Слова на букву de k-enol (15990) Universalium
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Universalium →  !kun-arti arti-boom boom-chri chri-de k de k-enol enol-gano gano-hipp hipp-john john-lowe lowe-moth moth-oik oil-pius pius-ramp ramp-schw schw-stag stag-tils tils-unre unre-work


Слова на букву de k-enol (15990)

<< < 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 > >>
disenchant
—disenchanter, n. —disenchanting, adj. —disenchantingly, adv. —disenchantment, n. /dis'en chant", -chahnt"/, v.t. to rid of or free from enchantment, illusion, credulity, ...
disenchanter
See disenchant. * * *
disenchantingly
See disenchanter. * * *
disenchantment
See disenchanter. * * *
disencumber
/dis'en kum"beuhr/, v.t. to free from a burden or other encumbrance; disburden. [1590-1600; < MF desencombrer, equiv. to des- DIS-1 + encombrer to ENCUMBER] Syn. disentangle, ...
disencumberment
See disencumber. * * *
disendow
—disendower, n. —disendowment, n. /dis'en dow"/, v.t. to deprive (a church, school, etc.) of endowment. [1860-65; DIS-1 + ENDOW] * * *
disendower
See disendow. * * *
disendowment
See disendower. * * *
disenfranchise
—disenfranchisement /dis'en fran"chuyz meuhnt, -chiz-/, n. /dis'en fran"chuyz/, v.t., disenfranchised, disenfranchising. to disfranchise. [1620-30; DIS-1 + ENFRANCHISE] * * *
disenfranchisement
See disenfranchise. * * *
disengage
—disengagedness /dis'en gay"jid nis, -gayjd"-/, n. /dis'en gayj"/, v., disengaged, disengaging. v.t. 1. to release from attachment or connection; loosen; unfasten: to disengage ...
disengaged
disengaged [dis΄in gājd′] adj. 1. having no engagements; at leisure 2. set loose; detached 3. not in gear * * *
disengagement
/dis'en gayj"meuhnt/, n. 1. the act or process of disengaging or the state of being disengaged. 2. freedom from obligation or occupation; leisure. 3. Obstet. (during childbirth) ...
disenroll
—disenrollment, n. /dis'en rohl"/, v.t. to dismiss or cause to become removed from a program of training, care, etc.: The academy disenrolled a dozen cadets. [1625-35; DIS-1 + ...
disentail
—disentailment, n. /dis'en tayl"/, v.t. Law. to free (an estate) from entail. [1635-45; DIS-1 + ENTAIL] * * *
disentailment
See disentail. * * *
disentangle
—disentanglement, n. —disentangler, n. /dis'en tang"geuhl/, v.t., v.i., disentangled, disentangling. to free or become free from entanglement; untangle; extricate (often fol. ...
disentanglement
See disentangle. * * *
disenthral
—disenthralment, n. /dis'en thrawl"/, v.t., disenthralled, disenthralling. disenthrall. * * *
disenthrall
—disenthrallment, n. /dis'en thrawl"/, v.t. to free from bondage; liberate: to be disenthralled from morbid fantasies. [1635-45; DIS-1 + ENTHRALL] * * *
disenthrone
—disenthronement, n. /dis'en throhn"/, v.t., disenthroned, disenthroning. to dethrone. [1600-10; DIS-1 + ENTHRONE] * * *
disentitle
—disentitlement, n. /dis'en tuyt"l/, v.t., disentitled, disentitling. to deprive of title or right. [1645-55; DIS-1 + ENTITLE] * * *
disentomb
—disentombment, n. /dis'en toohm"/, v.t. to remove from the tomb; disinter. [1620-30; DIS-1 + ENTOMB] * * *
disentrance
—disentrancement, n. /dis'en trans", -trahns"/, v.t., disentranced, disentrancing. to bring out of an entranced condition; disenchant. [1655-65; DIS-1 + ENTRANCE2] * * *
disepalous
/duy sep"euh leuhs/, adj. Bot. having two sepals. [1835-45; DI-1 + -SEPALOUS] * * *
disequilibrate
—disequilibration, n. /dis'i kwil"euh brayt', dis ee'kweuh luy"brayt/, v.t., disequilibrated, disequilibrating. to put out of equilibrium; unbalance: A period of high inflation ...
disequilibration
See disequilibrate. * * *
disequilibrium
/dis ee'kweuh lib"ree euhm, dis'ee-/, n. lack of equilibrium; imbalance. [1830-40; DIS-1 + EQUILIBRIUM] * * *
disestablish
—disestablishment, n. /dis'i stab"lish/, v.t. 1. to deprive of the character of being established; cancel; abolish. 2. to withdraw exclusive state recognition or support from ...
disestablishment
See disestablish. * * *
disestablishmentarian
—disestablishmentarianism, n. /dis'i stab'lish meuhn tair"ee euhn/, n. 1. a person who favors the separation of church and state, esp. the withdrawal of special rights, status, ...
disestablishmentarianism
See disestablishmentarian. * * *
disesteem
/dis'i steem"/, v.t. 1. to hold in low regard; think unfavorably of. n. 2. lack of esteem; disfavor; low regard. [1585-95; DIS-1 + ESTEEM] * * *
diseur
/dee zerr"/; Fr. /dee zuerdd"/, n., pl. diseurs /-zerrz"/; Fr. /-zuerdd"/. a male professional entertainer who performs monologues. [ < F: lit., speaker, OF, equiv. to dis- (s. ...
diseuse
Fr. /dee zuez"/, n., pl. diseuses /-zuez"/. a female professional entertainer who performs monologues. [1895-1900; < F, fem. of diseur DISEUR; see -EUSE] * * *
disfavor
—disfavorer; esp. Brit., disfavourer, n. /dis fay"veuhr/, n. 1. unfavorable regard; displeasure; disesteem; dislike: The prime minister incurred the king's disfavor. 2. the ...
disfeature
—disfeaturement, n. /dis fee"cheuhr/, v.t., disfeatured, disfeaturing. to mar the features of; disfigure. [1650-60; DIS-1 + FEATURE] * * *
disfeaturement
See disfeature. * * *
disfellowship
/dis fel"oh ship'/, n., v., disfellowshiped, disfellowshiping or (esp. Brit.) disfellowshipped, disfellowshipping. n. 1. (in some Protestant religions) the status of a member ...
disfiguration
See disfigure. * * *
disfigure
—disfigurer, n. /dis fig"yeuhr/; Brit. /dis fig"euhr/, v.t., disfigured, disfiguring. 1. to mar the appearance or beauty of; deform; deface: Our old towns are increasingly ...
disfigurement
/dis fig"yeuhr meuhnt/; Brit. /dis fig"euhr meuhnt/, n. 1. an act or instance of disfiguring. 2. a disfigured condition. 3. something that disfigures, as a scar. Also called ...
disfigurer
See disfiguration. * * *
disfluency
/dis flooh"euhn see/, n., pl. disfluencies for 2. 1. Pathol. impairment of the ability to produce smooth, fluent speech. 2. an interruption in the smooth flow of speech, as by a ...
disfranchise
—disfranchisement /dis fran"chuyz meuhnt, -chiz-/, n. —disfranchiser, n. /dis fran"chuyz/, v.t., disfranchised, disfranchising. 1. to deprive (a person) of a right of ...
disfranchisement
See disfranchise. * * *
disfranchiser
See disfranchisement. * * *
disfrock
/dis frok"/, v.t. Eccles. to unfrock. [1830-40; DIS-1 + FROCK] * * *
disfunction
—disfunctional, adj. /dis fungk"sheuhn/, n. dysfunction. [by confusion of DYS- with DIS-1] * * *
disfurnish
—disfurnishment, n. /dis ferr"nish/, v.t. to deprive of something with which a person or thing is furnished; divest of possessions; strip. [1525-35; < MF desfourniss-, s. of ...
disgavel
/dis gav"euhl/, v.t., disgaveled, disgaveling or (esp. Brit.) disgavelled, disgavelling. Eng. Law. to free from the tenure of gavelkind: to disgavel an estate. [1675-85; DIS-1 + ...
disgorge
—disgorgement, n. —disgorger, n. /dis gawrj"/, v., disgorged, disgorging. v.t. 1. to eject or throw out from the throat, mouth, or stomach; vomit forth. 2. to surrender or ...
disgorgement
See disgorge. * * *
disgrace
—disgracer, n. /dis grays"/, n., v., disgraced, disgracing. n. 1. the loss of respect, honor, or esteem; ignominy; shame: the disgrace of criminals. 2. a person, act, or thing ...
disgraceful
—disgracefully, adv. —disgracefulness, n. /dis grays"feuhl/, adj. bringing or deserving disgrace; shameful; dishonorable; disreputable. [1585-95; DISGRACE + -FUL] * * *
disgracefully
See disgraceful. * * *
disgracefulness
See disgracefully. * * *
disgracer
See disgrace. * * *
disgregate
—disgregation, n. /dis"gri gayt'/, v.t., v.i., disgregated, disgregating. to separate; disintegrate; scatter. [1375-1425; late ME < LL disgregatus separated (ptp. of ...
disgruntle
—disgruntlement, n. /dis grun"tl/, v.t., disgruntled, disgruntling. to put into a state of sulky dissatisfaction; make discontent. [1675-85; DIS-1 + gruntle, freq. of GRUNT] * ...
disgruntled
/dis grun"tld/, adj. displeased and discontented; sulky; peevish: Her disgruntled husband refused to join us. [DISGRUNTLE + -ED2] Syn. grouchy, testy, sullen, grumpy, ...
disgruntlement
See disgruntle. * * *
disguise
—disguisable, adj. —disguisedly, adv. —disguisedness, n. —disguiser, n. —disguisement, n. /dis guyz", di skuyz"/, v., disguised, disguising, n. v.t. 1. to change the ...
disguisedly
See disguise. * * *
disguisement
See disguisedly. * * *
disguiser
See disguisedly. * * *
disgust
—disgustedly, adv. —disgustedness, n. /dis gust", di skust"/, v.t. 1. to cause loathing or nausea in. 2. to offend the good taste, moral sense, etc., of; cause extreme ...
disgusted
dis·gust·ed (dĭs-gŭsʹtĭd) adj. Filled with disgust or irritated impatience.   dis·gustʹed·ly adv. * * *
Disgusted, Tunbridge Wells
(BrE) a humorous name for an angry middle-class older person who writes strong letters of complaint to newspapers about modern behaviour. The name comes from the signature that ...
disgustedly
See disgusted. * * *
disgustful
—disgustfully, adv. /dis gust"feuhl, di skust"-/, adj. causing disgust; nauseous; offensive. [1605-15; DISGUST + -FUL] * * *
disgustfully
See disgustful. * * *
disgusting
—disgustingly, adj. —disgustingness, n. /dis gus"ting, di skus"-/, adj. causing disgust; offensive to the physical, moral, or aesthetic taste. [1745-55; DISGUST + -ING2] Syn. ...
disgustingly
See disgusting. * * *
dish
/dish/, n. 1. an open, relatively shallow container of pottery, glass, metal, wood, etc., used for various purposes, esp. for holding or serving food. 2. any container used at ...
dish antenna
dish antenna n. an antenna consisting of a dish-shaped, usually concave parabolic, reflector, used to transmit or receive radio and TV signals, as from orbiting satellites * * *
dish gravy
meat juices, as from a roast, served as a gravy without seasoning or thickening. Cf. pan gravy. * * *
dish night
(formerly) a night, usually held weekly, when a movie theater distributed a free dish or piece of chinaware to each patron as an inducement to visit the theater. [1930-35] * * *
dish top
a circular table top upturned at the edge. * * *
dish towel
☆ dish towel n. a towel for drying dishes * * *
dishabille
/dis'euh beel", -bee"/, n. 1. the state of being dressed in a careless, disheveled, or disorderly style or manner; undress. 2. a garment worn in undress. 3. a loose morning ...
dishabituate
/dis'heuh bich"ooh ayt'/, v.t., dishabituated, dishabituating. to cause to be no longer habituated or accustomed. [1865-70; DIS-1 + HABITUATE] * * *
dishallow
/dis hal"oh/, v.t. to profane; desecrate. [1545-55; DIS-1 + HALLOW1] * * *
dishantenna
dish antenna n. A transmitter or receiver of electromagnetic energy, especially microwaves or radiowaves, consisting of a concave parabolic reflector. * * *
disharmonic
/dis'hahr mon"ik/, adj. 1. lacking harmony; disharmonious; discordant. 2. without symmetry in physical form. [1885-90; DISHARMON(Y) + -IC] * * *
disharmonious
/dis'hahr moh"nee euhs/, adj. inharmonious; discordant. [1650-60; DIS-1 + HARMONIOUS] * * *
disharmoniously
See disharmonious. * * *
disharmonize
—disharmonism /dis hahr"meuh niz'euhm/, n. /dis hahr"meuh nuyz'/, v.t., v.i., disharmonized, disharmonizing. to make or be inharmonious. Also, esp. Brit., ...
disharmony
/dis hahr"meuh nee/, n., pl. disharmonies. 1. lack of harmony; discord. 2. something discordant. [1595-1605; DIS-1 + HARMONY] * * *
dishcloth
/dish"klawth', -kloth'/, n., pl. dishcloths /-klawdhz', -klodhz', -klawths', -kloths'/. a cloth for use in washing dishes; dishrag. Also, Brit., dishclout ...
dishcloth gourd
loofah (def. 1). [1895-1900] * * *
dishclothgourd
dishcloth gourd n. See loofa. * * *
dishearten
—disheartener, n. —dishearteningly, adv. —disheartenment, n. /dis hahr"tn/, v.t. to depress the hope, courage, or spirits of; discourage. [1590-1600; DIS-1 + HEARTEN] Syn. ...
dishearteningly
See dishearten. * * *
disheartenment
See dishearteningly. * * *
dished
/disht/, adj. 1. concave: a dished face. 2. Older Slang. exhausted; worn out. 3. (of a parallel pair of vehicle wheels) farther apart at the top than at the bottom. [1580-90; ...
dishelm
/dis helm"/, v.t. to deprive of a helmet. [1470-80; DIS-1 + HELM2] * * *
disherison
/dis her"euh seuhn, -zeuhn/, n. disinheritance. [1250-1300; ME < OF desheriteison, deriv. of deseriter to disinherit; see DISHERIT] * * *
disherit
—disheritor, n. /dis her"it/, v.t. to disinherit. [1250-1300; ME deseriten < AF, OF deseriter, equiv. to des- DIS-1 + heriter to INHERIT] * * *
dishevel
—dishevelment, n. /di shev"euhl/, v.t., disheveled, disheveling or (esp. Brit.) dishevelled, dishevelling. 1. to let down, as hair, or wear or let hang in loose disorder, as ...
disheveled
/di shev"euhld/, adj. 1. hanging loosely or in disorder; unkempt: disheveled hair. 2. untidy; disarranged: a disheveled appearance. Also, esp. Brit., dishevelled. [1375-1425; ...
dishevelment
See dishevel. * * *
dishful
/dish"fool/, n., pl. dishfuls. the amount that a dish will hold. [1275-1325; ME; see DISH, -FUL] Usage. See -ful. * * *
dishonest
—dishonestly, adv. /dis on"ist/, adj. 1. not honest; disposed to lie, cheat, or steal; not worthy of trust or belief: a dishonest person. 2. proceeding from or exhibiting lack ...
dishonestly
See dishonest. * * *
dishonesty
/dis on"euh stee/, n., pl. dishonesties. 1. lack of honesty; a disposition to lie, cheat, or steal. 2. a dishonest act; fraud. [1350-1400; ME deshonestee. See DIS-1, HONESTY] * * ...
dishonor
—dishonorer, n. /dis on"euhr/, n. 1. lack or loss of honor; disgraceful or dishonest character or conduct. 2. disgrace; ignominy; shame: His arrest brought dishonor to his ...
dishonorable
—dishonorableness, n. —dishonorably, adv. /dis on"euhr euh beuhl/, adj. 1. showing lack of honor or integrity; ignoble; base; disgraceful; shameful: Cheating is ...
dishonorable discharge
Mil. 1. the discharge of a person from military service for an offense more serious than one for which a bad-conduct discharge is given. 2. a certificate of such a discharge. * * ...
dishonorabledischarge
dishonorable discharge n. Discharge from the armed forces for a grave offense, such as cowardice, murder, sabotage, or espionage. * * *
dishonorableness
See dishonorable. * * *
dishonorably
See dishonorableness. * * *
dishonorer
See dishonor. * * *
dishpan
/dish"pan'/, n. a large pan in which dishes, pots, etc., are washed. [1870-75, Amer.; DISH + PAN1] * * *
dishpan hands
hands, esp. of one who does housework, that are red and rough, as from washing dishes and exposure to strong cleaning agents. [1940-45] * * *
dishpanhands
dishpan hands pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) A rough, dry, scaly condition of the hands typically caused by sensitivity to or excessive use of household detergents or ...
dishtowel
/dish"tow'euhl/, n. a towel for drying dishes. [1865-70; DISH + TOWEL] * * *
dishware
/dish"wair'/, n. dishes used for food; tableware. [1945-50; DISH + WARE1] * * *
dishwasher
/dish"wosh'euhr, -waw'sheuhr/, n. 1. a person who washes dishes. 2. a machine for washing dishes, kitchen utensils, etc., automatically. [1520-30; DISH + WASHER] * * *
dishwasherproof
/dish"wosh'euhr proohf', -waw'sheuhr-/, adj. (of dishes, cooking utensils, etc.) able to withstand washing in an automatic dishwasher without breaking, chipping, fading, ...
dishwashing
dish·wash·ing (dĭshʹwŏsh'ĭng, -wô'shĭng) n. The act or process of washing dishes. adj. Of, relating to, or used for washing dishes: a dishwashing liquid. * * *
dishwater
/dish"waw'teuhr, -wot'euhr/, n. 1. water in which dishes are, or have been, washed. 2. dull as dishwater or ditchwater, extremely dull; boring. [1475-85; DISH + WATER] * * *
dishy
/dish"ee/, adj., dishier, dishiest. Slang. 1. Chiefly Brit. very attractive; pretty or beautiful: a couple of dishy fashion models. 2. gossipy; full of gossip: a dishy book about ...
disillusion
—disillusionment, n. —disillusive /dis'i looh"siv/, adj. /dis'i looh"zheuhn/, v.t. 1. to free from or deprive of illusion, belief, idealism, etc.; disenchant. n. 2. a freeing ...
disillusionize
—disillusionizer, disillusionist, n. /dis'i looh"zheuh nuyz'/, v.t., disillusionized, disillusionizing. to disillusion. Also, esp. Brit., disillusionise. [1860-65; DISILLUSION ...
disillusionment
disillusionment [dis΄i lo͞o′zhənmənt] n. 1. an act of disillusioning 2. the fact or state of being disillusioned * * * See disillusion. * * *
disillusive
See disillusionment. * * *
disimpassioned
/dis'im pash"euhnd/, adj. calm; dispassionate. [1860-65; DIS-1 + IMPASSIONED] * * *
disimprison
—disimprisonment, n. /dis'im priz"euhn/, v.t. to release from imprisonment. [1605-15; DIS-1 + IMPRISON] * * *
disincarnate
dis·in·car·nate (dĭs'ĭn-kärʹnĭt) adj. Divested of bodily nature or form; disembodied: disincarnate spirits. tr.v. dis·in·car·nat·ed, dis·in·car·nat·ing, ...
disincentive
/dis'in sen"tiv/, n. something that discourages or deters; deterrent: High interest rates and government regulations are disincentives to investment. [1945-50; DIS- + ...
disinclination
/dis in'kleuh nay"sheuhn, dis'in-/, n. the absence of inclination; reluctance; unwillingness. [1640-50; DIS-1 + INCLINATION] * * *
disincline
/dis'in kluyn"/, v.t., v.i., disinclined, disinclining. to make or be averse or unwilling: Your rudeness disinclines me to grant your request. [1640-50; DIS-1 + INCLINE] * * *
disinclined
/dis'in kluynd"/, adj. lacking desire or willingness; unwilling; averse: I'm disinclined to go to the movies tonight. [1640-50; DISINCLINE + -ED2] Syn. reluctant, loath. * * *
disincorporate
—disincorporation, n. /dis'in kawr"peuh rayt'/, v., disincorporated, disincorporating. v.t. 1. to remove from an incorporated state or status. v.i. 2. to become removed from an ...
disincorporation
See disincorporate. * * *
disinfect
—disinfection, n. —disinfective, adj. —disinfector, n. /dis'in fekt"/, v.t. to cleanse (rooms, wounds, clothing, etc.) of infection; destroy disease germs in. [1590-1600; < ...
disinfectant
/dis'in fek"teuhnt/, n. 1. any chemical agent used chiefly on inanimate objects to destroy or inhibit the growth of harmful organisms. adj. 2. serving as a ...
disinfection
See disinfect. * * *
disinfest
—disinfestation, n. /dis'in fest"/, v.t. to rid of insects, rodents, etc. [1915-20; DIS-1 + INFEST] * * *
disinfestant
dis·in·fes·tant (dĭs'ĭn-fĕsʹtənt) n. An agent that eradicates an infestation, as of vermin. * * *
disinfestation
See disinfest. * * *
disinflate
/dis'in flayt"/, v., disinflated, disinflating. Econ. v.i. 1. (of an economy) to slow down the rate of inflation. v.t. 2. to slow down the rate of inflation in (an ...
disinflation
—disinflationary, adj. /dis'in flay"sheuhn/, n. Econ. a period or process of slowing the rate of inflation. [1875-80; DIS-1 + INFLATION] * * *
disinflationary
See disinflation. * * *
disinform
—disinformer, n. /dis'in fawrm"/, v.t. to give or supply disinformation to. [1975-80; back formation from DISINFORMATION] * * *
disinformant
See disinformer. * * *
disinformation
/dis in'feuhr may"sheuhn, dis'in-/, n. false information, as about a country's military strength or plans, publicly announced or planted in the news media, esp. of other ...
disinformer
See disinform. * * *
disingenuous
—disingenuously, adv. —disingenuousness, n. /dis'in jen"yooh euhs/, adj. lacking in frankness, candor, or sincerity; falsely or hypocritically ingenuous; insincere: Her ...
disingenuously
See disingenuous. * * *
disingenuousness
See disingenuously. * * *
disinherit
—disinheritance, n. /dis'in her"it/, v.t. 1. Law. to exclude from inheritance (an heir or a next of kin). 2. to deprive of a heritage, country, right, privilege, etc.: the ...
disinheritance
See disinherit. * * *
disinhibit
dis·in·hib·it (dĭs'ĭn-hĭbʹĭt) tr.v. dis·in·hib·it·ed, dis·in·hib·it·ing, dis·in·hib·its To free from inhibitions. * * *
disinhibition
/dis in'i bish"euhn, -in'hi-, dis'in-/, n. 1. Psychol. a temporary loss of inhibition caused by an outside stimulus. 2. Chem. removal of an inhibitor. [1925-30; DIS-1 + ...
disinhume
/dis'in hyoohm"/ or, often, /-yoohm"/, v.t., disinhumed, disinhuming. to disinter. [1815-25; DIS-1 + INHUME] * * *
disintegrate
—disintegrable /dis in"teuh greuh beuhl/, adj. —disintegrative, disintegratory /dis in"teuh greuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee, -gray'teuh ree/, adj. —disintegrator, n. /dis in"teuh ...
disintegration
/dis in'teuh gray"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of disintegrating. 2. Physics. decay (def. 8). [1790-1800; DISINTEGRATE + -ION] * * *
disintegration constant
Physics. See decay constant. [1925-30] * * *
disintegrative
See disintegrate. * * *
disintegrator
See disintegrative. * * *
disinter
—disinterment, n. /dis'in terr"/, v.t., disinterred, disinterring. 1. to take out of the place of interment; exhume; unearth. 2. to bring from obscurity into view: The actor's ...
disinterest
/dis in"teuhr ist, -trist/, n. 1. absence of interest; indifference. v.t. 2. to divest of interest or concern. [1605-15; DIS-1 + INTEREST] * * *
disinterested
—disinterestedly, adv. —disinterestedness, n. /dis in"teuh res'tid, -tri stid/, adj. 1. unbiased by personal interest or advantage; not influenced by selfish motives: a ...
disinterestedly
See disinterested. * * *
disinterestedness
See disinterestedly. * * *
disintermediation
/dis'in teuhr mee'dee ay"sheuhn/, n. the act of removing funds from savings banks and placing them into short-term investments on which the interest-rate yields are ...
disinterment
See disinter. * * *
disintoxicate
dis·in·tox·i·cate (dĭs'ĭn-tŏkʹsĭ-kāt') tr.v. dis·in·tox·i·cat·ed, dis·in·tox·i·cat·ing, dis·in·tox·i·cates To free from the effects of intoxication or ...
disintoxication
/dis'in tok'si kay"sheuhn/, n. detoxification (def. 4). [1925-30; DIS-1 + INTOXICATION] * * *
disinvent
dis·in·vent (dĭs'ĭn-vĕntʹ) tr.v. dis·in·vent·ed, dis·in·vent·ing, dis·in·vents To rescind the invention or existence of: “The atomic bomb... cannot be ...
disinvention
See disinvent. * * *
disinvest
/dis'in vest"/, v.i. 1. to engage in disinvestment. v.t. 2. to subject (capital goods) to disinvestment. [1620-30; DIS-1 + INVEST] * * *
disinvestment
/dis'in vest"meuhnt/, n. the withdrawal of invested funds or the cancellation of financial aid, subsidies, or investment plans, as in a property, neighborhood, or foreign ...
disinvitation
See disinvite. * * *
disinvite
/dis'in vuyt"/, v.t., disinvited, disinviting. to withdraw an invitation to. [1570-80; DIS-1 + INVITE] * * *
disinvolvement
/dis'in volv"meuhnt/, n. the action or process of withdrawing from an obligation or commitment, esp. from a political or military involvement: The Secretary of State promised ...
disjasked
/dis jas"kit/, adj. Scot. dilapidated; decayed; broken. Also, disjasket, disjaskit. [1810-20; perh. alter. of DEJECTED] * * *
disject
—disjection, n. /dis jekt"/, v.t. to scatter; disperse. [1575-85; < L disjectus, ptp. of disicere, equiv. to dis- DIS-1 + -icere (comb. form of jacere to throw); see JET1] * * *
disjecta membra
/dis jek"teuh mem"breuh/ scattered members; disjointed portions or parts: applied to fragments of poetry or fragmentary quotations. [ < L, alter. of disjecti membra poetae limbs ...
disjoin
—disjoinable, adj. /dis joyn"/, v.t. 1. to undo or prevent the junction or union of; disunite; separate. v.i. 2. to become disunited; separate. [1475-85; ME disjoinen < OF ...
disjoined
/dis joynd"/, adj. 1. separated; disunited. 2. Entomol. disjunct (def. 3). [1565-75; DISJOIN + -ED2] * * *
disjoint
/dis joynt"/, v.t. 1. to separate or disconnect the joints or joinings of. 2. to put out of order; derange. v.i. 3. to come apart. 4. to be dislocated; be out of joint. adj. 5. ...
disjointed
—disjointedly, adv. —disjointedness, n. /dis joyn"tid/, adj. 1. having the joints or connections separated: a disjointed fowl. 2. disconnected; incoherent: a disjointed ...
disjointedly
See disjointed. * * *
disjointedness
See disjointedly. * * *
disjunct
adj. /dis jungkt"/; n. /dis"jungkt/, adj. 1. disjoined; separated. 2. Music. progressing melodically by intervals larger than a second. 3. Entomol. having the head, thorax, and ...
disjunction
/dis jungk"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of disjoining or the state of being disjoined: a disjunction between thought and action. 2. Logic. a. Also called disjunctive, inclusive ...
disjunctive
—disjunctively, adv. /dis jungk"tiv/, adj. 1. serving or tending to disjoin; separating; dividing; distinguishing. 2. Gram. a. syntactically setting two or more expressions in ...
disjunctively
See disjunctive. * * *
disjuncture
/dis jungk"cheuhr/, n. the act of disjoining or the state of being disjoined; disjunction. [1350-1400; ME ( < AF) < ML disjunctura, equiv. to L disjunct(us) (see DISJUNCT) + -ura ...
disjune
/dis joohn"/, n. Scot. Obs. breakfast. [1485-95; late ME (Scots) disione < OF desjeun, deriv. of desjeuner to break one's fast; see DINE] * * *
disk
—disklike, adj. /disk/, n. 1. any thin, flat, circular plate or object. 2. any surface that is flat and round, or seemingly so: the disk of the sun. 3. disc (def. 1). 4. ...
disk brake
Auto. See disc brake. * * *
disk crank
Mach. a crank having the form of a disk with a crankpin mounted off-center. See diag. under crankpin. [1885-90] * * *
disk drive
Computers. a device that, using an access mechanism under program control, enables data to be read from or written on a spinning magnetic disk, magnetic disk pack, floppy disk, ...
disk flower
Bot. one of a number of small tubular flowers composing the disk of certain composite plants. Also called disk floret. Cf. ray flower. [1865-70] * * *
disk harrow
a harrow having a number of sharp-edged, concave disks set at such an angle that as the harrow is drawn along the ground they turn the soil, pulverize it, and destroy ...
disk jockey
☆ disk jockey n. DISC JOCKEY * * *
disk jockey.
See disc jockey. * * *
disk operating system
Computers. See DOS. * * *
disk pack
Computers. a cylinder containing several magnetic disks that can be installed in or removed from a disk drive as a unit: used for data storage and retrieval. [1965-70] * * *
disk sander
a sander that uses a revolving abrasive disk driven by an electric motor. Cf. belt sander, orbital sander. * * *
disk wheel
a spokeless vehicular wheel, esp. on automobiles, having a heavy circular pressed-steel disk mounted on the wheel hub and supporting the tire rim on its outer edge. [1905-10] * * ...
disk-winged bat
▪ bat       any of three species of bats inhabiting Central America and northern South America that are distinguished by round disks at the base of the thumb and on the ...
diskbrake
disk brake n. Variant of disc brake. * * *
diskdrive
disk drive n. Computer Science A device that reads data stored on a magnetic or optical disk and writes data onto the disk for storage. * * *
diskette
/di sket"/, n. Computers. See floppy disk. [1970-75; DISK + -ETTE] * * *
diskflower
disk flower n. Any of the tiny tubular flowers in the central portion of the flower head of certain composite plants, such as the daisy. * * *
diskharrow
disk harrow or disc harrow n. A harrow equipped with a series of sharp metal disks set on edge or at an angle on one or more axles. * * *
diskjockey
disk jockey n. Variant of disc jockey. * * *
diskography
/di skog"reuh fee/, n., pl. diskographies. discography. * * *
diskoperating system
disk operating system n. DOS. * * *
diskpack
disk pack n. A computer storage device consisting of several magnetic disks that can be used and stored as a unit. * * *
disksander
disk sander orbital disk sander © School Division, Houghton Mifflin Company n. An electric sander fitted with a rotating abrasive disk. * * *
diskwheel
disk wheel n. A spokeless wheel in which a disk joins the hub to the rim. * * *
dislikable
See dislike. * * *
dislike
—dislikable, dislikeable, adj. /dis luyk"/, v., disliked, disliking, n. v.t. 1. to regard with displeasure, antipathy, or aversion: I dislike working. I dislike oysters. n. 2. ...
dislikeable
See dislikable. * * *
dislimn
/dis lim"/, v.t. Archaic. to cause to become dim or indistinct. [1600-10; DIS-1 + LIMN] * * *
dislocate
/dis"loh kayt', dis loh"kayt/, v., dislocated, dislocating n. v.t. 1. to put out of place; put out of proper relative position; displace: The glacier dislocated great stones. The ...
dislocation
/dis'loh kay"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of dislocating. 2. the state of being dislocated. 3. Crystall. (in a crystal lattice) a line about which there is a discontinuity ...
dislodge
—dislodgment; esp. Brit., dislodgement, n. /dis loj"/, v., dislodged, dislodging. v.t. 1. to remove or force out of a particular place: to dislodge a stone with one's foot. 2. ...
dislodgement
See dislodge. * * *
dislodgment
See dislodgement. * * *
disloyal
—disloyalist, n. —disloyally, adv. /dis loy"euhl/, adj. false to one's obligations or allegiances; not loyal; faithless; treacherous. [1470-80; < MF desloial, OF desleal, ...
disloyalist
See disloyal. * * *
disloyally
See disloyalist. * * *
disloyalty
/dis loy"euhl tee/, n., pl. disloyalties. 1. the quality of being disloyal; lack of loyalty; unfaithfulness. 2. violation of allegiance or duty, as to a government. 3. a disloyal ...
dismal
—dismally, adv. —dismalness, dismality, n. /diz"meuhl/, adj. 1. causing gloom or dejection; gloomy; dreary; cheerless; melancholy: dismal weather. 2. characterized by ...
dismal science
dismal science n. 〚< use by T. CARLYLE Thomas in essay (1849)〛 the science of economics: a humorous usage * * *
Dismal Swamp
a swamp in SE Virginia and NE North Carolina. ab. 30 mi. (48 km) long; ab. 600 sq. mi. (1500 sq. km). * * * or Great Dismal Swamp Wetland region, southeastern Virginia and ...
dismally
See dismal. * * *
dismalness
See dismally. * * *
DismalSwamp
Dis·mal Swamp or Great Dis·mal Swamp (dĭzʹməl) A swampy region of southeast Virginia and northeast North Carolina. The heavily forested area has been greatly reduced by ...
dismantle
—dismantlement, n. —dismantler, n. /dis man"tl/, v.t., dismantled, dismantling. 1. to deprive or strip of apparatus, furniture, equipment, defenses, etc.: to dismantle a ...
dismantlement
See dismantle. * * *
dismast
—dismastment, n. /dis mast", -mahst"/, v.t. to deprive (a ship) of masts; break off the masts of. [1740-50; DIS-1 + MAST1] * * *
dismay
—dismayedness /dis mayd"nis, -may"id-/, n. —dismayingly, adv. /dis may"/, v.t. 1. to break down the courage of completely, as by sudden danger or trouble; dishearten ...
dismayingly
See dismay. * * *
disme
/duym/, n. a former coin of the U.S., equal to 10 cents, issued in 1792: early form of the dime. [earlier or archaized sp. of DIME] * * *
dismember
—dismemberer, n. —dismemberment, n. /dis mem"beuhr/, v.t. 1. to deprive of limbs; divide limb from limb: The ogre dismembered his victims before he ate them. 2. to divide ...
dismemberment
See dismember. * * *
dismiss
—dismissible, adj. /dis mis"/, v.t. 1. to direct (an assembly of persons) to disperse or go: I dismissed the class early. 2. to bid or allow (a person) to go; give permission ...
dismissal
/dis mis"euhl/, n. 1. an act or instance of dismissing. 2. the state of being dismissed. 3. a spoken or written order of discharge from employment, service, enrollment, ...
dismissible
See dismiss. * * *
dismission
See dismissible. * * *
dismissive
—dismissively, adv. /dis mis"iv/, adj. 1. indicating dismissal or rejection; having the purpose or effect of dismissing, as from one's presence or from consideration: a curt, ...
dismount
—dismountable, adj. v. /dis mownt"/; n. /dis mownt", dis"mownt'/, v.i. 1. to get off or alight from a horse, bicycle, etc. v.t. 2. to bring or throw down, as from a horse; ...
dismountable
See dismount. * * *
disnature
/dis nay"cheuhr/, v.t., disnatured, disnaturing. to deprive (something) of its proper nature or appearance; make unnatural. [1400-50; late ME < AF, MF desnaturer, equiv. to des- ...
Disney
/diz"nee/, n. Walt(er E.), 1901-66, U.S. creator and producer of animated cartoons, motion pictures, etc. * * * (as used in expressions) Disney Co. Disney World and ...
Disney Co.
U.S. entertainment corporation. It was founded by Walt Disney and his brother Roy as Walt Disney Productions in 1929 to incorporate their cartoon animation studio. It produced ...
Disney Company
▪ American corporation in full  the Walt Disney Company,  formerly (1929–86)  Walt Disney Productions   American corporation that was the best-known purveyor of family ...
Disney World
the popular name for Walt Disney World™, the famous US amusement park near Orlando, Florida. It was opened in 1971 and is much larger than Disneyland although it has similar ...
Disney World and Disneyland
Two theme parks built by the Walt Disney Co. (see Disney Co.), a U.S. corporation that became the best-known 20th-century purveyor of entertainment. Disneyland, an interactive, ...
Disney, Walt
▪ American film producer Introduction byname of  Walter Elias Disney   born December 5, 1901, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. died December 15, 1966, Los Angeles, ...
Disney, Walt(er Elias)
born Dec. 5, 1901, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Dec. 15, 1966, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. animator and entertainment executive. In the 1920s he joined with his brother Roy and his ...
Disney,Walter Elias
Dis·ney (dĭzʹnē), Walter Elias. Known as “Walt.” 1901-1966. American animator, showman, and film producer. Noted for his creation of the cartoon characters Mickey Mouse ...
Disneyfy
—Disneyfication, n. /diz"nee fuy', -ni-/, v.t., Disneyfied, Disneyfying. to create or alter in a simplified, sentimentalized, or contrived form or manner. [1970-75, Amer.; ...
Disneyland
/diz"nee land'/ 1. Trademark. a large amusement park in Anaheim, Calif.: prototypical theme park. n. 2. any large, bustling place noted for its colorful attractions: The new ...


© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.086 c;