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Слова на букву chri-de k (15990)

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Cook,Mount
Cook, Mount 1. also A·o·rang·i (ä'ō-rängʹgē). The highest mountain, 3,766.4 m (12,349 ft), of New Zealand, on South Island in the Southern Alps. 2. A peak, 4,196.8 m ...
cook-off
☆ cook-off [kook′ôf΄ ] n. a cooking contest in which participants prepare their own recipes, as for chili or barbecued spare ribs, held as a public event, usually outdoors, ...
cookbook
/kook"book'/, n. a book containing recipes and instructions for cooking. Also, Brit., cookery book. [1800-10, Amer.; COOK1 + BOOK] * * *       collection of recipes, ...
Cooke
/kook/, n. 1. (Alfred) Alastair, born 1908, English journalist and broadcaster. 2. See Coke, Sir Edward. 3. Jay, 1821-1905, U.S. financier. 4. Terence (James), Cardinal, 1921-83, ...
Cooke, (Alfred) Alistair
born Nov. 20, 1908, Manchester, Eng. British-U.S. journalist and commentator. Cooke settled in New York City after studies at the University of Cambridge and Yale and Harvard ...
Cooke, (Alfred)Alistair
Cooke (ko͝ok), (Alfred) Alistair. Born 1908. British-born American journalist and broadcaster, whose books include Around the World in 50 Years (1966) and Alistair Cooke's ...
Cooke, Alistair
▪ 2005 Alfred Cooke        British-born American broadcaster and journalist (b. Nov. 20, 1908, Salford, Greater Manchester, Eng.—d. March 30, 2004, New York, N.Y.), ...
Cooke, Henry
▪ British composer and choirmaster born c. 1616, , Lichfield?, Staffordshire, Eng. died July 13, 1672, Hampton Court, near London       composer, bass singer, and ...
Cooke, Jack Kent
▪ 1998       Canadian-born American businessman and sports team owner who amassed a fortune through ownership of broadcast media companies, newspapers, and real estate, ...
Cooke, Jay
born Aug. 10, 1821, Sandusky, Ohio, U.S. died Feb. 18, 1905, Ogontz, Pa. U.S. financier and fund-raiser for the federal government during the American Civil War. He entered a ...
Cooke, Marvel Jackson
▪ 2001       American journalist (b. 1903?, Mankato, Minn.—d. Nov. 29, 2000, New York, N.Y.), wrote for such black publications as The Crisis, the Amsterdam News, and ...
Cooke, Rose Terry
▪ American author née  Rose Terry  born Feb. 17, 1827, near Hartford, Conn., U.S. died July 18, 1892, Pittsfield, Mass.       American poet and author, remembered ...
Cooke, Sam
▪ American singer Introduction byname of  Samuel Cook  born Jan. 22, 1931, Clarksdale, Miss., U.S. died Dec. 11, 1964, Los Angeles, Calif.       American singer, ...
Cooke, Sam(uel)
born Jan. 22, 1931, Clarksdale, Miss., U.S. died Dec. 11, 1964, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. singer and songwriter. The son of a Baptist minister, Cooke started his career singing ...
Cooke, Sir William Fothergill
▪ British inventor born May 4, 1806, Ealing, Middlesex, Eng. died June 25, 1879, Surrey       English inventor who worked with Charles Wheatstone (Wheatstone, Sir ...
cooker
/kook"euhr/, n. 1. an appliance or utensil for cooking: pressure cooker. 2. a person employed in certain industrial processes, as in brewing or distilling, to operate cooking ...
cookery
/kook"euh ree/, n., pl. cookeries. 1. the art or practice of cooking. 2. a place equipped for cooking. [1350-1400; ME cokerie. See COOK1, -ERY] * * *
cookery stove
Brit. cookstove. * * *
cookerybook
cookery book n. Chiefly British A cookbook. * * *
Cookeville
/kook"vil/, n. a town in central Tennessee. 20,350. * * * ▪ Tennessee, United States       city, seat (1854) of Putnam county, on the Cumberland Plateau in ...
Cookham
a small town on the river Thames, west of London, England, where Stanley Spencer lived and set some of his best-known paintings, such as Christ Preaching at Cookham Regatta. * * *
cookhouse
/kook"hows'/, n., pl. cookhouses /-how'ziz/. a building or place for cooking, esp. a camp kitchen. [1785-95; COOK1 + HOUSE] * * *
cookie
/kook"ee/, n. 1. a small cake made from stiff, sweet dough rolled and sliced or dropped by spoonfuls on a large, flat pan (cookie sheet) and baked. 2. Informal. dear; sweetheart ...
cookie cutter
a device, usually of metal, for cutting shaped forms, as circles or stars, for cookies from dough that has been rolled flat. [1900-05, Amer.] * * *
cookie jar
1. a jar or other container for storing cookies. 2. such a container used for storing money. 3. have one's hand in the cookie jar, Informal. to take or attempt to take advantage ...
Cookie Monster
▪ television character       American television puppet character (and one of the Muppets), whose appetite for cookies is legendary. Together with such characters as ...
cookie press
a device, operating in a manner similar to that of a syringe, in which dough is inserted in a chamber and extruded, by means of a plunger, through one of a number of ...
cookie sheet
cookie sheet n. a flat metal pan on which cookies are baked * * *
cookie sheet.
See under cookie (def. 1). [1925-30] * * *
cookie-cutter
/kook"ee kut'euhr/, adj. 1. having the same configuration or look as many others of a given kind; identical: rows of cookie-cutter houses. 2. lacking individuality; stereotyped ...
cookiecutter
cookie cutter n. A device for cutting flattened cookie dough into shapes before baking. * * *
cookiesheet
cookie sheet n. A baking sheet. * * *
cooking
/kook"ing/, n. 1. the act of a person or thing that cooks. 2. the art or practice of preparing food; cookery. adj. 3. used in preparing foods: a cooking utensil. 4. fit to eat ...
CookInlet
Cook Inlet An inlet of the Gulf of Alaska in southern Alaska west of the Kenai Peninsula. It is a major fishing ground for salmon and herring and has the largest tidal bore in ...
CookIslands
Cook Islands An island group of the southern Pacific Ocean southeast of Samoa. Probably first inhabited by Polynesians more than 1,500 years ago, the islands were sighted by ...
cookoff
/kook"awf', -of'/, n. a cooking contest in which competitors gather to prepare their specialties. Also, cook-off. Cf. Bake-Off. [1955-60; COOK1 + -OFF] * * *
cookout
/kook"owt'/, n. 1. a party or entertainment featuring the cooking and eating of a meal out of doors. 2. the process of cooking and eating a meal outdoors. 3. a meal cooked and ...
cookshack
/kook"shak'/, n. a simple structure, as on a ranch or at a camp, where food is cooked. [1905-10; COOK1 + SHACK1] * * *
cookshop
/kook"shop'/, n. a place where prepared food is sold or served; restaurant. [1545-55; COOK1 + SHOP] * * *
Cookson
(1906–98) an English writer of romantic novels about life in the north-east of England. She was one of Britain’s most popular authors, and was made a dame(2) in 1993. * * *
Cookson, Catherine
▪ 1999       British author (b. June 20, 1906, Jarrow, Durham, Eng.—d. June 11, 1998, Jesmond Dene, near Newcastle upon Tyne, Eng.), penned almost 100 popular novels, ...
cookstove
/kook"stohv'/, n. a wood- or coal-burning stove for use in cooking. [1805-15; COOK1 + STOVE1] * * *
Cookstown
District (pop., 2001: 32,581), Northern Ireland. In an agricultural region, it has extensive dairy farming and cattle, poultry, and sheep raising. The town of Cookstown (pop., ...
CookStrait
Cook Strait A narrow channel separating North Island and South Island in New Zealand. It was explored by Capt. James Cook in 1770. * * *
cooktop
/kook"top'/, n. a cooking surface consisting of a flat sheet of heat-transmitting glass and ceramic material over heating elements, usually electric. [COOK1 + TOP1] * * *
Cooktown
▪ Queensland, Australia       town and port, northeastern Queensland, Australia, at the mouth of the Endeavour River, on the Coral Sea facing the Great Barrier Reef. ...
cookware
/kook"wair'/, n. pots, pans, and other cooking utensils. [1950-55; COOK1 + WARE1] * * *
Cookworthy, William
▪ English porcelain manufacturer born April 12, 1705, Kingsbridge, Devonshire, Eng. died Oct. 17, 1780, Plymouth, Devonshire       china manufacturer who first produced ...
cooky
/kook"ee/, n., pl. cookies. cookie. * * *
cool
—coolingly, adv. —coolish, adj. —coolly, adv. —coolness, n. /koohl/, adj., cooler, coolest, adv., n., v. adj. 1. moderately cold; neither warm nor cold: a rather cool ...
Cool Britannia
(infml) a phrase used to describe Britain, showing approval of the new British pop groups, artists and fashions of the late 1990s. It became a popular phrase partly because it ...
cool jazz
a restrained, fluid modern-jazz style of the 1950s, marked by intricate harmonic structures, de-emphasized dynamics, and carefully controlled phrasing and ensemble playing, often ...
cool-down
cool-down [ko͞ol′doun΄] n. the act or an instance of gradually slowing or cooling down after vigorous exercise * * *
cool-headed
—cool-headedly, adv. —coolheadedness, n. /koohl"hed"id/, adj. not easily excited; calm. [1770-80] * * *
coolabah
/kooh"leuh bah'/, n. any of several Australian gum trees of the genus Eucalyptus, esp. E. microtheca, abundant along riverbanks and having sickle-shaped leaves and wrinkled, ...
coolamon
/kooh"leuh mon', -meuhn/, n. a basinlike dish made from wood or bark by Australian Aborigines. [1840-50; < Kamilaroi gulaman] * * *
coolant
/kooh"leuhnt/, n. 1. a substance, usually a liquid or a gas, used to reduce the temperature of a system below a specified value by conducting away the heat produced in the ...
Coolbrith, Ina Donna
▪ American poet original name  Josephine Donna Smith  born March 10, 1841, Nauvoo, Ill., U.S. died Feb. 29, 1928, Berkeley, Calif.       popular American poet of ...
cooldown
cool·down (ko͞olʹdoun') n. A period following strenuous physical activity in which stretching or milder exercise is performed to allow the body gradually to return to ...
cooler
/kooh"leuhr/, n. 1. a container or apparatus, as an insulated chest, in which something may be cooled or kept cool. 2. anything that cools or makes cool; refrigerant. 3. an air ...
Cooley
/kooh"lee/, n. Charles Horton /hawr"tn/, 1864-1929, U.S. author and pioneer in the field of sociology. * * *
Cooley's anemia
thalassemia. [1930-35; named after Thomas Benton Cooley (1871-1945), U.S. pediatrician, who reported incidences of the disease] * * *
Cooley'sanemia
Coo·ley's anemia (ko͞oʹlēz) n. A usually fatal form of thalassemia in which normal hemoglobin is absent, characterized by severe anemia, enlargement of the heart, liver, and ...
Cooley, Charles Horton
born Aug. 17, 1864, Ann Arbor, Mich., U.S. died May 8, 1929, Ann Arbor U.S. sociologist. The son of an eminent Michigan jurist, Cooley taught sociology at the University of ...
Cooley, Denton A
▪ American surgeon born Aug. 22, 1920, Houston, Texas, U.S.       U.S. surgeon and educator chiefly noted for heart-transplant operations. He was also the first to ...
Coolgardie
▪ Western Australia, Australia       town, south central Western Australia. It was founded in 1892 with the discovery of quartz gold in the vicinity, which marked the ...
coolheaded
coolheaded [ko͞ol′hed′id] adj. not easily flustered; calm * * *
Coolidge
/kooh"lij/, n. Calvin, 1872-1933, 30th president of the U.S. 1923-29. * * * (as used in expressions) Adams John Coolidge Coolidge John Calvin Coolidge William David * * *
Coolidge tube
Physics. a cathode ray tube, used for x-ray production, in which a beam of thermoelectrons is produced by heating a wire cathode. [1910-15, Amer.; named after William D. Coolidge ...
Coolidge, (John) Calvin
born July 4, 1872, Plymouth, Vt., U.S. died Jan. 5, 1933, Northampton, Mass. 30th president of the U.S. (1923–29). He practiced law in Massachusetts from 1897 and served as ...
Coolidge, (John)Calvin
Coo·lidge (ko͞oʹlĭj), (John) Calvin. 1872-1933. The 30th President of the United States (1923-1929), who took office after the death of Warren G. Harding. A strong supporter ...
Coolidge, Calvin
▪ president of United States in full  John Calvin Coolidge  born July 4, 1872, Plymouth, Vermont, U.S. died January 5, 1933, Northampton, Massachusetts  30th president of ...
Coolidge, Elizabeth Penn Sprague
▪ American philanthropist née  Elizabeth Penn Sprague  born Oct. 30, 1864, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Nov. 4, 1953, Cambridge, Mass.       American philanthropist, ...
Coolidge, Grace
▪ American first lady née  Grace Anna Goodhue  born January 3, 1879, Burlington, Vermont, U.S. died July 8, 1957, Northampton, Massachusetts  American first lady ...
Coolidge, Julian Lowell
▪ American mathematician and educator born Sept. 28, 1873, Brookline, Mass., U.S. died March 5, 1954, Cambridge, Mass.       U.S. mathematician and educator who ...
Coolidge, Martha
▪ American filmmaker born Aug. 17, 1946, New Haven, Conn., U.S.       American filmmaker who achieved commercial success directing films often underlain by a feminist ...
Coolidge, William Augustus Brevoort
▪ British historian and mountaineer born Aug. 28, 1850, New York City died May 8, 1926, Grindelwald, Switz.       American-born British historian and mountaineer who, ...
Coolidge, William D
▪ American engineer and chemist born Oct. 23, 1873, Hudson, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1975, Schenectady, N.Y.       American engineer and physical chemist whose ...
Coolidge, William D(avid)
born Oct. 23, 1873, Hudson, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1975, Schenectady, N.Y. U.S. engineer and physical chemist. He taught at MIT (1897, 1901–05) before joining the General ...
Coolidge,Grace Goodhue
Coo·lidge (ko͞oʹlĭj), Grace Goodhue. 1879-1957. First lady of the United States (1923-1929) as the wife of President Calvin Coolidge. She was known for her outgoing ...
coolie
/kooh"lee/, n. Offensive. 1. an unskilled laborer, esp. formerly in China and India. 2. an unskilled laborer employed cheaply, esp. one brought from Asia. adj. 3. Informal. ...
coolie hat
a wide, conical straw hat worn esp. as a shield against the sun. [1935-40] * * *
cooling board
South Midland and Southern U.S. Older Use. a plank for laying out a corpse. [1850-55] * * *
cooling degree-day
a degree-day above the standard temperature of 75°F (24°C), used in estimating the energy requirements for air conditioning and refrigeration. Cf. growing degree-day, heating ...
cooling system
Apparatus used to keep the temperature of a structure or device from exceeding limits imposed by needs of safety and efficiency. In a mechanical transmission, the oil loses its ...
cooling tower
Energy. a usually cylindrical structure, sometimes of very great size, in which heat is extracted from water that has been used for cooling, as in a nuclear reactor. [1900-05] * ...
cooling-off period
a period arranged by agreement to allow for negotiation and an abatement of tension between disputing parties: The law calls for a cooling-off period before a strike can ...
coolingtower
cool·ing tower (ko͞oʹlĭng) n. A large tower or similar structure typically attached to a power plant through which water is circulated to lower its temperature by partial ...
coolish
See cool. * * *
cooljazz
cool jazz n. A style of jazz that emerged by the early 1950s, characterized by rhythmic and emotional restraint, extensive legato passages, and a reflective character.   [On the ...
coolly
See coolish. * * *
coolness
See coolish. * * *
coolth
/koohlth/, n. Usually Facetious. coolness. [1540-50; COOL + -TH1] * * *
cooly
/kooh"lee/, n., pl. coolies., adj. coolie. * * *
coom
/koohm/, n. Chiefly Scot. and North Eng. 1. soot; coal dust; smut. 2. dust, esp. sawdust or dust from a gristmill. 3. grease from bearings, axles, etc. Also, coomb. [1580-90; ...
Cooma
▪ New South Wales, Australia       town, southeastern New South Wales, Australia, on the rolling Monaro grassland plateau. Established in 1849, it derives its name from ...
Coomaraswamy, Ananda Kentish
▪ Indian art historian born Aug. 22, 1877, Colombo, Ceylon died Sept. 9, 1947, Needham, Mass., U.S.       pioneer historian of Indian art and foremost interpreter of ...
coomb
coomb1 /koohm, kohm/, n. combe. Also, coombe. coomb2 /koohm/, n. coom. * * *
Coombs, Robin
▪ 2007 Robert Royston Amos Coombs        British immunologist (b. Jan. 9, 1921, London, Eng.—d. Jan. 25, 2006, Cambridge, Eng.), devised the Coombs test, a diagnostic ...
coon
/koohn/, n. 1. raccoon. 2. Slang (disparaging and offensive). a black person. 3. a rustic or undignified person. [1735-45, Amer.; aph. form] * * *
coon cat
cacomistle. [1900-05] * * *
coon cheese
a sharp crumbly cheddar cheese that has dark outer surfaces, usually enclosed in black wax. [1950-55] * * *
coon dog
any dog trained to hunt raccoons. [1825-35, Amer.] * * *
Coon Rapids
a city in E Minnesota. 35,826. * * *
coon's age
Informal. a long time: I haven't seen you in a coon's age! [1835-45, Amer.] * * *
coon'sage
coon's age (ko͞onz) n. Slang A long time. * * *
Coon, Carleton
▪ American anthropologist born June 23, 1904, Wakefield, Mass., U.S. died June 6, 1981, Gloucester, Mass.       American anthropologist who made notable contributions ...
Coonabarabran
▪ New South Wales, Australia       town, east-central New South Wales, Australia. It lies along the Castlereagh River, near the Pilliga Scrub district. Surveyed in 1859 ...
Coonamble
▪ New South Wales, Australia       town, north-central New South Wales, Australia. It lies along the Castlereagh River, at the western edge of the Pilliga Scrub ...
coonass
/koohn"as'/, n. Vulgar, Disparaging, and Offensive. (chiefly in Louisiana and Southeast Texas) a Cajun. [‡1960-65; prob. alter., by folk etym., of LaF, F conasse a contemptuous ...
cooncan
/koohn"kan'/, n. Cards. a variety of rummy for two players. [1885-90, Amer.; popular alter. of CONQUIAN] * * *
cooner
/kooh"neuhr/, n. See coon dog. [COON + -ER1] * * *
Cooney, Barbara
▪ 2001       American children's author and illustrator (b. Aug. 6, 1917, New York, N.Y.—d. March 10, 2000, Portland, Maine), was a literary star in the world of ...
coonhound
/koohn"hownd'/, n. 1. See coon dog. 2. a hound of any of several breeds developed esp. for hunting raccoons. Cf. black and tan coonhound, bluetick, Plott hound, redbone, Walker ...
CoonRapids
Coon Rapids (ko͞on) A city of eastern Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Population: 52,978. * * *
coonskin
/koohn"skin'/, n. 1. the pelt of a raccoon. 2. an article of clothing made of coonskin, esp. a cap with a tail. adj. 3. made of coonskin: a coonskin cap. [1615-25, Amer.; COON + ...
coontail
      aquatic plant of the genus Ceratophyllum in the angiosperm family Ceratophyllaceae. * * *
coontie
/koohn"tee/, n. 1. either of two arrowroots, Zamia integrifolia or Z. floridana, of Florida, having a short trunk, pinnate leaves, and cones: Z. floridana is an endangered ...
coony
/kooh"nee/, adj., coonier, cooniest. sharp-witted and shrewd; wily; canny. [1900-05, Amer.; COON + -Y1] * * *
coop
/koohp, koop/, n. 1. an enclosure, cage, or pen, usually with bars or wires, in which fowls or other small animals are confined for fattening, transportation, etc. 2. any small ...
Coop Himmelblau
▪ European architectural firm also rendered  Coop Himmelb(l)au        avant-garde architecture firm that rose to prominence in the 1980s and '90s. The two central ...
coop.
cooperative. Also, co-op. * * *
cooper
/kooh"peuhr, koop"euhr/, n. 1. a person who makes or repairs casks, barrels, etc. v.t. 2. to make or repair (casks, barrels, etc.). 3. to furnish or fix (usually fol. by ...
Cooper
/kooh"peuhr, koop"euhr/, n. 1. Anthony Ashley. See Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley Cooper. 2. Hugh Lincoln, 1865-1937, U.S. hydraulic engineer. 3. James Fenimore /fen"euh mawr', ...
Cooper Basin
▪ oil fields, South Australia, Australia       arid topographical depression and site of natural gas and oil fields in northeastern South Australia. It underlies the ...
Cooper City
a town in SE Florida. 10,140. * * *
Cooper Creek
or Barcoo River Intermittent stream, east-central Australia. Rising as the Barcoo on the northern slopes of the Warrego Range in Queensland, it is joined by the Alice River, ...
Cooper Union
▪ college, New York City, New York, United States in full  Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art   tuition-free undergraduate college in New York (New York ...
Cooper's hawk
a North American hawk, Accipiter cooperii, having a bluish-gray back and a rusty breast. [1820-30, Amer.; named after William Cooper (d. 1864), American ornithologist] * * *
Cooper'shawk
Coo·per's hawk (ko͞oʹpərz, ko͝opʹərz) n. A short-winged hawk (Accipiter cooperii) widespread throughout North America, having a dark back, a long tail, and a rusty-barred ...
Cooper, Alexander
▪ English painter baptized Dec. 11, 1609, London, Eng. died 1660, Stockholm, Swed.       English miniaturist, elder brother of Samuel Cooper (Cooper, ...
Cooper, Alfred Duff, 1st Viscount Norwich of Aldwick
born Feb. 22, 1890 died Jan. 1, 1954 British politician. He served as a Conservative in Parliament (1924–29 and 1931–45). After a stint as secretary of state for war ...
Cooper, Alice
▪ American rock group  American hard rock band that shared its name with its leader. In addition to producing a string of hits in the 1970s, Alice Cooper was among the first ...
Cooper, Art
▪ 2004       American magazine editor (b. Oct. 15, 1937, New York, N.Y.—d. June 9, 2003, New York City), as editor (1983–2003) of Gentlemen's Quarterly (GQ), created ...
Cooper, Cynthia
▪ American athlete born April 14, 1963, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.    American basketball player who was the first Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the Women's National Basketball ...
Cooper, Dame Gladys
born Dec. 18, 1888, Lewisham, London, Eng. died Nov. 17, 1971, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire British actress. After her London debut in 1906, she performed in musicals and ...
Cooper, Dame Whina
▪ 1995       New Zealand Maori activist (b. Dec. 9, 1895, Panguru, Northland region, N.Z.—d. March 26, 1994, Panguru), campaigned throughout her life for land rights ...
Cooper, Gary
orig. Frank James Cooper born May 7, 1901, Helena, Mont., U.S. died May 13, 1961, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. film actor. He moved to Hollywood in 1924 and played minor roles in ...
Cooper, Giles
▪ British writer in full  Giles Stannus Cooper   born Aug. 9, 1918, Carrickmines, County Dublin, Ire. died Dec. 2, 1966, London, Eng.       one of the most original ...
Cooper, Gordon, Jr.
▪ 2005       American astronaut (b. March 6, 1927, Shawnee, Okla.—d. Oct. 4, 2004, Ventura, Calif.), made history as one of the most enduring names in the U.S. space ...
Cooper, Harry
▪ 2001 “Lighthorse Harry”        American professional golfer (b. Aug. 6, 1904, England—d. Oct. 18, 2000, White Plains, N.Y.) was ranked 13th on the all-time ...
Cooper, James Fenimore
born Sept. 15, 1789, Burlington, N.J., U.S. died Sept. 14, 1851, Cooperstown, N.Y. The first major U.S. novelist. Cooper grew up in a prosperous family in the settlement of ...
Cooper, John M.
▪ American anthropologist in full  John Montgomery Cooper  born Oct. 28, 1881, Rockville, Md., U.S. died May 22, 1949, Washington, D.C.  U.S. Roman Catholic priest, ...
Cooper, Kent
▪ American journalist born March 22, 1880, Columbus, Indiana, U.S. died January 31, 1965, West Palm Beach, Florida       American journalist who achieved prominence as ...
Cooper, L. Gordon, Jr.
▪ American astronaut in full  Leroy Gordon Cooper, Jr.  born March 6, 1927, Shawnee, Oklahoma, U.S. died October 4, 2004, Ventura, California  one of the original team of ...
Cooper, Leon N(eil)
born Feb. 28, 1930, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. physicist. He taught at Ohio State University (1954–58) and Brown University (from 1958). For his role in developing the BCS ...
Cooper, Leon N.
▪ American physicist born Feb. 28, 1930, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American physicist and winner of the 1972 Nobel Prize for Physics, along with John Bardeen (Bardeen, ...
Cooper, Malcolm
▪ 2002       British marksman (b. Dec. 20, 1947, Camberley, Surrey, Eng.—d. June 9, 2001, Eastergate, West Sussex, Eng.), won consecutive Olympic gold medals in rifle ...
Cooper, Peter
born Feb. 12, 1791, New York, N.Y., U.S. died April 4, 1883, New York City U.S. inventor. Cooper became involved with the Canton Iron Works, built to supply the Baltimore and ...
Cooper, Samuel
▪ English artist born c. 1608 died May 5, 1672, London, Eng.  painter, one of the finest English miniaturists (miniature painting), and perhaps the most celebrated of all ...
Cooper, Sarah Brown Ingersoll
▪ American educator née  Sarah Brown Ingersoll  born Dec. 12, 1835, Cazenovia, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 10/11, 1896, San Francisco, Calif.       American educator, a ...
Cooper, Sir Astley Paston, 1st Baronet
▪ English surgeon born Aug. 23, 1768, Brooke, Norfolk, Eng. died Feb. 12, 1841, London  English surgeon who, in 1816, was the first to tie the abdominal aorta as a means of ...
Cooper, Susan Augusta Fenimore
▪ American writer and philanthropist born April 17, 1813, Mamaroneck, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 31, 1894, Cooperstown, N.Y.       19th-century American writer and ...
Cooper, Susan Vera Barker
▪ 1996       ("SUSIE"), British ceramic designer whose elegant but utilitarian household pottery was prized by royalty, private collectors, and museums (b. Oct. 29, ...
Cooper, Thomas
▪ British writer born March 20, 1805, Leicester, Leicestershire, Eng. died July 15, 1892, Lincoln, Lincolnshire       English writer whose political epic The Purgatory ...
Cooper,Gary
Coo·per (ko͞oʹpər, ko͝opʹər), Gary. 1901-1961. American actor who gained fame for his portrayals of strong, quiet heroes. He won an Academy Award for Sergeant York (1941) ...
Cooper,James Fenimore
Cooper, James Fenimore. 1789-1851. American novelist who is best remembered for his novels of frontier life, such as The Last of the Mohicans (1826). * * *
Cooper,Peter
Cooper, Peter. 1791-1883. American manufacturer, inventor, and philanthropist who built the first American locomotive and founded Cooper Union (1859) in New York City, which ...
Cooper-Hewitt
▪ museum, New York City, New York, United States in full  Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum        museum in New York (New York City), N.Y., noted for its ...
cooperage
/kooh"peuhr ij, koop"euhr-/, n. 1. the work or business of a cooper. 2. the place where such work is carried on. 3. articles made by a cooper, as barrels or casks. 4. the price ...
cooperate
—cooperator, co-operator, n. /koh op"euh rayt'/, v.i., cooperated, cooperating. 1. to work or act together or jointly for a common purpose or benefit. 2. to work or act with ...
cooperation
—cooperationist, co-operationist, n. /koh op'euh ray"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit; joint action. 2. more or ...
cooperationist
See cooperation. * * *
cooperative
—cooperatively, co-operatively /koh op"euhr euh tiv lee, -op"reuh tiv-, -op"euh ray'tiv-/, adv. —cooperativeness, co-operativeness, n. /koh op"euhr euh tiv, -op"reuh tiv, ...
cooperative bank.
See savings and loan association. * * *
cooperative credit union.
See credit union. * * *
cooperative store
1. a retail store owned and managed by consumer-customers who supply the capital and share in the profits by patronage dividends. 2. a store operated by a farmers' cooperative ...
cooperatively
See cooperative. * * *
cooperativeness
See cooperatively. * * *
cooperativity
/koh op'euhr euh tiv"i tee/, n. Biochem. the increase or decrease in the rate of interaction between a reactant and a protein as the reactant concentration increases. Also, ...
cooperator
See cooperate. * * *
coopered joint
Joinery. a joint made between pieces in a polygonal or curved construction, using either splines or dowels. * * *
cooperite
/kooh"peuh ruyt'/, n. a mineral, sulfide and arsenide of platinum, occurring in igneous rocks in the form of steel-gray crystals. [after R. A. Cooper, who described it in 1920; ...
Cooperstown
/kooh"peuhrz town', koop"euhrz-/, n. a town in central New York: location of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. 2342. * * * ▪ New York, United ...
coopery
/kooh"peuh ree, koop"euh-/, n., pl. cooperies. 1. the work of a cooper. 2. a cooper's shop. 3. articles made by a cooper. [1325-75; ME couperie. See COOPER, -Y3] * * *
coopt
—cooptation, co-optation, cooption, co-option /koh op"sheuhn/, n. —cooptative, co-optative /koh op"teuh tiv/, cooptive, co-optive, adj. /koh opt"/, v.t. 1. to elect into a ...
coordinate
—coordinately, co-ordinately, adv. —coordinateness, co-ordinateness, n. —coordinative, co-ordinative, /koh awr"dn ay'tiv, -awr"dn euh-/, adj. adj., n. /koh awr"dn it, -dn ...
coordinate bond
Chem. a type of covalent bond between two atoms in which the bonding electrons are supplied by one of the two atoms. Also called dative bond. [1935-40] * * *
coordinate clause
Gram. one of two or more clauses of equal status in a sentence, esp. when joined by a coordinating conjunction, as either The sun came out or the ice started to melt in The sun ...
coordinate geometry.
See analytic geometry. [1815-25] * * *
coordinate paper.
See graph paper. * * *
coordinate system
Math. any method that uses numbers to represent a point, line, or the like. * * * Arrangement of reference lines or curves used to identify the location of points in space. In ...
coordinatebond
coordinate bond n. A covalent chemical bond between two atoms that is produced when one atom shares a pair of electrons with another atom lacking such a pair. Also called ...
Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time n. UNIVERSAL TIME as periodically adjusted to coordinate with atomic clocks: it serves as the official international basis for STANDARD TIME: abbrev. ...
coordinateduniversal time
co·or·di·nat·ed universal time (kō-ôrʹdn-ā'tĭd) n. Abbr. UTC Universal time, taking into account the addition or omission of leap seconds by atomic clocks each year to ...
coordinately
See coordinate. * * *
coordinateness
See coordinately. * * *
coordinatesystem
coordinate system n. A method of representing points in a space of given dimensions by coordinates. * * *
coordinating conjunction
Gram. a conjunction that connects two grammatical elements of identical construction, as and in Sue and Andrea or or in He can't decide if he should stay or go. Also, coordinate ...
coordinatingconjunction
co·or·di·nat·ing conjunction (kō-ôrʹdn-ā'tĭng) n. A conjunction that connects two identically constructed or syntactically equal grammatical elements, such as or in They ...
coordination
/koh awr'dn ay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or state of coordinating or of being coordinated. 2. proper order or relationship. 3. harmonious combination or interaction, as of functions ...
coordination complex
coordination complex n. one of a number of complex compounds in which an atom or group of atoms is bound to the central atom by a shared pair of electrons supplied by the ...
coordination compound
Chem. complex (def. 10). Also called coordination complex. * * * ▪ chemistry Introduction  any of a class of substances with chemical structures in which a central metal ...
coordination number
Crystall. the number of anions surrounding a single cation in a stable crystal structure. [1905-10] * * * ▪ chemistry also called  Ligancy,         the number of ...
Coordination numbers and geometries of metal cyanide complexes
▪ Table Coordination numbers and geometries of metal cyanide complexes electron configuration* metal ion cyanide complex geometry total number of valence ...
coordinationcompound
coordination compound n. A chemical compound formed by joining independent molecules or ions usually to a central metallic atom by coordinate bonds. Also called coordination ...
coordinative
See coordinately. * * *
coordinator
/koh awr"dn ay'teuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that coordinates. 2. Gram. a coordinating conjunction. Also, co-ordinator. [1860-65; COORDINATE + -OR2] * * *
Coorg
/koorg/, n. a former province in SW India; now part of Karnataka state. 1593 sq. mi. (4126 sq. km). Also, Kurg. * * * ▪ district, India also called ...
Coornhert, Dirck Volckertszoon
▪ Dutch author born 1522, Amsterdam died Oct. 29, 1590, Gouda, Neth.       Dutch poet, translator, playwright, and moralist who set down Humanist values for the first ...
Coors, Joseph
▪ 2004       American businessman and political patron (b. Nov. 12, 1917, Golden, Colo.—d. March 15, 2003, Rancho Mirage, Calif.), with his brother William expanded ...
Coors{™}
an expensive US beer produced by the Adolph Coors Company of Denver, Colorado. It is advertised as special because it is made with water from the Rocky Mountains. The company ...
Coos
/koohs/, n. a language of a group of American Indians indigenous to the coast of Oregon. * * * ▪ county, New Hampshire, United States       county, northern New ...
Coos Bay
a town in SW Oregon. 14,424. * * * formerly Marshfield Bay Town (pop., 2000: 15,374), southwestern Oregon, U.S. Located on Coos Bay, an inlet of the Pacific, it was settled as ...
Coosa
Coo·sa (ko͞oʹsə) A river rising in northwest Georgia and flowing about 460 km (286 mi) southwest through eastern Alabama to join the Tallapoosa River near Montgomery and ...
Coosa River
River, in Georgia and Alabama, U.S. Formed by the confluence of the Etowah and Oostanaula rivers at Rome, Ga. , it flows south for 286 mi (460 km) through the Appalachian Ridge ...
coot
/kooht/, n. 1. any aquatic bird of the genus Fulica, as F. americana, of North America, and F. atra, of the Old World, characterized by lobate toes and short wings and tail. 2. ...
Cootamundra
▪ New South Wales, Australia       town, south-central New South Wales, Australia. Located in the Western Slopes region of the fertile Riverina, it was founded in 1830 ...
cootch
/koohch/, n. cooch. * * *
Coote, Sir Eyre
▪ British soldier born 1726, Kilmallock, County Limerick, Ire. died April 28, 1783, Madras [now Chennai], India       tempestuous yet effective British soldier who ...
cooter
/kooh"teuhr/, n. Chiefly Southern U.S. any of several large aquatic turtles of the southern U.S. and northern Mexico. [1820-30; said to be < Bambara, Malinke kuta turtle (with ...
cootie
cootie1 /kooh"tee/, n. Informal. a louse, esp. one affecting humans, as the body louse, head louse, or pubic louse. Also, cooty. [1910-15; perh. < Malay kutu biting body louse, ...
cooty
cooty1 /kooh"tee/, n., pl. cooties. cootie1. cooty2 /kooh"tee/, n., pl. cooties. Scot. cootie2. * * *
Coover
/kooh"veuhr/, n. Robert (Lowell), born 1932, U.S. novelist and playwright. * * *
Coover, Robert
▪ American author in full  Robert Lowell Coover   born Feb. 4, 1932, Charles City, Iowa, U.S.       American writer of avant-garde fiction, plays, poetry, and essays ...
cooze
/koohz/, n. Slang (vulgar). vagina. Also, coozie /kooh"zee/. [of obscure orig.] * * *
cop
cop1 /kop/, v.t., copped, copping. Informal. 1. to catch; nab. 2. to steal; filch. 3. to buy (narcotics). 4. cop a plea, a. to plead guilty or confess in return for receiving a ...
COP
Thermodynam. See coefficient of performance. * * *
cop-out
/kop"owt'/, n. Informal. 1. an act or instance of copping out; reneging; evasion: The governor's platform was a cop-out. 2. a person who cops out: Everyone helped as they had ...
Cop.
1. Copernican. 2. Coptic. * * *
cop.
1. copper. 2. copyright; copyrighted. * * *
Copacabana
Southeastern district of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Occupying a narrow strip of land between the mountains and the sea, it is a popular resort area, famous for its magnificent ...
copacetic
/koh'peuh set"ik, -see"tik/, adj. Slang. fine; completely satisfactory; OK. Also, copasetic, copesetic. [1915-20, Amer.; of obscure orig; popular attributions of the word to LaF, ...
copaiba
/koh pay"beuh, -puy"beuh/, n. an oleoresin obtained from several tropical, chiefly South American trees belonging to the genus Copaifera, of the legume family, used chiefly in ...
copaiba oil
a colorless, yellowish, or bluish liquid having a pepperlike odor and bitter taste, obtained from copaiba by distillation: used chiefly in the manufacture of perfumes and ...
copal
/koh"peuhl, -pal/, n. a hard, lustrous resin obtained from various tropical trees and used chiefly in making varnishes. [1570-80; < MexSp < Nahuatl copalli] * * * ▪ ...
copalm
☆ copalm [kō′päm΄ ] n. 〚< MexSp copalme〛 1. a brownish, aromatic resin obtained from the sweet gum tree 2. the tree * * *
Copán
Sp. /kaw pahn"/, n. See Santa Rosa de Copán. * * * Ruined ancient Maya city, Honduras. It lies near the Guatemalan border on the bank of the Copán River, about 35 mi (55 km) ...
coparcenary
/koh pahr"seuh ner'ee/, n. Law. a special kind of joint ownership arising esp. under common law upon the descent of real property to several female heirs. Also, coparceny /koh ...
coparcener
/koh pahr"seuh neuhr/, n. a member of a coparcenary. [1400-50; late ME. See CO-, PARCENER] * * *
copartner
—copartnership, n. /koh pahrt"neuhr, koh"pahrt'-/, n. a partner or associate, as in a business. [1495-1505; CO- + PARTNER] * * *
copartnership
See copartner. * * *
copasetic
/koh'peuh set"ik, -see"tik/, adj. copacetic. * * *
copay
/koh"pay'/, n. a small fixed amount required by a health insurer to be paid by the insured for each outpatient visit or drug prescription. Also called copayment ...
copayment
/koh pay"meuhnt/, n. a contributory payment by an employer, usually matching that of an employee, toward the payment of health-care or life-insurance premiums, a pension fund, ...
COPD
See chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. * * *
cope
cope1 —copeless, adj. —copelessness, n. /kohp/, v., coped, coping. v.i. 1. to struggle or deal, esp. on fairly even terms or with some degree of success (usually fol. by ...
Cope, Edward Drinker
born , July 28, 1840, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died April 12, 1897, Philadelphia U.S. paleontologist. He devoted 22 years to exploration and research, especially in the ...
Cope, Jack
▪ South African writer byname of  Robert Knox Cope   born June 3, 1913, Mooi River, South Africa died May 1991, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, England       South African ...
Copeau, Jacques
▪ French actor and director born Feb. 4, 1879, Paris, Fr. died Oct. 20, 1949, Beaune       French actor, literary critic, stage director, and dramatic coach who led a ...
copeck
/koh"pek/, n. kopeck. * * *
Copehan
/koh pay"euhn, -heuhn/, n. Wintun. [1891; < Patwin Cop-éh a village name (properly ko·pe lit., root) + -AN] * * *
Copeland
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       borough (district), administrative county of Cumbria, historic county of Cumberland, northwestern England, in the ...
Copeland, Charles Townsend
▪ American educator born April 27, 1860, Calais, Maine, U.S. died July 24, 1952, Waverly, Mass.       American journalist and teacher, who was preeminent as a mentor of ...
Copeland, Johnny Clyde
▪ 1998       American blues singer and guitarist who performed for over 25 years before becoming nationally and internationally known in the 1980s; his performance on ...
copemate
/kohp"mayt'/, n. Obs. 1. an antagonist; opponent. 2. a comrade; partner. Also, copesmate. [1555-65; COPE1 + MATE1] * * *
copen
/koh"peuhn/, n. 1. Also called copen blue. a medium blue color. adj. 2. Also, copen-blue. of the color copen. [1915-20; shortening of COPENHAGEN] * * *
Copenhagen
/koh'peuhn hay"geuhn, -hah"-, koh"peuhn hay'-, -hah'-/, n. a seaport in and the capital of Denmark, on the E coast of Zealand. 802,391; with suburbs, 1,380,204. Danish, ...
copenhagen blue
gray-blue. * * *
Copenhagen University Botanical Garden
▪ garden, Copenhagen, Denmark Danish  Københavns Universitet Botanisk Have        one of the notable botanical gardens of Europe. Founded in 1759 on part of the ...
Copenhagen Zoo
▪ zoo, Copenhagen, Denmark formally   Copenhagen Zoological Garden , Danish  Københavns Zoologisk Have        zoological garden founded in 1859 in Copenhagen. ...
Copenhagen, Battle of
(April 2, 1801) British naval victory over Denmark in the Napoleonic Wars. The armed-neutrality treaty of 1794 between Denmark and Sweden, to which Russia and Prussia adhered in ...
Copenhagen, Treaty of
▪ Denmark, Norway, and Sweden [1660]       (1660), treaty between Sweden and Denmark-Norway that concluded a generation of warfare between the two powers. Together with ...
copepod
/koh"peuh pod'/, n. any of numerous tiny marine or freshwater crustaceans of the order (or subclass) Copepoda, lacking compound eyes or a carapace and usually having six pairs of ...
coper
/koh"peuhr/, n. Brit. a horse dealer. Also called horse-coper. [1600-10; COPE4 + -ER1] * * *
Copernican
/koh perr"ni keuhn, keuh-/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to Copernicus or his theories. 2. important and radically different; thoroughgoing: a Copernican revolution in modern ...
Copernican system
Copernican system n. the theory of Copernicus that the planets revolve around the sun and that the turning of the earth on its axis from west to east accounts for the apparent ...
Copernicus
/koh perr"ni keuhs, keuh-/, n. 1. Nicolaus /nik'euh lay"euhs/, (Mikolaj Kopernik), 1473-1543, Polish astronomer who promulgated the now accepted theory that the earth and the ...
Copernicus, Nicolaus
Polish Mikołaj Kopernik born Feb. 19, 1473, Toruń, Pol. died May 24, 1543, Frauenburg, East Prussia Polish astronomer. He was educated at Kraków, Bologna, and Padua, where ...
Copernicus,Nicolaus
Co·per·ni·cus (kō-pûrʹnə-kəs, kə-), Nicolaus. 1473-1543. Polish astronomer who advanced the theory that Earth and the other planets revolve around the sun, disrupting ...
copesetic
/koh'peuh set"ik, -see"tik/, adj. copacetic. * * *
copestone
/kohp"stohn'/, n. 1. the top stone of a building or other structure. 2. a stone used for or in coping. 3. the crown or completion; finishing touch. [1560-70; COPE2 + STONE] * * *
Copht
/kopt/, n. Copt. * * *
copiable
See copyable. * * *


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