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Слова на букву boom-chri (15990)

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Charles Town
▪ Jefferson county, West Virginia, United States       city, seat (1801) of Jefferson county, in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, U.S. The city lies 16 miles (26 ...
Charles University
▪ university, Prague, Czech Republic Czech  Universita Karlova , also called  University of Prague        state-controlled institution of higher learning in Prague, ...
Charles V
1. ("Charles the Wise") 1337-81, king of France 1364-80. 2. See Charles I (def. 3). * * * I German Karl born Feb. 24, 1500, Ghent died Sept. 21, 1558, San Jerónimo de Yuste, ...
Charles VI
1. ("Charles the Mad" or "Charles the Well-beloved") 1368-1422, king of France 1380-1422. 2. 1685-1740, emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1711-40; as Charles III, king of Hungary ...
Charles VII
1. ("Charles the Victorious") 1403-61, king of France 1422-61 (son of Charles VI). 2. (Charles Albert) 1697-1745, elector of Bavaria 1726-45; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire ...
Charles VIII
1470-98, king of France 1483-98 (son of Louis XI). * * * born June 30, 1470, Amboise, France died April 7, 1498, Amboise King of France (1483–98). He abandoned claims to ...
Charles VIII Knutsson
▪ king of Sweden also called  (until 1448) Karl Knutsson Bonde   born c. 1408, Sweden died May 15, 1470, Stockholm  king of Sweden (1448–57, 1464–65, 1467–70), who ...
Charles Wesley
➡ Wesley (I) * * *
Charles Wheatstone
➡ Wheatstone * * *
Charles William Ferdinand of Brunswick
▪ Prussian noble German  Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand   born Oct. 9, 1735, Wolfenbüttel, Lower Saxony [Germany] died Nov. 10, 1806, Ottensen, near Hamburg       duke of ...
Charles X
1. (Charles Gustavus) 1622-60, king of Sweden 1654-60. 2. 1757-1836, king of France 1824-30. * * * born Oct. 9, 1757, Versailles, France died Nov. 6, 1836, Gorizia, Friuli King ...
Charles X Gustav
Swedish Karl Gustav born 1622 died 1660 King of Sweden (1654–60). Nephew of Gustav II Adolf, he failed in his efforts to marry the Swedish queen Christina, but she named him ...
Charles XI
1655-97, king of Sweden 1660-97 (son of Charles X). * * * Swedish Karl born Nov. 24, 1655, Stockholm, Swed. died April 5, 1697, Stockholm King of Sweden (1660–97). At age ...
Charles XII
1682-1718, king of Sweden 1697-1718. * * * Swedish Karl born June 17, 1682, Stockholm, Swed. died Nov. 30, 1718, Fredrikshald, Nor. King of Sweden (1697–1718). Son of ...
Charles XIII
Swedish Karl born Nov. 8, 1622, Nyköping Castle, Swed. died Feb. 13, 1660, Göteborg King of Sweden (1809–18) and first king of the union of Sweden and Norway ...
Charles XIV John
Swedish Karl Johan orig. Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte born Jan. 26, 1763, Pau, France died March 8, 1844, Stockholm, Swed. King of Sweden and Norway (1818–44). He became an ...
Charles XIV.
See Bernadotte, Jean Baptiste Jules. * * *
Charles XV
▪ king of Sweden and Norway Swedish  Karl  or  Carl , Swedish in full  Carl Ludvig Eugen   born May 3, 1826, Stockholm died Sept. 18, 1872, Malmö, Swed.  king of ...
Charles' law
Thermodynam. See Gay-Lussac's law. [named after J. A. C. Charles (1746-1823), French physicist, who stated it] * * *
Charles's law
Charles's law [chärl′ziz] n. 〚after J. Charles (1746-1823), Fr physicist〛 the statement that for a body of ideal gas at constant pressure the volume is directly ...
Charles's Wain
/chahrl"ziz wayn"/, Brit. See Big Dipper. [bef. 1000; OE Carles waegn Carl's wagon (Carl for Charlemagne); see WAIN] * * *
Charles'slaw
Charles's law (chärlʹzĭz) n. The physical law that the volume of a fixed mass of gas held at a constant pressure varies directly with the absolute temperature.   [After ...
Charles'sWain
Charles's Wain n. See Big Dipper.   [Middle English charleswen, Charles' (Charlemagne's) wain, probably reinterpreted from Old English carles wægn, churl's wain : carl, churl ...
Charles, Archduke
▪ Austrian field marshal German  Erzherzog Karl   born Sept. 5, 1771, Florence [Italy] died April 30, 1847, Vienna, Austria       Austrian archduke, field marshal, ...
Charles, Dame Eugenia
▪ 2006       Dominican lawyer and politician (b. May 15, 1919, Pointe Michel, Dominica—d. Sept. 6, 2005, Fort-de-France, Martinique), earned the nickname “Iron Lady ...
Charles, Eugenia
▪ prime minister of Dominica in full  Mary Eugenia Charles  born May 15, 1919, Pointe Michel, Dominica died September 6, 2005, Fort-de-France, Martinique       lawyer ...
Charles, Ezzard
▪ American athlete in full  Ezzard Mack Charles  born July 7, 1921, Lawrenceville, Georgia, U.S. died May 28, 1975, Chicago, Illinois  American world heavyweight boxing ...
Charles, Jacques Alexandre César
Charles, Jacques Alexandre César. 1746-1823. French physicist and inventor who formulated Charles's law (1787) and was the first to use hydrogen in balloons (1783). * * *
Charles, Jacques-Alexandre-César
▪ French physicist born Nov. 12, 1746, Beaugency, Fr. died April 7, 1823, Paris       French mathematician, physicist, and inventor who, with Nicolas Robert, was the ...
Charles, John
▪ 2005 “The Gentle Giant”        Welsh association football (soccer) player (b. Dec. 27, 1931, Cwmdu, Wales—d. Feb. 21, 2004, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, Eng.), was ...
Charles, Pierre
▪ 2005       Dominican politician (b. June 30, 1954, Grand Bay, Dominica—d. Jan. 6, 2004, Roseau, Dominica), was selected by Dominica Labour Party leaders to become ...
Charles, Prince of Lorraine and Bar
▪ Austrian governor of The Netherlands German  Karl, Prinz Von Lothringen und Bar  born Dec. 12, 1712, Lunéville, Lorraine [now in France] died July 4, 1780, Castle ...
Charles, prince of Wales
▪ 1998       During the 1990s Great Britain's monarchy was subject to more criticism—and more doubts about its future survival—than at any other time during the 20th ...
Charles, Ray
orig. Ray Charles Robinson born Sept. 23, 1930, Albany, Ga., U.S. died June 10, 2004, Beverly Hills, Calif. U.S. pianist, singer, and songwriter. His family moved to ...
Charles, Thomas
▪ Welsh religious leader born Oct. 14, 1755, Pantdwin, near St. Clears, Carmarthenshire, Wales died Oct. 5, 1814, Bala, Merionethshire       Welsh religious leader, a ...
Charles,Ray
Charles, Ray. Born 1930. American musician and composer whose songs, such as “I Can't Stop Loving You,” are rooted in gospel music, blues, and jazz. * * *
Charlesbourg
/shahrl"boorg/; Fr. /shannrddl boohrdd"/, n. a city in S Quebec, in E Canada, near Quebec. 68,326. * * * ▪ Quebec, Canada       former city, Québec region, southern ...
CharlesI
I. Charles I1, 1600-1649. King of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625-1649). His power struggles with Parliament resulted in the English Civil War (1642-1648) in which Charles ...
CharlesII
Charles II, 1630-1685. King of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1660-1685) who reigned during the Restoration, a period of expanding trade and colonization as well as strong ...
CharlesIX
Charles IX, 1550-1574. King of France (1560-1574). His mother, Catherine de Médicis, controlled most of his decisions and persuaded him to order the massacre of French ...
CharlesMartel
Charles Mar·tel (mär-tĕlʹ), Known as “the Hammer.” 688?-741. Frankish ruler of Austrasia (715-741) who in 732 halted the European invasion of the Moors. His grandson was ...
Charleson, Ian
▪ British actor born Aug. 11, 1949, Edinburgh, Scot. died Jan. 6, 1990, London, Eng.       English stage actor best known for his work in the film Chariots of Fire ...
CharlesRiver
Charles River A river, about 97 km (60 mi) long, of eastern Massachusetts flowing into Boston harbor and separating Boston from Cambridge. * * *
Charleston
/chahrlz"teuhn, chahrl"steuhn/, n. 1. a seaport in SE South Carolina. 69,510. 2. a city in and the capital of West Virginia, in the W part. 63,968. 3. a city in E central ...
Charleston, College of
▪ college, Charleston, South Carolina, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S. It consists of ...
Charleston, Oscar
▪ American athlete in full  Oscar McKinley Charleston  born October 14, 1896, Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. died October 6, 1954, Philadelphia, ...
CharlestonPeak
Charleston Peak A mountain, 3,635.3 m (11,919 ft) high, of southeast Nevada in the Spring Mountains west of Las Vegas. * * *
Charlestown
/chahrlz"town'/, n. a former city in E Massachusetts: since 1874 a part of Boston; navy yard; battle of Bunker Hill June 17, 1775. * * * ▪ Saint Kitts and ...
CharlesV
Charles V, 1500-1558. Holy Roman emperor (1519-1558) and king of Spain as Charles I (1516-1556). He summoned the Diet of Worms (1521) and the Council of Trent (1545-1563). * * *
CharlesVII
Charles VII, 1403-1461. King of France (1422-1461). He ended the Hundred Years' War (1453) by driving the English from most of France. * * *
CharlesX
Charles X, 1757-1836. King of France (1824-1830) who attempted to restore absolutism by dissolving the Chamber of Deputies and terminating freedom of the press. He abdicated as a ...
CharlesXIV
Charles XIV, Originally Jean Baptiste Jules Bernadotte. 1763-1844. King of Sweden and Norway (1818-1844). He served under Napoleon Bonaparte in the Italian campaign (1796-1797) ...
Charleton
/chahrl"tn/, n. a male given name. * * *
Charleville
▪ Queensland, Australia       town, south-central Queensland, Australia. It lies along the Warrego River at an elevation of 974 feet (297 metres). The town was settled ...
Charleville-Mézières
▪ twin towns, France       twin towns, jointly capital of Ardennes département, Champagne-Ardenne région, northeastern France. They lie along the Meuse River, 52 ...
Charlevoix
▪ Michigan, United States       city, seat (1869) of Charlevoix county, northwestern Michigan, U.S. It is located between Lake Charlevoix and Lake Michigan (Michigan, ...
Charlevoix, Pierre-François-Xavier de
▪ French Jesuit born Oct. 29, 1682, Saint-Quentin, France died Feb. 1, 1761, La Flèche       French Jesuit who wrote one of the earliest descriptive accounts of North ...
Charley
/chahr"lee/, n., pl. Charleys. Mil. Slang. See Victor Charley. Also, Charlie. * * *
charley horse
/chahr"lee/ a painful, involuntary cramp of an arm or leg muscle resulting from excessive muscular strain or a blow. [1885-90; orig. baseball slang] * * *
charleyhorse
char·ley horse (chärʹlē) n. Informal A cramp or stiffness in a muscle, especially of the upper leg, caused by injury or excessive exertion.   [Originally baseball slang, of ...
Charley’s Aunt
a British comedy play (1892) by Brandon Thomas (1856–1914) which is still often performed, especially by amateur actors. It is about a man who pretends to be his friend’s ...
Charlie
/chahr"lee/, n. 1. a word used in communications to represent the letter C. 2. Mil. Slang. Charley. 3. a male given name, form of Charles. 4. a female given name. * * * (as used ...
Charlie Brown
➡ Peanuts. * * *
Charlie Chan
➡ Chan * * *
Charlie Chaplin
➡ Chaplin * * *
Charlie ‘Bird’ Parker
➡ Parker (I) * * *
Charline
/shahr leen"/, n. a female given name, form of Caroline. * * *
charlock
/chahr"leuhk/, n. a wild mustard, Brassica kaber, having lobed, ovate leaves and clusters of small, yellow flowers, often troublesome as a weed in grainfields. [bef. 1000; ME ...
Charlot
/shahr"loh/; Fr. /shannrdd loh"/, n. Jean /jeen/; Fr. /zhahonn/, born 1898, U.S. painter, lithographer, and illustrator; born in France. * * *
Charlot, André
▪ French theatrical impresario and actor in full  André-eugène-maurice Charlot   born July 26, 1882, Paris, France died May 20, 1956, Hollywood, Calif., ...
Charlot, Jean
▪ French artist born February 7, 1898, Paris, France died March 20, 1979, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.       French-born muralist, painter, and book illustrator who was known ...
charlotte
/shahr"leuht/, n. 1. a dessert of many varieties, served hot or cold and commonly made by lining a mold with cake or bread and filling it with fruit, whipped cream, custard, or ...
Charlotte
/shahr"leuht/, n. 1. Grand Duchess (Charlotte Aldegonde Elise Marie Wilhelmine), 1896-1985, sovereign of Luxembourg 1919-64. 2. a city in S North Carolina. 314,447. 3. a female ...
Charlotte Amalie
/shahr"leuht euh mah"lee euh/ a seaport in and the capital of the Virgin Islands, on St. Thomas. 12,372. Formerly, St. Thomas. * * * City (pop., 2000: 11,004), capital of the ...
Charlotte Brontë
➡ Brontë sisters * * *
Charlotte Harbor
Inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, western coast of Florida, U.S. It is about 25 mi (40 km) long and 5 mi (8 km) wide. It receives the Peace River in the northeast, and a dredged ...
charlotte russe
/roohs/ 1. a dessert made by lining a mold with sponge cake or ladyfingers and filling it with Bavarian cream. 2. a simpler version of this, consisting of a small piece of sponge ...
CharlotteAmalie
Charlotte A·ma·lie (ə-mälʹyə) The capital of the U.S. Virgin Islands, on St. Thomas Island in the West Indies east of Puerto Rico. It was called St. Thomas from 1921 to ...
Charlottenburg
/shahr lot"n berrg'/; Ger. /shahrdd lawt"n boorddk'/, n. a residential neighborhood in Berlin, Germany: 17th century palace. * * * ▪ district, Berlin, ...
charlotterusse
charlotte russe (ro͞osʹ) n. A cold dessert of Bavarian cream set in a mold lined with ladyfingers.   [French : charlotte, charlotte + russe, Russian.] * * *
Charlottesville
/shahr"leuhts vil'/, n. a city in central Virginia. 45,010. * * * City (pop., 2000: 45,049), central Virginia, U.S. Located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge and settled in the ...
Charlottetown
/shahr"leuht town'/, n. a seaport on and the capital of Prince Edward Island, in SE Canada. 17,063. * * * City (pop., 2001: 32,245), capital of Prince Edward Island, ...
Charlottetown Conference
First in a series of meetings in 1864 that led to the formation of the Dominion of Canada in 1867. The conference, held at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, was originally ...
Charlton
/chahrl"tn/, n. a male given name. * * *
Charlton Heston
➡ Heston * * *
Charlton, Boy
▪ Australian athlete byname of  Andrew Charlton   born Aug. 12, 1907, Sydney, Australia died Dec. 11, 1975, Sydney       Australian swimmer who won five Olympic ...
Charlton, Sir Bobby
▪ British athlete byname of  Robert Charlton  born October 11, 1937, Ashington, Northumberland, England    football (football () (soccer) player and manager who is ...
Charlyne
/shahr"lin, shahr leen"/, n. a female given name, form of Caroline. Also, Charlyn /shahr"lin/. * * *
charm
charm1 —charmedly /chahr"mid lee/, adv. —charmer, n. —charmless, adj. —charmlessly, adv. /chahrm/, n. 1. a power of pleasing or attracting, as through personality or ...
charm quark
charm quark n. Particle Physics CHARMED QUARK * * *
charm school
a school for teaching the social graces, grooming and dress, etc. [1945-50] * * *
charmed
/chahrmd/, adj. 1. marked by good fortune or privilege: a charmed life. 2. Physics. (of a particle) having a nonzero value of charm. [1250-1300; ME. See CHARM1, -ED2] * * *
charmed circle
an exclusive or privileged group: the charmed circle of concert violinists. [1895-1900] * * *
charmed quark
Physics. the quark having electric charge 2/3 times the elementary charge and charm C = +1. It is more massive than the up, down, and strange quarks. Also called c quark. * * *
charmedlife
charmed life (chärmd) n. A life that seems to have been protected by a charm or spell. * * *
charmedparticle
charmed particle n. Physics A particle with nonzero total charm. * * *
charmer
charmer [chärm′ər] n. 〚see CHARM〛 1. a delightful, fascinating, or attractive person 2. a person who seemingly casts a spell; enchanter [a snake charmer] * * * charm·er ...
charmeuse
/shahr moohz", -moohs"/; Fr. /shannrdd muez"/, n. a soft, lightweight, drapable fabric of silk or synthetic fibers, having a semilustrous satin face and a dull back. [1905-10; ...
Charmian
/chahr"mee euhn, shahr"-/, n. a female given name: from a Greek word meaning "source of joy." * * *
charming
—charmingly, adv. —charmingness, n. /chahr"ming/, adj. 1. pleasing; delightful: a charming child. 2. using charm; exercising magic power. [1250-1300; ME; see CHARM1, ...
charmingly
See charm. * * *
Charmin{™}
n [U] the name of a range of US paper products made by Procter and Gamble. For many years television advertisements for soft Charmin toilet paper showed Mr Whipple, a supermarket ...
charmless
See charmingly. * * *
charmonium
/chahr moh"nee euhm/, n. Physics. any meson composed of a charmed quark and a charmed antiquark. [1970-75; CHARM1 + -onium, prob. extracted from POSITRONIUM] * * *
charmquark
charm quark n. Abbr. c A quark with a charge of + 2/3, a mass about 2,900 times that of the electron, and a charm of +1. * * *
charmschool
charm school n. A school or course in which polite manners and proper etiquette are taught. * * *
Charnay Fibula
▪ French art       curved silver ornament, dating from the mid-6th century, that bears a runic (runic alphabet) inscription. The Fibula, a type of clasp, was discovered ...
Charnay, Claude-Joseph-Désiré
▪ French archaeologist born May 2, 1828, Fleure, Fr. died Oct. 24, 1915, Paris       French explorer and archaeologist, noted for his pioneering investigations of ...
charnel
/chahr"nl/, n. 1. a repository for dead bodies. adj. 2. of, like, or fit for a charnel; deathlike; sepulchral. [1350-1400; ME < MF < LL carnale, n. and adj. use of neut. of ...
charnel house
a house or place in which the bodies or bones of the dead are deposited. [1550-60] * * *
charnelhouse
charnel house n. 1. A building, room, or vault in which the bones or bodies of the dead are placed; a charnel. 2. A scene or place of great physical suffering and loss of ...
Charney, Jule Gregory
▪ American meteorologist born Jan. 1, 1917, San Francisco died June 16, 1981, Boston       American meteorologist who contributed to the development of numerical ...
Charnock, Job
▪ British official died Jan. 10, 1693, Calcutta [now Kolkata], India       English founder of Calcutta (now Kolkata (Calcutta)) and controversial administrator in the ...
charnockite
▪ rock       any member of a series of metamorphic rocks with variable chemical composition, first described from the state of Tamil Nadu in southern India and named for ...
Charnwood
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative county of Leicestershire, England. Nearly all of the borough belongs to the historic county ...
Charolais
/shar'euh lay"/, n. one of a breed of large white or cream-colored beef cattle, originally of France, often used in crossbreeding. Also, Charolaise /shar'euh layz"/. [1890-95; < ...
Charon
—Charonian /keuh roh"nee euhn/, Charonic /keuh ron"ik/, adj. /kair"euhn, kar"-/, n. 1. Class. Myth. the ferryman who conveyed the souls of the dead across the Styx. 2. (usually ...
Charonton, Enguerrand
▪ French painter Charonton also spelled  Charrenton, or Quarton   born c. 1410, Laon, France; fl. 1444–66, Provence    French religious painter of the late Gothic ...
Charophyceae
Class of algae, certain members of which are commonly known as stoneworts. Stoneworts contain calcium carbonate deposits so extensive that they may form the major part of lake ...
charophyte
/kar"euh fuyt'/, n. any green algae of the class Charophyceae (or group Charophyta), comprising the stoneworts. [ < NL Charophyta, equiv. to Char(a) a genus of stoneworts (L: a ...
charoseth
Seph. /khah rddoh"set/; Ashk. /khah rddoh"sis/, n. Hebrew. haroseth. Also, charoset. * * *
Charpak
Char·pak (shär-päkʹ), Georges. Born 1924. Polish-born French physicist who won a 1992 Nobel Prize for developing a particle detector. * * *
Charpak, Georges
▪ French physicist born Aug. 1, 1924, Poland       Polish-born French physicist, winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1992 for his invention of subatomic particle ...
Charpentier
/shannrdd pahonn tyay"/, n. 1. Gustave /gyuu stannv"/, 1860-1956, French composer. 2. Marc Antoine /mannrddk ahonn twannn"/, 1634-1704, French composer. * * *
Charpentier, Gustave
▪ French composer born June 25, 1860, Dieuze, Fr. died Feb. 18, 1956, Paris       French composer best known for his opera Louise.       Charpentier studied at ...
Charpentier, Johann von
▪ Swiss scientist born Dec. 8, 1786, Freiberg, Saxony [Germany] died Dec. 12, 1855, Bex, Switz.       pioneer glaciologist, one of the first to propose the idea of the ...
Charpentier, Marc-Antoine
born 1634, Paris, France died Feb. 24, 1704, Paris French composer. He was a student of Giacomo Carissimi in Rome in the 1660s. Back in Paris, he succeeded Jean-Baptiste Lully ...
charpoy
/chahr"poy"/, n. a light bedstead used in India. Also, charpai /chahr"puy"/. [1835-45; < Urdu charpai < Pers, equiv. to ch(ah)ar FOUR + pay FOOT] * * *
charqui
—charquid /chahr"kid/, adj. /chahr"kee/, n. jerky2. [ < AmerSp < Quechua ch'arki] * * *
charr
charr [chär] n. CHAR3 * * * charr (chär) n. Variant of char2. * * *
charrette
/sheuh ret"/, n. a final, intensive effort to finish a project, esp. an architectural design project, before a deadline. Also, charette. [1965-70; < F: cart, OF, equiv. to char ...
Charrière, Henri
▪ French criminal byname  Papillon   born 1906, Ardèche, France died July 29, 1973, Madrid, Spain       French criminal and prisoner in French Guiana who described a ...
Charrière, Isabelle-Agnès-Élizabeth de
▪ Swiss novelist original name  Isabella Agneta Elisabeth van Tuyll van Serooskerken , bynames  Belle van Zuylen,  Zélide , and  Abbé de la Tour  born Oct. 20, 1740, ...
charro
/chahr"oh/; Sp. /chahrdd"rddaw/, n., pl. charros /chahr"ohz/; Sp. /chahrdd"rddaws/. a Mexican horseman or cowboy, typically one wearing an elaborate outfit, often with silver ...
Charron, Pierre
▪ French theologian born 1541, Paris, Fr. died Nov. 16, 1603, Paris       French Roman Catholic theologian and major contributor to the new thought of the 17th century. ...
Charrúa
▪ people       South American Indians who inhabited the grasslands north of the Río de la Plata in a territory somewhat larger than modern Uruguay. Little is known of ...
charry
/chahr"ee/, adj., charrier, charriest. of, like, or covered with charcoal. [1780-90; CHAR1 + -Y1] * * *
chart
—chartable, adj. /chahrt/, n. 1. a sheet exhibiting information in tabular form. 2. a graphic representation, as by curves, of a dependent variable, as temperature, price, ...
chart house
Naut. a room or deckhouse for storing and working with charts, navigational instruments, etc. Also called chart room. [1890-95] * * *
chart room
Naut. See chart house. [1875-80] * * *
chart.
(in prescriptions) a paper. [ < L charta] * * *
chart. cerat.
(in prescriptions) waxed paper. [ < L charta cerata] * * *
charta
/kahr"teuh/, n., pl. chartae /-tee/. Pharm. 1. a strip of paper that is impregnated with a medicinal substance, for external application. 2. Also called chartula, powder paper. a ...
chartaceous
/kahr tay"sheuhs/, adj. of or like paper; papery. [1645-55; < L chartaceus made of papyrus. See CHARTA, -ACEOUS] * * *
charter
—charterable, adj. —charterage, n. —charterer, n. —charterless, adj. /chahr"teuhr/, n. 1. a document, issued by a sovereign or state, outlining the conditions under which ...
charter colony
Amer. Hist. a colony, as Virginia, Massachusetts, Connecticut, or Rhode Island, chartered to an individual, trading company, etc., by the British crown. Cf. royal colony (def. ...
charter member
—charter membership. one of the original members or founders of a club, organization, etc. [1905-10, Amer.] * * *
Charter Oath
or Five Articles Oath Oath issued in 1868 by Japan's Meiji emperor. One article, important in spurring the creation of a new legislative body, promised that assemblies would be ...
Charter of 1814
or Charte Constitutionnelle French constitution issued by Louis XVIII after he became king (see Bourbon Restoration). The charter, which was revised in 1830 and remained in ...
Charter of Rights
Canadian. a section of the Canadian Constitution containing a statement of the basic rights of citizens of Canada. * * *
charter party
charter (def. 5). [1530-40] * * * ▪ contract       contract by which the owner of a ship lets it to others for use in transporting a cargo. The shipowner continues to ...
charter school
charter school n. an alternative school that is founded on a charter, or contract, between a sponsoring group and a governmental unit and is funded with public money * * * (in ...
Charter Schools Gain Momentum
▪ 2004       By 2003 more than 684,000 U.S. students attended charter schools—publicly funded schools that pledged better academic results and were unencumbered by ...
chartered accountant
Brit. a member of the Institute of Accountants. Abbr.: C.A. [1850-55] * * *
chartered bank
Canadian. a private bank operating under authorization by the federal government of Canada. * * *
chartered company
Type of corporation that evolved in the 16th century in Europe. Under a charter granted by the state's sovereign authority, the company had certain rights and obligations which ...
charteredaccountant
char·tered accountant (chärʹtərd) n. Chiefly British Abbr. CA A member of one of the institutes of accountants granted a royal charter. * * *
charterer
See charter. * * *
Charterhouse
/chahr"teuhr hows'/, n., pl. Charterhouses /-how'ziz/. 1. a Carthusian monastery. 2. the hospital and charitable institution founded in London, in 1611, on the site of a ...
Charterhouse of Parma, The
/pahr"meuh/, (French, La Chartreuse de Parme) a novel (1839) by Stendhal. * * *
Charterhouse School
➡ Charterhouse * * *
Charteris, Leslie
▪ 1994       (LESLIE CHARLES BOWYER YIN), British-born writer (b. May 12, 1907, Singapore—d. April 15, 1993, Windsor, Berkshire, England), created the roguish Simon ...
chartermember
charter member n. An original member or a founder of an organization. * * *
Charters Towers
▪ Queensland, Australia       city, northeastern Queensland, Australia, in the upper Burdekin River basin. A gold boom, which began in the early 1870s, led to the ...
charterschool
charter school n. A public school operated independently of the local school board, often with a curriculum and educational philosophy different from the other schools in the ...
Chartier, Alain
▪ French author born c. 1385, Bayeux, Normandy, France died c. 1433, Avignon, Provence?       French poet and political writer whose didactic, elegant, and Latinate ...
Chartism
—Chartist, n., adj. /chahr"tiz euhm/, n. the principles or movement of a party of political reformers, chiefly workingmen, in England from 1838 to 1848: so called from the ...
chartist
/chahr"tist/, n. 1. a specialist in the stock market who studies and draws charts of trading actions. 2. a cartographer. [1960-65; CHART + -IST] * * *
chartless
/chahrt"lis/, adj. uncharted or unknown: chartless regions of space. [1800-10; CHART + -LESS] * * *
chartlet
/chahrt"lit/, n. Navig. a small chart indicating some special thing, as information relative to a radio navigational aid. [CHART + -LET] * * *
chartophylacium
/kahr'toh fi lay"sheuhm/, n., pl. chartophylacia /-sheuh/. (in a medieval church) a place for the keeping of records and documents. [ < LGk chartophylákion, equiv. to charto- ...
chartophylax
/kahr tof"euh laks'/, n. Gk. Orth. Ch. an official who serves chiefly as the chancellor and archivist of a diocese. [1875-80; < LGk, Gk, equiv. to charto- (see CHARTOPHYLACIUM + ...
Chartres
/shahr"treuh, shahrt/; Fr. /shannrdd"trddeu/, n. a city in and the capital of Eure-et-Loir, in N France, SW of Paris: cathedral. 41,251. * * * City (pop., 1999: 40,361), ...
Chartres Cathedral
Cathedral of Notre-Dame at Chartres, one of the most influential examples of High Gothic architecture. The main part of this great cathedral was built between 1194 and 1220. It ...
Chartreuse
/shahr troohz", -troohs"/; Fr. /shannrdd trdduez"/, n. 1. an aromatic liqueur, usually yellow or green, made by the Carthusian monks at Grenoble, France, and, at one time, at ...
charts
n [pl] a list of pop music which changes regularly to show which song is selling the most copies. * * *
chartula
/kahr"cheuh leuh/, n., pl. chartulae /-lee'/. Pharm. charta (def. 2). [ < NL, L, equiv. to chart(a) piece of paper (see CHARTA) + -ula -ULE] * * *
chartulary
/kahr"cheuh ler'ee/, n., pl. chartularies. 1. a register of charters, title deeds, etc. 2. an archivist. Also, cartulary. [1565-75; < ML chartularium, equiv. to L chartul(a) ...
Chartwell
a large house in Kent, England, where Winston Churchill lived from 1922 until he died. The house and gardens, which contain many objects from his life, are now open to the public ...
Charvaka
/chahr"vah keuh, -veuh-/, n. Lokayatika. * * *
charvet
/shahr"vay, shahr vay"/, n. a soft, lusterless silk or rayon tie fabric, often made with a faint stripe effect. [named after the French firm] * * *
charwoman
/chahr"woom'euhn/, n., pl. charwomen. a woman hired to do general cleaning, esp. in an office or large house. [1590-1600; CHAR3 + WOMAN] * * *
chary
—charily, adv. /chair"ee/, adj., charier, chariest. 1. cautious or careful; wary: He was chary of investing in oil wells. 2. shy; timid. 3. fastidious; choosy: She is ...
Charybdis
—Charybdian, adj. /keuh rib"dis/, n. 1. a whirlpool in the Strait of Messina off the NE coast of Sicily. Modern, Galofalo, Garofalo. 2. Class. Myth. a daughter of Gaea and ...
Chas.
Charles. * * *
chase
chase1 —chaseable, adj. /chays/, v., chased, chasing, n. v.t. 1. to pursue in order to seize, overtake, etc.: The police officer chased the thief. 2. to pursue with intent to ...
Chase
/chays/, n. 1. Mary Ellen, 1887-1973, U.S. educator, novelist, and essayist. 2. Salmon Portland /sal"meuhn/, 1808-73, U.S. jurist and statesman: secretary of the Treasury ...
Chase Manhattan Corp.
Former U.S. holding company incorporated in 1969 with the Chase Manhattan Bank as its main subsidiary. The bank itself was created in 1955 by the merger of the Bank of Manhattan ...
Chase Manhattan Corporation, The
▪ American corporation       former American holding company that merged with J.P. Morgan & Co. (JPMorgan Chase & Co.) in 2000 to form J.P. Morgan Chase & ...
chase mortise
—chase mortised. a mortise having one inclined narrow side. [1825-35] * * *
Chase, Mary Ellen
▪ American writer born Feb. 24, 1887, Blue Hill, Maine, U.S. died July 28, 1973, Northampton, Mass.  American scholar, teacher, and writer whose novels are largely concerned ...
Chase, Merrill Wallace
▪ 2005       American immunologist (b. Sept. 17, 1905, Providence, R.I.—d. Jan. 5, 2004, New York, N.Y.), discovered the importance of white blood cells in the human ...
Chase, Philander
▪ American clergyman born Dec. 14, 1775, Cornish, N.H. died Sept. 20, 1852, near Peoria, Ill., U.S.       U.S. clergyman and bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, ...
Chase, Salmon P(ortland)
born Jan. 13, 1808, Cornish Township, N.H., U.S. died May 7, 1873, New York, N.Y. U.S. antislavery leader and sixth chief justice of the U.S. (1864–73). He practiced law in ...
Chase, Salmon P.
▪ chief justice of United States in full  Salmon Portland Chase  born Jan. 13, 1808, Cornish Township, N.H., U.S. died May 7, 1873, New York City  lawyer and politician, ...
Chase, Samuel
born April 17, 1741, Princess Anne, Md. died June 19, 1811, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist. He was a member of the Maryland assembly (1764–84). An ardent patriot, he helped ...
Chase, William Merritt
born Nov. 1, 1849, Williamsburg, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 25, 1916, New York, N.Y U.S. painter and teacher. He studied in New York and for six years in Munich. Chase became the ...
Chase,Salmon Portland
Chase (chās), Salmon Portland. 1808-1873. American jurist who served as the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1864-1873). He presided over the trial of President Andrew ...
Chase,Samuel
Chase, Samuel. 1741-1811. American jurist and Revolutionary War leader who was a delegate to the Continental Congresses, signed the Declaration of Independence, and served as an ...
chaser
chaser1 /chay"seuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that chases or pursues. 2. a drink of a milder beverage taken after a drink of liquor. 3. Also called chase gun. (on a vessel) a gun ...
Chasid
—Chasidic /khah sid"ik, hah-/, adj. —Chasidism, n. /khah"sid, hah"-/; Ashk. Heb. /khaw"sid/; Seph. Heb. /khah seed"/, n., pl. Chasidim /khah sid"im, hah-/; Ashk. Heb. /khaw ...
Chasidim
Chasidim [has′ə dim΄, has′ədēm΄, hä sēd′im; ] Heb [ khä sē′dim] pl.n. sing. Chasid [has′id, hä′sid; ] Heb [ khä′sid] HASIDIM Chasidic [ha sid′ik, hä ...
chasing
/chay"sing/, n. 1. a design chased on metal. 2. an object decorated by chasing. [1825-35; CHASE3 + -ING1] * * * ▪ metalwork  metalwork technique used to define or refine the ...
Chasles
/shahl/, n. Michel /mee shel"/, 1793-1880, French mathematician. * * *
Chasles, Michel
▪ French mathematician born November 15, 1793, Épernon, France died December 18, 1880, Paris       French mathematician who, independently of the Swiss German ...
chasm
—chasmal, chasmic, adj. —chasmed, adj. —chasmy, adj. /kaz"euhm/, n. 1. a yawning fissure or deep cleft in the earth's surface; gorge. 2. a breach or wide fissure in a wall ...
chasmal
See chasm. * * *
chasmogamous
—chasmogamy, n. /kaz mog"euh meuhs/, adj. Bot. pertaining to or having pollination occur in a fully opened flower. Cf. cleistogamous. [1955-60] * * *
chassé
/sha say"/ or, esp. in square dancing, /sa shay"/, n., v., chasséd, chasséing. Dancing. n. 1. a gliding step in which one foot is kept in advance of the other. v.i. 2. to ...
chasse gardée
/shanns gannrdd day"/, pl. chasses gardées /shanns gannrdd day"/. French. 1. a private hunting preserve. 2. private grounds. * * *
chassepot
/shas"poh/; Fr. /shanns poh"/, n., pl. chassepots /-pohz/; Fr. /-poh"/. a breechloading rifle, closed with a sliding bolt, introduced into the French army after 1866. [1865-70; ...
Chassériau, Théodore
▪ French painter born Sept. 20, 1819, Samana, Dominican Republic died Oct. 8, 1856, Paris  French painter who attained some measure of success in his attempt to fuse the ...
chasseur
/sha serr"/; Fr. /shann suerdd"/, n., pl. chasseurs /-serrz"/; Fr. /-suerdd"/. 1. (in the French army) one of a body of cavalry or infantry troops equipped and trained for rapid ...
Chassid
—Chassidic /hah sid"ik, heuh-/, adj. —Chassidism, n. /khah"sid, hah"-/; Ashk. Heb. /khaw"sid/; Seph. Heb. /khah seed"/, n., pl. Chassidim /khah sid"im, hah-/; Ashk. Heb. ...
Chassidic
See Chassid. * * *
Chassidism
See Chassidic. * * *
chassis
/chas"ee, -is, shas"ee/, n., pl. chassis /chas"eez, shas"-/. 1. Auto. the frame, wheels, and machinery of a motor vehicle, on which the body is supported. 2. Ordn. the frame or ...
chaste
—chastely, adv. —chasteness, n. /chayst/, adj., chaster, chastest. 1. refraining from sexual intercourse that is regarded as contrary to morality or religion; virtuous. 2. ...
chaste tree
a shrub or small tree, Vitex agnus-castus, of southern Europe, having aromatic, hairy leaves and long clusters of fragrant, pale lilac-blue flowers. Also called hemp tree, monk's ...
Chastelard, Pierre de Bocosel de
▪ French statesman born 1540, Dauphiné, Fr. died 1563, St. Andrews, Fife, Scot.       French courtier whose passion for Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, eventually led to ...
Chastellain, Georges
▪ Burgundian author Chastellain also spelled  Chastelain   born c. 1405 or c. 1415, Aalst, Brabant died 1475, Valenciennes, Burgundian Hainaut       Burgundian ...
chastely
See chaste. * * *
chasten
—chastener, n. —chasteningly, adv. —chastenment, n. /chay"seuhn/, v.t. 1. to inflict suffering upon for purposes of moral improvement; chastise. 2. to restrain; subdue: Age ...
chastener
See chasten. * * *
chasteness
See chastely. * * *
chastetree
chaste tree n. Any of several shrubs or trees of the genus Vitex, especially two cultivated Old World species (V. agnus-castus and V. negundo), having aromatic, palmately ...
chastisable
See chastise. * * *
chastise
—chastisable, adj. —chastisement /chas"tiz meuhnt, chas tuyz"-/, n. —chastiser, n. /chas tuyz", chas"tuyz/, v.t., chastised, chastising. 1. to discipline, esp. by corporal ...
chastisement
See chastisable. * * *
chastiser
See chastisable. * * *
chastity
/chas"ti tee/, n. the state or quality of being chaste. [1175-1225; ME chastite, var. of chastete < OF < L castitat- (s. of castitas), equiv. to cast(us) CHASTE + -itat- -ITY] * ...
chastity belt
a beltlike device, worn by women esp. in the Middle Ages, designed to prevent sexual intercourse. [1930-35] * * *
chastitybelt
chastity belt n. A beltlike device of medieval times designed to prevent the woman wearing it from having sexual intercourse. * * *
chastushka
▪ literature       a rhymed folk verse usually composed of four lines. The chastushka is traditional in form but often has political or topical content. The word is a ...
chasuble
—chasubled, adj. /chaz"yeuh beuhl, -euh beuhl, chas"-/, n. Eccles. a sleeveless outer vestment worn by the celebrant at Mass. [1250-1300; < F < LL casubla, unexplained var. of ...
chat
—chattable, adj. /chat/, v., chatted, chatting, n. v.i. 1. to converse in a familiar or informal manner. v.t. 2. chat up, Chiefly Brit. a. to talk flirtatiously with. b. to ...
chat room
Computers. a branch of a computer system in which participants can engage in real-time discussions with one another. * * *
chat show
Brit. a television talk show. [1970-75] * * *
chat-thrush
▪ bird  any of the 190 species belonging to the songbird family Turdidae (order Passeriformes) that are generally smaller and have slenderer legs and more colourful plumage ...
Chât.
(esp. in Bordeaux wines) Château. * * *
chatchka
☆ chatchka or chatchke [chäch′kə ] n. Informal TCHOTCHKE * * *
château
/sha toh"/; Fr. /shah toh"/, n., pl. châteaus, châteaux /-tohz"/; Fr. /-toh"/. 1. (in France) a castle or fortress. 2. a stately residence imitating a distinctively French ...
château d'eau
/shah toh doh"/, pl. châteaux d'eau /shah toh doh"/. French. an architecturally treated fountain or cistern. [lit: castle of water] * * *
château wine
wine made at a vineyard estate in the Bordeaux region of France. [1885-90] * * *
Château-Renault, François-Louis Rousselet, marquis de
▪ French admiral born Sept. 22, 1637, Château-Renault, Fr. died Nov. 15, 1716, Paris       French admiral, afterward a marshal of France, who served with distinction ...
Château-Thierry
/sha toh"tee"euh ree/; Fr. /shah toh tye rddee"/, n. a town in N France, on the Marne River: scene of heavy fighting 1918. 13,856. * * * ▪ France       town, northeast ...
Châteaubriand
/shah toh brddee ahonn"/; Eng. /sha toh'bree ahonn"/, n. 1. François René /frddahonn swann" rddeuh nay"/, Vicomte de, 1768-1848, French author and statesman. 2. (l.c.) a thick ...
Chateaubriand, (François-Auguste-) René, viscount of
born Sept. 4, 1768, Saint-Malo, France died July 4, 1848, Paris French author and statesman. A cavalry officer at the start of the French Revolution, he refused to join the ...
Chateaubriand, François-Auguste-René, vicomte de
▪ French author born Sept. 4, 1768, Saint-Malo, France died July 4, 1848, Paris  French author and diplomat, one of his country's first Romantic writers. He was the ...
Chateaubriand, Vicomte François Renéde
Cha·teau·bri·and (shä-tō'brē-äɴʹ, shă-), Vicomte François René de. 1768-1848. French political leader, diplomat, and writer considered a forerunner of romanticism. ...
Châteauguay
/shat"euh gay', -gee/; Fr. /shah toh gay"/, n. a town in S Quebec, in E Canada, on the St. Lawrence. 36,928. * * * ▪ Quebec, Canada       town, Montérégie region, ...
Châteauguay, Battle of
(Oct. 26, 1813) Engagement in the War of 1812, in which the British compelled a U.S. force to abandon an attack on Montreal. An advance unit of 1,500 men from an invading U.S. ...
Châteauneuf-du-Pape
/shah toh nuef dyuu pannp"/, n. a dry red or white wine from the Rhone valley near Avignon. [1850-55; named after a village, center of its production] * * *
Châteauroux
/shah toh rddooh"/, n. a city in and capital of Indre, in central France. 55,629. * * * ▪ France       town, capital of Indre département, Centre région, central ...
Châteauroux, Marie-Anne de Mailly-Nesle, Duchess de
▪ French noble born Oct. 5, 1717, Paris, France died Dec. 8, 1744, Paris  mistress of Louis XV of France who used her influence with the king to promote French involvement ...
chatelain
/shat"l ayn'/; Fr. /shahteu laonn"/, n., pl. chatelains /shat"l aynz'/; Fr. /shahteu laonn"/. a castellan. [ < MF < L castellanus CASTELLAN] * * *
chatelaine
/shat"l ayn'/; Fr. /shahteu len"/, n., pl. chatelaines /shat"l aynz'/; Fr. /shahteu len"/. 1. the mistress of a castle. 2. the mistress of an elegant or fashionable household. 3. ...
Châtelet
▪ building, Paris, France       in Paris, the principal seat of common-law (common law) jurisdiction under the French monarchy from the Middle Ages to the French ...
Châtelet, Gabrielle-Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du
▪ French scientist and philosopher born Dec. 17, 1706, Paris, France died Sept. 10, 1749, Lunéville  French mathematician and physicist who was the mistress of ...
Châtellerault
▪ France       town, Vienne département, Poitou-Charentes région, west-central France. It lies north-northeast of Poitiers, on the main road from Paris to Bordeaux. ...
Chatham
/chat"euhm/, n. 1. 1st Earl of. See Pitt, William, 1st Earl of Chatham. 2. a city in N Kent, in SE England. 56,921. 3. a city in SW Ontario, in S Canada, near Lake St. Clair. ...
Chatham Islands
a group of islands in the S Pacific, E of and belonging to New Zealand. 372 sq. mi. (963 sq. km). * * * ▪ islands, New Zealand       island group in the South Pacific ...
Chatham Strait
Narrow passage, North Pacific Ocean. Extending off southeastern Alaska 150 mi (240 km) between the Admiralty and Kuiu islands on the east and the Chicagof and Baranof islands on ...
Chatham,First Earl of
Chatham,First Earl of. See Pitt, William1. * * *
Chatham-Kent
▪ Ontario, Canada formerly  Wallaceburg        municipality, southern Ontario, Canada. It lies at the confluence of the north and east branches of the Sydenham ...


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