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Слова на букву chri-de k (15990)

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Cukor,George
Cu·kor (kyo͞oʹkər, -kôr, ko͞oʹ-), George. 1899-1983. American filmmaker whose works include Little Women (1933), The Philadelphia Story (1940), and My Fair Lady (1964), ...
cul-de-sac
/kul"deuh sak", -sak', kool"-/; Fr. /kyuudeu sannk"/, n., pl. culs-de-sac /kulz"deuh sak", -sak', koolz"-/; Fr. /kyuudeu sannk"/. 1. a street, lane, etc., closed at one end; ...
Cūlavaṃsa
▪ historical chronicle       (Pāli: “Little Chronicle”), Ceylonese historical chronicle that details the history of the island of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) from about ...
Culbertson
/kul"beuhrt seuhn/, n. Ely /ee"lee/, 1893-1955, U.S. authority on contract bridge. * * *
Culbertson, Ely
▪ American bridge player born July 22, 1891, Ploeşti, Rom. died Dec. 27, 1955, Brattleboro, Vt., U.S.       American authority on the card game known as Contract ...
Culbertson,Ely
Cul·bert·son (kŭlʹbərt-sən), Ely. 1891-1955. American contract bridge authority whose dominance of international matches and several books, including The Contract Bridge ...
culch
/kulch/, n. 1. the stones, old shells, etc., forming an oyster bed and furnishing points of attachment for the spawn of oysters. 2. the spawn of oysters. 3. Also, sculch. Eastern ...
culdoscope
culdoscope [kul′də skōp΄] n. an endoscope used in a medical examination of the ovary, uterus, etc., inserted through the upper vaginal wall into the pelvic cavity culdoscopy ...
Culebra Cut
/kooh lay"breuh/; Sp. /kooh le"vrddah/ former name of Gaillard Cut. * * *
Culebra Island
▪ island, Puerto Rico Spanish  Isla De Culebra,         island, Puerto Rico, 20 miles (30 km) east of Puerto Rico island and 15 miles west of St. Thomas, Virgin ...
CulebraCut
Cu·le·bra Cut (ko͞o-lāʹbrə) See Gaillard Cut. * * *
CulebraPeak
Culebra Peak A mountain, 4,284.3 m (14,047 ft) high, in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of extreme south-central Colorado. * * *
culet
/kyooh"lit/, n. 1. Jewelry. a small face forming the bottom of a faceted gem. 2. Armor. a piece below the backplate, composed of lames and corresponding to the fauld in ...
culex
—culicine /kyooh"leuh suyn', -sin/, adj. /kyooh"leks/, n., pl. culices /-leuh seez'/. any of numerous mosquitoes constituting the widespread genus Culex, distinguished by the ...
Culhane, James
▪ 1997       ("SHAMUS"), U.S. pioneering animator who gave life to the characters in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Walt Disney's first feature-length cartoon (b. Nov. ...
Culiacán
/kooh'lyah kahn"/, n. a city in and capital of Sinaloa state, in NW Mexico. 358,800. * * * City (pop., 2000: 540,823), capital of Sinaloa state, western Mexico. Located on the ...
culicid
/kyooh lis"id/, n. 1. any of numerous dipterous insects of the family Culicidae, comprising the mosquitoes. adj. 2. belonging or pertaining to the culicids. [ < NL Culicidae, ...
culinarian
/kyooh'leuh nair"ee euhn, kul'euh-/, n. a cook or chef. [1605-15; CULINARY + -AN] * * *
culinarily
See culinary. * * *
culinary
—culinarily, adv. /kyooh"leuh ner'ee, kul"euh-/, adj. of, pertaining to, or used in cooking or the kitchen. [1630-40; < L culinarius of the kitchen, equiv. to culin(a) kitchen, ...
Culion
/kooh lyawn"/, n. an island of the Philippines, in the W part of the group, N of Palawan. 150 sq. mi. (389 sq. km). * * *
Culion Island
▪ island, Philippines       island, one of the Calamian Group (q.v.), west-central Philippines. The island has an area of 150 square miles (389 square km) and is the ...
cull
—culler, n. /kul/, v.t. 1. to choose; select; pick. 2. to gather the choice things or parts from. 3. to collect; gather; pluck. n. 4. act of culling. 5. something culled, esp. ...
Cullen
/kul"euhn/, n. Countee /kown tay", -tee"/, 1903-46, U.S. poet. * * * (as used in expressions) Bryant William Cullen Cullen Countee Cullen William * * *
Cullen, Countée
Cul·len (kŭlʹən), Countée. 1903-1946. American poet whose collections Colors (1926) and Copper Sun (1927) established him as a leading figure of the Harlem Renaissance. * * ...
Cullen, Paul
▪ Irish cardinal born April 29, 1803, near Ballitore, County Kildare, Ire. died Oct. 24, 1878, Dublin       archbishop of Dublin who became the first Irish ...
Cullen, William
born April 15, 1710, Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scot. died Feb. 5, 1790, Kirknewton, near Edinburgh Scottish physician and professor. One of the first to teach in English rather ...
cullender
/kul"euhn deuhr/, n. colander. * * *
culler
See cull. * * *
cullet
/kul"it/, n. broken or waste glass suitable for remelting. [1810-20; var. of collet < It colletto glass blower's term, lit., little neck. See COL, -ET] * * *
Cullinan diamond
the largest diamond ever found, weighing about 620 grams. It was named after Thomas Cullinan, the head of the Transvaal mine in which it was found in 1905. Two years later the ...
cullion
/kul"yeuhn/, n. Archaic. a base or vile fellow. [1350-1400; ME culyon, coil(i)on < AF, MF coillon worthless fellow, lit., testicle < VL *coleonem, acc. of *coleo, for L colei ...
cullis
/kul"is/, n. a gutter, as at the eaves of a roof. [1830-40; < F coulisse COULISSE; cf. PORTCULLIS] * * *
Cullis, Stanley
▪ 2002 “Stan”        British association football (soccer) player and manager (b. Oct. 25, 1915, Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, Eng.—d. Feb. 27, 2001, Great Malvern, ...
Cullman
/kul"meuhn/, n. a city in N Alabama. 13,084. * * * ▪ Alabama, United States       city, seat (1877) of Cullman county, on Brindley Mountain, northern Alabama, U.S., ...
Cullman, Joseph Frederick, III
▪ 2005       American executive (b. April 9, 1912, New York, N.Y.—d. April 30, 2004, New York City), oversaw the growth of Philip Morris, Inc., into one of the world's ...
Culloden
a battle (1746) fought on Culloden Moor near Inverness in Scotland between the mainly English soldiers led by the Duke of Cumberland (the second son of King George II) and the ...
Culloden, Battle of
(April 16, 1746) Last battle of the "Forty-five Rebellion," which took place on a moor near Inverness, Scot. The Jacobites, under Charles Edward, the Young Pretender, were ...
CullodenMoor
Cul·lo·den Moor (kə-lŏdʹn, -lôdʹn) A moor in northern Scotland east of Inverness. It was the site of the final defeat of the Highland Jacobites by English forces (April ...
Cullum, Jamie
▪ 2007       There was no rest for jazzy British pop singer Jamie Cullum in 2006. The young star was too busy crisscrossing the world, playing more than 140 mostly ...
cully
/kul"ee/, n., pl. cullies, v., cullied, cullying. n. 1. Archaic. a dupe. 2. Slang. fellow; companion. v.t. 3. to trick; cheat; dupe. [1655-65; perh. shortening of CULLION] * * *
culm
culm1 /kulm/, n. 1. coal dust; slack. 2. anthracite, esp. of inferior grade. [1300-50; ME colme, prob. equiv. to col COAL + -m suffix of uncert. meaning (cf. -m in OE faethm ...
Culmann, Carl
▪ German engineer born July 10, 1821, Bergzabern, Rhenish Palatinate [Germany] died Dec. 9, 1881, Zürich, Switz.       engineer whose graphic methods of structural ...
culmicolous
/kul mik"euh leuhs/, adj. (of a fungus) growing on grass culms. [CULM2 + -I- + -COLOUS] * * *
culmiferous
/kul mif"euhr euhs/, adj. having or producing culms. [1695-1705; CULM2 + -I- + -FEROUS] * * *
culminant
/kul"meuh neuhnt/, adj. culminating; topmost. [1595-1605; < ML culminant- (s. of culminans), prp. of culminare to come to a peak. See CULMINATE, -ANT] * * *
culminate
/kul"meuh nayt'/, v., culminated, culminating. v.i. 1. to reach the highest point, summit, or highest development (usually fol. by in). 2. to end or arrive at a final stage ...
culmination
/kul'meuh nay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or fact of culminating. 2. that in which anything culminates; the culminating position or stage; highest point; acme. 3. Astron. the position ...
culminative
/kul"meuh nay'tiv/, adj. Ling. (of stress or tone accent) serving to indicate the number of independent words or the important points in an utterance by assigning prominence to ...
culotte
culotte [ko͞o′lät΄, kyo͞o′lät΄] n. 〚Fr < cul, posterior: see CULET〛 [often pl.] a women's or girls' garment consisting of trousers made full in the legs to resemble ...
culottes
/kooh lots", kyooh-/, n.pl. women's trousers, usually knee-length or calf-length, cut full to resemble a skirt. Also, culotte. [1835-45; < F: lit., breeches, equiv. to cul rump + ...
culpa
/kul"peuh/; Lat. /kool"pah/, n., pl. culpae /-pee/; Lat. /-puy/. 1. Roman and Civil Law. negligence; neglect (distinguished from dolus): One is not always liable before law for ...
culpability
See culpable. * * *
culpable
—culpability, culpableness, n. —culpably, adv. /kul"peuh beuhl/, adj. deserving blame or censure; blameworthy. [1275-1325; ME < L culpabilis, equiv. to culpa(re) to hold ...
culpably
See culpability. * * *
Culpeper
/kul"pep'euhr/, n. Thomas (2nd Baron Culpeper of Thoresway), 1635-89, English colonial governor of Virginia 1680-83. * * *
Culpeper's Rebellion
(1677–79) Popular uprising in the Albemarle section of Carolina to protest the British Navigation Acts, which denied the colonists free markets. Led by John Culpeper and ...
Culpeper,Lord Thomas
Cul·pep·er (kŭlʹpĕp'ər), Lord Thomas. 1635-1689. English colonial administrator who served as governor of Virginia (1677-1683). * * *
culprit
/kul"prit/, n. 1. a person or other agent guilty of or responsible for an offense or fault. 2. a person arraigned for an offense. [1670-80; traditionally explained as cul (repr. ...
Culross
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       small, picturesque royal burgh (town) in Fife council area and historic county, Scotland, on the northern bank of the Firth of Forth. ...
culs-de-sac
culs-de-sac (kŭlzʹdĭ-săkʹ, ko͝olz'-) n. A plural of cul-de-sac. * * *
cult
—cultic, cultual /kul"chooh euhl/, adj. —cultish, adj. /kult/, n. 1. a particular system of religious worship, esp. with reference to its rites and ceremonies. 2. an instance ...
cult of personality
a cult promoting adulation of a living national leader or public figure, as one encouraged by Stalin to extend his power. [‡1965-70; trans. of Russ kul't líchnosti] * * *
cultch
/kulch/, n., v.t. culch. * * *
cultellus
/kul tel"euhs/, n., pl. cultelli /-tel"uy/. Zool. a sharp, knifelike structure, as the mouthparts of certain bloodsucking flies. [1895-1900; < L: dim. of culter knife, COLTER; ...
culteranismo
▪ Spanish literature       in Spanish literature, an esoteric style of writing that attempted to elevate poetic language and themes by re-Latinizing them, using ...
culti
cul·ti (kŭlʹtī) n. A plural of cultus. * * *
cultic
See cult. * * *
cultigen
/kul"teuh jeuhn, -jen'/, n. a cultivated plant of unknown or obscure taxonomic origin. [1920-25; CULTI(VATED) + -GEN] * * *
cultish
See cultic. * * *
cultism
—cultist, n. /kul"tiz euhm/, n. the practices and devotions of a cult. [1830-40; CULT + -ISM] * * *
cultist
See cultic. * * *
cultivability
See cultivable. * * *
cultivable
—cultivability, n. —cultivably, adv. /kul"teuh veuh beuhl/, adj. capable of being cultivated. Also, cultivatable /kul"teuh vay'teuh beuhl/. [1675-85; CULTIV(ATE) + -ABLE] * * ...
cultivar
/kul"teuh vahr', -veuhr/, n. a variety of plant that originated and persisted under cultivation. [1920-25; b. CULTIVATED and VARIETY] * * * Any variety of a plant, originating ...
cultivatable
See cultivate. * * *
cultivate
/kul"teuh vayt'/, v.t., cultivated, cultivating. 1. to prepare and work on (land) in order to raise crops; till. 2. to use a cultivator on. 3. to promote or improve the growth of ...
cultivated
/kul"teuh vay'tid/, adj. 1. prepared and used for raising crops; tilled: cultivated land. 2. produced or improved by cultivation, as a plant. 3. educated; refined; cultured: ...
cultivated mushroom
cultivated mushroom n. an edible mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) with a pale cap and stalk: the most common food mushroom * * *
cultivation
/kul'teuh vay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or art of cultivating. 2. the state of being cultivated. 3. culture; refinement. [1690-1700; CULTIVATE + -ION] Syn. 3. gentility, breeding, ...
Cultivation System
or Culture System Revenue system in the Dutch East Indies (modern Indonesia) that forced farmers to pay revenue to The Netherlands in the form of export crops or compulsory ...
cultivator
/kul"teuh vay'teuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that cultivates. 2. an implement drawn between rows of growing plants to loosen the earth and destroy weeds. [1655-65; CULTIVATE + ...
cultrate
/kul"trayt/, adj. sharp-edged and pointed, as a leaf. Also, cultrated. [1855-60; < L cultratus knife-shaped, equiv. to cultr- (s. of culter) knife + -atus -ATE1] * * *
cultural
—culturally, adv. /kul"cheuhr euhl/, adj. of or pertaining to culture or cultivation. [1865-70; CULTURE + -AL1] * * * (as used in expressions) cultural anthropology Cultural ...
cultural anthropology
—cultural anthropologist. the branch of anthropology dealing with the origins, history, and development of human culture, and including in its scope the fields of archaeology, ...
cultural evolution
▪ social science Introduction       the development of one or more cultures from simpler to more complex forms. The subject may be viewed as a unilinear phenomenon that ...
cultural exchange
an exchange of students, artists, athletes, etc., between two countries to promote mutual understanding. * * *
cultural lag
Sociol. slowness in the rate of change of one part of a culture in relation to another part, resulting in a maladjustment within society, as from the failure of the nonmaterial ...
cultural pluralism
Sociol. 1. a condition in which minority groups participate fully in the dominant society, yet maintain their cultural differences. 2. a doctrine that a society benefits from ...
cultural relativity
Sociol. a concept that cultural norms and values derive their meaning within a specific social context. Also called cultural relativism. Cf. ethnocentrism (def. 2). * * *
Cultural Revolution
a radical sociopolitical movement in China c1966-71, led by Mao Zedong and characterized by military rule, terrorism, purges, restructuring of the educational system, etc. Cf. ...
cultural sociology
the study of the origins and development of societal institutions, norms, and practices. * * *
cultural studies
Interdisciplinary field concerned with the role of social institutions in the shaping of culture. Originally identified with the Center for Contemporary Cultural Studies at the ...
cultural universal
a cultural pattern extant in every known society. * * *
culturalanthropology
cultural anthropology n. The scientific study of the development of human cultures based on ethnologic, ethnographic, linguistic, social, and psychological data and methods of ...
culturalize
—culturalization, n. /kul"cheuhr euh luyz'/, v.t., culturalized, culturalizing. Anthropol. to expose or subject to the influence of culture. Also, esp. Brit., ...
culturally
See cultural. * * *
CulturalRevolution
Cul·tur·al Revolution (kŭlʹchər-əl) n. A comprehensive reform movement in China initiated by Mao Zedong in 1965 to eliminate counterrevolutionary elements in the country's ...
culturati
/kul'cheuh rah"tee, -ray"tuy/, n.pl. people deeply interested in cultural and artistic matters. [1970-75; CULTURE + -ati, patterned on LITERATI] * * *
culture
/kul"cheuhr/, n., v., cultured, culturing. n. 1. the quality in a person or society that arises from a concern for what is regarded as excellent in arts, letters, manners, ...
culture area
Anthropol. a region having a distinct pattern of culture. * * * ▪ anthropological concept Introduction also called  cultural area,  culture province , or ...
culture center
Anthropol. the part of a culture area in which the most distinctive traits of the area are concentrated. * * *
culture complex
Sociol. a group of culture traits all interrelated and dominated by one essential trait: Nationalism is a culture complex. * * *
culture contact
Contact between peoples with different cultures, usually leading to change in one or both systems. Forms of culture contact traditionally include acculturation, assimilation, ...
culture diffusion
Anthropol., Sociol. the spreading out of culture, culture traits, or a cultural pattern from a central point. Cf. diffusionism. [1965-70] * * *
culture factor
Anthropol., Sociol. culture as a causative agent, esp. in contrast to biological factors. * * *
culture hero
1. a mythical or mythicized historical figure who embodies the aspirations or ideals of a society. 2. a mythical figure considered by a people to have furnished it the means of ...
culture lag.
See cultural lag. * * *
culture medium
Bacteriol. medium (def. 9). [1880-85] * * *
culture pattern
Anthropol. a group of interrelated culture traits of some continuity. [1930-35] * * *
culture shock
—culture-shocked, adj. a state of bewilderment and distress experienced by an individual who is suddenly exposed to a new, strange, or foreign social and cultural ...
culture specific syndrome
Psychiatry. a behavioral disturbance in a specific cultural setting that is identified and named by the cultural group itself. * * *
Culture System
▪ Indonesian history also called  Cultivation System , Dutch  Cultuurstelsel        revenue system in the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) that forced farmers to pay ...
culture trait
Anthropol. any trait of human activity acquired in social life and transmitted by communication. * * *
culture vulture
Slang. a person with an excessive or pretentious interest in the arts. [1945-50] * * *
culture-and-personality studies
▪ anthropological school also called  psychological anthropology         branch of cultural anthropology that seeks to determine the range of personality types ...
cultured
/kul"cheuhrd/, adj. 1. enlightened; refined. 2. artificially nurtured or grown: cultured bacteria. 3. cultivated; tilled. [1735-45; CULTURE + -ED2] Syn. 1. polished, ...
cultured pearl
a pearl induced to form by placement of a grain of sand or another irritating object within the shell of a pearl oyster or mussel. Also, culture pearl. [1920-25] * * * ▪ ...
culturemedium
culture medium n. A liquid or gelatinous substance containing nutrients in which microorganisms or tissues are cultivated for scientific purposes. * * *
cultureshock
culture shock n. A condition of confusion and anxiety affecting a person suddenly exposed to an alien culture or milieu. * * *
culturist
/kul"cheuhr ist/, n. 1. a cultivator. 2. an advocate or devotee of culture. [1820-30; CULTURE + -IST] * * *
culturology
/kul'cheuh rol"euh jee/, n. a branch of anthropology concerned with the study of cultural institutions as distinct from the people who are involved in them. [1935-40, Amer.; ...
cultus
cultus1 /kul"teuhs/, n., pl. cultuses, culti /-tuy/. a cult. [1630-40; < L; see CULT] cultus2 /kul"teuhs/, n., pl. cultuses, (esp. collectively) cultus. lingcod. Also called ...
cultus coolee
/kul"teuhs kooh"lee/, Chiefly Western Canadian. a purposeless or recreational stroll or ride. [1890-95; < Chinook Jargon; see CULTUS2, COULEE] * * *
culver
/kul"veuhr/, n. Brit. Dial. a dove or pigeon. [bef. 900; ME; OE culfer, culfre < VL *columbra, for L columbula, equiv. to columb(a) dove + -ula -ULE] * * *
Culver City
/kul"veuhr/ a city in SW California, W of Los Angeles. 38,139. * * * ▪ California, United States       city, Los Angeles county, California, U.S. Culver City is ...
culver hole
Masonry. a hole for receiving a timber. [1555-65] * * *
Culver's root
1. the root of a tall plant, Veronicastrum virginicum, of the figwort family, having spikelike clusters of small, white, tubular flowers, used in medicine as a cathartic and ...
Culver'sroot
Cul·ver's root (kŭlʹvərz) n. 1. A perennial herb (Veronicastrum virginicum) native to eastern North America, having whorled leaves and small white or pinkish flowers in ...
CulverCity
Cul·ver City (kŭlʹvər) A city of southern California, a residential suburb of Los Angeles. Its motion-picture industry dates to c. 1915. Population: 38,793. * * *
culverin
/kul"veuhr in/, n. 1. medieval form of musket. 2. a kind of heavy cannon used in the 16th and 17th centuries. [1400-50; late ME < MF coulevrine < L colubrina, fem. of colubrinus ...
culvert
/kul"veuhrt/, n. a drain or channel crossing under a road, sidewalk, etc.; sewer; conduit. [1765-75; orig. uncert.] * * *
Culverwel, Nathanael
▪ British philosopher born 1618?, London, Eng. died 1651?       English empiricist philosopher who specialized in the application of reason to ethical problems, ...
cum
cum1 /kum, koom/, prep. with; combined with; along with (usually used in combination): My garage-cum-workshop is well equipped. [1580-90; < L: with, together with ...
cum dividend
Stock Exchange. with a previously declared dividend included in the price of a stock (distinguished from ex dividend). Abbr.: cum d, cum div [1875-80] * * *
cum grano salis
cum grano salis [koom grä′nō sä′lis] 〚ModL, with a grain of salt〛 not too literally; with some reservations * * *
cum laude
/koom low"day, -deuh, -dee; kum law"dee/ with honor: used in diplomas to grant the lowest of three special honors for grades above the average. Cf. magna cum laude, summa cum ...
cum.
cumulative. * * *
Cumae
—Cumaean, adj. /kyooh"mee/, n. an ancient city in SW Italy, on the coast of Campania: believed to be the earliest Greek colony in Italy or in Sicily. * * * Ancient city west ...
Cumaean
Cumaean [kyo͞o mē′ən] adj. 1. of Cumae 2. of or relating to a famous sibyl of Cumae: cf. SIBYLLINE BOOKS * * *
Cumalı, Necati
▪ Turkish author born 1921, Flórina, Greece died Nov. 10, 2001, Istanbul, Tur.       Turkish writer and translator whose notable contributions to his native literature ...
Cuman
▪ people Hungarian  Kun,         member of a nomadic Turkish people, comprising the western branch of the Kipchak confederation until the Mongol invasion (1237) ...
Cumaná
/kooh'mah nah"/, n. a seaport in N Venezuela. 119,751. * * * ▪ Venezuela  city, capital of Sucre estado (state), northeastern Venezuela. It lies on the Manzanares River 1 ...
Cumanagoto
Cu·ma·na·go·to (ko͞o-mä'nä-gōʹtō) n. pl. Cumanagoto or Cu·ma·na·go·tos 1. A member of an extinct South American Indian people of northeast Venezuela. 2. The ...
cumarin
/kooh"meuh rin/, n. Chem. coumarin. * * *
cumarone
/kooh"meuh rohn', kyooh"-/, n. Chem. coumarone. * * *
cumber
—cumberer, n. —cumberment, n. /kum"beuhr/, v.t. 1. to hinder; hamper. 2. to overload; burden. 3. to inconvenience; trouble. n. 4. a hindrance. 5. something that cumbers. 6. ...
cumberer
See cumber. * * *
Cumberland
/kum"beuhr leuhnd/, n. 1. a former county in NW England, now part of Cumbria. 2. a town in N Rhode Island. 27,069. 3. a city in NW Maryland, on the Potomac River. 25,933. 4. a ...
Cumberland Gap
a pass in the Cumberland Mountains at the junction of the Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee boundaries. 1315 ft. (401 m) high. * * * ▪ mountain pass, United States  natural ...
Cumberland Gap National Historical Park
National historical park, Tennessee, U.S. Created in 1940 to preserve the Cumberland Gap, a natural pass at 1,640 ft (500 m) through the Cumberland Plateau, it includes the ...
Cumberland House
▪ historical site, Canada       unincorporated settlement and historic site on the south shore of Cumberland Lake (formerly Pine Island Lake, part of the Saskatchewan ...
Cumberland Island National Seashore
▪ barrier island, Georgia, United States       barrier island of saltwater marshes, mud flats, beaches, and forests in southeastern Georgia, U.S., just north of the ...
Cumberland Islands
▪ archipelago, Queensland, Australia       archipelago in the Great Barrier Reef, off the eastern coast of Queensland, Australia. The group comprises more than 70 inner ...
Cumberland Mountains
a plateau largely in Kentucky and Tennessee, a part of the Appalachian Mountains: highest point, ab. 4000 ft. (1220 m). Also called Cumberland Plateau. * * *
Cumberland Narrows
▪ gorge, United States       scenic gorge 1,000 feet (305 metres) deep in Allegany county, northwestern Maryland, U.S., just northwest of Cumberland city. Cut by Wills ...
Cumberland Plateau
Cumberland Plateau or Cumberland Mountains 〚after William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland: see CUMBERLAND (the river)〛 division of the W Appalachians, extending from S W.Va. to ...
Cumberland Presbyterian Church
▪ American religion       denomination organized in 1810 by a group of Presbyterians on the Kentucky–Tennessee frontier who left the Presbyterian Church in ...
Cumberland River
River, Kentucky and Tennessee, U.S. It rises in southeastern Kentucky and flows west, looping through northern Tennessee before returning north to join the Ohio River after a ...
Cumberland Road
▪ highway, United States also called  National Road,         first federal highway in the United States and for several years the main route to what was then the ...
Cumberland sausage
n [U, C] a very long, spicy pork sausage traditionally made in the north of England. It is usually twisted into a spiral before cooking. * * *
Cumberland Sound
Inlet of Davis Strait, Nunavut, Canada. Indenting the southeastern coast of Baffin Island, it is 170 mi (270 km) long and 100 mi (160 km) wide. John Davis, an English navigator, ...
Cumberland wrestling
▪ sport  form of wrestling developed in northern England and southern Scotland, also called the North Country style. The wrestlers stand chest to chest, each grasping the ...
Cumberland, Richard
▪ British bishop and philosopher born July 15, 1631, London, Eng. died Oct. 9, 1718, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire  English theologian, Anglican bishop, and philosopher of ...
Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of
▪ British general born April 15, 1721, London, Eng. died Oct. 31, 1765, London       British general, nicknamed “Butcher Cumberland” for his harsh suppression of ...
CumberlandGap
Cum·ber·land Gap (kŭmʹbər-lənd) A natural passage through the Cumberland Plateau near the junction of the Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee borders. It was used by Daniel ...
CumberlandPlateau
Cumberland Plateau or Cumberland Mountains The southwest section of the Appalachian Mountains, extending northeast to southwest from southern West Virginia through Virginia, ...
CumberlandRiver
Cumberland River A river rising in southeast Kentucky and flowing about 1,105 km (687 mi) in a winding course southwest into northern Tennessee then northwest to the Ohio River ...
Cumbernauld
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       “new town,” North Lanarkshire council area, historic county of Dunbartonshire, central Scotland. Cumbernauld was designated a new ...
cumbersome
—cumbersomely, adv. —cumbersomeness, n. /kum"beuhr seuhm/, adj. 1. burdensome; troublesome. 2. unwieldy; clumsy. [1325-75; ME cummyrsum. See CUMBER, -SOME1] Syn. 1. heavy, ...
cumbersomely
See cumbersome. * * *
cumbia
cum·bi·a (ko͞omʹbē-ə) n. 1. A Latin-American dance originating among African slave populations on Colombia's Atlantic coast and characterized by short sliding steps. 2. ...
Cumbraes, the
▪ islands, Scotland, United Kingdom       two islands in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland. They lie between the island of Bute to the west and the coast of the Scottish ...
cumbrance
/kum"breuhns/, n. 1. trouble; bother. 2. burden; encumbrance. [1275-1325; ME combraunce, aph. var. of ACOMBRAUNCE defeat, harassment; see ENCUMBRANCE] * * *
Cumbres de Monterrey National Park
▪ park, Mexico       park in the Sierra Madre Oriental, in Nuevo León state, northeastern Mexico. Established in 1939, it has a total area of 952 square miles (2,465 ...
Cumbria
/kum"bree euh/, n. a county in NW England. 473,800; 2659 sq. mi. (6886 sq. km). * * * Administrative county (pop., 2001: 487,607), northwestern England. Extending along the ...
Cumbrian
See Cumbria. * * *
CumbrianMountains
Cumbrian Mountains A range of hills in northwest England rising to 979.1 m (3,210 ft) at Scafell Pike. * * *
cumbrous
—cumbrously, adv. —cumbrousness, n. /kum"breuhs/, adj. cumbersome. [1325-75; ME cumberous. See CUMBER, -OUS] * * *
cumbrously
See cumbrous. * * *
cumbrousness
See cumbrously. * * *
cumene
/kyooh"meen/, n. Chem. a colorless and toxic liquid, C9H12, soluble in alcohol: used as a solvent and in the production of phenol and acetone. Also called isopropylbenzene. [ < F ...
cumin
/kum"euhn, koom"-/ or, often, /kooh"meuhn, kyooh"-/, n. 1. a small plant, Cuminum cyminum, of the parsley family, bearing aromatic, seedlike fruit, used in cookery and ...
cumlaude
cum lau·de (ko͝om louʹdə, louʹdē, kŭm lôʹdē) adv. & adj. With honor. Used to express academic distinction: graduated cum laude; 25 cum laude graduates.   [Probably ...
cummer
/kum"euhr/, n. Scot. 1. a godmother. 2. a girl or woman. [1275-1325; ME commare godmother < AF, MF commere < LL commater, equiv. to L com- COM- + mater MOTHER] * * *
cummerbund
/kum"euhr bund'/, n. a wide sash worn at the waist, esp. a horizontally pleated one worn with a tuxedo. Also, kummerbund. [1610-20; < Hindi kamarband loin-band < Pers] * * *
Cummings
/kum"ingz/, n. Edward Estlin /est"lin/, ("e e cummings"), 1894-1962, U.S. poet. * * *
Cummings, Bruce Frederick
▪ British author pseudonym  Wilhelm Nero Pilate Barbellion   born Sept. 7, 1889, Barnstaple, Devon, Eng. died Oct. 22, 1919, Gerard's Cross, ...
Cummings, Constance
▪ 2006 Constance Halverstadt  American-born actress (b. May 15, 1910, Seattle, Wash.—d. Nov. 23, 2005, Oxfordshire, Eng.), enchanted audiences in Britain and the U.S. ...
Cummings, E(dward) E(stlin)
born Oct. 14, 1894, Cambridge, Mass., U.S. died Sept. 3, 1962, North Conway, N.H. U.S. poet and painter. Cummings attended Harvard University. His experience in World War I of ...
Cummings, E.E.
▪ American poet in full  Edward Estlin Cummings   born October 14, 1894, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. died September 3, 1962, North Conway, New Hampshire  American poet ...
Cummings, Robert
▪ American actor in full  Charles Clarence Robert Orville Cummings   born June 10, 1908, Joplin, Mo., U.S. died Dec. 2, 1990, Woodland Hills, Calif.       American ...
Cummings,Edward Estlin
Cum·mings (kŭmʹĭngz), Edward Estlin. Usually styled e. e. cummings. 1894-1962. American writer. Best known for his lyrical and typographically eccentric poetry, he also ...
cummingtonite
/kum"ing teuh nuyt'/, n. an amphibole mineral, magnesium-iron silicate, similar in composition to anthophyllite but richer in iron. [named after Cummington, Mass., where it is ...
Cummins, Albert Baird
▪ United States politician born Feb. 15, 1850, Carmichaels, Pa., U.S. died July 30, 1926, Des Moines, Iowa  American lawyer, state governor, and U.S. senator, a noted ...
Cummins, George David
▪ American clergyman born Dec. 11, 1822, near Smyrna, Del., U.S. died June 26, 1876, Lutherville, Md.  dissident American clergyman who founded and became the first bishop of ...
Cummins, Maria Susanna
▪ American author born April 19, 1827, Salem, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 1, 1866, Dorchester, Mass.       American author, most remembered for her sentimental first novel, ...
Cumnock
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       small burgh (town) and agricultural centre in East Ayrshire council area, historic county of Ayrshire, Scotland. The town was formerly ...
Cumont, Franz
▪ Belgian archaeologist born Jan. 3, 1868, Aalst, Belg. died Aug. 25, 1947, Brussels       Belgian archaeologist and philologist who strongly influenced the modern ...
cumquat
/kum"kwot/, n. kumquat. * * *
cumshaw
/kum"shaw/, n. a present; gratuity; tip. [1810-20; < dial. Chin (Xiamen) kam sia, equiv. to Chin gân xiè grateful thanks] * * *
cumul-
cumul- pref. Variant of cumulo-. * * *
cumulate
—cumulately, adv. v. /kyooh"myeuh layt'/; adj. /kyooh"myeuh lit, -layt'/, v., cumulated, cumulating, adj. v.t. 1. to heap up; amass; accumulate. adj. 2. heaped up. [1525-35; < ...
cumulation
/kyooh'myeuh lay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of cumulating; accumulation. 2. a heap; mass. [1610-20; CUMULATE + -ION] * * *
cumulative
—cumulatively, adv. —cumulativeness, n. /kyooh"myeuh leuh tiv, -lay'tiv/, adj. 1. increasing or growing by accumulation or successive additions: the cumulative effect of one ...
cumulative evidence
1. evidence of which the parts reinforce one another, producing an effect stronger than any part by itself. 2. Chiefly Law. a. testimony repetitive of testimony given earlier. b. ...
cumulative scoring
Duplicate Bridge. a method of scoring in which the score of a partnership is taken as the sum of their scores on all hands played. * * *
cumulative voting
a system that gives each voter as many votes as there are persons to be elected from one representative district, allowing the voter to accumulate them on one candidate or to ...
cumulatively
See cumulative. * * *
cumulativeness
See cumulatively. * * *
cumulativevoting
cumulative voting n. A system of voting in which each voter is given as many votes as there are positions to be filled and allowed to cast those votes for one candidate or ...
cumuli
cu·mu·li (kyo͞omʹyə-lī') n. Plural of cumulus. * * *
cumuli-
cumuli- pref. Variant of cumulo-. * * *
cumuliform
/kyooh"myeuh leuh fawrm'/, adj. having the appearance or character of cumulus clouds. [1880-85; < NL cumuli-, comb. form of CUMULUS + -FORM] * * *
cumulo-
a combining form representing cumulus in compound words. [see CUMULUS, -O-] * * *
cumulonimbus
/kyooh'myeuh loh nim"beuhs/, n., pl. cumulonimbus. a cloud of a class indicative of thunderstorm conditions, characterized by large, dense towers that often reach altitudes of ...
cumulous
cumulous [kyo͞o′myə ləs] adj. of, or having the form of, a cumulus, esp. the cloud * * * cu·mu·lous (kyo͞oʹmyə-ləs) adj. Resembling a pile or mound; heaped up. * * *
cumulus
/kyooh"myeuh leuhs/, n., pl. cumulus. 1. a heap; pile. 2. a cloud of a class characterized by dense individual elements in the form of puffs, mounds, or towers, with flat bases ...
cun
▪ brushstroke Chinese“wrinkles”Wade-Giles romanization  ts'un        in Chinese painting, brushstrokes or dabs that give texture, or surface, to the pictorial ...
Cuna
/kooh"neuh/, n., pl. Cunas, (esp. collectively) Cuna for 1. 1. a member of a group of American Indian people inhabiting settlements on the Isthmus of Panama and islands in the ...
Cunard
(1787–1865 ) a Canadian ship owner who in 1839 started a service carrying passengers across the Atlantic between Britain and North America. The journey then took about two ...
Cunard Line
➡ Cunard * * *
Cunard, Sir Samuel, 1st Baronet
born Nov. 21, 1787, Halifax, Nova Scotia died April 28, 1865, Kensington, London, Eng. Canadian-British merchant and shipowner. He became prosperous in commerce and began ...
Cunaxa
/kyooh nak"seuh/, n. an ancient town in Babylonia, near the Euphrates: famous battle between Cyrus the Younger and Artaxerxes II in 401 B.C. * * *
Cunaxa, Battle of
▪ Middle Eastern history       (401 BC), battle fought between Cyrus The Younger, satrap of Anatolia, and his brother Artaxerxes II over the Achaemenian throne. ...
cunctation
—cunctatious, cunctatory /kungk"teuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, cunctative /kungk"teuh tiv/, adj. /kungk tay"sheuhn/, n. delay; tardiness. [1575-85; < L cunctation- (s. of cunctatio) ...
cunctative
See cunctation. * * *
cunctator
—cunctatorship, n. /kungk tay"teuhr/, n. a procrastinator; delayer. [1645-55; < L, equiv. to cuncta(ri) to delay + -tor -TOR] * * *
cuneal
/kyooh"nee euhl/, adj. wedgelike; wedge-shaped. [1570-80; < L cune(us) a wedge + -AL1] * * *
cuneate
—cuneately, adv. /kyooh"nee it, -ayt'/, adj. 1. wedge-shaped. 2. (of leaves) triangular at the base and tapering to a point. Also, cuneated. [1800-10; < L cuneatus, equiv. to ...
cuneately
See cuneate. * * *
cuneatic
/kyooh'nee at"ik/, adj. cuneiform; cuneate. [1850-55; CUNEATE + -IC] * * *
cuneiform
/kyooh nee"euh fawrm', kyooh"nee euh-/, adj. 1. having the form of a wedge; wedge-shaped. 2. composed of slim triangular or wedge-shaped elements, as the characters used in ...
cuneiform law
Body of laws revealed by documents written in cuneiform script (see cuneiform writing). It includes the laws of the Sumerians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Elamites, Hurrians, ...
cuneiform writing
System of writing employed in ancient times to write a number of languages of the Middle East. The original and primary writing material for cuneiform texts was a damp clay ...
cuneiformist
/kyooh nee"euh fawr'mist, kyooh"nee euh-/, n. a person who studies or deciphers cuneiform writing. [1880-85; CUNEIFORM + -IST] * * *
Cunene
Cu·ne·ne also Ku·ne·ne (ko͞o-nāʹnə) A river rising in west-central Angola and flowing about 1,207 km (750 mi) south and west to the Atlantic Ocean. It forms the ...
Cunene River
or Kunene River River, southwestern Angola. It flows south to enter the northern Kalahari Desert. Forming part of the boundary between Angola and Namibia, it passes through the ...
Cuneo
/kooh"ne aw/, n. a city in NW Italy. 56,057. * * * ▪ Italy French  Coni        city, Piemonte ( Piedmont) regione, northwestern Italy, on a plateau in the wedge ...
cuneus
/kyooh"nee euhs/, n., pl. cunei /-nee uy'/. 1. Anat. a wedge-shaped convolution on the medial surface of the occipital lobe of the cerebrum. 2. Entomol. a wedge-shaped segment of ...
Cunha
Cu·nha (ko͞oʹnyə), Tristão da. 1460-1540. Portuguese explorer who, during an expedition to India, discovered (1506) the group of volcanic islands in the South Atlantic ...
Cunha, Euclides da
▪ Brazilian author in full  Euclides Rodrigues Pimenta da Cunha  born January 20, 1866, Santa Rita do Rio Negro, Brazil died August 15, 1909, Rio de ...
Cunhal, Alvaro Barreirinhas
▪ 2006       Portuguese political activist (b. Nov. 10, 1913, Coimbra, Port.—d. June 13, 2005, Lisbon, Port.), returned from exile to lead the Portuguese Communist ...
Cunibert, Saint
▪ bishop of Cologne born c. 590, Moselle, Austrasia [now in France] died c. 663, Cologne [Germany]; feast day November 12       prelate, bishop of Cologne and chief ...
cuniculus
—cunicular, adj. /kyooh nik"yeuh leuhs/, n., pl. cuniculi /-luy'/. 1. a small conduit or burrow, as an underground drain or rabbit hole. 2. a low tunnel, as to a burial ...
cuniform
/kyooh"neuh fawrm'/, adj., n. cuneiform. * * *
Cunliffe, Walter Cunliffe, 1st Baron
▪ English banker born December 4, 1855, London, England died January 6, 1920, Epsom, Surrey       English banker who established in London the merchant banking business ...
cunner
/kun"euhr/, n. a small wrasse, Tautogolabrus adspersus, common in North Atlantic coastal waters of the U.S. Also called bergall. [1595-1605; orig. uncert.] * * *
cunnilingual
See cunnilingus. * * *
cunnilingus
—cunnilingual, adj. /kun'l ing"geuhs/, n. the act or practice of orally stimulating the female genitals. Also, cunnilinctus /kun'l ingk"teuhs/. [1885-90; < NL, L: one who licks ...
cunning
—cunningly, adv. —cunningness, n. /kun"ing/, n. 1. skill employed in a shrewd or sly manner, as in deceiving; craftiness; guile. 2. adeptness in performance; dexterity: The ...
Cunningham
/kun"ing ham'/, n. 1. Glenn ("Kansas Ironman"), born 1909, U.S. track-and-field athlete. 2. Merce /merrs/, born 1919?, U.S. dancer and choreographer. * * *
Cunningham, Agnes
▪ 2005 “Sis”        American folk-song composer (b. Feb. 19, 1909, Watongo, Okla.—d. June 27, 2004, New Paltz, N.Y.), cofounded in 1962 the small but inspirational ...
Cunningham, Allan
▪ Scottish poet born Dec. 7, 1784, Keir, Dumfriesshire, Scot. died Oct. 30, 1842, London, Eng.  Scottish poet, a member of the brilliant circle of writers that included ...
Cunningham, Andrew Browne
▪ British naval officer born January 7, 1883, Dublin, Ireland died June 12, 1963, London, England  British naval officer who was an outstanding combat commander early in ...
Cunningham, Emory Orgustus
▪ 2001       American publisher (b. March 17, 1921, Kansas, Ala.—d. Jan. 24, 2000, Birmingham, Ala.), founded Southern Living magazine in 1966, a publication that ...
Cunningham, Glenn
▪ American athlete byname  The Kansas Ironman, or The Kansas Flyer   born Aug. 4, 1909, Atlanta?, Kan., U.S. died March 10, 1988, Menifee, Ark.       American ...
Cunningham, Imogen
born April 12, 1883, Portland, Ore., U.S. died June 24, 1976, San Francisco, Calif. U.S. photographer. She began taking pictures in 1901; her earliest prints imitated ...
Cunningham, Kate Richards O'Hare
▪ American reformer née  Kathleen Richards  born March 26, 1877, near Ada, Ottawa county, Kansas, U.S. died Jan. 10, 1948, Benicia, Calif.       American socialist ...
Cunningham, Laurie
▪ British athlete born March 8, 1956, London, England died July 15, 1989, Madrid, Spain       professional football (football () (soccer) player. In 1977 Cunningham ...
Cunningham, Merce
born April 16, 1919, Centralia, Wash., U.S. U.S. avant-garde dancer and choreographer. In 1939 he joined Martha Graham's company, where he created roles in several of her ...
Cunningham, R. Walter
▪ American astronaut in full  Ronnie Walter Cunningham   born March 16, 1932, Creston, Iowa, U.S.    American astronaut and civilian participant in the Apollo 7 mission ...
Cunningham, Sir Alan Gordon
▪ British army officer born May 1, 1887, Dublin, Ire. died Jan. 30, 1983, Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent, Eng.       British army officer who scored important victories ...
Cunningham, Sir Alexander
▪ British army officer and archaeologist born Jan. 23, 1814, London, Eng. died Nov. 28, 1893, London       British army officer and archaeologist who excavated many ...
Cunningham, Sir Josias
▪ 2001       Northern Irish politician (b. Jan. 20, 1934, County Antrim, N.Ire.—d. Aug. 9, 2000, Belfast, N.Ire.), was a key figure for more than 25 years in the ...


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