * *
carnality
See carnal. * * *
carnalknowledge
carnal knowledge n. Sexual intercourse. * * *
carnallite
/kahr"nl uyt'/, n. Mineral. a white hydrous chloride of potassium and magnesium, KMgCl3·6H2O, used chiefly as a source of potassium and magnesium. [1875-85; named after R. von ...
carnally
See carnality. * * *
Carnap
/kahr"nap/, n. Rudolf P., 1891-1970, U.S. philosopher, born in Germany. * * *
Carnap, Rudolf
born May 18, 1891, Ronsdorf, Ger. died Sept. 14, 1970, Santa Monica, Calif., U.S. German-born U.S. philosopher. He earned a doctorate in physics at the University of Jena in ...
Carnap,Rudolf
Car·nap (kärʹnäp', -năp'), Rudolf. 1891-1970. German-born American philosopher whose antimetaphysical views, set forth in such works as The Logical Structure of the World ...
Carnarvon
/kahr nahr"veuhn/, n. 1. Caernarvon. 2. Also, Carnarvonshire /kahr nahr"veuhn shear', -sheuhr/. Caernarvonshire. * * *
Carnarvon Gorge
▪ Queensland, Australia       gorge in southeastern Queensland, Australia, on the eastern slopes of Carnarvon Range of the Great Dividing Range. The gorge, sometimes ...
Carnarvon Range
▪ plateau, Queensland, Australia       plateau section of the Great Dividing Range, southeast-central Queensland, Australia. The Carnarvon Range lies 230 to 280 miles ...
Carnarvon, George Edward Stanhope Molyneux Herbert, 5th earl of, Baron Porchester Of Highclere
▪ British Egyptologist born , June 26, 1866, Highclere Castle, Berkshire, Eng. died April 5, 1923, Cairo       British Egyptologist who was the patron and associate of ...
Carnarvon, Henry George Reginald Molyneux Herbert, 7th earl of
▪ 2002       British horse racing manager (b. Jan. 19, 1924, Highclere, Hampshire, Eng.—d. Sept. 11, 2001, Winchester, Hampshire), managed a stud farm and a racing ...
Carnarvon, Henry Howard Molyneux Herbert, 4th earl of
▪ British statesman born June 24, 1831, London died June 28, 1890, London       British statesman, a liberally inclined member of Conservative Party governments, who ...
carnassial
/kahr nas"ee euhl/, Zool. adj. 1. (of teeth) adapted for shearing flesh. n. 2. a carnassial tooth, esp. the last upper premolar or the first lower molar tooth of certain ...
Carnatic
/kahr nat"ik/, n. a historically important region on the SE coast of India: now in Madras state. * * *
Carnatic music
▪ Indian music Carnatic also spelled  Karnatic  or  Karnatak         music of southern India (generally south of the city of Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh state) that ...
Carnatic Wars
▪ Euro-Indian wars also spelled  Karnatic Wars        series of military contests during the 18th century between the British (British Empire), the French, the ...
carnation
/kahr nay"sheuhn/, n. 1. any of numerous cultivated varieties of the clove pink, Dianthus caryophyllus, having long-stalked, fragrant, usually double flowers in a variety of ...
carnauba
/kahr now"beuh, -naw"-, -nooh"-/, n. 1. a palm, Copernicia prunifera, of Brazil, having palmate leaves covered with wax. 2. Also called carnauba wax. the hard, lustrous wax ...
carnauba wax
Very hard wax obtained from fronds of the carnauba tree, Copernicia cerifera, a fan palm of Brazil. During the regular dry seasons in Brazil, where it is called the tree of ...
Carné
/kahr nay"/; Fr. /kannrdd nay"/, n. Marcel /mahr sel"/; Fr. /mannrdd sel"/, born 1909, French film director. * * *
Carné, Marcel
born Aug. 18, 1906, Paris, France died Oct. 31, 1996, Clamart French film director. He worked as an assistant director before directing his first feature, Jenny (1936). This ...
Carneades
/kahr nee"euh deez'/, n. 214?-129? B.C., Greek philosopher. * * * ▪ Greek philosopher born 214?, BC died 129?       Greek philosopher who headed the New Academy at ...
Carnegie
/kahr"ni gee/ or, for 1, 3, /kahr nay"gee, -neg"ee/, n. 1. Andrew, 1835-1919, U.S. steel manufacturer and philanthropist, born in Scotland. 2. Dale, 1888-1955, U.S. author and ...
Carnegie Hall
a large concert hall in New York, used for all types of music. When it first opened in 1891 it was called the Music Hall, but in 1898 it was named after Andrew Carnegie. ...
Carnegie Medal
(in Britain) an award for the best children’s book published each year, made by the Library Association and named after Andrew Carnegie. The first book to win the award was ...
Carnegie Mellon University
Private university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. It was formed in 1967 through the merger of the Carnegie Institute of Technology (created in 1900 through a gift from Andrew ...
Carnegie unit
Educ. a standardized unit of measurement for evaluating courses in secondary schools in terms of college entrance requirements, representing one year's study in any subject, that ...
Carnegie, Andrew
born Nov. 25, 1835, Dunfermline, Fife, Scot. died Aug. 11, 1919, Lenox, Mass., U.S. U.S. industrialist and philanthropist. The son of a Scottish weaver, he emigrated to the ...
Carnegie, Dale
orig. Dale Carnegey born Nov. 24, 1888, Maryville, Mo., U.S. died Nov. 1, 1955, Forest Hills, N.Y. U.S. lecturer and author. Born into poverty, he worked as a traveling ...
Carnegie,Andrew
Car·ne·gie (kärʹnə-gē, kär-nāʹgē, -nĕgʹē), Andrew. 1835-1919. Scottish-born American industrialist and philanthropist who amassed a fortune in the steel industry ...
Carnegie,Dale
Car·ne·gie (kärʹnə-gē), Dale. 1888-1955. American educator known for his self-improvement book How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936). * * *
Carneia
▪ ancient Greek festival       important religious festival among ancient Dorian-speaking Greeks, held in the month of Karneios (roughly August). The name is connected ...
Carneiro, Eneas Ferreira
▪ 2008       Brazilian cardiologist and politician born Nov. 5, 1938, Rio Branco, Braz. died May 6, 2007 , Rio de Janeiro, Braz. was an extreme right-winger who ran ...
carnelian
/kahr neel"yeuhn/, n. a red or reddish variety of chalcedony, used in jewelry. Also, cornelian. [1685-95; var. (with a of CARNATION) of cornelian, ME cornel(ine) ( < MF, prob. ...
carneous
/kahr"nee euhs/, adj. fleshlike; flesh-colored. [1570-80; < LL carneus, equiv. to L carn- (s. of caro) flesh + -eus -EOUS] * * *
Carnera, Primo
▪ Italian athlete born October 26, 1906, Sequals, Udine, Italy died June 29, 1967, Sequals  Italian heavyweight boxing champion of the world from June 29, 1933, when he ...
Carnesecchi, Pietro
▪ Florentine heretic born Dec. 24, 1508, Florence [Italy] died Oct. 1, 1567, Rome, Papal States       controversial Italian humanist and religious reformer executed ...
carnet
/kahr nay"/; Fr. /kannrdd ne"/, n., pl. carnets /-nayz"/; Fr. /-ne"/. a customs document allowing an automobile to be driven at no cost across international borders. [1895-1900; ...
carney
/kahr"nee/, n., pl. carneys, adj. carny. * * *
Carney, Arthur William Matthew
▪ 2004 “Art”        American actor (b. Nov. 4, 1918, Mount Vernon, N.Y.—d. Nov. 9, 2003, Chester, Conn.), had a long and varied career in radio, television, ...
Carney, Harry Howell
▪ American musician born April 1, 1910, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 8, 1974, New York, N.Y.       American musician, featured soloist in Duke Ellington (Ellington, ...
Carney, Robert Bostwick
▪ United States admiral born March 26, 1895, Vallejo, Calif., U.S. died June 25, 1990, Washington, D.C.       U.S. Navy admiral and military strategist during World War ...
Carnian Stage
▪ geochronology       lowermost of three divisions of the Upper Triassic Series, representing those rocks deposited worldwide during Carnian time (228 million to 216.5 ...
Carnic Alps
/kahr"nik/ a mountain range in S Austria and N Italy, part of the E Alps. Highest peak, Kellerwand, 9217 ft. (2809 m). * * * ▪ mountains, Europe Italian  Alpi Carniche, ...
CarnicAlps
Car·nic Alps (kärʹnĭk) A range of the eastern Alps in southern Austria and northeast Italy rising to about 2,782 m (9,121 ft). * * *
carniferous
/kahr nif"euhr euhs/, adj. bearing flesh. [1835-45; < L carni- (comb. form of caro flesh) + -FEROUS] * * *
carnification
/kahr'neuh fi kay"sheuhn/, n. Pathol. the conversion of tissue into flesh or a fleshlike substance, as of lung tissue into fibrous tissue as a result of pneumonia. [1725-35; ...
carnify
/kahr"neuh fuy'/, v., carnified, carnifying. v.t. 1. to form or turn into flesh. v.i. 2. Pathol. to undergo carnification. [1630-40; < L carni- (comb. form of caro flesh) + ...
Carniola
—Carniolan, adj. /kahr'nee oh"leuh, kahrn yoh"-/, n. a former duchy and crown land of Austria: now in NW Yugoslavia. * * * Region, western Slovenia. It is located northeast ...
Carniolan
See Carniola. * * *
carnitas
/kahr nee"teuhz/; Sp. /kahrdd nee"tahs/, n.pl. Mexican Cookery. small or shredded pieces of crisp roast pork, eaten as a snack, used as a filling for burritos, etc. [ < MexSp, ...
carnitine
/kahr"ni teen'/, n. Biochem. a dipolar compound that occurs in muscle and liver and is involved in the transport of fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. [1920-25; ...
carnival
—carnivalesque, carnivallike, adj. /kahr"neuh veuhl/, n. 1. a traveling amusement show, having sideshows, rides, etc. 2. any merrymaking, revelry, or festival, as a program of ...
carnival glass
a colorful iridescent pressed glassware popular in the U.S. in the early 20th century. * * *
carnival song
▪ Italian music Italian  Canto Carnascialesco,  plural  Canti Carnascialeschi,         late 15th- and early 16th-century part song performed in Florence during the ...
carnivalesque
carnivalesque [kar΄nə vəl esk′] adj. like a carnival, as in being excessive, disordered, chaotic, surreal, vital, etc. * * *
Carnivora
/kahr niv"euhr euh/, n. the order comprising the carnivores. [1820-30; < NL; L: neut. pl. of CARNIVORUS; see CARNIVOROUS] * * *
carnivore
—carnivoral /kahr niv"euhr euhl/, adj. /kahr"neuh vawr', -vohr'/, n. 1. an animal that eats flesh. 2. a flesh-eating mammal of the order Carnivora, comprising the dogs, cats, ...
carnivorous
—carnivorism, n. —carnivorously, adv. —carnivorousness, n. /kahr niv"euhr euhs/, adj. 1. flesh-eating: A dog is a carnivorous animal. 2. of the carnivores. [1640-50; < L ...
carnivorous plant
Any of about 400 diverse species of plants specially adapted for capturing insects and other tiny animals by ingenious pitfalls and traps and for digesting the nitrogen-rich ...
carnivorously
See carnivorous. * * *
carnivorousness
See carnivorously. * * *
carnosaur
Any of the large carnivorous dinosaurs, a branch of theropod dinosaurs that evolved into predators of large herbivorous dinosaurs. Carnosaurs were massive animals with short ...
carnose
—carnosity /kahr nos"i tee/, n. /kahr"nohs/, adj. of or pertaining to flesh; fleshy. Also, carnous. [1555-65; < L carnosus fleshy, equiv. to carn- (s. of caro) flesh + -osus ...
Carnot
/kahr noh"/; Fr. /kannrdd noh"/, n. 1. Lazare Nicolas Marguerite /lann zannrdd" nee kaw lah" mannrdd geuh rddeet"/, 1753-1823, French general and statesman. 2. (Marie François) ...
Carnot cycle
Thermodynam. an ideal cycle of reversible engine operations in which a substance at one temperature is compressed adiabatically to a second temperature, expanded isothermally at ...
Carnot engine
Thermodynam. an engine using a Carnot cycle of operations. * * *
Carnot refrigerator
Thermodynam. a device operating on the Carnot cycle in which the first temperature is higher than the second. * * *
Carnot's theorem
Thermodynam. the principle that no engine operating between two given temperatures can be more efficient than a Carnot engine operating between the same temperatures. * * *
Carnot, (Marie-François-) Sadi
born Aug. 11, 1837, Limoges, France died June 24, 1894, Lyon French politician. Grandson of Lazare Carnot and son of Sadi Carnot, he worked as a government engineer before ...
Carnot, (Nicolas-Léonard-) Sadi
born June 1, 1796, Paris, France died Aug. 24, 1832, Paris French scientist, known for describing the Carnot cycle. Son of Lazare Carnot, he was an army officer most of his ...
Carnot, Lazare
▪ French military engineer Introduction in full  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot , byname  Organizer of Victory  or  The Great Carnot, French Organisateur de la ...
Carnot, Lazare (-Nicolas-Marguerite)
born May 13, 1753, Nolay, Burgundy, France died Aug. 2, 1823, Magdeburg, Prussian Saxony French statesman and administrator in successive governments of the French ...
Carnot, Nicolas LéonardSadi
Carnot, Nicolas Léonard Sadi. 1796-1832. French physicist and engineer who founded the science of thermodynamics. * * *
Carnot, Sadi
▪ French engineer and physicist in full  Nicolas-léonard-sadi Carnot  born June 1, 1796, Paris, Fr. died Aug. 24, 1832, Paris       French scientist who described ...
Carnot,Lazare Nicolas Marguerite
Car·not (kär-nōʹ), Lazare Nicolas Marguerite. 1753-1823. French military strategist for the Republican armies during the French Revolution. He later held high positions ...
carnotite
/kahr"neuh tuyt'/, n. Mineral. a yellow, earthy, hydrous potassium uranium vanadate: an ore of uranium. [1895-1900; named after A. Carnot (d. 1920), French mining official; see ...
carnous
/kahr"neuhs/, adj. carnose. * * *
Carnovsky, Morris
▪ American actor born Sept. 5, 1897, St. Louis, Mo., U.S. died Sept. 1, 1992, Easton, Conn.       American actor who excelled in dialectal character roles and who was ...
Carnuntum
Ancient town, Roman empire. Located in northern Pannonia on the Danube River, it was an important Roman post from the time of Augustus. It was used as a base by Marcus Aurelius ...
carny
/kahr"nee/, n., pl. carnies, adj. Informal. n. 1. a person employed by a carnival. 2. carnival (def. 1). adj. 3. of or pertaining to carnivals: carny slang. Also, ...
Caro
(1924– ) an English sculptor, well known for his large abstract sculptures of brightly painted metal. He was one of the first artists to leave his finished works on the floor, ...
Caro Baroja, Julio
▪ 1996       Spanish Basque anthropologist and historian who was best known for his ethnographic studies of Basque and Spanish traditional cultures and folklore (b. Nov. ...
Caro's acid
/kahr"ohz/, Chem. See persulfuric acid (def. 1). [named after Heinrich Caro (1834-1910), German chemist] * * *
Caro, Annibale
▪ Italian writer born June 19, 1507, Civitanova Marche, Papal States died Nov. 21, 1566, Rome       Roman lyric poet, satirist, and translator, remembered chiefly for ...
Caro, Sir Anthony
▪ English sculptor in full  Sir Anthony Alfred Caro  born March 8, 1924, London, Eng.       English sculptor of abstract, loosely geometrical metal ...
carob
/kar"euhb/, n. 1. a Mediterranean tree, Ceratonia siliqua, of the legume family, bearing long, leathery pods containing hard seeds and sweet, edible pulp. 2. Also called St. ...
caroche
/keuh rohch", -rohsh"/, n. (in the 17th century) a luxurious or stately coach or carriage. [1585-95; < MF < It carroccio, equiv. to carr(o) wheeled conveyance (see CAR1) + -occio ...
carol
—caroler; esp. Brit., caroller, n. /kar"euhl/, n., v., caroled, caroling or (esp. Brit.) carolled, carolling. n. 1. a song, esp. of joy. 2. a Christmas song or hymn. 3. a seat ...
Carol
/kar"euhl/, n. a male or female given name. * * * I Popular song, usually of religious joy, associated with a season, especially Christmas. It typically alternates verses with ...
Carol Burnett Show, The
▪ American television program       American television variety and sketch comedy program comprising skits, musical comedy, and vaudeville-style performances by the ...
Carol City
/kar"euhl/ a town in SE Florida, near Miami. 47,349. * * *
Carol I
orig. Karl Eitel Friedrich, prince von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen born April 20, 1839, Sigmaringen, Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen died Oct. 10 1914, Sinaia, Rom. King of Romania ...
Carol II
/kar"euhl/; Rum. /kah"rddawl/ 1893-1953, king of Rumania 1930-40. * * * born Oct. 15, 1893, Sinaia, Rom. died April 4, 1953, Estoril, Port. King of Romania (1930–40). He ...
Carol Reed
➡ Reed (I) * * *
carol services
➡ carols and carol singing * * *
Carol Shields
➡ Shields * * *
carol singers
➡ carols and carol singing * * *
Carol Smillie
➡ Smillie * * *
Carol Stream
a town in NE Illinois. 15,472. * * *
Carol Vorderman
➡ Vorderman * * *
Carol, Martine
▪ French actress original name  Marie-louise-jeanne Mourer   born May 16, 1922, Biarritz, Fr. died Feb. 16, 1967, Monte-Carlo       French film actress, the reigning ...
Carol.
Carolingian. * * *
Carola
/kar"euh leuh/, n. a female given name, form of Carol. * * *
CarolCity
Carol City An unincorporated community of southeast Florida northwest of Miami Beach. It is mainly residential. Population: 53,331. * * *
Carole
/kar"euhl/, n. a female given name. * * * ▪ European dance       medieval European dance in a ring, chain, or linked circle, performed to the singing of the dancers. ...
Carolean
/kar'euh lee"euhn/, adj. characteristic of the time of Charles I and II of England: a Carolean costume. [1645-55; < ML Carolae(us) (Carol(us) Charles + L -aeus adj. suffix) + ...
caroler
See carol. * * *
CarolII
Car·ol II (kărʹəl), 1893-1953. King of Romania (1930-1940) who renounced his right of succession (1925) because of his love for a commoner, Magda Lupescu (1896?-1977), but ...
Carolina
/kar'euh luy"neuh/; for 3 also Sp. /kah'rddaw lee"nah/, n. 1. a former English colony on the Atlantic coast of North America: officially divided into North Carolina and South ...
Carolina allspice
an aromatic shrub, Calycanthus floridus, of the southern U.S., having hairy, ovate leaves and purplish-brown flowers. Also called sweet shrub. [1780-90, Amer.] * * *
Carolina bay
any of the shallow, usually marshy, oval depressions found in the coastal plains of the eastern U.S. that are heavily forested and have rich soil. * * *
Carolina chickadee
a chickadee, Parus carolinensis, of the southeastern U.S., resembling but smaller than the black-capped chickadee. * * *
Carolina jessamine
a vine, Gelsemium sempervirens, of the southern U.S. and Central America, of the logania family, having glossy, lance-shaped leaves and fragrant yellow flowers: the state flower ...
Carolina lily
a bulbous lily, Lilium michauxii, of the southeastern U.S., having large, spotted, orange-red flowers with recurved petals. * * *
Carolina moonseed
a twining woody vine, Cocculus carolinus, of the southeastern U.S., having inconspicuous flowers and showy, red fruit. [1775-85, Amer.] * * *
Carolina parakeet
an extinct New World parakeet, Conuropsis carolinensis, that ranged into the northern U.S., having yellowish-green plumage with an orange-yellow head. [1840-50, Amer.] * * *
Carolina rail
sora. [1825-35, Amer.] * * *
Carolina wren
a large wren, Thryothorus ludovicianus, of the U.S., having a musical call. [1800-10, Amer.] * * *
Carolinaallspice
Car·o·li·na allspice (kăr'ə-līʹnə) n. A species of sweet shrub (Calycanthus floridus) native chiefly to the southeast United States. Also called strawberry shrub. * * *
Carolinajasmine
Car·o·li·na jasmine also Car·o·li·na jessamine (kăr'ə-līʹnə) n. Any of several poisonous, woody, evergreen vines of the genus Gelsemium, especially G. sempervirens, ...
Carolinas
Car·o·li·nas (kăr'ə-līʹnəz) The colonies (after 1729) or present-day states of North Carolina and South Carolina. * * *
Caroline
/kar"euh luyn', -lin/, adj. of or pertaining to Charles, esp. Charles I and Charles II of England or their times. Also, Carolinian. [1645-55; < ML Carolinus, equiv. to Carol(us) ...
Caroline Atoll
▪ atoll, Kiribati also called  Thornton Island  or  Millennium Island    coral formation in the Central and Southern Line Islands, part of Kiribati, in the southwestern ...
Caroline Islands
a group of more than 500 islands in the Pacific, E of the Philippines: formerly a Japanese mandate; now under U.S. trusteeship. 525 sq. mi. (1360 sq. km). * * * Archipelago ...
Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach
▪ queen of Great Britain German  Karoline von Brandenburg-Ansbach   born March 1, 1683, Ansbach, Brandenburg-Ansbach [Germany] died Nov. 20, 1737, London, ...
Caroline of Brunswick-Lüneburg
▪ queen of United Kingdom in full  Caroline Amelia Elizabeth , German  Karoline von Braunschweig-Lüneburg , or  Karoline Amalie Elisabeth  born May 17, 1768, ...
CarolineIslands
Caroline Islands An archipelago of the western Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines. The islands were controlled successively by Spain, Germany, and Japan before being included ...
Carolingian
/kar'euh lin"jee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to the Frankish dynasty that reigned in France A.D. 751-987, first under Charlemagne, and in Germany until A.D. 911. 2. ...
Carolingian art
Art produced in Europe during the reign of Charlemagne and his successors until с 900. The outstanding characteristic of the period was a revival of interest in Roman ...
Carolingian dynasty
Family of Frankish aristocrats that ruled nearly all or part of western Europe in 751–987. Pippin I (d. 640), the dynasty's founder, came to power in the office of mayor of ...
Carolingian minuscule
▪ writing  in calligraphy, clear and manageable script that was established by the educational reforms of Charlemagne in the latter part of the 8th and early 9th centuries. ...
CarolingianRenaissance
Carolingian Renaissance n. A revival of classical art and architecture in parts of northern and western Europe begun under Charlemagne and lasting into the 10th century. * * *
Carolinian
/kar'euh lin"ee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to North Carolina or South Carolina or both. n. 2. a native or inhabitant of North Carolina or of South Carolina. [1695-1705; ...
caroller
See caroler. * * *
carols and carol singing
Carols are traditional songs that are sung just before Christmas. Many of them celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.   Carols were first sung in the 14th century. They were ...
CarolStream
Carol Stream A village of northeast Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. Population: 31,716. * * *
carolus
/kar"euh leuhs/, n., pl. caroluses, caroli /-luy'/. any of various coins issued under monarchs named Charles, esp. the broad of Charles I of England. [1680-90; < ML: Latinized ...
Carolyn
/kar"euh lin/, n. a female given name. * * *
carom
/kar"euhm/, n. 1. Billiards, Pool. a shot in which the cue ball hits two balls in succession. 2. any strike and rebound, as a ball striking a wall and glancing off. v.i. 3. to ...
carom ball
Billiards, Pool. the ball struck by the cue ball in rebounding off the object ball. Cf. object ball (def. 1). [1770-80] * * *
carom billiards
▪ game also called  French billiards,         game played with three balls (two white and one red) on a table without pockets, in which the object is to drive one of ...
Caron, Antoine
▪ French painter born c. 1515, , Beauvais, France died 1593       one of the few significant painters in France during the reigns of Charles IX and Henry III; his work ...
Carondelet, (Francisco Luis) Hector, baron de
born с 1748, Noyelles, Flanders died Aug. 10, 1807, Quito, Viceroyalty of New Granada Spanish governor of the territory of Louisiana and western Florida (1791–97). When he ...
Carondelet, Hector, baron de
▪ Spanish governor born c. 1748, , Noyelles, Flanders died Aug. 10, 1807, Quito, Viceroyalty of New Granada [Ecuador]       governor of the Spanish territory of ...
Caroní
Ca·ro·ní (kär'ə-nēʹ) A river rising in southeast Venezuela near the Guyana border and flowing 885 km (550 mi) northward to join the Orinoco River. * * *
Caroni River
▪ river, Trinidad and Tobago       river in northwestern Trinidad, in the country of Trinidad and Tobago in the southern Caribbean Sea. It rises near Valencia on the ...
Caroní River
▪ river, Venezuela Spanish  Río Caroní         river in Bolívar estado (state), southeastern Venezuela. Its headwaters flow from the slopes of Mount Roraima in ...
Carora
▪ Venezuela       city, west-central Lara estado (state), northwestern Venezuela, on the Morere, an affluent of the Tocuyo River, west of Barquisimeto. It lies at 1,128 ...
Carossa, Hans
▪ German writer born Dec. 15, 1878, Tölz, Ger. died Sept. 12, 1956, Rittsteig, W.Ger.  poet and novelist who contributed to the development of the German autobiographical ...
carotene
/kar"euh teen'/, n. any of three yellow or orange fat-soluble pigments having the formula C40H56, found in many plants, esp. carrots, and transformed to vitamin A in the liver; ...
carotenemia
car·o·te·ne·mi·a (kăr'ə-tə-nēʹmē-ə) n. The presence of excess carotene in the blood, often resulting in yellowing of the skin. * * * ▪ pathology also called ...
carotenoid
/keuh rot"n oyd'/, Biochem. n. 1. any of a group of red and yellow pigments, chemically similar to carotene, contained in animal fat and some plants. adj. 2. similar to ...
Carothers
/keuh rudh"euhrz/, n. Wallace Hume, 1896-1937, U.S. chemist: associated with the invention of synthetic nylon material. * * *
Carothers, W(allace) H(ume)
born April 27, 1896, Burlington, Iowa, U.S. died April 29, 1937, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. chemist. He became director of organic chemical research at DuPont in 1928. There he ...
Carothers, Wallace Hume
▪ American chemist born April 27, 1896, Burlington, Iowa, U.S. died April 29, 1937, Philadelphia, Pa.  American chemist who developed nylon, the first synthetic polymer ...
Carothers,Wallace Hume
Ca·roth·ers (kə-rŭthʹərz), Wallace Hume. 1896-1937. American chemist who developed the synthetic material nylon, which was patented in 1937. * * *
carotid
—carotidal, adj. /keuh rot"id/, Anat. n. 1. Also called carotid artery. either of the two large arteries, one on each side of the head, that carry blood to the head and that ...
carotid artery
▪ anatomy       one of several arteries that supply blood to the head and neck. Of the two common carotid arteries, which extend headward on each side of the neck, the ...
carotid body
Anat. a small mass of cells and nerve endings adjacent to the carotid sinus that, in response to chemical changes in the blood, adjusts the respiratory rate. Also called carotid ...
carotid sinus
Anat. specialized nerve end organs producing a slight dilatation of the carotid artery where it branches into the external and internal carotid arteries, responding to changes in ...
carotidbody
carotid body n. A chemoreceptor located near the bifurcations of the carotid arteries that monitors changes in the oxygen content of the blood and helps control respiratory ...
carotidsinus
carotid sinus n. A dilated area located at the bifurcations of the carotid arteries and containing numerous baroreceptors that function in the control of blood pressure by ...
carotin
/kar"euh tin/, n. carotene. * * *
Caroto, Giovan Francesco
▪ Italian painter born c. 1480, Verona, Republic of Venice [Italy] died 1555, Verona       Venetian painter whose largely derivative works are distinguished by their ...
carousal
/keuh row"zeuhl/, n. a noisy or drunken feast or social gathering; revelry. [1755-65; CAROUSE + -AL2] * * *
carouse
—carouser, n. —carousingly, adv. /keuh rowz"/, v., caroused, carousing, n. v.i. 1. to engage in a drunken revel: They caroused all night. 2. to drink deeply and ...
carousel
/kar'euh sel", kar"euh sel'/, n. 1. merry-go-round (def. 1). 2. a continuously revolving belt, track or other device on which items are placed for later retrieval: a baggage ...
Carousel
/kar'euh sel", kar"euh sel'/, Trademark. a circular tray in which photographic transparencies are held on a projector and from which they are lowered through slots for projection ...
carousels
➡ fairs * * *
carouser
See carouse. * * *
carp
carp1 —carper, n. /kahrp/, v.i. 1. to find fault or complain querulously or unreasonably; be niggling in criticizing; cavil: to carp at minor errors. n. 2. a peevish ...
carp.
carpentry. * * *
carpaccio
/kahr pah"choh, -chee oh'/, n. an appetizer of thinly sliced raw beef served with a vinaigrette or other piquant sauce. [after V. CARPACCIO; said to have been introduced under ...
Carpaccio
/kahrdd paht"chaw/, n. Vittore /veet taw"rdde/, c1450-1525, Venetian painter. * * *
Carpaccio, Vittore
born с 1460, Venice died 1525/26, Venice Italian painter active in Venice. Little is known of his early life, but the dominant influences on his work were the Bellini family ...
Carpaccio,Vittore
Car·pac·cio (kär-päʹchē-ō, -chō), Vittore. 1460?-1525?. Italian painter noted for his vivid narrative series on religious subjects. * * *
carpal
/kahr"peuhl/, Anat. adj. 1. pertaining to the carpus: the carpal joint. n. 2. a carpale. [1735-45; < NL carpalis. See CARPUS, -AL1] * * *
carpal bone
▪ anatomy  any of several small angular bones that in humans make up the wrist (carpus), and in horses, cows, and other quadrupeds the “knee” of the foreleg. They ...
carpal tunnel syndrome
Pathol. a common disorder of the wrist and hand characterized by pain, tingling, and muscular weakness, caused by pressure on the median nerve in the wrist area and often ...
carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)
Painful condition caused by repetitive stress to the wrist over time. The median nerve and the tendons that bend the fingers pass through the carpal tunnel on the inner side of ...
carpale
/kahr pay"lee/, n., pl. carpalia /-lee euh/. Anat. any of the bones of the wrist. Also, carpal. [ < NL, neut. of carpalis CARPAL] * * *
carpaltunnel
carpal tunnel n. A passageway in the wrist through which nerves and the flexor muscles of the hands and fingers pass. * * *
carpaltunnel syndrome
carpal tunnel syndrome n. A condition characterized by pain and numbing or tingling sensations in the hand and caused by compression of a nerve in the carpal tunnel at the ...
carpark
car park n. Chiefly British A parking lot. * * *
Carpathian Mountains
/kahr pay"thee euhn/ a mountain range in central Europe, extending from N Slovakia to central Rumania. Highest peak, Gerlachovka, 8737 ft. (2663 m). Also called Carpathians. * * ...
CarpathianMountains
Car·pa·thi·an Mountains (kär-pāʹthē-ən) A major mountain system of central Europe in Slovakia, southern Poland, western Ukraine, and northeast Romania. Extending in an ...
Carpatho-Ukraine
/kahr pay"thoh yooh krayn"/, n. a region in W Ukraine: ceded by Czechoslovakia in 1945. Cf. Ruthenia. * * *
carpe diem
/kahrdd"pe dee"em/; Eng. /kahr"pee duy"euhm, kahr"pay dee"euhm/ Latin. seize the day; enjoy the present, as opposed to placing all hope in the future. * * * ▪ ...
Carpeaux
/kahr poh"/; Fr. /kannrdd poh"/, n. Jean Baptiste /zhahonn bann teest"/, 1827-75, French sculptor. * * *
Carpeaux, Jean-Baptiste
▪ French sculptor born May 11, 1827, Valenciennes, France died Oct. 12, 1875, Courbevoie       the leading French sculptor of his time. His works, containing a lively ...
carpediem
car·pe di·em (kärʹpĕ dēʹĕm', -əm, dīʹ-) interj. Used as an admonition to seize the pleasures of the moment without concern for the future. n. Such an ...
carpel
—carpellary /kahr"peuh ler'ee/, adj. /kahr"peuhl/, n. Bot. a simple pistil, or a single member of a compound pistil. [1810-20; < NL carpellum, equiv. to Gk karp(ós) fruit + L ...
carpellary
See carpel. * * *
carpellate
/kahr"peuh layt'/, adj. Bot. having carpels. [ < NL carpellatus. See CARPEL, -ATE1] * * *
Carpentaria
/kahr'peuhn tair"ee a/, n. Gulf of, a gulf on the coast of N Australia. ab. 480 mi. (775 km) long; ab. 300 mi. (485 km) wide. * * *
Carpentaria, Gulf of
Gulf, northeastern Australia. An inlet of the Arafura Sea, it is bordered by the Northern Territory and by Cape York Peninsula and extends north-south about 480 mi (770 km) and ...
Carpentaria,Gulf of
Car·pen·tar·i·a (kär'pən-târʹē-ə), Gulf of A wide inlet of the Arafura Sea indenting the northern coast of Australia. * * *
carpenter
/kahr"peuhn teuhr/, n. 1. a person who builds or repairs wooden structures, as houses, scaffolds, or shelving. v.i. 2. to do carpenter's work. v.t. 3. to make by carpentry. 4. to ...
Carpenter
/kahr"peuhn teuhr/, n. 1. John Alden, 1876-1951, U.S. composer. 2. (Malcolm) Scott, born 1925, U.S. astronaut and oceanographer. * * *
carpenter ant
a black or brown ant of the genus Camponotus that nests in the wood of decaying or dead trees in which it bores tunnels for depositing its eggs. [1880-85] * * *
carpenter bee
any of several solitary bees of the family Apidae that nest in solid wood, boring tunnels in which to deposit their eggs. [1830-40] * * * ▪ insect       any of a group ...
carpenter gothic
(sometimes caps.) a style of Victorian Gothic architecture adapted to the resources of contemporary woodworking tools and machinery. * * * U.S. domestic architecture style of ...
carpenter moth
▪ insect       any member of a group of insects in the moth and butterfly order, Lepidoptera, whose pale, nearly hairless larvae bore in wood or pithy stems and can be ...
Carpenter, Edward
▪ British author born Aug. 29, 1844, Brighton, Sussex, Eng. died June 28, 1929, Guildford, Surrey  English writer identified with social and sexual reform and the late ...
Carpenter, Humphrey William Bouverie
▪ 2006       British writer, editor, and radio broadcaster (b. April 29, 1946, Oxford, Eng.—d. Jan. 4, 2005, Oxford), was best known for his insightful “group ...
Carpenter, John Alden
▪ American composer born Feb. 28, 1876, Park Ridge, Ill., U.S. died April 26, 1951, Chicago  American composer who was prominent in the 1920s and was one of the earliest to ...
Carpenter, M. Scott
▪ American astronaut in full  Malcolm Scott Carpenter   born May 1, 1925, Boulder, Colo., U.S.    second U.S. astronaut to make an orbital spaceflight. In Aurora 7 he made ...
Carpenter, Mary
▪ British philanthropist born April 3, 1807, Exeter, Devon, Eng. died June 14, 1877, Bristol, Gloucestershire  British philanthropist, social reformer, and founder of free ...
Carpenter, Thelma
▪ 1998       American performer who was a big-band singer during the 1930s and '40s and performed on Broadway in the '40s and '50s but then disappeared from show ...
carpenterant
carpenter ant n. Any of various large ants of the genus Camponotus that nest in and are destructive to wood. * * *
carpenterbee
carpenter bee n. Any of various solitary bees of the family Apidae that bore tunnels into wood to lay their eggs. * * *
carpentering
/kahr"peuhn teuhr ing/, n. the trade or work of a carpenter. [1830-40; CARPENTER + -ING1] * * *
Carpentersville
/kahr"peuhn teuhrz vil'/, n. a city in NE Illinois, near Chicago. 23,272. * * *
carpenterworm
/kahr"peuhn teuhr werrm'/, n. the larva of the carpenterworm moth. [CARPENTER + WORM] * * *
carpenterworm moth
any moth of the family Cossidae, as Prionoxystus robiniae of the U.S. and southern Canada, whose larvae bore into the trunks and branches of oaks, locusts, and other trees. Also ...
Carpentier, Alejo
born Dec. 26, 1904, Lausanne, Switz. died April 24, 1980, Paris, France Latin American novelist, essayist, and playwright, a leading literary figure. Born to a French father ...
Carpentier, Georges
▪ French boxer byname  Orchid Man   born January 12, 1894, Lens, France died October 27, 1975, Paris  French boxer who was world light-heavyweight champion (1920–22) and ...
Carpentier,Alejo
Car·pen·tier (kär'pĕn-tyārʹ), Alejo. 1904-1980. Cuban writer, musicologist, and diplomat who is considered the founder of magical realism. His novels include The Kingdom ...
carpentry
/kahr"peuhn tree/, n. 1. the trade of a carpenter: He earned his living at carpentry. 2. the work produced by a carpenter. 3. the way in which something, esp. a work of ...
carper
See carp1. * * *
carpet
—carpetless, adj. —carpetlike, adj. /kahr"pit/, n. 1. a heavy fabric, commonly of wool or nylon, for covering floors. 2. a covering of this material. 3. any relatively soft ...
carpet beetle
any of several small beetles of the family Dermestidae, the larvae of which are household pests, feeding on rugs and other woolen fabrics, esp. Anthrenus scrophulariae (buffalo ...
carpet grass
either of two grasses, Axonopus affinis or A. compressus, native to tropical and subtropical America. [1900-05, Amer.] * * * ▪ plant       (Axonopus affinis), ...
carpet moss
▪ plant       any of the plants of the genus Hypnum (subclass Bryidae), which form dense green mats in many habitats throughout the world, especially on decaying wood in ...
carpet moth
a clothes moth, Trichophaga tapetzella, the larvae of which infest carpets and other woolen articles. Also called tapestry moth. [1855-60] * * * ▪ insect ...
carpet shark
any shark of the family Orectolobidae, found in tropical Indo-Pacific waters, having mottled skin and fleshy lobes along the sides of the head. [1925-30] * * * ▪ ...
carpet slipper
a house slipper, esp. one for men, made of carpet material. [1850-55] * * *
carpet snake
a large, nonvenomous Australian python, Morelia spilotes variegata, having a variegated pattern on its back, often used to control rats and mice in barns and silos. [1860-65] * * ...
carpet sweeper
a pushable, long-handled implement for removing dirt, lint, etc., from rugs and carpets, consisting of a metal case enclosing one or more brushes that rotate. [1855-60, Amer.] * ...
carpet tack
a flat-headed tack used esp. to tack down carpets. * * *
carpet tile
a tile made of carpeting material that is used for flooring. * * *
carpet-bagger
n (disapprov) 1. (AmE old use) a politician from the north who became active in the southern US after the American Civil War in order to take advantage of the political situation ...
carpet-bomb
carpet-bomb [kär′pət bäm΄] vt. to drop many bombs on (an area) to prepare for advancing ground forces carpet-bombing n. * * * car·pet-bomb (kärʹpĭt-bŏm') tr. & ...
carpet-bombing
See carpet-bomb. * * *
carpetbag
/kahr"pit bag'/, n., v., carpetbagged, carpetbagging. n. 1. a bag for traveling, esp. one made of carpeting. v.i. 2. to journey with little luggage. 3. to act as a ...
carpetbagger
—carpetbaggery, n. /kahr"pit bag'euhr/, n. 1. U.S. Hist. a Northerner who went to the South after the Civil War and became active in Republican politics, esp. so as to ...
carpetbaggery
See carpetbagger. * * *
carpetbagging
car·pet·bag·ging (kärʹpĭt-băg'ĭng) adj. Of or relating to carpetbaggers or their practices. * * *
carpetbeetle
carpet beetle n. Any of various small beetles of the genera Anthrenus and Attagenus having larvae that are injurious to fabrics and furs. Also called buffalo bug. * * *
carpetgrass
carpet grass or car·pet·grass (kärʹpĭt-grăs') n. Any of several coarse, sod-forming grasses of the chiefly New World genus Axonopus, especially A. affinis, cultivated for ...
carpeting
/kahr"pi ting/, n. 1. material for carpets. 2. carpets in general. [1750-60; CARPET + -ING1] * * *
carpetsweeper
carpet sweeper n. A device used to clean rugs and floors, consisting of a metal or plastic box equipped with rotating brushes and pushed by means of a long handle. * * *
carpetweed
/kahr"pit weed'/, n. a North American prostrate weed, Mollugo verticillata, having whorled leaves and small, whitish flowers. [1775-85, Amer. CARPET + WEED1] * * *
carphology
/kahr fol"euh jee/, n. Pathol. floccillation. [1850-55; < NL carphologia; LL: fumbling, plucking at straws, blankets < Gk karphología, equiv. to kárpho(s) twig, straw, piece of ...
carphone
car phone n. A cellular telephone used or installed in a car. * * *
carpi
/kahr"puy/, n. pl. of carpus. * * * ▪ Italy       town, Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy, north of Modena city. Carpi is distinguished by its great piazza, the ...
Carpi, Ugo da
▪ Italian painter and printmaker born c. 1480, , Carpi, Duchy of Modena died , between 1520 and 1532  painter and printmaker, the first Italian practitioner of the art of the ...
carping
—carpingly, adv. /kahr"ping/, adj. 1. characterized by fussy or petulant faultfinding; querulous: carping criticism. n. 2. petty faultfinding. [1275-1325; ME (n.); see CARP1, ...
carpingly
See carping. * * *
Carpinteria
/kahr'pin teuh ree"euh/, n. a town in SW California. 10,835. * * *
Carpo
/kahr"poh/, n. an ancient Greek goddess of summer fruit, considered by Athenians as one of the Horae. * * *
carpo-
carpo-1 a combining form meaning "fruit," "fruiting body," used in the formation of compound words: carpophore; carpogonium. [ < Gk karpo-, comb. form of karpós fruit] carpo-2 a ...
Carpocratian
Follower of the 2nd-century Christian Gnostic Carpocrates, whose sect flourished in Alexandria. Carpocratians revered Jesus as an ordinary man whose soul had not forgotten that ...
carpogonium
—carpogonial, adj. /kahr'peuh goh"nee euhm/, n., pl. carpogonia /-nee euh/. the one-celled female sex organ of some red algae, that, when fertilized, gives rise to the ...
carpoid
▪ fossil subphylum       member of an extinct group of unusual echinoderms (modern echinoderms include starfish, sea urchins, and sea lilies), known as fossils from ...
carpology
/kahr pol"euh jee/, n. the branch of botany dealing with fruits and seeds. [1800-10; CARPO-1 + -LOGY] * * *
carpometacarpal
/kahr'peuh met'euh kahr"peuhl, -met"euh kahr'-/, adj. 1. Anat. of or pertaining to the carpus and the metacarpus. 2. Ornith. of or pertaining to the carpometacarpus. [1830-40; ...
carpometacarpus
/kahr'peuh met'euh kahr"peuhs, -met"euh kahr'-/, n., pl. carpometacarpi /-puy/. Ornith. 1. the bone of a bird's wing formed by fusion of the carpal and metacarpal bones. 2. the ...
carpool
/kahr"poohl'/, n. Also, car pool. 1. Also, carpooling, car pooling. an arrangement among a group of automobile owners by which each owner in turn drives the others or their ...
carpooler
/kahr"pooh'leuhr/, n. a member of a carpool. Also, car pooler. [CARPOOL + -ER1] * * *
carpophagous
/kahr pof"euh geuhs/, adj. fruit-eating. [1830-40; CARPO-1 + -PHAGOUS] * * *


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