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Слова на букву chri-de k (15990)

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clapperrail
clapper rail n. A North American bird (Rallus longirostris) of coastal marshes, characterized by a henlike appearance, brownish plumage, long bill, and clattering cry. * * *
Clapperton, Hugh
▪ British explorer born May 18, 1788, Annan, Dumfries, Scot. died April 13, 1827, near Sokoto, Fulani Empire       the first European explorer in West Africa to return ...
clapskate
clap skate n. A speed skate that has a blade attached by a hinge at the heel, allowing one to skate more efficiently by keeping the full length of the blade on the ice while the ...
clapt
/klapt/, v. Archaic. pt. or pp. of clap1. * * *
Clapton
/klap"teuhn/, n. Eric, born 1945, English blues and rock guitarist and composer. * * *
Clapton, Eric
▪ British musician Introduction original name  Eric Patrick Clapp  born March 30, 1945, Ripley, Surrey, England       British rock musician who was a highly ...
claptrap
/klap"trap'/, n. 1. pretentious but insincere or empty language: His speeches seem erudite but analysis reveals them to be mere claptrap. 2. any artifice or expedient for winning ...
claque
/klak/, n. 1. a group of persons hired to applaud an act or performer. 2. a group of sycophants. [1860-65; < F, deriv. of claquer to clap] * * * Group of people hired to clap ...
claqueur
/kla kerr"/, n. a member of a claque. Also, claquer /klak"euhr/. [1830-40; < F, equiv. to claque CLAQUE + -eur -EUR] * * *
clar.
clarinet. * * *
Clara
/klair"euh, klar"euh/, n. a female given name: from a Latin word meaning "clear, bright." * * * (as used in expressions) Barton Clara Bow Clara Schumann Clara Clara Josephine ...
Clara Barton
➡ Barton * * *
Clara Bow
➡ Bow * * *
Clarabelle
/klair"euh bel', klar"-/, n. a female given name. * * *
clarain
/klair"ayn/, n. the coal forming the bright layers in banded bituminous coal. Cf. durain, vitrain. [1915-20; < L clar(us) CLEAR, bright + F -ain, as in DURAIN] * * *
Clare
/klair/, n. 1. a county in W Republic of Ireland. 87,489; 1231 sq. mi. (3190 sq. km). Co. seat: Ennis. 2. a male or female given name. * * * I County (pop., 1996: 94,006), ...
Clare Booth Luce
➡ Luce * * *
Clare of Assisi, Saint
1194-1253, Italian nun: founder of the Franciscan order of nuns. Also, Clara of Assisi. * * * born July 16, 1194, Assisi, duchy of Spoleto died Aug. 11, 1253, Assisi; canonized ...
Clare of Assisi,Saint
Clare of As·si·si (klâr; ə-sēʹzē, -sē, ə-sĭsʹē), Saint. 1194-1253. Italian nun and religious leader who founded with Saint Francis of Assisi the first Franciscan ...
Clare Short
➡ Short (I) * * *
Clare, Ada
▪ American writer and actress original name  Jane McElhenney  born 1836?, Charleston, S.C., U.S. died March 4, 1874, New York, N.Y.       American writer and actress ...
Clare, John
born July 13, 1793, Helpston, near Peterborough, Northamptonshire, Eng. died May 20, 1864, Northampton, Northamptonshire British poet. Clare grew up in extreme rural poverty, ...
Clare, John Fitzgibbon, 1st earl of
▪ Irish politician born 1749, near Dublin died Jan. 28, 1802, Dublin       lord chancellor of Ireland who was a powerful supporter of a repressive policy toward Irish ...
clare-obscure
/klair"euhb skyoor"/, n. chiaroscuro. * * *
Claremont
/klair"mont/, n. 1. a town in SW California. 30,950. 2. a city in W New Hampshire. 14,557. * * * ▪ California, United States       city, Los Angeles county, ...
Claremont Colleges
Consortium of private colleges in Claremont, California, U.S. It comprises Pomona College (founded 1887), the Claremont Graduate School (1925), Scripps College (1926), Claremont ...
Claremore
/klair"mawr, -mohr/, n. a town in NE Oklahoma. 12,085. * * * ▪ Oklahoma, United States  city, seat (1907) of Rogers county, northeastern Oklahoma, U.S., northeast of ...
clarence
/klar"euhns/, n. a closed, four-wheeled carriage, usually with a glass front, with seats inside for four persons. [1830-40; named after Duke of Clarence (1765-1837), later ...
Clarence
/klar"euhns/, n. a male given name: from a Latin word meaning "clear one." * * * (as used in expressions) Birdseye Clarence Darrow Clarence Seward William Clarence ...
Clarence Darrow
➡ Darrow * * *
Clarence House
a large house in London, England, next to St James’s Palace. It was built in 1829 for the Duke of Clarence (later King William IV). Queen Elizabeth II lived there before she ...
Clarence River
▪ river, New South Wales, Australia       coastal river, northeastern New South Wales, Australia, rising in the McPherson Range near the Queensland border, flowing south ...
Clarence, George Plantagenet, duke of
▪ English noble born Oct. 21, 1449, Dublin died Feb. 18, 1478, London       English nobleman who engaged in several major conspiracies against his brother King Edward ...
Clarence, Lionel of Antwerp, duke of
▪ English noble also called  (1346–62) Earl Of Ulster   born Nov. 29, 1338, Antwerp died Oct. 17, 1368, Alba, Italy       second surviving son of King Edward III of ...
Clarence, Thomas Plantagenet, duke of
▪ English noble born , before Sept. 30, 1388, London died March 22, 1421, Baugé, Anjou, Fr.       second son of Henry IV of England and aide to his elder brother, ...
Clarendon
/klar"euhn deuhn/, n. 1. Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of, 1609-74, British statesman and historian. 2. Council of, the ecumenical council (1164) occasioned by the opposition of Thomas ...
Clarendon Code
(1661–65) Four acts, passed in England during the ministry of the earl of Clarendon, designed to cripple the power of the Nonconformists, or Dissenters. The first, the ...
Clarendon, Assize of
▪ English history       (1166), a series of ordinances initiated by King Henry II of England in a convocation of lords at the royal hunting lodge of Clarendon. In an ...
Clarendon, Constitutions of
(1164) Sixteen articles issued by King Henry II defining church-state relations in England. Designed to restrict ecclesiastical privileges and curb the power of the church ...
Clarendon, Edward Hyde, 1st earl of
born Feb. 18, 1609, Dinton, Wiltshire, Eng. died Dec. 9, 1674, Rouen, France. English statesman and historian. A successful lawyer, he was also well known in literary circles. ...
Clarendon, Edward Hyde, 1st earl of, Viscount Cornbury
▪ English statesman Introduction also called  (1643–60) Sir Edward Hyde , or  (1660–61) Baron Hyde of Hindon  born Feb. 18, 1609, Dinton, Wiltshire, Eng. died Dec. 9, ...
Clarendon, George William Frederick Villiers, 4th earl of
born Jan. 12, 1800, London, Eng. died June 27, 1870, London British statesman. After serving as British ambassador to Spain (1833–39), he held various cabinet posts until ...
Clarendon, Henry Hyde, 2nd earl of
▪ English statesman also called  (until 1674) Viscount Cornbury   born June 2, 1638, England died Oct. 31, 1709, England       English statesman, eldest son of the ...
Clarendon,First Earl of
Clar·en·don (klărʹən-dən), First Earl of. See Hyde, Edward. * * *
Clarendonian Stage
▪ geology       lowermost and oldest major division of continental rocks and time of the Pliocene in North America (the Pliocene Epoch began about 7,000,000 years ago ...
claret
/klar"it/, n. 1. the red table wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France: originally it was light red or yellowish. 2. a similar wine made elsewhere. 3. Also called claret ...
claret cup
an iced beverage made of claret and carbonated water with lemon juice, brandy or other spirits, fruits, and sugar. [1875-80] * * *
claretcup
claret cup n. A chilled drink made of claret mixed with soda, fruit juices, brandy, and sugar. * * *
Claretian
/kla ree"sheuhn, kleuh-/, Rom. Cath. Ch. n. 1. a member of the "Congregation of the Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary," founded in Spain in 1849, and devoted ...
Clari, Giovanni Carlo Maria
▪ Italian composer born Sept. 27, 1677, Pisa [Italy] died May 16, 1754, Pisa       Italian composer whose vocal music was admired by Luigi Cherubini, G.F. Handel, and ...
Claribel
/klair"euh bel', klar"-/, n. a female given name. * * *
Clarice
/klar"is, kleuh rees"/; Fr. /klann rddees"/, n. a female given name, form of Clara. * * *
Claridge’s
a famous hotel in Mayfair in the West End of London, England. It has been fashionable since the early 1800s among rich people, including various kings and queens. The present ...
clarificant
/kla rif"i keuhnt/, n. Chem. any substance for clarifying a liquid. [ < LL clarificant- (s. of clarificans), prp. of clarificare to CLARIFY; see -ANT] * * *
clarification
See clarify. * * *
clarified butter
clarified butter n. butter with the water and milk solids removed, used for cooking at high temperatures without burning * * *
clarifier
See clarification. * * *
clarify
—clarification, n. —clarifier, n. /klar"euh fuy'/, v., clarified, clarifying. v.t. 1. to make (an idea, statement, etc.) clear or intelligible; to free from ambiguity. 2. to ...
Clarinda
/kleuh rin"deuh/, n. a female given name, form of Clara. * * *
clarinet
—clarinetist, clarinettist, n. /klar'euh net"/, n. a woodwind instrument in the form of a cylindrical tube with a single reed attached to its mouthpiece. [1790-1800; < F ...
clarinetist
See clarinet. * * *
clarinettist
See clarinetist. * * *
clarino
/kleuh ree"noh/, n., pl. clarini /-nee/, clarinos. a valveless trumpet used in the 17th and 18th centuries for playing rapid passages in the high register. Also called clarin ...
clarion
/klar"ee euhn/, adj. 1. clear and shrill: the clarion call of a battle trumpet. n. 2. an ancient trumpet with a curved shape. 3. the sound of this instrument. 4. any similar ...
Clarion Fracture Zone
▪ geological formation, United States        submarine fracture zone, 3,200 miles (5,200 km) in length, defined by one of numerous transform faults traversing the ...
Clarion River
▪ river, Pennsylvania, United States       river formed at Johnsonburg, Elk county, northwestern Pennsylvania, U.S., by the confluence of East Branch and West Branch ...
Clarion University of Pennsylvania
▪ school, Pennsylvania, United States       public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Clarion, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of Pennsylvania's State ...
Clarissa
/kleuh ris"euh/, n. a female given name, form of Clara. * * *
clarity
/klar"i tee/, n. 1. clearness or lucidity as to perception or understanding; freedom from indistinctness or ambiguity. 2. the state or quality of being clear or transparent to ...
Clark
/klahrk/, n. 1. Alvan, 1804-87, and his son Alvan Graham, 1832-97, U.S. astronomers and telescope-lens manufacturers. 2. Champ /champ/, (James Beauchamp), 1850-1921, U.S. ...
Clark (of Saltwood), Kenneth (Mackenzie) Clark, Baron
born July 13, 1903, London, Eng. died May 21, 1983, Hythe British art historian and administrator. Born to a wealthy family, he studied at the University of Oxford. After two ...
Clark Air Base
▪ military base, Philippines formerly  Clark Field         former U.S. military air base, central Luzon, Philippines. It covered an area of about 12 square miles (30 ...
Clark Family
▪ American astronomers and telescope makers       American family of telescope makers and astronomers who supplied unexcelled lenses to many observatories in the United ...
Clark Fork
Clark Fork 〚after CLARK2 William〛 river flowing from W Mont. northwest into Pend Oreille Lake in N Ida.: c. 300 mi (483 km) * * * River, Montana and Idaho, U.S. Rising near ...
Clark Gable
➡ Gable * * *
Clark Kent
➡ Kent (II) * * *
Clark University
▪ university, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States       private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Worcester, Massachusetts, U.S. The university ...
Clark's nutcracker
a nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana, of western North America, having pale gray plumage and black and white wings and tail. Also, Clark nutcracker. Also called Clark's ...
Clark, Abraham
▪ American patriot born Feb. 15, 1726, Elizabethtown, N.J. [U.S.] died Sept. 15, 1794, Elizabeth, N.J., U.S.       American patriot and signer of the Declaration of ...
Clark, Adam
▪ British civil engineer born Aug. 14, 1811, Edinburgh, Scot. died July 23, 1866, Buda [now Budapest], Hung.       British civil engineer who is associated with the ...
Clark, Alan Kenneth McKenzie
▪ 2000       British historian and politician who was as well known for his acerbic wit, publicly acknowledged marital infidelities, and sensational Diaries (1993) as he ...
Clark, Champ
orig. James Beauchamp Clark born March 7, 1850, near Lawrenceburg, Ky., U.S. died March 2, 1921, Washington, D.C. U.S. politician. Clark moved to Missouri in 1876 and settled ...
Clark, Dane
▪ 1999       American actor on stage, on television, and especially in motion pictures, where he was most memorable in roles as a tough but sympathetic down-to-earth ...
Clark, Dick
in full Richard Wagstaff Clark born Nov. 30, 1929, Mount Vernon, N.Y., U.S. U.S. television personality. He worked as a radio and television announcer before beginning his ...
Clark, Eugenie
▪ American ichthyologist born May 4, 1922, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American ichthyologist noted for her research on poisonous fishes of the tropical seas and on the ...
Clark, Francis Edward
▪ American minister born Sept. 12, 1851, Aylmer, Quebec, Can. died May 26, 1927, Newton, Mass., U.S.       Congregational churchman and writer who founded and led ...
Clark, George Rogers
born Nov. 19, 1752, Albemarle county, Va. died Feb. 13, 1818, near Louisville, Ky., U.S. Frontier military leader in the American Revolution. The brother of William Clark, he ...
Clark, Glen David
▪ 1997       When British Columbia Premier Glen Clark and his socialist New Democratic Party (NDP) were returned to power with a majority government in the general ...
Clark, Helen
born Feb. 26, 1950, Hamilton, N.Z. New Zealand prime minister. In 1999 she became the first woman in New Zealand to hold the office of prime minister immediately following an ...
Clark, J Desmond
▪ 2003       British archaeologist and anthropologist (b. April 10, 1916, London, Eng.—d. Feb. 14, 2002, Oakland, Calif.), was a world-renowned authority on ancient ...
Clark, James
▪ British automobile racer byname  Jim Clark   born March 4, 1936, Duns, Berwickshire, Scot. died April 7, 1968, Hockenheim, W.Ger.  Scottish automobile racer who became ...
Clark, James H.
born 1944, Plainview, Tex., U.S. U.S. businessman. He dropped out of high school to join the navy. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Utah and ...
Clark, Joe
▪ prime minister of Canada byname of  Charles Joseph Clark   born June 5, 1939, High River, Alberta, Canada    prime minister of Canada from June 1979 to March 1980, the ...
Clark, John Bates
▪ American economist born January 26, 1847, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S. died March 21, 1938, New York, New York  American economist noted for his theory of marginal ...
Clark, John Maurice
▪ American economist born Nov. 30, 1884, Northampton, Mass., U.S. died June 27, 1963, Westport, Conn.       American economist whose work on trusts brought him world ...
Clark, John Pepper
▪ Nigerian author pseudonym  J.P. Clark-Bekederemo  born April 6, 1935, Kiagbodo, Nigeria       the most lyrical of the Nigerian poets, whose poetry celebrates the ...
Clark, Kenneth Bancroft
▪ 2006       American psychologist (b. July 14, 1914, Panama Canal Zone—d. May 1, 2005, Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.), conducted pioneering research into the impact of ...
Clark, Kenneth Mackenzie Clark, Baron
▪ British art historian also called  (1938–69) Sir Kenneth Clark   born July 10, 1903, London, Eng. died May 21, 1983, Hythe, Kent       British art historian who ...
Clark, Larry
▪ American photographer born Jan. 19, 1943, Tulsa, Okla., U.S.       American photographer known for his images that graphically depict unconventional teenage ...
Clark, Laurel Blair Salton
▪ 2004       American astronaut (b. March 10, 1961, Ames, Iowa—d. Feb. 1, 2003, over Texas), was a mission specialist and flight surgeon on the space shuttle Columbia. ...
Clark, Marguerite
▪ American actress in full  Helen Marguerite Clark  born Feb. 22, 1883, Avondale [now in Cincinnati], Ohio, U.S. died Sept. 25, 1940, New York, N.Y.       American ...
Clark, Mark
▪ American military officer in full  Mark Wayne Clark,   born May 1, 1896, Madison Barracks, N.Y., U.S. died April 17, 1984, Charleston, S.C.  U.S. Army officer during ...
Clark, Mark (Wayne)
born May 1, 1896, Madison Barracks, N.Y., U.S. died April 17, 1984, Charleston, S.C. U.S. army officer. After graduating from West Point, he served in Europe in World War I. In ...
Clark, Raymond
▪ 1997       ("OSSIE"), British fashion designer whose whimsical and romantic creations of the mid-1960s to early '70s epitomized that free-spirited era; his designs, ...
Clark, Septima Poinsette
▪ American educator and civil rights advocate née  Septima Poinsette  born May 3, 1898, Charleston, S.C., U.S. died Dec. 15, 1987, Johns Island, S.C.       American ...
Clark, Sir Grahame Douglas
▪ 1996       British archaeologist and authority on the prehistoric age in northwestern Europe known as the Mesolithic Period, which dates from about 8000 until about ...
Clark, Tom
orig. Thomas Campbell born Sept. 23, 1899, Dallas, Texas, U.S. died June 13, 1977, New York, N.Y. U.S. jurist. He studied law at the University of Texas and entered private ...
Clark, Tom C.
▪ American jurist original name  Thomas Campbell Clark   born Sept. 23, 1899, Dallas, Texas, U.S. died June 13, 1977, New York, N.Y.       U.S. attorney general ...
Clark, Walter van Tilburg
▪ American writer born Aug. 3, 1909, East Orland, Maine, U.S. died Nov. 10, 1971, Reno, Nev.       American novelist and short-story writer whose works, set in the ...
Clark, William
born Aug. 1, 1770, Caroline county, Va. died Sept. 1, 1838, St. Louis, Mo., U.S. U.S. explorer and soldier. The brother of George Rogers Clark, he joined the army and ...
Clark, William Smith
▪ American educator born July 31, 1826, Ashfield, Mass., U.S. died March 9, 1886, Amherst, Mass.  American educator and agricultural expert who helped organize Sapporo ...
Clark,Charles Joseph
Clark (klärk), Charles Joseph. Known as “Joe.” Born 1939. Canadian politician who served as prime minister (1979-1980). * * *
Clark,George Rogers
Clark, George Rogers. 1752-1818. American military leader and frontiersman who led numerous raids on British troops and Native Americans in the Northwest Territory during the ...
Clark,John Bates
Clark, John Bates. 1847-1938. American economist known for his theory of marginal productivity. He wrote The Philosophy of Wealth (1885) and The Distribution of Wealth (1899). * ...
Clark,Kenneth Bancroft
Clark, Kenneth Bancroft. Born 1914. Panamanian-born American psychologist and author who demonstrated the psychological effects of racial segregation and ghetto life, influencing ...
Clark,Mark Wayne
Clark, Mark Wayne. 1896-1984. American general who was Allied commander in North Africa and Italy in World War II and supreme commander of United Nations forces in Korea ...
Clark,Sir Kenneth McKenzie
Clark, Sir Kenneth McKenzie. 1903-1983. British art historian whose works include The Nude (1955), Civilisation (1970), and Feminine Beauty (1980). * * *
Clark,William
Clark, William. 1770-1838. American explorer who joined Meriwether Lewis in an expedition to the Pacific Ocean (1804-1806). Clark was responsible for the careful mapmaking en ...
Clarke
/klahrk/, n. Arthur C(harles), born 1917, English science-fiction writer. * * * (as used in expressions) Clarke Arthur Charles Moore Clement Clarke Quantrill William Clarke * * *
Clarke's gazelle
dibatag. [perh. after George S. Clarke, Baron Sydenham (1848-1933), English soldier and colonial administrator] * * *
Clarke, Alexander Ross
▪ British geodesist born Dec. 16, 1828, Reading, Berkshire, Eng. died Feb. 11, 1914, Reigate, Surrey       English geodesist whose calculations of the size and shape of ...
Clarke, Arthur C(harles)
born Dec. 16, 1917, Minehead, Somerset, Eng. British science-fiction writer. He first published stories while in the Royal Air Force and, after earning a degree in physics and ...
Clarke, Charles Cowden
▪ English editor and critic born Dec. 15, 1787, Enfield, Middlesex, Eng. died March 13, 1877, Genoa, Italy  English editor and critic best known for his work on William ...
Clarke, Edward Daniel
▪ English mineralogist born June 5, 1769, Willingdon, Sussex, Eng. died March 9, 1822, London       English mineralogist and traveler who amassed valuable collections ...
Clarke, Helen Archibald; and Porter, Charlotte Endymion
▪ American writers Charlotte Endymion Porter originally  Helen Charlotte Porter  Respectively,   born Nov. 13, 1860, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 8, 1926, Boston, ...
Clarke, James Freeman
▪ American minister and author born April 4, 1810, Hanover, N.H., U.S. died June 8, 1888, Jamaica Plain, Mass.       Unitarian minister, theologian, and author, whose ...
Clarke, Jeremiah
▪ English composer born c. 1674, London, Eng. died Dec. 1, 1707, London       English organist and composer, mainly of religious music. His Trumpet Voluntary was once ...
Clarke, John Hessin
▪ American jurist born Sept. 18, 1857, New Lisbon, Ohio, U.S. died March 22, 1945, San Diego, Calif.  associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States ...
Clarke, Kenneth Harry
▪ 1994       In May 1993, with his government in trouble and the U.K.'s economy still struggling to escape recession, Prime Minister John Major (q.v.) turned to one of ...
Clarke, Kenny
▪ American musician byname of  Kenneth Spearman Clarke,  also called  Klook  born Jan. 9, 1914, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S. died Jan. 25, 1985, Montreuil-sous-Bois, near Paris, ...
Clarke, Marcus
▪ Australian author in full  Marcus Andrew Hislop Clarke  born April 24, 1846, London, England died August 2, 1881, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia       English-born ...
Clarke, Martha
▪ American choreographer born June 3, 1944, Baltimore, Md., U.S.       American choreographer and dancer whose emotionally evocative work draws extensively on ...
Clarke, Mary Frances
▪ Irish-American religious leader born March 2, 1803, Dublin, Ire. died Dec. 4, 1887, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.       Irish-born religious leader and educator, a founder of ...
Clarke, Rebecca Sophia
▪ American writer born Feb. 22, 1833, Norridgewock, Maine, U.S. died Aug. 16, 1906, Norridgewock       American writer of children's literature whose spirited writing ...
Clarke, Samuel
▪ English theologian and philosopher born Oct. 11, 1675, Norwich, Norfolk, Eng. died May 17, 1729, Leicestershire  theologian, philosopher, and exponent of Newtonian ...
Clarke, Shirley Brimberg
▪ 1998       American motion picture director of independent films whose gritty cinema verité works in the 1950s and '60s, including The Connection, The Cool World, and ...
Clarke, Sir Andrew
▪ British engineer and politician born July 27, 1824, Southsea, Hampshire, Eng. died March 29, 1902, London       British engineer, soldier, politician, and civil ...
Clarke, Sir Arthur C.
▪ British author and scientist in full  Sir Arthur Charles Clarke  born Dec. 16, 1917, Minehead, Somerset, Eng. died March 19, 2008, Colombo, Sri L.       English ...
Clarke, Sir Arthur Charles
▪ 2009       British author born Dec. 16, 1917, Minehead, Somerset, Eng. died March 19, 2008, Colombo, Sri Lanka wrote more than 100 fiction and nonfiction books, but ...
Clarke, Sir Cyril Astley
▪ 2001       British physician and scientist (b. Aug. 22, 1907, Leicester, Eng.—d. Nov. 21, 2000, Hoylake, Cheshire, Eng.), helped develop a vaccine against ...
Clarke, T.E.B.
▪ British writer in full  Thomas Ernest Bennett Clarke   born June 7, 1907, Watford, Hertfordshire, Eng. died Feb. 11, 1989, London       British screenwriter who ...
Clarke,Arthur Charles
Clarke (klärk), Arthur Charles. Born 1917. British writer, scientist, and underwater explorer noted for his stories of space exploration. His works include 2001: A Space ...
Clarke,Kenneth Spearman
Clarke, Kenneth Spearman. Known as “Kenny.” 1914-1985. American jazz drummer who was a leading contributor to bop. He originated the now standard practice of maintaining a ...
ClarkFork
Clark Fork A river rising in southwest Montana near Butte and flowing about 579 km (360 mi) generally north then northwest to Pend Oreille Lake in the Idaho Panhandle. * * *
clarkia
/klahr"kee euh/, n. any of various western U.S. plants belonging to the genus Clarkia, of the evening primrose family, having narrow leaves and ornamental red or purple ...
Clarksburg
/klahrks"berrg/, n. a city in N West Virginia, on the Monongahela River. 22,371. * * * ▪ West Virginia, United States       city, seat of Harrison county, northern ...
Clarksdale
/klahrks"dayl'/, n. a city in NW Mississippi. 21,137. * * * ▪ Mississippi, United States       city, seat (1892) of Coahoma county, northwestern Mississippi, U.S. It ...
Clarkson, Adrienne
▪ 2000       “Allow me a moment of personal reflection. The Poy family, arriving here as refugees in 1942 ... did not arrive as part of a regular immigration ...
Clarkson, Kelly
▪ American singer-songwriter in full  Kelly Brianne Clarkson  born April 24, 1982, Fort Worth, Texas, U.S.       American singer-songwriter who emerged as a pop-rock ...
Clarkson, Thomas
▪ English abolitionist born March 28, 1760, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, Eng. died Sept. 26, 1846, Ipswich, Suffolk       abolitionist, one of the first effective ...
Clarksville
/klahrks"vil/, n. 1. a city in N Tennessee. 54,777. 2. a town in SE Indiana. 15,164. * * * ▪ Tennessee, United States       city, seat (1796) of Montgomery county, ...
Clarks{™}
the name of a British company that makes and sells shoes, or any of the shops owned by the company. Clarks are well known for making children’s shoes in different widths. * * *
claro
/klahr"oh/, adj., n., pl. claros. adj. 1. (of cigars) light-colored and, usually, mild. n. 2. such a cigar. [1890-95; < Sp < L clarus CLEAR] * * *
Claros
▪ ancient Greek site, Turkey       site of an oracular (oracle) shrine of the Greek god Apollo, near Colophon in Ionia, Asia Minor (now in Turkey). According to a ...
clarsach
/klair"sakh, -seuhkh, klahr"-/, n. an ancient Irish and Scottish harp. Also, clairseach, clarseach /klair"sakh, -seuhkh, klahr"-/, clarsech, clarseth /klair"seuhkh, klahr"-/. [ < ...
clary
/klair"ee/, n., pl. claries. any of several aromatic herbs of the genus Salvia, esp. S. sclarea, having hairy, heart-shaped leaves and open clusters of lilac or blue flowers, ...
clash
—clasher, n. —clashingly, adv. /klash/, v.i. 1. to make a loud, harsh noise: The gears of the old car clashed and grated. 2. to come together or collide, esp. noisily: The ...
Clash, the
▪ British rock group Introduction       British punk rock band that was second only to the Sex Pistols (Sex Pistols, the) in influence and impact as a standard-bearer ...
Clashing Rocks
Symplegades. * * *
clasp
/klasp, klahsp/, n., v., clasped or (Archaic) claspt /klaspt, klahspt/; clasping. n. 1. a device, usually of metal, for fastening together two or more things or parts of the same ...
clasp knife
a large pocket knife having a blade or blades that may be folded into the handle. [1745-55] * * *
clasper
/klas"peuhr, klah"speuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that clasps. 2. (in insects, fishes, crustaceans, etc.) one of the modified, usually paired organs or parts by which the male ...
clasping
/klas"ping, klah"sping/, adj. (of a leaf) partly or wholly surrounding the stem. [1870-75; CLASP + -ING2] * * *
claspknife
clasp knife n. A pocketknife with a folding blade. * * *
class
—classable, adj. —classer, n. /klas, klahs/, n. 1. a number of persons or things regarded as forming a group by reason of common attributes, characteristics, qualities, or ...
class A drug
an illegal drug which is on a list of the strongest, most harmful drugs and which carries a heavy penalty for anyone caught with the drug or selling it. Class A drugs include ...
class act
Informal. something or someone regarded as outstanding or elegant in quality or performance. [1975-80] * * *
class action
—class-action /klas"ak"sheuhn, klahs"-/, adj. a legal proceeding in which persons representing interests common to a large group participate as representatives of the group or ...
class action (suit)
class action (suit) or class action n. a legal action brought by one or more persons on behalf of themselves and a much larger group, all of whom have the same grounds for ...
class book
☆ class book n. a book published by members of a school or college class, containing pictures of students and teachers, an account of student activities, etc. * * *
class conflict.
See class struggle (def. 1). [1895-1900] * * *
class consciousness
—class-conscious /klas"kon"sheuhs, klahs"-/, adj. 1. awareness of one's own social or economic rank in society. 2. a feeling of identification and solidarity with those ...
class day
(sometimes cap.) a day during the commencement season on which the members of the graduating class in U.S. colleges and schools celebrate the completion of their course with ...
class inclusion
Logic. the relation between two classes in which all members of one class are included in the other, as in the proposition "All humans are animals." * * *
class interval
Statistics. one of a set of intervals of arbitrary width into which the range of a sample of measurement is partitioned. [1925-30] * * *
class mark
Statistics. the midpoint of a class interval. [1885-90, for an earlier sense] * * *
class meaning
Gram. 1. the meaning of a grammatical category or a form class, common to all forms showing the category or to all members of the form class, as in the meaning of number common ...
class struggle
1. Also called class conflict. conflict between different classes in a community resulting from different social or economic positions and reflecting opposed interests. 2. Also ...
class, social
Group of people within a society who possess the same socioeconomic status. The term was first widely used in the early 19th century, following the industrial and political ...
class-action
See class action. * * *
class-conscious
class-con·scious (klăsʹkŏnʹshəs) adj. 1. Aware of belonging to a particular socioeconomic class. 2. Supportive of class solidarity.   classʹ-conʹscious·ness n. * * *
class-consciousness
See class-conscious. * * *
class.
1. classic. 2. classical. 3. classification. 4. classified. * * *
classact
class act n. Informal One of distinctive and superior quality: “Academy members... tend to favor films that will make Hollywood seem a class act instead of a hotbed of ...
classaction
class action n. A lawsuit brought by one or more plaintiffs on behalf of a large group of others who have a common interest.   classʹ-acʹtion (klăsʹăkʹshən) adj. * * *
classbook
/klas"book', klahs"-/, n. 1. a book kept by a teacher recording student attendance, grades, etc. 2. a souvenir book of a graduating class, containing photographs, articles, ...
classes
clas·ses (klăsʹēz) n. Plural of classis. * * * ➡ exams * * *
Classes of organosulfur compounds
▪ Table Classes of organosulfur compounds structure name example RSH thiol methanethiol RSR sulfide dimethyl sulfide RSSR disulfide methyl ...
classic
/klas"ik/, adj. 1. of the first or highest quality, class, or rank: a classic piece of work. 2. serving as a standard, model, or guide: the classic method of teaching ...
Classic FM
a British national commercial radio station, begun in 1992, which broadcasts popular classical music. * * *
Classic Glacial/Cold and Interglacial/Warm Episodes*, Table
▪ Table oxygen-18 stage central United States Great Britain northwestern Europe 1 Holocene Holocene, Flandrian ...
classical
—classicality, classicalness, n. —classically, adv. /klas"i keuhl/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Greek and Roman antiquity: classical literature; classical ...
Classical architecture
Architecture of ancient Greece and Rome, especially from the 5th century BC in Greece to the 3rd century AD in Rome, that emphasized the column and pediment. Greek architecture ...
classical ballet
also called  romantic ballet        system of dance based on formalized movements and positions of the arms, feet, and body designed to enable the dancer to move with ...
classical conditioning
conditioning (def. 2). [1945-50] * * *
classical economics
—classical economist. a system or school of economic thought developed by Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham, Thomas Malthus, and David Ricardo, advocating minimum governmental ...
Classical Greek
1. the form of Greek used in classical literature, esp. the literary Attic Greek of the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. 2. (loosely) ancient Greek. * * *
Classical Latin
the form of Latin used in classical literature, esp. the literary Latin of the 1st century B.C. and the 1st and 2nd centuries A.D. * * *
classical literature
      the literature of ancient Greece and Rome (see Greek literature; Latin literature). The term is also used for the literature of any language in a period notable ...
classical mechanics
Physics. the branch of mechanics that is based on Newton's laws of motion and that is applicable to systems that are so large that Planck's constant can be regarded as negligibly ...
classical Nahuatl
Aztec (def. 2). * * *
classical Sanskrit
Sanskrit of an ancient period earlier than that of the Prakrits and later than Vedic. * * *
classical scholarship
Introduction       the study, in all its aspects, of ancient Greece (ancient Greek civilization) and Rome (ancient Rome). In continental Europe the field is known as ...
ClassicalArmenian
Clas·si·cal Armenian (klăsʹĭ-kəl) n. The oldest recorded variety of Armenian, attested from the fifth century and in continuous use as a literary language until the ...
ClassicalChinese
Classical Chinese n. The written form of Chinese from about the fifth century B.C. to the end of the Han dynasty in 220 A.D. adj. Of or relating to Classical Chinese. * * *
classicalconditioning
classical conditioning n. Psychology A process of behavior modification by which a subject comes to respond in a desired manner to a previously neutral stimulus that has been ...
classicalism
classicalism [klas′i kəliz΄əm] n. CLASSICISM * * *
classicality
See classical. * * *
classically
See classicality. * * *
classicalness
See classicality. * * *
classicalpathway
classical pathway n. Immunology The activation of complement by an antigen-antibody complex. * * *
classicism
—classicistic /klas'euh sis"tik/, adj. /klas"euh siz'euhm/, n. 1. the principles or styles characteristic of the literature and art of ancient Greece and Rome. 2. adherence to ...
Classicism and Neoclassicism
Art-historical tradition or aesthetic attitudes based on the art of ancient Greece and Rome. "Classicism" refers to the art produced in antiquity or to later art inspired by ...
classicist
/klas"euh sist/, n. 1. an adherent of classicism in literature or art (contrasted with romanticist). 2. an authority on the classics; a classical scholar. 3. a person who ...
classicize
/klas"euh suyz'/, v., classicized, classicizing. v.t. 1. to make classic. v.i. 2. to conform to the classic style. Also, esp. Brit., classicise. [1850-55; CLASSIC + -IZE] * * *
classico
classico [klas′i kō΄, kläs′kō΄] adj. 〚It〛 made from grapes grown in a certain specified area in Italy with a reputation for superior quality [Chianti classico] * * *
classifiable
See classify. * * *
classification
—classificatory /kleuh sif"i keuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee, klas"euh fi-/ or, esp. Brit., /klas'euh fi kay"teuh ree/, adj. —clasificatorily, adv. —classificational, adj. /klas'euh ...
Classification and Examples of Some Musical Instruments
▪ Table Idiophones Struck against each other cymbals, castanets with a beater triangle, glockenspiel, xylophone, ...
Classification and survey of antiseptics and germicides
▪ Table Classification and survey of antiseptics and germicides agent approximate concentration used (percent) mode of action uses alcohols (e.g., ethyl ...
Classification of fruits
▪ Table Classification of fruits structure major types one carpel two or more carpels dry dehiscent follicle—at maturity, the carpel splits down one side, usually the ...
Classification of major climatic types according to the Koppen-Geiger-Pohl scheme
▪ Table Classification of major climatic types according to the Köppen-Geiger-Pohl scheme letter symbol 1st 2nd 3rd criterion A temperature of coolest month 18 degrees ...
classification theory
      principles governing the organization of objects into groups according to their similarities and differences or their relation to a set of criteria. Classification ...
classificatorily
See classification. * * *
classificatory
See classificatorily. * * *
classified
/klas"euh fuyd'/, adj. 1. arranged or distributed in classes or according to class: We plan to review all the classified specimens in the laboratory. 2. of or designating the ...
classified ad
an advertisement in a newspaper, magazine, or the like generally dealing with offers of or requests for jobs, houses, apartments, used cars, and the like. Also called classified, ...
classified ads
➡ advertising * * *
classified advertising
1. classified ads collectively. 2. the business or practice of selling space for classified ads. 3. the department of a newspaper or other publication that handles classified ...
classifiedadvertisement
classified advertisement n. An advertisement, usually brief and in small type, printed in a newspaper or magazine under headings with others of the same category. * * *
classifier
/klas"euh fuy'euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that classifies. 2. a device for separating solids of different characteristics by controlled rates of settling. 3. Gram. (in ...
classify
—classifiable, adj. /klas"euh fuy'/, v.t., classified, classifying. 1. to arrange or organize by classes; order according to class. 2. to assign a classification to ...
classiness
See classy. * * *
classis
/klas"is/, n., pl. classes /klas"eez/. (in certain Reformed churches) 1. the organization of pastors and elders that governs a group of local churches; a presbytery. 2. the group ...
classism
/klas"iz euhm/, n. 1. a biased or discriminatory attitude based on distinctions made between social or economic classes. 2. the viewing of society as being composed of distinct ...
classist
See classism. * * *
classless
—classlessness, n. /klas"lis, klahs"-/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to a society in which there are no economic or social distinctions. 2. (of an individual) not having membership ...
classless society
▪ Marxism       in Marxism, the ultimate condition of social organization, expected to occur when true communism is achieved. According to Karl Marx (Marx, Karl) ...
classmate
/klas"mayt', klahs"-/, n. a member of the same class at a school or college. [1705-15, Amer.; CLASS + MATE1] * * *
classon
classon [klas′än΄] n. Particle Physics either of two stable elementary particles, the photon and the graviton, having no mass or electric charge: a classon is a boson * * ...
classroom
/klas"roohm', -room', klahs"-/, n. 1. a room, as in a school or college, in which classes are held. 2. any place where one learns or gains experience: The sea is the sailor's ...
classwork
/klas"werrk', klahs"-/, n. 1. the written or oral work done in a classroom by a student (distinguished from homework). 2. the work done in a classroom by the students and teacher ...
classy
—classily, adv. —classiness, n. /klas"ee, klah"see/, adj., classier, classiest. Informal. of high class, rank, or grade; stylish; admirably smart; elegant. [1890-95; CLASS + ...
clast
/klast/, n. a grain of sediment, silt, sand, gravel, etc., esp. as a constituent fragment of a clastic rock formation, as distinguished from a chemical or biogenic component of ...
clastic
/klas"tik/, adj. 1. Biol. breaking up into fragments or separate portions; dividing into parts. 2. pertaining to an anatomical model made up of detachable pieces. 3. Geol. noting ...
clathrate
/klath"rayt/, adj. 1. Biol. resembling a lattice; divided or marked like latticework. n. 2. Chem. a substance in which a molecule of one compound fills a cavity within the ...
clathrin
/klath"rin/, n. Cell Biol. a basketlike network of protein molecules that forms on the cell membrane in response to the attachment of ligands to receptors and becomes the inside ...
clatter
—clatterer, n. —clatteringly, adv. —clattery, adj. /klat"euhr/, v.i. 1. to make a loud, rattling sound, as that produced by hard objects striking rapidly one against the ...
clatterer
See clatter. * * *
clattery
See clatterer. * * *
Clauberg, Johann
▪ German philosopher and theologian born Feb. 24, 1622, Solingen, duchy of Berg [Germany] died Jan. 31, 1665, Duisburg, Brandenburg  philosopher and theologian who became ...
claucht
/klawkht, klahkht/, v. a pt. of cleek. * * *
Claude
/klawd/; Fr. /klohd/, n. 1. Albert, 1899-1983, U.S. biologist, born in Belgium: Nobel prize for medicine 1974. 2. Also, Claud. a male given name: from a Roman family name meaning ...
Claude Lorrain
Claude Lorrain [klōd lō̂ ran′] (born Claude Gelée) 1600-82; Fr. painter * * * orig. Claude Gellée born с 1600, Chamagne, France died Nov. 23, 1682, Rome French ...
Claude Lorrain glass
▪ painting tool       black convex glass used by artists to reflect the landscape in miniature and, in doing so, to merge details and reduce the strength of colour so ...
Claude Of France
▪ queen of France French  Claude De France   born Oct. 14, 1499, Romorantin, France died July 20, 1524, Blois       queen consort of King Francis I of France (reigned ...
Claude, Albert
▪ Belgian cytologist born August 24, 1898, Longlier, Belgium died May 22, 1983, Brussels       Belgian-American cytologist who developed the principal methods of ...
Claude, Georges
▪ French engineer born Sept. 24, 1870, Paris, France died May 23, 1960, Saint-Cloud  engineer, chemist, and inventor of the neon light, which found widespread use in signs ...
Claudel
/kloh del"/, n. Paul (Louis Charles) /pawl lwee shannrddl/, 1868-1955, French diplomat, poet, and dramatist. * * *
Claudel, Camille
▪ French artist in full  Camille-Rosalie Claudel  born Dec. 8, 1864, Villeneuve-sur-Fère, Fr. died Oct. 19, 1943, Montdevergues asylum, Montfavet, near ...
Claudel, Camille (-Rosalie)
born Dec. 8, 1864, Villeneuve-sur-Fère, Fr. died Oct. 19, 1943, Montdevergues asylum, Montfavet French sculptor. She was educated with her brother, Paul Claudel, and by her ...
Claudel, Paul
▪ French author in full  Paul-Louis-Charles-Marie Claudel  born Aug. 6, 1868, Villeneuve-sur-Fère, Fr. died Feb. 23, 1955, Paris  poet, playwright, essayist, a towering ...
Claudel, Paul (-Louis-Charles-Marie)
born Aug. 6, 1868, Villeneuve-sur-Fère, France died Feb. 23, 1955, Paris French poet, playwright, and diplomat. He converted to Catholicism at age 18. His brilliant diplomatic ...
Claudel,Camille
Clau·del (klō-dĕlʹ), Camille. 1864-1943. French sculptor best known for her bust models of Auguste Rodin (1888-1892). * * *
Claudel,Paul Louis Charles
Claudel, Paul Louis Charles. 1868-1955. French diplomat and writer whose works include poetry and a number of plays, such as Tidings Brought to Mary (1912). * * *

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