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Слова на букву de k-enol (15990)

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disc
/disk/, n. 1. a phonograph record. 2. disk (defs. 1, 2, 4-9). v.t. 3. Informal. to make (a recording) on a phonograph disc. 4. disk (defs. 11, 12). Also, disk (for defs. 1, ...
disc brake
Auto. a brake system in which a disc attached to a wheel is slowed by the friction of brake pads being pressed against the disc by a caliper. Also, disk brake. [1900-05] * * *
disc camera
a camera that accepts a film cartridge in the form of a rotatable disc with film frames mounted around the outer edge. * * *
disc film
film used in a disc camera. * * *
disc harrow
☆ disc harrow n. DISK HARROW * * *
disc jockey
☆ disc jockey n. a person who conducts a radio program of recorded music, esp. popular music, or one who plays recorded music for dancing at a disco, party, etc. * * * ▪ ...
disc jockey (DJ)
Person who plays recorded music on radio or television or at a nightclub or other live venue. Disc jockey programs became the economic base of many radio stations in the U.S. ...
disc jockey.
1. a person who conducts a radio broadcast consisting of recorded music, informal talk, commercial announcements, etc. 2. a person who selects, plays, and announces records at a ...
disc player.
See videodisc player. * * *
disc-
disc- pref. Variant of disco-. * * *
disc.
1. discount. 2. discovered. * * *
discalced
/dis kalst"/, adj. (chiefly of members of certain religious orders) without shoes; unshod; barefoot. Also, discalceate /dis kal"see it, -ayt'/. Cf. calced. [1625-35; part trans. ...
discant
—discanter, n. n. /dis"kant/; v. /dis kant"/, n. 1. Also, discantus /dis kan"teuhs/. Music. a 13th-century polyphonic style with strict mensural meter in all the voice parts, ...
discard
—discardable, adj. —discarder, n. v. /di skahrd"/; n. /dis"kahrd/, v.t. 1. to cast aside or dispose of; get rid of: to discard an old hat. 2. Cards. a. to throw out (a card ...
discardable
See discard. * * *
discarder
See discardable. * * *
discarnate
—discarnation, n. /dis kahr"nit, -nayt/, adj. without a physical body; incorporeal. [1655-65; DIS1 + -carnate, as in INCARNATE] * * *
discase
/dis kays"/, v.t., discased, discasing. to take the case or covering from; uncase. [1590-1600; DIS-1 + CASE2] * * *
discbrake
disc brake also disk brake n. A brake in which the friction is caused by a set of pads that press against a rotating disk. * * *
discern
—discerner, n. /di serrn", -zerrn"/, v.t. 1. to perceive by the sight or some other sense or by the intellect; see, recognize, or apprehend: They discerned a sail on the ...
discerner
See discern. * * *
discernible
—discernibleness, discernableness, n. —discernibly, discernably, adv. /di serr"neuh beuhl, -zerr"-/, adj. capable of being discerned; distinguishable. Also, ...
discernibly
See discernible. * * *
discerning
—discerningly, adv. /di serr"ning, -zerr"-/, adj. showing good or outstanding judgment and understanding: a discerning critic of French poetry. [1600-10; DISCERN + -ING2] Syn. ...
discerningly
See discerning. * * *
discernment
/di serrn"meuhnt, -zerrn"-/, n. 1. the faculty of discerning; discrimination; acuteness of judgment and understanding. 2. the act or an instance of discerning. [1580-90; < MF ...
discerptible
—discerptibility, discerptibleness, n. /di serrp"teuh beuhl, -zerrp"-/, adj. capable of being torn apart; divisible. [1730-40; < L discerpt(us) torn to pieces (ptp. of ...
Disch, Thomas Michael
▪ 2009       American science-fiction writer and poet born Feb. 2, 1940, Des Moines, Iowa died July 4, 2008, New York, N.Y. authored works of scathing social ...
discharge
—dischargeable, adj. —discharger, n. v. /dis chahrj"/; n. /dis"chahrj, dis chahrj"/, v., discharged, discharging, n. v.t. 1. to relieve of a charge or load; unload: to ...
discharge lamp
a lamp in which light is produced by an electric discharge in a gas-filled glass enclosure. [1935-40] * * *
discharge printing
a fabric-printing method in which the material is dyed and then certain areas are discharged so as to permit the original hue or its color replacement to act as a pattern against ...
discharge tube
Electronics. See gas tube. [1895-1900] * * *
dischargeable
See discharge. * * *
discharged
➡ juries * * *
dischargee
/dis'chahr jee"/, n. a person who has been discharged, as from military service. [1890-95; DISCHARGE + -EE] * * *
dischargelamp
discharge lamp n. A lamp that generates light by means of an internal electrical discharge between electrodes in a gas. * * *
discharger
See dischargeable. * * *
dischargetube
discharge tube n. A closed insulating vessel containing a gas at low pressure through which an electric current flows when sufficient voltage is applied to its electrodes. * * *
discharging arch
an arch for taking some of the weight from a structural member beneath it. Also called relieving arch. [1810-20] * * *
discharrow
disc harrow n. Variant of disk harrow. * * *
disci-
disci- pref. Variant of disco-. * * *
discifloral
/dis'i flawr"euhl, -flohr"-/, adj. Bot. having flowers in which the receptacle is expanded into a conspicuous disk, as in composite plants. [1870-75; DISC + -I- + FLORAL] * * *
disciform
dis·ci·form (dĭsʹə-fôrm', dĭsʹkə-) adj. Flat and rounded in shape; discoid: disciform fungi. * * *
disciple
—disciplelike, adj. —discipleship, n. /di suy"peuhl/, n., v., discipled, discipling. n. 1. Relig. a. one of the 12 personal followers of Christ. b. one of the 70 followers ...
Disciples of Christ
a Christian denomination, founded in the U.S. by Alexander Campbell in the early part of the 19th century, that rejects all creeds, holds the Bible as a sufficient rule of faith ...
discipleship
See disciple. * * *
Disciplesof Christ
Dis·ci·ples of Christ (dĭ-sīʹpəlz) pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) A Christian denomination founded in 1809 that accepts the Bible as the only rule of Christian ...
disciplinable
/dis"euh plin'euh beuhl/, adj. 1. subject to or meriting disciplinary action: a disciplinable breach of rules. 2. capable of being instructed. [1425-75; late ME < MF < LL ...
disciplinal
See discipline. * * *
disciplinarian
/dis'euh pleuh nair"ee euhn/, n. 1. a person who enforces or advocates discipline: The teacher was a formidable disciplinarian. adj. 2. disciplinary. [1575-85; DISCIPLINE + ...
disciplinarily
See disciplinary. * * *
disciplinarity
See disciplinarily. * * *
disciplinary
/dis"euh pleuh ner'ee/, adj. of, for, or constituting discipline; enforcing or administering discipline: disciplinary action. [1575-85; DISCIPLINE + -ARY] * * *
discipline
—disciplinal /dis"euh pleuh nl, -plin'l, dis'euh pluyn"l/, adj. —discipliner, n. /dis"euh plin/, n., v., disciplined, disciplining. n. 1. training to act in accordance with ...
disciplined
/dis"euh plind/, adj. having or exhibiting discipline; rigorous: paintings characterized by a disciplined technique. [1350-1400; ME. See DISCIPLINE, -ED2] * * *
discipliner
See disciplinal. * * *
discission
/di sish"euhn/, n. Ophthalm. an incision of the lens of the eye, as for removal of cataract. [1640-50; < LL discission- (s. of discissio) division, separation, equiv. to L ...
discjockey
disc jockey also disk jockey n. An announcer who presents and comments on popular recorded music, especially on the radio; a DJ. * * *
disclaim
/dis klaym"/, v.t. 1. to deny or repudiate interest in or connection with; disavow; disown: disclaiming all participation. 2. Law. to renounce a claim or right to. 3. to reject ...
disclaimed
➡ peerage * * *
disclaimer
/dis klay"meuhr/, n. 1. the act of disclaiming; the renouncing, repudiating, or denying of a claim; disavowal. 2. a person who disclaims. 3. a statement, document, or assertion ...
disclamation
—disclamatory /dis klam"euh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj. /dis'kleuh may"sheuhn/, n. the act of disclaiming; renunciation; disavowal. [1585-95; < ML disclamat(us) (ptp. of ...
disclimax
/dis kluy"maks/, n. Ecol. a stable community that has replaced the normal climax in a given area, owing to disturbance by humans or domestic animals. [1935-40; DIS-1 + CLIMAX] * ...
disclosable
See disclose. * * *
disclose
—discloser, n. /di sklohz"/, v., disclosed, disclosing, n. v.t. 1. to make known; reveal or uncover: to disclose a secret. 2. to cause to appear; allow to be seen; lay open to ...
discloser
See disclosable. * * *
disclosing
/di skloh"zing/, adj. indicating or involving a substance used to reveal the presence of plaque on the teeth by staining the plaque. [DISCLOSE + -ING2] * * *
disclosingagent
dis·clos·ing agent (dĭ-sklōʹzĭng) n. A dye used in dentistry as a diagnostic aid, applied to the teeth to reveal the presence of dental plaque. Also called disclosing ...
disclosure
/di skloh"zheuhr/, n. 1. the act or an instance of disclosing; exposure; revelation. 2. that which is disclosed; a revelation. 3. Patent Law. (in a patent application) the ...
disco
/dis"koh/, n., pl. discos, adj., v. n. 1. discotheque. 2. a style of popular music for dancing, usually recorded and with complex electronic instrumentation, in which simple, ...
disco-
disco- [dis′kō, dis′kə] 〚< L discus, DISCUS〛 combining form 1. disk-shaped; discoid 2. phonograph record [discography] * * * disco- or disc- also disci- pref. 1. ...
Discoglossidae
▪ toad family       family of frogs (order Anura) containing the midwife toad (Alytes, four species) and the painted frog (Discoglossus, six species). Both genera are ...
discographer
/di skog"reuh feuhr/, n. a person who compiles discographies. [1940-45; DISCOGRAPH(Y) + -ER1] * * *
discographic
See discographer. * * *
discographical
See discographer. * * *
discography
—discographical /dis'keuh graf"i keuhl/, discographic, adj. —discographically, adv. /di skog"reuh fee/, n., pl. discographies. 1. a selective or complete list of phonograph ...
discoid
/dis"koyd/, adj. Also, discoidal. 1. having the form of a discus or disk; flat and circular. 2. Bot. (of a composite flower) consisting of a disk only, without rays. n. 3. ...
discolor
/dis kul"euhr/, v.t. 1. to change or spoil the color of; fade or stain. v.i. 2. to change color; become faded or stained. [1350-1400; ME discolouren < OF descolorer < LL ...
discoloration
/dis kul'euh ray"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or fact of discoloring or the state of being discolored. 2. a discolored marking or area; stain. Also called discolorment. [1635-45; ...
discolour
discolour [dis΄kul′ər] vt., vi. Brit. sp. of DISCOLOR * * *
discombobulate
—discombobulation, n. /dis'keuhm bob"yeuh layt'/, v.t., discombobulated, discombobulating. to confuse or disconcert; upset; frustrate: The speaker was completely ...
discombobulation
See discombobulate. * * *
discomfit
—discomfiter, n. /dis kum"fit/, v.t. 1. to confuse and deject; disconcert: to be discomfited by a question. 2. to frustrate the plans of; thwart; foil. 3. Archaic. to defeat ...
discomfiture
/dis kum"fi cheuhr/, n. 1. disconcertion; confusion; embarrassment. 2. frustration of hopes or plans. 3. Archaic. defeat in battle; rout. [1300-50; ME desconfiture < AF: defeat. ...
discomfort
—discomfortable /dis kum"feuhr teuh beuhl, -kumf"teuh-/, adj. —discomfortingly, adv. /dis kum"feuhrt/, n. 1. an absence of comfort or ease; uneasiness, hardship, or mild ...
discomfortable
discomfortable [dis kum′fərt ə bəl, dis′ kum′fərt ə bəl] adj. 〚ME < OFr desconfortable〛 Archaic causing discomfort * * * See discomfort. * * *
discomfortingly
See discomfortable. * * *
discommend
—discommender, n. /dis'keuh mend"/, v.t. 1. to express disapproval of; belittle; disparage. The diners discommended the wine. 2. to bring into disfavor: He was discommended for ...
discommendable
See discommend. * * *
discommode
—discommodious, adj. —discommodiously, adv. —discommodiousness, n. /dis'keuh mohd"/, v.t., discommoded, discommoding. to cause inconvenience to; disturb, trouble, or ...
discommodity
/dis'keuh mod"i tee/, n., pl. discommodities. Archaic. 1. inconvenience; disadvantageousness. 2. a source of inconvenience or trouble; disadvantage. [1505-15; DIS-1 + ...
discommon
/dis kom"euhn/, v.t. 1. (at Oxford and Cambridge) to prohibit (tradespeople or townspeople who have violated the regulations of the university) from dealing with the ...
discompose
—discomposedly, adv. —discomposingly, adv. /dis'keuhm pohz"/, v.t., discomposed, discomposing. 1. to upset the order of; disarrange; disorder; unsettle: The breeze ...
discomposedly
See discompose. * * *
discomposingly
See discomposedly. * * *
discomposure
/dis'keuhm poh"zheuhr/, n. the state of being discomposed; disorder; agitation; perturbation. [1635-45; DIS-1 + COMPOSURE] * * *
discomycete
/dis'koh muy"seet, -muy seet"/, n. Mycol. any of a group of fungi considered as belonging to the class Ascomycetes of the kingdom Plantae, including cup fungi, morels, and ...
discomycota
/dis'koh muy koh"teuh/, n.pl. Mycol. the discomycetes considered as belonging to the phylum Ascomycota of the kingdom Fungi. [ < NL; see DISCOMYCETE, -OTE] * * *
disconcert
—disconcerted, adj. —disconcertingly, adv. —disconcertingness, n. —disconcertion, disconcertment, n. /dis'keuhn serrt"/, v.t. 1. to disturb the self-possession of; ...
disconcertingly
See disconcert. * * *
disconfirm
—disconfirmation /dis kon'feuhr may"sheuhn, dis'kon-/, n. /dis'keuhn ferrm"/, v.t. to prove to be invalid. [1935-40; DIS- + CONFIRM] * * *
disconformable
/dis'keuhn fawr"meuh beuhl/, adj. Geol. of or pertaining to a disconformity. [1900-05; DIS-1 + CONFORMABLE] * * *
disconformity
/dis'keuhn fawr"mi tee/, n., pl. disconformities. 1. Geol. the surface of a division between parallel rock strata, indicating interruption of sedimentation: a type of ...
discongruity
/dis'keuhn grooh"i tee, -keuhng-/, n., pl. discongruities. Obs. incongruity. [1615-25; DIS-1 + CONGRUITY] * * *
disconnect
—disconnecter, n. —disconnective, adj. —disconnectiveness, n. /dis'keuh nekt"/, v.t. 1. to sever or interrupt the connection of or between; detach: They disconnected the ...
disconnected
—disconnectedly, adv. —disconnectedness, n. /dis'keuh nek"tid/, adj. 1. disjointed; broken. 2. not coherent; seemingly irrational: a disconnected argument. [1775-85; ...
disconnectedly
See disconnected. * * *
disconnectedness
See disconnectedly. * * *
disconnection
/dis'keuh nek"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of disconnecting. 2. the state of being disconnected; lack of connection. Also, Brit., disconnexion. [1725-35; DIS-1 + CONNECTION] * * *
disconsolate
—disconsolately, adv. —disconsolation /dis kon'seuh lay"sheuhn/, disconsolateness, n. /dis kon"seuh lit/, adj. 1. without consolation or solace; hopelessly unhappy; ...
disconsolately
See disconsolate. * * *
disconsolateness
See disconsolately. * * *
disconsolation
See disconsolately. * * *
discontent
/dis'keuhn tent"/, adj. 1. not content; dissatisfied; discontented. n. 2. Also, discontentment. lack of content; dissatisfaction. 3. a restless desire or craving for something ...
discontented
—discontentedly, adv. —discontentedness, n. /dis'keuhn ten"tid/, adj. not content or satisfied; dissatisfied; restlessly unhappy: For all their wealth, or perhaps because of ...
discontentedly
See discontented. * * *
discontentedness
See discontentedly. * * *
discontentment
See discontent. * * *
discontinuance
/dis'keuhn tin"yooh euhns/, n. 1. the act or state of discontinuing or the state of being discontinued; cessation: the discontinuance of a business. 2. Law. the termination of a ...
discontinuation
/dis'keuhn tin'yooh ay"sheuhn/, n. a breach or interruption of continuity or unity: Progress was delayed by repeated discontinuations of work. [1605-15; < MF < ML ...
discontinue
—discontinuer, n. /dis'keuhn tin"yooh/, v., discontinued, discontinuing. v.t. 1. to put an end to; stop; terminate: to discontinue nuclear testing. 2. to cease to take, use, ...
discontinuity
/dis'kon tn ooh"i tee, -yooh"-/, n., pl. discontinuities. 1. lack of continuity; irregularity: The plot of the book was marred by discontinuity. 2. a break or gap: The surface of ...
discontinuous
—discontinuously, adv. —discontinuousness, n. /dis'keuhn tin"yooh euhs/, adj. 1. not continuous; broken; interrupted; intermittent: a discontinuous chain of mountains; a ...
discontinuously
See discontinuous. * * *
discontinuousness
See discontinuously. * * *
discontinuousvariation
discontinuous variation n. Variation within a population in which few or no intermediate phenotypes fall between the extremes. * * *
discophile
/dis"keuh fuyl'/, n. a person who studies and collects phonograph records, esp. those of a rare or specialized nature. [1935-40; DISC + -O- + -PHILE] * * *
discord
n. /dis"kawrd/; v. /dis kawrd"/, n. 1. lack of concord or harmony between persons or things: marital discord. 2. disagreement; difference of opinion. 3. strife; dispute; war. 4. ...
discordance
/dis kawr"dns/, n. 1. a discordant state; disagreement; discord. 2. an instance of this. 3. dissonance. 4. Geol. lack of parallelism between adjacent strata, as in an angular ...
discordancy
/dis kawr"dn see/, n., pl. discordancies. discordance (defs. 1-3). [1600-10; DISCORDANCE + -Y3] * * *
discordant
—discordantly, adv. /dis kawr"dnt/, adj. 1. being at variance; disagreeing; incongruous: discordant opinions. 2. disagreeable to the ear; dissonant; harsh. 3. Geol. (of strata) ...
discordantly
See discordancy. * * *
Discordia
/dis kawr"dee euh/, n. the ancient Roman goddess of discord, identified with the Greek goddess Eris. [ < L: DISCORD] * * *
discotheque
/dis"keuh tek', dis'keuh tek"/, n. a nightclub for dancing to live or recorded music and often featuring sophisticated sound systems, elaborate lighting, and other effects. Also, ...
discount
—discountable, adj. v. /dis"kownt, dis kownt"/; n., adj. /dis"kownt/, v.t. 1. to deduct a certain amount from (a bill, charge, etc.): All bills that are paid promptly will be ...
discount broker
—discount brokerage. 1. an agent who discounts commercial paper. 2. a stockbroker who charges discount commission fees. [1860-65] * * *
discount house
1. Also called discount store. a store that sells much of its merchandise at a price below the usual price. 2. Brit. See bill broker. [1945-50] * * *
discount market
a trading market in which notes, bills, and other negotiable instruments are discounted. [1890-95] * * *
discount rate
Finance. 1. the rate of interest charged in discounting commercial paper. 2. the interest rate charged by Federal Reserve Banks on loans to their member banks, usually against ...
discount store
▪ merchandising       in merchandising, a retail store that sells products at prices lower than those asked by traditional retail outlets. Some discount stores are ...
discountable
See discount. * * *
discountbroker
discount broker n. 1. An agent who discounts a bill, note, or other commercial paper. 2. A stockbroker or brokerage house that gives a discount on commission fees.   discount ...
discountbrokerage
See discount broker. * * *
discountenance
—discountenancer, n. /dis kown"tn euhns/, v., discountenanced, discountenancing, n. v.t. 1. to disconcert, embarrass, or abash: With his composure, he survived every attempt to ...
discounter
/dis"kown teuhr/, n. 1. a person who discounts. 2. a person who operates a discount house or business. 3. Informal. a discount house. 4. See discount broker. [1725-35; DISCOUNT + ...
discounthouse
discount house n. See discount store. * * *
discountrate
discount rate n. 1. The interest deducted in advance in purchasing, selling, or lending a commercial paper. 2. The interest rate charged by a central bank on loans to its member ...
discountstore
discount store n. A store that sells merchandise, especially consumer goods, at a discount from the manufacturer's suggested retail price. Also called discounter, discount ...
discourage
—discourager, n. —discourageable, adj. —discouragingly, adv. /di skerr"ij, -skur"-/, v., discouraged, discouraging. v.t. 1. to deprive of courage, hope, or confidence; ...
discourageable
See discourage. * * *
discouragement
/di skerr"ij meuhnt, -skur"-/, n. 1. an act or instance of discouraging. 2. the state of being discouraged. 3. something that discourages: Poor health and poverty are grave ...
discourager
See discourageable. * * *
discouraging
discouraging [di skʉr′ijiŋ] adj. that discourages; disheartening; depressing discouragingly adv. * * *
discouragingly
See discourageable. * * *
discourse
—discourser, n. n. /dis"kawrs, -kohrs, dis kawrs", -kohrs"/; v. /dis kawrs", -kohrs"/, n., v., discoursed, discoursing. n. 1. communication of thought by words; talk; ...
discourse analysis
Ling. 1. the study of the rules or patterns characterizing units of connected speech or writing longer than a sentence. 2. the study of the rules governing appropriate language ...
discourser
See discourse. * * *
discourteous
—discourteously, adv. —discourteousness, n. /dis kerr"tee euhs/, adj. not courteous; impolite; uncivil; rude: a discourteous salesman. [1570-80; DIS-1 + COURTEOUS] * * *
discourteously
See discourteous. * * *
discourteousness
See discourteously. * * *
discourtesy
/dis kerr"teuh see/, n., pl. discourtesies. 1. lack or breach of courtesy; incivility; rudeness. 2. a discourteous or impolite act. [1545-55; DIS-1 + COURTESY] * * *
discover
—discoverable, adj. —discoverably, adv. /di skuv"euhr/, v.t. 1. to see, get knowledge of, learn of, find, or find out; gain sight or knowledge of (something previously unseen ...
discoverable
See discover. * * *
discovered check
Chess. a check that is effected by moving an intervening piece from the line of attack of a queen, rook, or bishop. [1840-50] * * *
discoverer
/di skuv"euhr euhr/, n. 1. a person who discovers. 2. (cap.) U.S. Aerospace. one of an early series of polar-orbiting reconnaissance satellites. [1250-1300; ME < OF descovreur. ...
discoverist
/di skuv"euhr ist/, adj. Educ. advocating or using the discovery method. [DISCOVER(Y) + -IST] * * *
discovert
/dis kuv"euhrt/, adj. Law. (of a woman) not covert; not under the protection of a husband. [1250-1300; ME < AF discoverte, descoverte (fem. adj.). See DIS-1, COVERT] * * *
discoverture
/dis kuv"euhr cheuhr/, n. Law. the state of being discovert; freedom from coverture. [1810-20; DISCOVERT + -URE] * * *
discovery
/di skuv"euh ree/, n., pl. discoveries. 1. the act or an instance of discovering. 2. something discovered. 3. Law. compulsory disclosure, as of facts or documents. 4. (cap., ...
Discovery Bay
▪ bay, Australia       wide curved bay indenting the south coast of Australia. An inlet of the Indian Ocean, it is 50 miles (80 km) across and is bounded on the east by ...
Discovery Channel
a major US cable television channel, which offers programmes on history, technology, nature and adventure. * * *
Discovery Club
a division of Camp Fire, Inc., for members who are 12 or 13 years of age. * * *
Discovery Day
☆ Discovery Day n. COLUMBUS DAY * * *
Discovery Day.
See Columbus Day. * * *
Discovery Inlet
an inlet of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. * * *
discovery method
Educ. a largely unstructured, situational method or philosophy of teaching whereby students are permitted to find solutions to problems on their own or at their own pace, often ...
Discovery of the Transuranium Elements, Table
▪ Table Table 27: Discovery of the Transuranium Elements atomic number element symbol atomic  weight   discoverers and  date of discovery source of first  preparation ...
discovery procedure
Ling. any rigorous method by the application of which a grammar might be constructed from a corpus of utterances in a language; an algorithm leading from data to a formulation. * ...
discreate
—discreation, n. /dis'kree ayt"/, v.t., discreated, discreating. to reduce to nothing; annihilate. [1560-70; DIS1- + CREATE] * * *
discredit
/dis kred"it/, v.t. 1. to injure the credit or reputation of; defame: an effort to discredit honest politicians. 2. to show to be undeserving of trust or belief; destroy ...
discreditable
—discreditability, n. —discreditably, adv. /dis kred"i teuh beuhl/, adj. bringing or liable to bring discredit. [1630-40; DISCREDIT + -ABLE] * * *
discreditably
See discreditable. * * *
discreet
—discreetly, adv. —discreetness, n. /di skreet"/, adj. 1. judicious in one's conduct or speech, esp. with regard to respecting privacy or maintaining silence about something ...
discreetly
See discreet. * * *
discreetness
See discreetly. * * *
discrepance
dis·crep·ance (dĭ-skrĕpʹəns) n. Discrepancy. * * *
discrepancy
/di skrep"euhn see/, n., pl. discrepancies for 2. 1. the state or quality of being discrepant; difference; inconsistency. 2. an instance of difference or inconsistency: There are ...
discrepant
—discrepantly, adv. /di skrep"euhnt/, adj. (usually of two or more objects, accounts, findings etc.) differing; disagreeing; inconsistent: discrepant accounts. [1400-50; late ...
discrepantly
See discrepant. * * *
discrete
—discretely, adv. —discreteness, n. /di skreet"/, adj. 1. apart or detached from others; separate; distinct: six discrete parts. 2. consisting of or characterized by distinct ...
discretely
See discrete. * * *
discreteness
See discretely. * * *
discretevariable
discrete variable n. A variable that assumes only values in a discrete set, such as the integers. * * *
discretion
/di skresh"euhn/, n. 1. the power or right to decide or act according to one's own judgment; freedom of judgment or choice: It is entirely within my discretion whether I will go ...
discretional
—discretionally, adv. /di skresh"euh nl/, adj. discretionary. [1650-60; DISCRETION + -AL1] * * *
discretionally
See discretional. * * *
discretionarily
See discretionary. * * *
discretionary
—discretionarily, adv. /di skresh"euh ner'ee/, adj. 1. subject or left to one's own discretion. 2. for any use or purpose one chooses; not earmarked for a particular purpose: ...
discretionary account
an account in which the stockbroker is allowed complete control over the purchase and sale of securities on the customer's behalf. [1915-20] * * *
discretionary incomes
➡ standards of living * * *
discretionaryaccount
discretionary account n. A stock or commodity account in which an agent is free to trade without prior consultation with the customer. * * *
discretionaryincome
discretionary income n. Individual income that is not allocated for necessary items such as food and shelter. * * *
discretization
dis·cret·i·za·tion (dĭ-skrē'tĭ-zāʹshən) n. The act of making mathematically discrete. * * *
discriminability
dis·crim·i·na·bil·i·ty (dĭ-skrĭm'ə-nə-bĭlʹĭ-tē) n. 1. The quality of being discriminable. 2. The capacity or power to discriminate. * * *
discriminable
—discriminability, n. —discriminably, adv. /di skrim"euh neuh beuhl/, adj. capable of being discriminated or distinguished. [1720-30; DISCRIMIN(ATE) + -ABLE] * * *
discriminably
See discriminable. * * *
discriminant
—discriminantal /dis krim'euh nan"tl/, adj. /di skrim"euh neuhnt/, n. Math. a relatively simple expression that determines some of the properties, as the nature of the roots, ...
discriminant function
Statistics. a linear function of measurements of different properties of an object or event that is used to assign the object or event to one population or another (discriminant ...
discriminantfunction
discriminant function n. Statistics A function of a set of variables used to classify an object or event. * * *
discriminate
—discriminately, adv. v. /di skrim"euh nayt'/; adj. /di skrim"euh nit/, v., discriminated, discriminating, adj. v.i. 1. to make a distinction in favor of or against a person or ...
discriminately
See discriminate. * * *
discriminating
—discriminatingly, adv. /di skrim"euh nay'ting/, adj. 1. differentiating; analytical. 2. noting differences or distinctions with nicety; discerning; perspicacious: a ...
discriminatingly
See discriminating. * * *
discrimination
—discriminational, adj. /di skrim'euh nay"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of discriminating. 2. treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, ...
discriminational
See discrimination. * * *
discriminative
—discriminatively, adv. /di skrim"euh nay'tiv, -neuh tiv/, adj. 1. constituting a particular quality, trait, or difference; characteristic; notable. 2. making distinctions; ...
discriminatively
See discriminative. * * *
discriminator
/di skrim"euh nay'teuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that discriminates. 2. Electronics. a circuit in which the output is a function of some variation of an input signal from a ...
discriminatorily
See discriminatory. * * *
discriminatory
—discriminatorily, adv. /di skrim"euh neuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj. 1. characterized by or showing prejudicial treatment, esp. as an indication of racial, religious, or sexual ...
discrown
/dis krown"/, v.t. to deprive of a crown; dethrone; depose. [1580-90; DIS-1 + CROWN] * * *
discursion
/di skerr"sheuhn/, n. 1. an instance of discursive writing, speech, etc.; a wandering or logically unconnected statement. 2. the quality or characteristic of ranging from topic ...
discursive
—discursively, adv. —discursiveness, n. /di skerr"siv/, adj. 1. passing aimlessly from one subject to another; digressive; rambling. 2. proceeding by reasoning or argument ...
discursively
See discursive. * * *
discursiveness
See discursively. * * *
discus
/dis"keuhs/, n., pl. discuses, disci /dis"uy/. 1. a circular disk more than 7 in. (18 cm) in diameter and 2.2 lb. (1 kg) in weight, usually wooden with a metal rim and thicker in ...
discus fish
      two species of the genus Symphysodon of fishes in the family Cichlidae (order Perciformes), characterized by a compressed, disk-shaped body. The two species (S. ...
discus throw
Track-and-field sport of hurling for distance a disk-shaped object known as a discus. The discus is 8.6 in. (219 mm) in diameter and is thicker in the centre than at the ...
discuss
—discusser, n. —discussable, discussible, adj. /di skus"/, v.t. 1. to consider or examine by argument, comment, etc.; talk over or write about, esp. to explore solutions; ...
discussable
See discuss. * * *
discussant
/di skus"euhnt/, n. a person who participates in a formal discussion or symposium and is responsible for a specific topic. [1925-30, Amer.; DISCUSS + -ANT] * * *
discusser
See discussable. * * *
discussible
See discussable. * * *
discussion
—discussional, adj. /di skush"euhn/, n. an act or instance of discussing; consideration or examination by argument, comment, etc., esp. to explore solutions; informal ...
discussion sections
➡ higher education * * *
disdain
/dis dayn", di stayn"/, v.t. 1. to look upon or treat with contempt; despise; scorn. 2. to think unworthy of notice, response, etc.; consider beneath oneself: to disdain replying ...
disdainful
—disdainfully, adv. —disdainfulness, n. /dis dayn"feuhl, di stayn"-/, adj. full of or showing disdain; scornful. [1535-45; DISDAIN + -FUL] Syn. contemptuous, haughty, ...
disdainfully
See disdainful. * * *
disdainfulness
See disdainfully. * * *
Disdéri, André-Adolphe-Eugène
▪ French photographer born March 28, 1819, Paris, France died Oct. 4, 1889, Paris  French photographer noted for his popularization of the carte-de-visite, a small albumen ...
disease
—diseasedly, adv. —diseasedness, n. /di zeez"/, n., v., diseased, diseasing. n. 1. a disordered or incorrectly functioning organ, part, structure, or system of the body ...
diseased
/di zeezd"/, adj. having or affected with disease. [1425-75; late ME disesed; cf. AF diseasé. See DISEASE, -ED2] * * *
diseases
(as used in expressions) bacterial diseases fungal diseases protozoal diseases viral diseases * * *
diseconomy
/dis'i kon"euh mee/, n., pl. diseconomies for 2. 1. a lack of economy. 2. something that adds costs, as opposed to something that contributes to economy or efficiency. [1935-40; ...
disegno
/dee se"nyaw/, n. Italian. drawing or design: a term used during the 16th and 17th centuries to designate the formal discipline required for the representation of the ideal form ...
disembargo
/dis'em bahr"goh/, v.t., disembargoed, disembargoing. to remove an embargo from. [1875-80; DIS-1 + EMBARGO] * * *
disembark
—disembarkation /dis em'bahr kay"sheuhn/, disembarkment, n. /dis'em bahrk"/, v.i. 1. to go ashore from a ship. 2. to leave an aircraft or other vehicle. v.t. 3. to remove or ...
disembarkation
See disembark. * * *
disembarrass
—disembarrassment, n. /dis'em bar"euhs/, v.t. 1. to disentangle or extricate from something troublesome, embarrassing, or the like. 2. to relieve; rid. 3. to free from ...
disembarrassment
See disembarrass. * * *
disembodiment
See disembody. * * *
disembody
—disembodiment, n. /dis'em bod"ee/, v.t., disembodied, disembodying. to divest (a soul, spirit, etc.) of a body. [1705-15; DIS-1 + EMBODY] * * *
disembogue
—disemboguement, n. /dis'em bohg"/, v., disembogued, disemboguing. v.i. 1. to discharge contents by pouring forth. 2. to discharge water, as at the mouth of a stream: a river ...
disemboguement
See disembogue. * * *
disembosom
/dis'em booz"euhm, -booh"zeuhm/, v.t. 1. to reveal; divulge. 2. to unburden (oneself) of a secret. [1735-45; DIS-1 + EMBOSOM] * * *
disembowel
—disembowelment, n. /dis'em bow"euhl/, v.t., disemboweled, disemboweling or (esp. Brit.) disembowelled, disembowelling. 1. to remove the bowels or entrails from; eviscerate. 2. ...
disembowelment
See disembowel. * * *
disembroil
/dis'em broyl"/, v.t. to free from embroilment, entanglement, or confusion. [1615-25; DIS-1 + EMBROIL] * * *
disemploy
—disemployment, n. /dis'em ploy"/, v.t. to put out of work; cause to become unemployed. [1610-20; DIS- + EMPLOY] * * *
disemployed
disemployed [dis΄im ploid′] adj. out of work, esp. because of lack of skill, training, or education, rather than because work is unavailable disemployment n. * * *
disemployment
See disemploy. * * *
disempower
—disempowerment, n. /dis'em pow"euhr/, v.t. to deprive of influence, importance, etc.: Voters feel they have become disempowered by recent political events. [1805-15; DIS-1 + ...
disempowerment
See disempower. * * *
disenable
/dis'en ay"beuhl/, v.t., disenabled, disenabling. to deprive of ability; make unable; prevent. [1595-1605; DIS-1 + ENABLE] * * *
disenamor
/dis'i nam"euhr/, v.t. to disillusion; disenchant (usually used in the passive and fol. by of or with): He was disenamored of working in the city. Also, esp. Brit., ...


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