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Слова на букву boom-chri (15990)

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Chaldaic
/kal day"ik/, n., adj. Chaldean. [ < L Chaldaicus < Gk Chaldaïkós. See CHALDEAN, -IC] * * *
Chaldea
/kal dee"euh/, n. 1. an ancient region in the lower Tigris and Euphrates valley, in S Babylonia. 2. Babylonia. Also, Chaldaea. * * * Ancient region, on the headwaters of the ...
Chaldean
/kal dee"euhn/, n. 1. one of an ancient Semitic people that formed the dominant element in Babylonia. 2. the indigenous Semitic language of the Chaldeans, Aramaic being used as ...
Chaldean Catholic Church
      Eastern rite church prevalent in Iraq, Iran, and Lebanon, united with the Roman Catholic Church since 1830, and intermittently from 1551.       Christianity ...
Chaldean rite
▪ Christianity also called  East Syrian Rite,         system of liturgical practices and discipline historically associated with the Church of the East, or Nestorian ...
Chaldee
Chaldee [kal′dē, kal dē′] adj., n. CHALDEAN * * *
Chāldirān, Battle of
▪ Turkey       (Aug. 23, 1514), military engagement in which the Ottomans won a decisive victory over the Ṣafavids (Ṣafavid Dynasty) of Iran and went on to gain ...
chaldron
/chawl"dreuhn/, n. an English dry measure formerly used for coal, coke, lime, and the like, varying locally from 32 to 36 bushels or more. [1375-1425; late ME, earlier chaudron < ...
chalet
/sha lay", shal"ay/; Fr. /shah le"/, n., pl. chalets /sha layz", shal"ayz/; Fr. /shah le"/. 1. a herdsman's hut in the Swiss Alps. 2. a kind of farmhouse, low and with wide ...
chalets
➡ seaside and beach * * *
Chaleur Bay
/sheuh loor", -lerr"/ an inlet of the Gulf of St. Lawrence between NE New Brunswick and SE Quebec, in SE Canada: rich fishing ground. ab. 85 mi. (135 km) long; 15-25 mi. (24-40 ...
ChaleurBay
Cha·leur Bay (shə-lo͝orʹ, -lûrʹ) An inlet of the Gulf of St. Lawrence between eastern Quebec and northern New Brunswick, Canada. It is an important fishing ground. * * *
Chalfie, Martin
▪ American chemist born 1947, Chicago, Ill., U.S.       American chemist who was a corecipient, with Osamu Shimomura (Shimomura, Osamu) and Roger Y. Tsien (Tsien, Roger ...
Chalfont St. Giles
▪ England, United Kingdom       town (parish), Chiltern district, administrative and historic county of Buckinghamshire, England, 24 miles (39 km) northwest of London. ...
Chalgrin, Jean-François-Thérèse
born 1739, Paris, Fr. died Jan. 21, 1811, Paris French architect. He was trained by Étienne-Louis Boullée and won the Academy of Architecture's Grand Prix de Rome at age 19. ...
Chaliapin
/shahl yah"pin/; Russ. /shu lyah"pyin/, n. Fëdor Ivanovich /fyaw"deuhrdd ee vah"neuh vyich/, 1873-1938, Russian operatic bass. * * *
Chaliapin, Feodor
▪ Russian musician in full  Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin , also spelled  Fyodor Shalyapin  born Feb. 1 [Feb. 13, New Style], 1873, near Kazan, Russia died April 12, 1938, ...
Chaliapin, Feodor (Ivanovich)
or Fyodor Shalyapin born Feb. 13, 1873, near Kazan, Russia died April 12, 1938, Paris, France Russian singer. Born a peasant, he received little early musical training, but ...
Chaliapin,Feodor Ivanovich
Cha·lia·pin (shä-lyäʹpĭn), Feodor Ivanovich. 1873-1938. Russian-born French operatic basso who gained fame for his performance in Arrigo Boito's Mefistofele. * * *
chalice
—chaliced /chal"ist/, adj. /chal"is/, n. 1. Eccles. a. a cup for the wine of the Eucharist or Mass. b. the wine contained in it. 2. a drinking cup or goblet. 3. a cuplike ...
chaliced
chaliced [chal′ist] adj. cup-shaped: said of a flower * * *
chalicothere
/kal"i koh thear'/, n. a horselike fossil of the genus Chalicotherium and related genera, common in Europe, Asia, and Africa during the Tertiary Period, having a sloping back and ...
Chalicotherium
▪ paleontology       genus of extinct perissodactyls, the order including the horse and rhinoceros. Fossil remains of the genus are common in deposits of Asia, Europe, ...
chalk
—chalklike, adj. /chawk/, n. 1. a soft, white, powdery limestone consisting chiefly of fossil shells of foraminifers. 2. a prepared piece of chalk or chalklike substance for ...
chalk drawing
▪ art  in the visual arts, technique of drawing with chalk, a prepared natural stone or earth substance that is usually available in black (made either from soft black stone ...
chalk line
Building Trades. 1. a chalked string for making a straight line on a large surface, as a wall, by holding the string taut against the surface and snapping it to transfer the ...
chalk stripe
(on a fabric) a pattern of thin white lines on a dark ground. [1940-45] * * *
chalk talk
a talk or lecture in which the speaker illustrates points by drawing on a blackboard: The coach gave a chalk talk before the big game. [1830-40, Amer.] * * *
chalk-stripe
chalk-stripe [chôk′strīp΄] n. 1. a stripe, as in the fabric of some suits, that is wider and usually more muted than a pinstripe 2. a pattern of such stripes in parallel * * ...
chalkboard
/chawk"bawrd', -bohrd'/, n. a blackboard, esp. a green or other light-colored one. [1935-40, Amer.; CHALK + BOARD] * * *
Chalkhill, John
▪ English poet born c. 1595, , possibly at Chalkhill House, Kingsbury, Middlesex, Eng. died April 8, 1642, Westminster       English poet whose Thealma and Clearchus ...
chalkiness
See chalk. * * *
Chalkís
also called Khalkís or Chalcis formerly Euripus City (pop., 2001: 53,584), on the island of Euboea, Greece. It is situated off the Euripus Strait, which separates Euboea from ...
chalkrail
/chawk"rayl'/, n. a troughlike molding or strip holding chalk, erasers, etc., under a blackboard. [CHALK + RAIL1] * * *
chalkstone
—chalkstony, adj. /chawk"stohn'/, n. Pathol. a chalklike concretion in the tissues or small joints of a person with gout. [1350-1400; ME, for sense "limestone"; 1730-40 for ...
chalktalk
chalk talk n. A lecture, often informal, illustrated with diagrams chalked on a blackboard. * * *
chalky
—chalkiness, n. /chaw"kee/, adj., chalkier, chalkiest. 1. of or like chalk. 2. of a chalklike consistency: chalky soil. 3. without resonance, color, warmth, etc.: several high ...
challah
/khah"leuh, hah"/, n. a loaf of rich white bread leavened with yeast and containing eggs, often braided before baking, prepared esp. for the Jewish Sabbath. Also, challeh, ...
challenge
—challengeable, adj. /chal"inj/, n., v., challenged, challenging, adj. n. 1. a call or summons to engage in any contest, as of skill, strength, etc. 2. something that by its ...
challenge for cause
➡ juries * * *
challengeable
See challenge. * * *
challenged
/chal"injd/, adj. (used as a euphemism) disabled, handicapped, or deficient (usually prec. by an adverb): physically challenged; ethically challenged. [1980-85, Amer.] * * *
challenger
/chal"in jeuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that challenges. 2. Boxing. a boxer who fights a champion for his championship title. 3. Radio. interrogator (def. 2). 4. (cap., italics) ...
Challenger disaster
▪ United States history  explosion of the U.S. space shuttle orbiter Challenger, shortly after its launch from Cape Canaveral (Canaveral, Cape), Fla., on Jan. 28, 1986, ...
Challenger Expedition
▪ oceanography  prolonged oceanographic exploration cruise from Dec. 7, 1872, to May 26, 1876, covering 127,600 km (68,890 nautical miles) and carried out through cooperation ...
challenging
—challengingly, adv. /chal"in jing/, adj. 1. offering a challenge; testing one's ability, endurance, etc: a challenging course; a challenging game. 2. stimulating, interesting, ...
challis
/shal"ee/, n. a soft fabric of plain weave in wool, cotton, rayon, or other staple fiber, either in a solid color or, more often, a small print. Also, challie, chally. [1840-50; ...
Challis, James
▪ British astronomer born Dec. 12, 1803, Braintree, Essex, Eng. died Dec. 3, 1882, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire       British clergyman and astronomer, famous in the ...
Challoner, Richard
▪ English scholar born Sept. 29, 1691, Lewes, Sussex, Eng. died Jan. 12, 1781, London  leader of English Roman Catholics whose revision of the Douai-Reims (Douai-Reims ...
Chalmers
/chah"meuhrz, chal"-/, n. Alexander, 1759-1834, Scottish biographer, editor, and journalist. * * *
Chalmers, Alexander
▪ Scottish author and editor born March 29, 1759, Aberdeen, Scot. died Dec. 10, 1834, London, Eng.       Scottish editor and biographer best known for his General ...
Chalmers, Floyd Sherman
▪ 1994       U.S.-born Canadian editor, publisher, and philanthropist (b. Sept. 14, 1898, Chicago, Ill.—d. April 26, 1993, Toronto, Ont.), relied on hard work and ...
Chalmers, James
▪ Scottish missionary born Aug. 4, 1841, Ardrishaig, Argyll, Scot. died April 9, 1901, Dopima, Goaribari Island       Scottish Congregationalist missionary who explored ...
Chalmers, Thomas
▪ Scottish minister born March 17, 1780, Anstruther, Fife, Scot. died May 30, 1847, Edinburgh  Presbyterian minister, theologian, author, and social reformer who was the ...
Chalmette
Chal·mette (shăl-mĕtʹ) A village of extreme southeast Louisiana on the east bank of the Mississippi River just below New Orleans. It is a processing center. Population: ...
Chalon-sur-Saône
▪ France       town, Saône-et-Loire département, Bourgogne (Burgundy) région, east-central France, south of Dijon. Chalon's fine quays border the Saône River at its ...
chalone
/kal"ohn/, n. Physiol. an endocrine secretion that depresses or inhibits physiological activity. [1910-15; < Gk chalôn, prp. of chalân to slacken, loosen; on the model of ...
Châlons
/shann lawonn"/, n. 1. Also called Châlonssur-Marne /shann lawn syuurdd mannrddn"/. a city in and the capital of Marne, in NE France: defeat of Attila A.D. 451. 55,709. 2. Also ...
Châlons-en-Champagne
▪ France formerly (until 1997)  Châlons-sur-Marne        town, capital of Marne département, Champagne-Ardenne région, northeastern France. It lies along the right ...
Châlons-sur-Marne
Châlons-sur-Marne [shä lōn sür mȧrn′] city in NE France, on the Marne River: scene of defeat (A.D. 451) of Attila by the Romans: pop. 50,000: also Châlons * * ...
Chalukya
—Chalukyan, adj. /chah"leuh kyeuh/, n. a dynasty of central India, ruling A.D. c500-753, and restored A.D. 973-1190. * * *
Chalukya dynasty
▪ Indian dynasties Chalukya also spelled  Calukya        either of two ancient Indian dynasties. The Western Chalukyas ruled as emperors in the Deccan (i.e., ...
chalumeau
/shal'yeuh moh"/; Fr. /shann lyuu moh"/, n., pl. chalumeaux /-mohz"/, Fr. /-moh"/. 1. Music. the low register of the clarinet. 2. a 17th- or 18th-century woodwind ...
chalupa
/cheuh looh"peuh/; Sp. /chah looh"pah/, n., pl. chalupas /-peuhz/; Sp. /-pahs/. Mexican Cookery. a fried tortilla spread with bean paste or ground cooked meat and topped with ...
chalutz
/khah loohts"/, n., pl. chalutzim /-looh tseem"/. Hebrew. halutz. * * *
chalybeate
/keuh lib"ee it, -ayt'/, adj. 1. containing or impregnated with salts of iron, as a mineral spring or medicine. n. 2. a chalybeate water, medicine, or the like. [1625-35; < NL ...
chalybite
/kal"euh buyt'/, n. Mineral. siderite (def. 1). [1855-60; < Gk chalyb- (s. of chályps) iron, also iron-worker, member of the Chalybes, a tribe of Asia Minor noted for their ...
cham
/kam/, n. Archaic. khan1. * * *
chamade
/sheuh mahd"/, n. Mil. Archaic. a signal by drum or trumpet inviting an enemy to a parley. [1675-85; < F < Pg chamada, equiv. to cham(ar) to sound ( < L clamare to shout; see ...
chamaedorea
/kam'i dawr"ee euh, -dohr"-/, n. any of various small, slender palms of the genus Chamaedorea, several species of which are cultivated as houseplants. [ < NL (1806) < Gk chamaí ...
Chamaeleon
/keuh mee"lee euhn, -meel"yeuhn/, n., gen. Chamaeleontis /-mee'lee on"tis/. Astron. a small southern constellation between Musca and Hydrus. Also, Chameleon. [ < L] * * *
chamaephyte
/kam"euh fuyt'/, n. Bot. a plant having dormant vegetative buds at, or slightly above, ground level. [1910-15; < Gk chamaí on the ground + -PHYTE] * * *
Chamba
▪ India       town, northwestern Himachal Pradesh (Himāchal Pradesh) state, northwestern India. The town lies on the Ravi River (Rāvi River) between two mountain ...
Chambal River
River, central India. Rising in the western Vindhya Mountains near Indore, it flows easterly 550 mi (900 km) before emptying into the Yamuna River, of which it is the chief ...
chamber
/chaym"beuhr/, n. 1. a room, usually private, in a house or apartment, esp. a bedroom: She retired to her chamber. 2. a room in a palace or official residence. 3. the meeting ...
chamber concert
a concert of chamber music. [1830-40] * * *
chamber mug
Chiefly New England Older Use. a chamber pot. [1945-50, Amer.] * * *
chamber music
music suited for performance in a room or a small concert hall, esp. for two or more, but usually fewer than ten, solo instruments. [1780-90] * * * Music composed for small ...
chamber of commerce
an association, primarily of people in business, to promote the commercial interests of an area. Abbr.: C of C [1780-90] * * * or commercial association Any of various ...
chamber of deputies
the lower house of the legislature of certain countries, as Italy. Also, Chamber of Deputies. * * *
chamber of horrors
1. a place for the exhibition of gruesome or horrible objects. 2. a group of such objects, as instruments of torture or murder. 3. any collection of things or ideas that inspire ...
chamber opera
an opera requiring few performers and a small orchestra. * * *
chamber orchestra
a small orchestra, commonly of about 25 players. [1925-30] * * *
chamber pot
a portable container, esp. for urine, used in bedrooms. [1560-70] * * *
chamber process
▪ chemistry also called  Lead-chamber Process,         method of producing sulfuric acid by oxidizing sulfur dioxide with moist air, using gaseous nitrogen oxides as ...
chamber sonata
Italian  sonata da camera        a type of solo or trio sonata (trio sonata) intended for secular performance; see sonata da camera. * * *
chamber tomb
Archaeol. a type of late Neolithic to Bronze Age tomb found in Britain and Europe, usually of megaliths covered by mounds, sometimes decorated, and used for successive family or ...
chambered
/chaym"beuhrd/, adj. having compartmental chambers: a spiral chambered seashell. [1350-1400; ME. See CHAMBER, -ED3] * * *
chambered nautilus
nautilus (def. 1). [1855-60] * * *       any of a genus (Nautilus) of cephalopod mollusks. See nautilus. * * *
chamberednautilus
cham·bered nautilus (chāmʹbərd) n. See nautilus. * * *
chamberer
chamberer1 /chaym"beuhr euhr/, n. Archaic. a man who frequents ladies' chambers; gallant. [1200-50; ME: chamberlain < AF; see CHAMBER, -ER2] chamberer2 /chaym"beuhr euhr/, n. ...
chamberlain
/chaym"beuhr lin/, n. 1. an official charged with the management of the living quarters of a sovereign or member of the nobility. 2. an official who receives rents and revenues, ...
Chamberlain
/chaym"beuhr lin/, n. 1. (Arthur) Neville, 1869-1940, British statesman: prime minister 1937-40. 2. Joseph, 1836-1914, British statesman (father of Sir Austen and Neville ...
Chamberlain's Men
or Lord Chamberlain's Men English theatrical company, the most important in Elizabethan and Jacobean England. It was based at the Globe Theatre from 1599 to 1608. In 1603 it ...
Chamberlain, (Arthur) Neville
born March 18, 1869, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died Nov. 9, 1940, Heckfield, near Reading, Hampshire British prime minister (1937–40). Son of Joseph Chamberlain and half ...
Chamberlain, (Arthur)Neville
Cham·ber·lain (chāmʹbər-lĭn), (Arthur) Neville. 1869-1940. British politician and prime minister (1937-1940) who advocated a policy of appeasement toward the fascist ...
Chamberlain, Charles Joseph
born Feb. 23, 1863, Sullivan, Ohio, U.S. died Feb. 5, 1943, Chicago, Ill. U.S. botanist. His research into the structure and life cycles of primitive plants (cycads) enabled ...
Chamberlain, Houston Stewart
born Sept. 9, 1855, Southsea, Hampshire, Eng. died Jan. 9, 1927, Bayreuth, Ger. British-born Germanophile writer. An admirer of Richard Wagner, he wrote a biography of the ...
Chamberlain, John
▪ American sculptor born April 16, 1927, Rochester, Ind., U.S.       U.S. Abstract Expressionist sculptor whose work is characterized by an emotional approach to ...
Chamberlain, John (Angus)
born April 16, 1927, Rochester, Ind., U.S. U.S. sculptor. He studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and at Black Mountain College. In 1957 he had his first ...
Chamberlain, Joseph
born July 8, 1836, London, Eng. died July 2, 1914, London British politician and reformer. Early success in business enabled him to retire at age 38 with a substantial fortune. ...
Chamberlain, Neville
▪ prime minister of United Kingdom born March 18, 1869, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died Nov. 9, 1940, Heckfield, near Reading, Hampshire  British prime minister from May ...
Chamberlain, Owen
▪ 2007       American physicist (b. July 10, 1920, San Francisco, Calif.—d. Feb. 28, 2006, Berkeley, Calif.), shared the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1959 with Emilio ...
Chamberlain, Sir (Joseph) Austen
born Oct. 16, 1863, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died March 16, 1937, London British statesman. Son of Joseph Chamberlain and half brother of Neville Chamberlain, he entered ...
Chamberlain, Sir (Joseph)Austen
Chamberlain, Sir (Joseph) Austen. 1863-1937. British politician who helped establish the Locarno Pact. He shared the 1925 Nobel Peace Prize. * * *
Chamberlain, Sir Austen
▪ British statesman in full  Sir Joseph Austen Chamberlain  born Oct. 16, 1863, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died March 16, 1937, London       British foreign ...
Chamberlain, Wilt
▪ American basketball player in full  Wilton Norman Chamberlain , byname  Wilt the Stilt  or  the Big Dipper  born August 21, 1936, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. died ...
Chamberlain, Wilt(on Norman)
born Aug. 21, 1936, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1999, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. basketball player, one of the greatest offensive players in basketball history. The ...
Chamberlain, Wilton Norman
▪ 2000 “Wilt,” “Wilt the Stilt,” and “Big Dipper”        American basketball player (b. Aug. 21, 1936, Philadelphia, Pa.—d. Oct. 12, 1999, Los Angeles, ...
Chamberlain,Wilton Norman
Chamberlain, Wilton Norman. Known as “Wilt.” Born 1936. American basketball player. He ranks among the all-time leading NBA scorers and rebounders and holds the record for ...
Chamberlain’s Men
the most famous company of actors in Elizabethan England. Shakespeare joined them in 1594, and wrote most of his plays for the company. * * *
Chamberlen, Hugh
born 1630, London, Eng. died с 1720, London British midwife. He was grandnephew of Peter Chamberlen the Elder (1560–1631), who invented the obstetrical forceps. A midwife to ...
Chamberlen, Hugh, The Elder
▪ British midwife born 1630, London died c. 1720       British male midwife, prominent member of a family of medical men remembered for the parts they played in the ...
Chamberlen, Peter, The Elder
▪ French surgeon born 1560, Paris died 1631, London       surgeon, a French Huguenot whose father, William, emigrated with his family to England in 1569. A celebrated ...
Chamberlin
Chamberlin [chām′bər lin] Thomas Chrowder [krou′dər] 1843-1928; U.S. geologist * * *
Chamberlin, Edward Hastings
▪ American economist born May 18, 1899, La Conner, Washington, U.S. died July 16, 1967, Cambridge, Massachusetts       American economist known for his theories on ...
Chamberlin, Thomas Chrowder
▪ American geologist born Sept. 25, 1843, Mattoon, Ill., U.S. died Nov. 15, 1928, Chicago  U.S. geologist and educator who proposed the planetesimal hypothesis, which held ...
Chamberlin,Thomas Chrowder
Cham·ber·lin (chāmʹbər-lĭn), Thomas Chrowder. 1843-1928. American geologist who with the astronomer Forest Ray Moulton (1872-1952) proposed (1906) the planetismal ...
chambermaid
/chaym"beuhr mayd'/, n. a maid who cleans bedrooms and bathrooms. [1580-90; CHAMBER + MAID] * * *
chambermusic
chamber music n. Compositions traditionally intended for performance in a private room or small concert hall and written for an instrumental ensemble, such as a trio or quartet, ...
chamberof commerce
chamber of commerce n. pl. chambers of commerce Abbr. C. of C. An association of businesspersons and merchants for the promotion of commercial interests in the community. * * *
chamberpot
chamber pot n. A portable vessel used in a bedroom as a toilet. * * *
Chambers
/chaym"beuhrz/, n. 1. Robert, 1802-71, Scottish publisher and editor. 2. Robert William, 1865-1933, U.S. novelist and illustrator. 3. Whittaker (Jay David Chambers), 1901-61, ...
Chambers's Encyclopaedia
▪ British encyclopaedia       British encyclopaedia published in Oxford, Eng., and named after its original publishers, Robert and William Chambers. The first edition in ...
Chambers, (David) Whittaker
orig. Jay Vivian Chambers born April 1, 1901, Philadelphia died July 9, 1961, near Westminster, Md., U.S. U.S. journalist and principal figure in the Alger Hiss case. He ...
Chambers, (Jay David)Whittaker
Cham·bers (chāmʹbərz), (Jay David) Whittaker. 1901-1961. American journalist and onetime member of the Communist Party who testified before the House Un-American Activities ...
Chambers, Dorothea Lambert
▪ British athlete née  Douglass  born September 13, 1878, Ealing, Middlesex, England died January 7, 1960, London  British tennis player who was the leading female ...
Chambers, Ephraim
▪ British author born c. 1680, , Kendal, Westmorland, Eng. died May 15, 1740, London       British encyclopaedist whose work formed a basis for the 18th-century French ...
Chambers, George
▪ 1998       Trinidadian politician who served (1981-86) as prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago and was faced with the difficult task of diversifying the economy ...
Chambers, John Graham
▪ British sportsman and journalist born Feb. 12, 1843, Llanelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales died March 4, 1883, London       British sportsman and journalist who in 1867 ...
Chambers, John T.
▪ 2001       “The Internet will change companies, industries, and products in ways we can't even imagine. These changes will take place at speeds we have never seen ...
Chambers, Robert
▪ British publisher born July 10, 1802, Peebles, Peeblesshire [now in Scottish Borders], Scotland died March 17, 1871, St. Andrews, Fife  Scottish author, publisher, and, ...
Chambers, Robert and William
born July 10, 1802, Peebles, Tweeddale, Scot. died March 17, 1871, St. Andrews, Fifeshire born 1800, Peebles died 1883 Scottish publishers. Robert, who began business as a ...
Chambers, Sir William
▪ British architect born Feb. 23, 1723, Göteborg, Swed. died March 8, 1796, London, Eng.  British eclectic architect of the Georgian period who was one of the leading ...
Chambers, Whittaker
▪ American journalist original name  Jay Vivian Chambers   born April 1, 1901, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. died July 9, 1961, near Westminster, Maryland  American ...
Chambersburg
/chaym"beuhrz berrg'/, n. a city in central Pennsylvania. 16,174. * * * ▪ Pennsylvania, United States       borough (town), seat (1784) of Franklin county, southern ...
Chambertin
/shahonn berdd taonn"/, n. a dry, red wine from the Gevrey-Chambertin commune of the Burgundy region in France. * * *
chambertomb
chamber tomb n. A Neolithic tomb consisting of a chamber built out of large upright stones with one or more capstones, buried in an earthen mound. * * *
Chambéry
/shahonn bay rddee"/, n. 1. a city in and the capital of Savoie, in SE France. 56,788. 2. a dry vermouth from this city. * * * ▪ France       town, capital of Savoie ...
Chambeshi River
▪ river, Zambia also spelled  Chambezi,         river in northeastern Zambia. It rises in hills on the Tanzanian border and flows 300 miles (480 km) southwest to the ...
Chambly
/sham"blee, shahm"-/; Fr. /shahonn blee"/, n. a city in S Quebec, in E Canada. 12,190. * * * ▪ Quebec, Canada       city, Montérégie region, southern Quebec ...
Chambly Canal
▪ waterway, Canada       waterway bypassing a series of rapids on the Richelieu River between the Chambly Basin and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, in Quebec province, Canada. ...
Chambon-Feugerolles, Le
▪ France       town, Rhône-Alpes région, south-central France, on the Ondaine River, just southwest of Saint-Étienne. It is overlooked (southeast) by the castle of ...
Chambonnières, Jacques Champion de
▪ French composer born c. 1602 died 1672, Paris, France       first of the great 17th-century school of French harpsichord players and composers ...
Chambord
Cham·bord (shäɴ-bôrʹ) A village of north-central France northeast of Tours. It is noted for its magnificent Renaissance château built by Francis I. * * * ▪ ...
Chambord, Henri Dieudonné d'Artois, count de
born Sept. 29, 1820, Paris, France died Aug. 24, 1883, Frohsdorf, Austria French nobleman, last heir of the elder branch of the house of Bourbon and, as Henry V, pretender to ...
Chambord, Henri Dieudonné d'Artois, Count de, Duke De Bordeaux
▪ French noble in full  Henri-charles-ferdinand-marie Dieudonné D'artois, Count De Chambord   born Sept. 29, 1820, Paris, France died Aug. 24, 1883, Frohsdorf, ...
chambray
/sham"bray/, n. a fine cloth of cotton, silk, or linen, commonly of plain weave with a colored warp and white weft. [1805-15, Amer.; var. of CAMBRIC] * * *
Chambre des Comptes
▪ French court       (French: Chamber of Accounts), in France under the ancien régime, sovereign court charged with dealing with numerous aspects of the financial ...
Chambre des Enquêtes
▪ French court       (French: Chamber of Inquiries), in France under the ancien régime, a chamber of the Parlement, or supreme court, of Paris that was responsible for ...
Chambre des Requêtes
▪ French court       (French: Chamber of Petitions), in France under the ancien régime, a chamber of the Parlement of Paris with responsibilities for examining the ...
chameleon
—chameleonic /keuh mee'lee on"ik/, adj. —chameleonlike, adj. /keuh mee"lee euhn, -meel"yeuhn/, n. 1. any of numerous Old World lizards of the family Chamaeleontidae, ...
chameleonic
See chameleon. * * *
chametz
Seph. /khah mets"/; Ashk. /khaw"mits/, n. Hebrew. hametz. * * *
chamfer
—chamferer, n. /cham"feuhr/, n. 1. a cut that is made in wood or some other material, usually at a 45° angle to the adjacent principal faces. Cf. bevel. v.t. 2. to make a ...
chamfer bit
a bit for beveling the edge of a hole. [1875-80] * * *
Chamfort, Sébastien-Roch Nicolas
▪ French author born April 1740/41, Clermont, Fr. died April 13, 1794, Paris  French playwright and conversationalist, famous for his wit, whose maxims became popular ...
chamfron
/cham"freuhn/, n. Armor. chanfron. * * *
Chamic languages
      group of languages spoken in Vietnam and Cambodia, classified as West Indonesian languages in the Hesperonesian group of the Austronesian language family. Of the ...
Chamillart, Michel
▪ French administrator born Jan. 10, 1652, Paris, Fr. died April 14, 1721, Paris       controller general who, under King Louis XIV, directed the financing and ...
Chaminade
/shann mee nannd"/, n. Cécile Louise Stéphanie /say seel" lweez stay fann nee"/, 1857-1944, French pianist and composer. * * *
Chaminade, Cécile
▪ French musician in full  Cécile Louise Stéphanie Chaminade  born Aug. 8, 1857, Paris, France died April 18, 1944, Monte-Carlo  French composer and pianist known chiefly ...
chamise
cha·mi·se (chə-mēzʹ) also cha·mi·so (-mēʹsō) n. pl. cha·mi·ses, also cha·mi·sos An evergreen shrub (Adenostoma fasciculatum) in the rose family, native to ...
chamiso
/sheuh mee"zoh, cheuh-/, n., pl. chamisos. a saltbush, Atriplex canescens, of the western U.S. and Mexico, having grayish, scurfy foliage. Also, chamiza /sheuh mee"zeuh, cheuh-/. ...
Chamisso, Adelbert von
▪ German-language lyricist original name  Louis-Charles-Adélaïde Chamisso de Boncourt   born Jan. 30, 1781, Château de Boncourt, Champagne, France died Aug. 21, 1838, ...
Chamizal
Cha·mi·zal (shăm'ĭ-zälʹ, chäm'ĭ-sälʹ) An area on the northern bank of the Rio Grande near El Paso, Texas. It became part of the United States after the river shifted ...
chammy
/sham"ee/, n., pl. chammies, v.t., chammied, chammying. chamois (defs. 2-4, 6, 7). * * *
chamois
/sham"ee/; Fr. /shann mwah"/, n., pl. chamois, chamoix /sham"eez/; Fr. /shann mwah"/, v., chamoised /sham"eed/, chamoising /sham"ee ing/. n. 1. an agile, goatlike antelope, ...
chamomile
/kam"euh muyl', -meel'/, n. 1. a composite plant, Chamaemelium nobile (or Anthemis nobilis), native to the Old World, having strongly scented foliage and white ray flowers with ...
Chamonix
/sham'euh nee", sham"euh nee/; Fr. /shann maw nee"/, n. a mountain valley in E France, N of Mont Blanc. Also, Chamouni Fr. /shann mooh nee"/. * * *
Chamonix-Mont-Blanc
▪ resort, French Alps  internationally known mountain resort in the French Alps, Haute-Savoie département, Rhône-Alpes région, west of Annecy. It is situated at an ...
Chamorro
/cheuh mawr"oh/; Sp. /chah mawrdd"rddaw/, n., pl. Chamorros /-mawr"ohz/; Sp. /-mawrdd"rddaws/, (esp. collectively) Chamorro for 1. 1. a people inhabiting the Mariana Islands. 2. ...
Chamorro Vargas, Emiliano
▪ president of Nicaragua byname  Lion Of Nicaragua,  Spanish  León De Nicaragua  born 1871 died Feb. 26, 1966, Managua, Nicaragua  prominent diplomat and politician, ...
Chamorro, Violeta (Barrios de)
born Oct. 18, 1929, Rivas province, Nic. President of Nicaragua (1990–96). Born into a wealthy family, she married the publisher of La Prensa, a newspaper that opposed the ...
Chamorro, Violeta Barrios de
▪ president of Nicaragua née  Violeta Barrios  born October 18, 1929, Rivas, Nicaragua    newspaper publisher and politician who served as president of Nicaragua from ...
Chamos
/kay"mos/, n. Douay Bible. Chemosh. * * *
chamosite
/sham"euh zuyt'/, n. a mineral of the chlorite group, hydrous aluminum silicate of iron, occurring in gray or black crystals in oolitic iron ore. [1825-35; var. of camoisite, ...
chamotte
/sheuh mot"/, n. Metall. grog (def. 3). [1885-90; prob. < F < G Schamotte] * * *
Chamoun, Camille
▪ president of Lebanon Chamoun also spelled  Shamʿun   born April 3, 1900, Dayr al-Qamar, Lebanon died Aug. 7, 1987, Beirut       political leader who served as ...
Chamoun, Camille (Nimer)
also spelled Kamīl Shamʽūn born April 3, 1900, Dayr al-Qamar, Leb. died Aug. 7, 1987, Beirut President of Lebanon (1952–58). He reorganized government departments to ...
champ
champ1 —champer, n. —champy, adj. /champ, chomp/, v.t. 1. to bite upon or grind, esp. impatiently: The horses champed the oats. 2. to crush with the teeth and chew vigorously ...
Champa
Ancient kingdom, Southeast Asia. Occupying a region now part of central Vietnam, it was formed in the 2nd century AD during the breakup of China's Han dynasty when the Han ...
champac
/cham"pak, chum"puk/, n. a southern Asian tree, Michelia champaca, of the magnolia family, having fragrant yellow or orange flowers and yielding an oil (champaca oil) used in ...
champagne
/sham payn"/, n. 1. (cap.) the sparkling, dry, white table wine from the region of Champagne in France. 2. a similar sparkling wine produced elsewhere. 3. (formerly) the ...
Champagne
/sham payn"/; Fr. /shahonn pannn"yeu/, n. a region and former province in NE France. * * * Historical and cultural region, northeastern France. The terrain is interrupted by ...
Champagne-Ardenne
▪ region, France  région of France encompassing the northern départements of Haute-Marne, Aube, Marne, and Ardennes and roughly coextensive with the historical province of ...
Champagny, Jean-Baptiste Nompère de, Duc De Cadore
▪ French statesman born Aug. 4, 1756, Roanne, Fr. died July 3, 1834, Paris       French statesman and diplomat, foreign minister under Napoleon I.       Elected ...
champaign
/sham payn"/, n. 1. level, open country; plain. 2. Obs. a battlefield. adj. 3. level and open: champaign fields. [1350-1400; ME champai(g)ne < MF champa(i)gne < L campania; see ...
Champaign
/sham payn"/, n. a city in E Illinois, adjoining Urbana. 58,133. * * * ▪ Illinois, United States  city, Champaign county, east-central Illinois, U.S. Lying about 135 miles ...
Champaigne, Philippe de
born May 26, 1602, Brussels died Aug. 12, 1674, Paris, Fr. Flemish-born French painter. Trained in Brussels, he arrived in Paris in 1621. His patrons included Louis XIII, Marie ...
champak
cham·pak also cham·pac (chămʹpăk, chŭmʹpŭk) or cham·pa·ca (chămʹpə-kə, chŭmʹ-) n. An evergreen timber tree (Michelia champaca) native to India and having ...
Champasak
▪ Laos also spelled  Champassak,  also called  Bassac        town, southern Laos. It lies on the west bank of the Mekong River, within an agricultural region of ...
Champerico
▪ Guatemala       town and port, southwestern Guatemala, on the Pacific Ocean. Linked by paved highway with Retalhuleu, Champerico is one of the country's most ...
champers
/sham"peuhrz/, n. Brit. Slang. champagne (def. 1). [1950-55; CHAMP(AGNE) + -ERS] * * *
champertous
See champerty. * * *
champerty
—champertous, adj. /cham"peuhr tee/, n. Law. a sharing in the proceeds of litigation by one who agrees with either the plaintiff or defendant to help promote it or carry it ...
Champfleury
▪ French author pseudonym of  Jules-françois-félix Husson   born Sept. 17, 1821, Laon, Fr. died Dec. 6, 1889, Sèvres       French novelist and journalist, ...
champignon
/sham pin"yeuhn/ or, esp. Brit., /cham-/; Fr. /shahonn pee nyawonn"/, n., pl. champignons /-pin"yeuhnz/; Fr. /-pee nyawonn"/. mushroom (defs. 1, 2). [1570-80; < MF, appar.
Champigny-sur-Marne
Cham·pi·gny-sur-Marne (shäɴ-pē-nyē'sûr-märnʹ, -sür-) A city of northern France, a suburb of Paris. Population: 76,176. * * * ▪ France       town, a ...
champion
—championless, adj. —championlike, adj. /cham"pee euhn/, n. 1. a person who has defeated all opponents in a competition or series of competitions, so as to hold first place: ...
Champion International Corporation
▪ American company       former American forest products enterprise engaged in the manufacture of building materials, paper, and packaging materials. It was acquired by ...
champion jockey
n (in Britain) the jockey who has won the most horse races in a season. There are two champion jockeys each year, the one who wins the most steeplechases (= races with jumps) in ...
Champion of England
a hereditary official at British coronations, representing the king (King's Champion) or the queen (Queen's Champion) who is being crowned, and having originally the function of ...
Champion,Gower
Cham·pi·on (chămpʹyən), Gower. 1921-1980. American dancer who choreographed and directed many musicals, including Hello Dolly! (1964). * * *
championship
/cham"pee euhn ship'/, n. 1. the distinction or condition of being a champion: to win a championship. 2. advocacy or defense: championship of the underdog. 3. championships, a ...
Champlain
/sham playn"/; for 1 also Fr. /shahonn plaonn"/, n. 1. Samuel de /sam"yooh euhl deuh/; Fr. /sann myuu el" deuh/, 1567-1635, French explorer in the Americas: founder of Quebec; ...
Champlain, Lake
Lake between Vermont and New York, U.S. Located on the states' northern boundaries and extending into Canada about 6 mi (10 km), it is about 125 mi (200 km) long and has an area ...
Champlain, Samuel de
born 1567, Brouage, France died Dec. 25, 1635, Quebec, New France French explorer. He made several expeditions to North America before founding Quebec in 1608 with 32 ...
Champlain,Lake
Cham·plain (shăm-plānʹ), Lake A lake of northeast New York, northwest Vermont, and southern Quebec, Canada. It was the site of important battles in the French and Indian ...
Champlain,Samuel de
Cham·plain (shăm-plānʹ, shäɴ-plăɴʹ), Samuel de. 1567?-1635. French explorer who founded Port Royal, now Annapolis Royal, in Nova Scotia (1605) and established a ...
champlevé
/shahonn leuh vay"/, adj., n., pl. champlevés /-vay", -vayz"/. adj. 1. of or pertaining to an enamel piece or enameling technique in which enamel is fused onto the incised or ...
Champmeslé, Marie
▪ French actress byname  La Champmeslé , née  Marie Desmares  born Feb. 18, 1642, Rouen, Fr. died May 15, 1698, Auteuil  French tragedienne who created the heroines in ...
Champollion
/shahonn paw lyawonn"/, n. Jean François /zhahonn frddahonn swann"/, 1790-1832, French Egyptologist. * * *
Champollion, Jean François
Cham·pol·lion (shäɴ-pô-lyôɴʹ), Jean François. 1790-1832. French Egyptologist. Working from the Rosetta stone, he became the first person to decipher Egyptian ...
Champollion, Jean-François
born Dec. 23, 1790, Figeac, France died March 4, 1832, Paris French scholar. He played a major role in the deciphering of Egyptian hieroglyphs. Champollion was a linguistic ...
Champollion-Figeac, Jacques-Joseph
▪ French paleographer born Oct. 5, 1778, Figeac, Fr. died May 9, 1867, Fontainebleau  French librarian and paleographer remembered for his own writings and for editing ...
Champs Élysées
/shahonn zay lee zay"/ a boulevard in Paris, France, noted for its cafés, shops, and theaters. * * *
Champs-Élysées
(French: "Elysian Fields") One of the world's most remarkable avenues, stretching 1. 17 mi (1.88 km) from the Arc de Triomphe to the Place de la Concorde, in Paris. It is ...
Chan
an American Chinese detective character in books, in films and on television, who regularly solved crimes which the police had failed to solve. He was created in 1925 by the ...
Chan Chan
/chahn" chahn"/ the site of the ancient capital city of the Chimu people, near the modern city of Trujillo, Peru, characterized by large walled enclosures and houses made of ...
Chan I
▪ king of Cambodia died 1566       one of the most illustrious Cambodian kings (reigned 1516–66) of the post-Angkor era. He successfully defended his kingdom against ...
Chan II
▪ king of Cambodia born 1791 died 1835       king of Cambodia who sought to balance Siam (Thailand) against Vietnam. Both countries had traditionally contested for the ...
Chan painting
▪ Chinese painting Wade-Giles romanization  Ch'an        school of Chinese painting inspired by the “meditative” school of Buddhism called, in Chinese, Chan ...
Chan, Jackie
▪ 1996       Since crashing onto the martial-arts movie scene in the late 1970s, Hong Kong actor-director Jackie Chan had been a smash. The popular film star broke ...
Chan, Margaret
▪ 2007       On Nov. 8, 2006, Margaret Chan, a former director of the Hong Kong Department of Health, was nominated to succeed Lee Jong Wook of South Korea as director ...
Chan.
1. Chancellor. 2. Chancery. Also, Chanc. * * *
Chanaan
/kay"neuhn, -nay euhn/, n. Douay Bible. Canaan (def. 4). * * *
Chanba, Samson
▪ Abkhazian educator, poet, and dramatist Abkhaz in full  Samson Kuagu-ipa Chanba , Russian in full  Samson Iakovlevich Chanba  born June 18, 1886, Atara, Abkhazia, ...
Chanc
Chanc abbrev. 1. Chancellor 2. Chancery * * *
chanc.
1. chancellor. 2. chancery. * * *
chance
—chanceless, adj. /chans, chahns/, n., v., chanced, chancing, adj. n. 1. the absence of any cause of events that can be predicted, understood, or controlled: often personified ...
chance music
aleatory music. [1960-65] * * *
chance-medley
/chans"med'lee, chahns"-/, n. Law. 1. a killing occurring during a sudden and unpredicted encounter. 2. aimless and random action. [1485-95; < AF chance medlee] * * *
chanceful
—chancefully, adv. /chans"feuhl, chahns"-/, adj. 1. full of chance or chances. 2. Archaic. a. dependent on chance. b. risky. [1585-95; CHANCE + -FUL] * * *
chancel
—chanceled, chancelled, adj. /chan"seuhl, chahn"-/, n. the space about the altar of a church, usually enclosed, for the clergy and other officials. [1275-1325; ME < MF < LL ...
Chancelade skeleton
      fossil remains of a human (genus Homo) discovered in 1888 in a rock shelter at Chancelade, southwestern France. The 17,000-year-old skeleton was found in a curled ...
chancellery
/chan"seuh leuh ree, -sleuh ree, -seuhl ree, chahn"-/, n., pl. chancelleries. 1. the position of a chancellor. 2. the office or department of a chancellor. 3. the office attached ...
chancellor
/chan"seuh leuhr, -sleuhr, chahn"-/, n. 1. the chief minister of state in certain parliamentary governments, as in Germany; prime minister; premier. 2. the chief administrative ...
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
a British Cabinet minister who has almost no official duties, and so is free to work on any special jobs chosen by the Prime Minister. The title remains from the 15th century, ...
Chancellor of the Exchequer
the minister of finance in the British government. [1350-1400; ME] * * *
Chancellor, John William
▪ 1997       U.S. television journalist (b. July 14, 1927, Chicago, Ill.—d. July 12, 1996, Princeton, N.J.), spent more than 40 years as a broadcaster for NBC, where ...
Chancellor, Richard
▪ British seaman died Nov. 10, 1556, Pitsligo Bay, Aberdeen, Scot.       British seaman whose visit to Moscow in 1553–54 laid the foundations for English trade with ...
Chancellorof the Exchequer
Chan·cel·lor of the Exchequer (chănʹsə-lər, -slər) n. The senior finance minister in the British government and a member of the prime minister's cabinet. * * *
chancellorship
/chan"seuh leuhr ship', -sleuhr-, chahn"-/, n. 1. the office or rank of chancellor. 2. a chancellor's term of office. [1425-75; late ME chanceler-schepp. See CHANCELLOR, -SHIP] * ...
Chancellorsville
/chan"seuh leuhrz vil', -sleuhrz-, chahn"-/, n. a village in NE Virginia: site of a Confederate victory 1863. * * *
Chancellorsville, Battle of
Military engagement of the American Civil War. In May 1863 near Chancellorsville, Va., the Union army in Virginia, led by Joseph Hooker, attempted to encircle and destroy the ...
chancellory
chan·cel·lor·y (chănʹsə-lə-rē, -slə-rē) n. Variant of chancellery. * * *
chancer
/chan"seuhr, chahn"-/, n. Chiefly Brit. a person who takes many risks. [1880-85; CHANCE + -ER1] * * *
chancery
/chan"seuh ree, chahn"-/, n., pl. chanceries. 1. the office or department of a chancellor; chancellery. 2. an office of public records, esp. those of the Lord Chancellor in ...
Chancery Division
(also Chancery) (in Britain) the section of the High Court of Justice which deals mainly with commercial cases such as company law, patents (= official documents that give people ...
Chancery, Court of
▪ court       in England, the court of equity under the lord high chancellor that began to develop in the 15th century to provide remedies not obtainable in the courts ...
ChanChan
Chan Chan (chänʹ chänʹ) A ruined pre-Incan city on the northern coast of Peru, built after A.D. 850. It may once have had a population of 200,000. * * *
Chanchiang
Chan·chiang (jänʹjyängʹ) See Zhanjiang. * * *
chanciness
See chancy. * * *
chancre
—chancrous, adj. /shang"keuhr/, n. Pathol. the initial lesion of syphilis and certain other infectious diseases, commonly a more or less distinct ulcer or sore with a hard ...
chancroid
—chancroidal, adj. /shang"kroyd/, n. Pathol. an infectious venereal ulcer with a soft base. Also called simple chancre, soft chancre. [1860-65; CHANCRE + -OID] * * * ▪ ...
chancroidal
See chancroid. * * *
chancrous
See chancre. * * *
chancy
—chanciness, n. /chan"see, chahn"-/, adj., chancier, chanciest. 1. uncertain, hazardous, or risky. 2. random; haphazard; subject to chance. 3. Chiefly Scot. lucky. [1505-15; ...
Chand, Dhyan
▪ Indian athlete born August 29, 1905, Allahabad, India died December 3, 1979, Delhi       Indian field hockey player who was considered to be one of the greatest ...
Chandannagar
Chandannagar [chun΄də nug′ər] port in NE India, near Kolkata: formerly a French dependency, it became part of the republic of India in 1950: pop. 120,000 * * *
Chandela
▪ Indian clan also spelled  Candella        Rajput (Rājput) clan of Gond origin that for some centuries ruled Bundelkhand in north-central India and fought against ...
chandelier
—chandeliered, adj. /shan'dl ear"/, n. a decorative, sometimes ornate, light fixture suspended from a ceiling, usually having branched supports for a number of ...
chandelle
/shan del", shahonn-/, n., v. chandelled, chandelling. Aeron. n. 1. an abrupt climbing turn in which an aircraft almost stalls while using its momentum to gain a higher rate of ...
Chandernagor
/chun'deuhr neuh gawr", -gohr"/, n. a port in S West Bengal, in E India, on the Hooghly River: a former French dependency. 421,256. Also, Chandarnagar /chun'deuhr nug"euhr/. * * *


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