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Disneyland{™}
the original US amusement park opened by Walt Disney in 1955 at Anaheim, California. It is divided into different ‘lands’ such as Adventureland, Frontierland and ...
disobedience
/dis'euh bee"dee euhns/, n. lack of obedience or refusal to comply; disregard or transgression. [1350-1400; ME < OF desobedience, equiv. to des- DIS-1 + obedience OBEDIENCE] * * *
disobedient
—disobediently, adv. /dis'euh bee"dee euhnt/, adj. neglecting or refusing to obey; not submitting; refractory. [1400-50; late ME < OF desobedient, equiv. to des- DIS-1 + ...
disobediently
See disobedient. * * *
disobey
—disobeyer, n. /dis'euh bay"/, v.t., v.i. to neglect or refuse to obey. [1350-1400; ME disobeien < OF desobeir, equiv. to des- DIS-1 + obeir to OBEY] Syn. defy, disregard, ...
disobeyer
See disobey. * * *
disoblige
—disobligingly, adv. —disobligingness, n. /dis'euh bluyj"/, v.t., disobliged, disobliging. 1. to refuse or neglect to oblige; act contrary to the desire or convenience of; ...
disobligingly
See disoblige. * * *
disodium phosphate
/duy soh"dee euhm/, Chem. See sodium phosphate (def. 2). [DI-1 + SODIUM] * * *
disoperation
disoperation [dis΄äp ər ā′shən] n. Ecol. a coaction that is harmful to the organisms involved * * *
disopyramide
/duy'soh pir"euh muyd'/, n. Pharm. a substance, C21H29N3O, used in its phosphate form in the symptomatic and prophylactic treatment of certain cardiac arrhythmias. [contr. of the ...
disorder
/dis awr"deuhr/, n. 1. lack of order or regular arrangement; confusion: Your room is in utter disorder. 2. an irregularity: a disorder in legal proceedings. 3. breach of order; ...
disordered
—disorderedly, adv. —disorderedness, n. /dis awr"deuhrd/, adj. 1. lacking organization or in confusion; disarranged. 2. suffering from or afflicted with a physical or mental ...
disorderedly
See disordered. * * *
disorderedness
See disorderedly. * * *
disorderliness
See disorderly. * * *
disorderly
—disorderliness, n. /dis awr"deuhr lee/, adj. 1. characterized by disorder; irregular; untidy; confused: a disorderly desk. 2. unruly; turbulent; tumultuous: a disorderly ...
disorderly conduct
Law. any of various petty misdemeanors, generally including nuisances, breaches of the peace, offensive or immoral conduct in public, etc. [1885-90] * * * Conduct likely to lead ...
disorderly house
1. a house of prostitution; brothel. 2. a gambling place. [1800-10] * * *
disorderly person
Law. a person guilty of disorderly conduct. [1735-45] * * *
disorderlyconduct
disorderly conduct n. Law An offense involving disturbance of the public peace and decency. * * *
Disorders of the immune system
▪ Table Disorders of the immune system Immune deficiencies AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) (AIDS) Chédiak-Higashi syndrome chronic granulomatous ...
disorganization
/dis awr'geuh neuh zay"sheuhn/, n. 1. a breaking up of order or system; disunion or disruption of constituent parts. 2. the absence of organization or orderly arrangement; ...
disorganize
—disorganizer, n. /dis awr"geuh nuyz'/, v.t., disorganized, disorganizing. to destroy the organization, systematic arrangement, or orderly connection of; throw into confusion ...
disorganized
/dis awr"geuh nuyzd'/, adj. 1. functioning without adequate order, systemization, or planning; uncoordinated: a woefully disorganized enterprise. 2. careless or undisciplined; ...
disorient
/dis awr"ee ent', -ohr"-/, v.t. 1. to cause to lose one's way: The strange streets disoriented him. 2. to confuse by removing or obscuring something that has guided a person, ...
disorientate
—disorientation, n. /dis awr"ee euhn tayt', -ohr"-/, v.t., disorientated, disorientating. to disorient. [1695-1705; DIS-1 + ORIENTATE] * * *
disorientation
dis·o·ri·en·ta·tion (dĭs-ôr'ē-ĕn-tāʹshən) n. 1. Loss of one's sense of direction, position, or relationship with one's surroundings. 2. Mental confusion or impaired ...
disoriented
/dis awr"ee en'tid, -ohr"-/, adj. confused as to time or place; out of touch: therapy for disoriented patients. [DISORIENT + -ED2] Syn. distracted, mixed up, unstable, ...
disown
—disownment, n. /dis ohn"/, v.t. to refuse to acknowledge as belonging or pertaining to oneself; deny the ownership of or responsibility for; repudiate; renounce: to disown ...
disparage
—disparager, n. /di spar"ij/, v.t., disparaged, disparaging. 1. to speak of or treat slightingly; depreciate; belittle: Do not disparage good manners. 2. to bring reproach or ...
disparagement
/di spar"ij meuhnt/, n. 1. the act of disparaging. 2. something that derogates or casts in a bad light, as a remark or censorious essay. [1480-90; < AF, MF desparagement, equiv. ...
disparager
See disparagement. * * *
disparaging
—disparagingly, adv. /di spar"i jing/, adj. that disparages; tending to belittle or bring reproach upon: disparaging remarks. [1635-45; DISPARAGE + -ING2] * * *
disparagingly
See disparagement. * * *
disparate
—disparately, adv. —disparateness, n. /dis"peuhr it, di spar"-/, adj. distinct in kind; essentially different; dissimilar: disparate ideas. [1580-90; < L disparatus separated ...
disparately
See disparate. * * *
disparateness
See disparately. * * *
disparity
/di spar"i tee/, n., pl. disparities. lack of similarity or equality; inequality; difference: a disparity in age; disparity in rank. [1545-55; < MF desparite < LL disparitas; see ...
disparlure
dis·par·lure (dĭsʹpär-lo͝or') n. 1. A pheromone, C19H38O, produced by female gypsy moths. 2. A synthetic substance used to attract male gypsy moths to traps.   [New Latin ...
dispart
—dispartment, n. /dis pahrt"/, v.t., v.i. to divide into parts; separate; sunder. [1580-90; appar. < It dispartire < L dispartire to part, separate, divide, equiv. to dis- ...
dispassion
/dis pash"euhn/, n. the state or quality of being unemotional or emotionally uninvolved. [1685-95; DIS-1 + PASSION] * * *
dispassionate
—dispassionately, adv. —dispassionateness, n. /dis pash"euh nit/, adj. free from or unaffected by passion; devoid of personal feeling or bias; impartial; calm: a ...
dispassionately
See dispassionate. * * *
dispassionateness
See dispassionately. * * *
dispatch
/di spach"/, v.t. 1. to send off or away with speed, as a messenger, telegram, body of troops, etc. 2. to dismiss (a person), as after an audience. 3. to put to death; kill: The ...
dispatch boat
Naut. a small, fast boat used for delivering dispatches. [1785-95] * * *
dispatch box
n 1. (in British political life) a red leather case in which important papers are delivered to senior government ministers. It is traditional for the Chancellor of the Exchequer ...
dispatch case.
See attaché case. [1915-20] * * *
dispatcher
/di spach"euhr/, n. 1. a person who dispatches. 2. a person who oversees the departure of trains, airplanes, buses, etc., as for a transportation company or railroad. 3. ...
dispauper
/dis paw"peuhr/, v.t. Law. to divest of the status of a person having the privileges of a pauper, as of public support or of legal rights as a pauper. [1625-35; DIS-1 + PAUPER] * ...
dispel
—dispellable, adj. —dispeller, n. /di spel"/, v.t., dispelled, dispelling. 1. to drive off in various directions; disperse; dissipate: to dispel the dense fog. 2. to cause to ...
dispend
/di spend"/, v.t. Obs. to pay out; expend; spend. [1250-1300; ME dispenden < AF, OF despendre < L dispendere to weigh out; see DISPENSE] * * *
dispensability
See dispensable. * * *
dispensable
—dispensability, dispensableness, n. /di spen"seuh beuhl/, adj. 1. capable of being dispensed with or done without; not necessary or essential. 2. capable of being dispensed or ...
dispensableness
See dispensability. * * *
dispensary
/di spen"seuh ree/, n., pl. dispensaries. 1. a place where something is dispensed, esp. medicines. 2. a charitable or public facility where medicines are furnished and free or ...
dispensation
—dispensational, adj. —dispensatorily /di spen"seuh tawr'euh lee, -tohr'-/, adv. /dis'peuhn say"sheuhn, -pen-/, n. 1. an act or instance of dispensing; distribution. 2. ...
dispensational
See dispensation. * * *
dispensationalism
/dis'peuhn say"sheuh nl iz'euhm, -pen-/, n. the interpreting of history as a series of divine dispensations. [DISPENSATIONAL + -ISM] * * *
dispensator
/dis"peuhn say'teuhr, -pen-/, n. Obs. a person who dispenses; distributor; administrator. [1350-1400; ME dispensatour < ML dispensator, L: manager, steward, equiv. to ...
dispensatory
/di spen"seuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, n., pl. dispensatories. 1. a book in which the composition, preparation, and uses of medicinal substances are described; a nonofficial ...
dispense
/di spens"/, v., dispensed, dispensing, n. v.t. 1. to deal out; distribute: to dispense wisdom. 2. to administer: to dispense the law without bias. 3. Pharm. to make up and ...
dispenser
/di spen"seuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that dispenses. 2. a container, package, device, or vending machine for holding and dispensing something in small amounts, as facial ...
dispensible
/di spen"seuh beuhl/, adj. Obs. dispensable. * * *
dispeople
—dispeoplement, n. —dispeopler, n. /dis pee"peuhl/, v.t., dispeopled, dispeopling. to deprive of people; depopulate. [1480-90; DIS-1 + PEOPLE] * * *
dispermous
/duy sperr"meuhs/, adj. Bot. having two seeds. [1720-30; DI-1 + SPERMOUS] * * *
dispermy
—dispermic, adj. /duy"sperr'mee/, n. the fertilization of an ovum by two spermatozoa. Cf. monospermy, polyspermy. [1895-1900; DI-1 + -spermy < Gk -spermía. See -SPERM, -Y3] * ...
dispersal
/di sperr"seuhl/, n. dispersion (def. 1). [1815-25; DISPERSE + -AL2] * * *
dispersant
/di sperr"seuhnt/, n. 1. something that disperses. 2. Physical Chem. any admixture to a dispersion capable of maintaining the dispersed particles in suspension. adj. 3. acting as ...
disperse
—dispersedly /di sperr"sid lee/, adv. —disperser, n. —dispersibility, n. —dispersible, adj. /di sperrs"/, v., dispersed, dispersing, adj. v.t. 1. to drive or send off in ...
disperse dye
Chem. any of the class of slightly water-soluble dyes dispersed in aqueous solution for dyeing synthetic textile fibers. * * *
disperse system
disperse system n. a two-phase colloidal system consisting of the colloidal particles (disperse phase) and the medium in which they are suspended (disperse medium) * * *
dispersedly
See disperse. * * *
dispersephase
disperse phase n. The particles or droplets in a disperse system that are dispersed throughout a medium. * * *
disperser
See dispersedly. * * *
dispersesystem
disperse system n. Chemistry A system, such as a colloid, consisting of a disperse phase in a dispersion medium. Also called dispersion. * * *
dispersible
See dispersedly. * * *
dispersing agent
dispersing agent [di spʉrs′ənt] n. Chem. a surface-active substance added to a suspension, usually a colloid, to improve the separation of particles and to prevent settling ...
dispersion
/di sperr"zheuhn, -sheuhn/, n. 1. Also, dispersal. an act, state, or instance of dispersing or of being dispersed. 2. Optics. a. the variation of the index of refraction of a ...
dispersionmedium
dispersion medium n. The continuous medium, such as a gas, liquid, or solid, in which a disperse phase is distributed. * * *
dispersive
—dispersively, adv. —dispersiveness, n. /di sperr"siv/, adj. serving or tending to disperse. [1620-30; DISPERSE + -IVE] * * *
dispersive power
Optics. a measure of the ability of a substance to disperse light, equal to the quotient of the difference in refractive indices of the substance for two representative ...
dispersively
See dispersive. * * *
dispersiveness
See dispersively. * * *
dispersoid
/di sperr"soyd/, n. Physical Chem. the suspended particles in a dispersion. [1910-15; DISPERSE + -OID] * * *
disphenoid
/duy sfee"noyd/, n. Crystall. bisphenoid. [1890-95] * * *
dispirit
/di spir"it/, v.t. to deprive of spirit, hope, enthusiasm, etc.; depress; discourage; dishearten. [1635-45; DI-2 + SPIRIT] * * *
dispirited
—dispiritedly, adv. —dispiritedness, n. /di spir"i tid/, adj. discouraged; dejected; disheartened; gloomy. [1640-50; DISPIRIT + -ED2] * * *
dispiritedly
See dispirited. * * *
dispiteous
—dispiteously, adv. —dispiteousness, n. /dis pit"ee euhs/, adj. Archaic. malicious; cruel; pitiless. [1795-1805; earlier despiteous, alter., after PITEOUS, of dispitous, ...
displace
—displaceable, adj. /dis plays"/, v.t., displaced, displacing. 1. to compel (a person or persons) to leave home, country, etc. 2. to move or put out of the usual or proper ...
displaceable
See displace. * * *
displaced
/dis playst"/, adj. 1. lacking a home, country, etc. 2. moved or put out of the usual or proper place. n. 3. (used with a pl. v.) persons who lack a home, as through political ...
displaced homemaker
a woman recently divorced, separated, or widowed after many years as a homemaker. [1975-80] * * *
displaced person
a person driven or expelled from his or her homeland by war, famine, tyranny, etc. Abbr.: DP, D.P. [1940-45] * * *
displacedhomemaker
dis·placed homemaker (dĭs-plāstʹ) n. A woman who, after managing a household for years, is forced by financial necessity to find a wage-paying job. * * *
displacedperson
displaced person n. One who has been driven from one's homeland by war or internal upheaval. * * *
displacement
/dis plays"meuhnt/, n. 1. the act of displacing. 2. the state of being displaced or the amount or degree to which something is displaced. 3. Physics. a. the displacing in space ...
displacement activity
Animal Behav. a behavior performed out of its usual context and apparently irrelevant to the prevailing situation, as eating when an unknown individual approaches, tending to ...
displacement current
Elect. the rate of change, at any point in space, of electric displacement with time. [1890-95] * * * ▪ electronics       in electromagnetism, a phenomenon analogous to ...
displacement engine.
See reciprocating engine. * * *
displacement hull
Naut. a hull that displaces a significant volume of water when under way. Cf. planing hull. * * *
displacement law
▪ physics       in physics, any of the statements (originally formulated in 1913) that radioactive decay (radioactivity) produces daughter atoms whose position in the ...
displacement ton
Naut. a unit for measuring the displacement of a vessel, equal to a long ton of 2240 lb. (1016 kg) or 35 cu. ft. (1 cu. m) of seawater. * * *
displacement tonnage
Naut. the number of long tons of water displaced by a vessel, light or load displacement being specified. * * *
displacementton
displacement ton n. A unit for measuring the displacement of a ship afloat, equivalent to one long ton or about one cubic meter of salt water. * * *
displacer
/dis play"seuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that displaces. 2. plum (def. 10). [1580-90; DISPLACE + -ER1] * * *
displant
/dis plant", -plahnt"/, v.t. Obs. 1. to dislodge. 2. to transplant. [1485-95; DIS-1 + PLANT, modeled on MF desplanter] * * *
display
—displayer, n. /di splay"/, v.t. 1. to show or exhibit; make visible: to display a sign. 2. to reveal; betray: to display fear. 3. to unfold; open out; spread out: to display a ...
display ad
an advertisement, in a newspaper or other publication, often using special attention-getting devices, as large size, display type, and illustrations. [1915-20] * * *
display advertising
display ads taken collectively. * * *
display behaviour
Ritualized activity by which an animal conveys specific information. The best-known displays are visual, but others rely on sound, smell, or touch. Agonistic (aggressive) ...
display type
Print. type larger than body type, used in headings, advertisements, etc. Cf. body type. [1860-65] * * *
displayed
/di splayd"/, adj. Heraldry. (of a bird) represented with wings and legs spread: an eagle displayed. [1350-1400; ME; see DISPLAY, -ED2] * * *
displease
—displeasingly, adv. —displeasingness, n. /dis pleez"/, v., displeased, displeasing. v.t. 1. to incur the dissatisfaction, dislike, or disapproval of; offend; annoy: His ...
displeasingly
See displease. * * *
displeasure
—displeasureable, adj. —displeasureably, adv. /dis plezh"euhr/, n., v., displeasured, displeasuring. n. 1. dissatisfaction, disapproval, or annoyance. 2. discomfort, ...
displode
—displosion /dis ploh"zheuhn/, n. /dis plohd"/, v.t., v.i., disploded, disploding. Archaic. to explode. [1660-70; < L displodere, equiv. to dis- DIS-1 + -plodere, comb. form of ...
displume
/dis ploohm"/, v.t., displumed, displuming. 1. to strip of plumes; deplume. 2. to strip of honors. [1470-80; DIS-1 + PLUME; cf. DEPLUME] * * *
displuviate
/dis plooh"vee ayt'/, adj. (of the atrium of an ancient Roman house) having roofs sloping downward and outward from a central opening. [ < L displuviatus, equiv. to dis- DIS-1 + ...
disport
—disportment, n. /di spawrt", -spohrt"/, v.t. 1. to divert or amuse (oneself). 2. to display (oneself) in a sportive manner: The picnickers disported themselves merrily on the ...
disposability
See disposable. * * *
disposable
—disposability, disposableness, n. —disposably, adv. /di spoh"zeuh beuhl/, adj. 1. designed for or capable of being thrown away after being used or used up: disposable ...
disposable income
1. the part of a person's income remaining after deducting personal income taxes. 2. (in national income accounting) the total disposable income of all consumers. [1945-50] * * ...
disposably
See disposability. * * *
disposal
disposal1 /di spoh"zeuhl/, n. 1. an act or instance of disposing; arrangement: the disposal of the troops. 2. a disposing of or getting rid of something: the disposal of waste ...
dispose
—disposingly, adv. /di spohz"/, v., disposed, disposing, n. v.t. 1. to give a tendency or inclination to; incline: His temperament disposed him to argue readily with people. 2. ...
disposed
—disposedly, adv. —disposedness, n. /di spohzd"/, adj. having a certain inclination or disposition; inclined (usually fol. by to or an infinitive): a man disposed to like ...
disposer
/di spoh"zeuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that disposes. 2. disposal2. [1520-30; DISPOSE + -ER1] * * *
disposition
—dispositional, adj. /dis'peuh zish"euhn/, n. 1. the predominant or prevailing tendency of one's spirits; natural mental and emotional outlook or mood; characteristic attitude: ...
dispositive
/di spoz"i tiv/, adj. involving or affecting disposition or settlement: a dispositive clue in a case of embezzlement. [1475-85; DISPOSE + -ITIVE, on the model of POSITIVE] * * *
dispossess
—dispossession, n. —dispossessor, n. —dispossessory /dis'peuh zes"euh ree/, adj. /dis'peuh zes"/, v.t. 1. to put (a person) out of possession, esp. of real property; ...
dispossessed
/dis'peuh zest"/, adj. 1. evicted, as from a dwelling, land, etc.; ousted. 2. without property, status, etc., as wandering or displaced persons; rootless; disfranchised. 3. ...
dispossession
See dispossess. * * *
dispossessor
See dispossession. * * *
dispossessory
See dispossession. * * *
disposure
/di spoh"zheuhr/, n. Archaic. disposal; disposition. [1560-70; DISPOSE + -URE] * * *
dispraise
—dispraiser, n. —dispraisingly, adv. /dis prayz"/, v., dispraised, dispraising, n. v.t. 1. to speak of as undeserving or unworthy; censure; disparage. n. 2. an act or ...
dispraiser
See dispraise. * * *
dispraisingly
See dispraiser. * * *
dispread
—dispreader, n. /di spred"/, v.t., v.i., dispread, dispreading. to spread out; extend. Also, disspread. [1580-90; DI-2 + SPREAD] * * *
Disprin{™}
n [C, U] a mild medicine for relieving pain, such as headaches, etc. It is sold in tablets which can be dissolved in water. * * *
disprize
/dis pruyz"/, v.t., disprized, disprizing. to hold in small esteem; disdain. [1425-75; late ME disprisen < AF, MF despriser, late var. of despreis(i)er to DISPRAISE] * * *
disproof
/dis proohf"/, n. 1. the act of disproving. 2. proof to the contrary; refutation. [1525-35; DIS-1 + PROOF] * * *
disproportion
—disproportionable, adj. —disproportionableness, n. —disproportionably, adv. /dis'preuh pawr"sheuhn, -pohr"-/, n. 1. lack of proportion; lack of proper relationship in ...
disproportional
—disproportionality, disproportionalness, n. —disproportionally, adv. /dis'preuh pawr"sheuh nl, -pohr"-/, adj. not in proportion; disproportionate. [1600-10; DIS-1 + ...
disproportionally
See disproportional. * * *
disproportionate
—disproportionately, adv. —disproportionateness, n. /dis'preuh pawr"sheuh nit, -pohr"-/, adj. not proportionate; out of proportion, as in size or number. [1544-55; DIS-1 + ...
disproportionately
See disproportionate. * * *
disproportionateness
See disproportionately. * * *
disproportionation
/dis'preuh pawr'sheuh nay"sheuhn, -pohr'-/, n. Chem. the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of a substance reacting with itself, thereby forming two dissimilar molecules, as ...
disprovable
See disprove. * * *
disproval
See disprovable. * * *
disprove
—disprovable, adj. —disprover, n. /dis proohv"/, v.t., disproved, disproving. to prove (an assertion, claim, etc.) to be false or wrong; refute; invalidate: I disproved his ...
Dispur
Dispur [dis′poor΄] city in NE India: capital of Assam state: pop. 1,700 * * * City, capital of Assam state, northeastern India. Following the administrative reorganization ...
disputability
See disputable. * * *
disputable
—disputability, disputableness, n. —disputably, adv. /di spyooh"teuh beuhl, dis"pyoo-/, adj. capable of being disputed; debatable; questionable. [1540-50; < L disputabilis, ...
disputably
See disputability. * * *
disputant
/di spyooht"nt/, n. 1. a person who disputes; debater. adj. 2. engaged in dispute; disputing. [1605-15; < L disputant- (s. of disputans, prp. of disputare), equiv. to disput- ...
disputation
/dis'pyoo tay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of disputing or debating; verbal controversy; discussion or debate. 2. an academic exercise consisting of the arguing of a thesis between its ...
disputatious
—disputatiously, adv. —disputatiousness, n. /dis'pyoo tay"sheuhs/, adj. fond of or given to disputation; argumentative; contentious: disputatious litigants. Also, disputative ...
disputatiously
See disputatious. * * *
disputatiousness
See disputatiously. * * *
dispute
—disputeless, adj. —disputer, n. /di spyooht"/, v., disputed, disputing, n. v.i. 1. to engage in argument or debate. 2. to argue vehemently; wrangle or quarrel. v.t. 3. to ...
disputer
See dispute. * * *
disqualification
/dis kwol'euh fi kay"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or instance of disqualifying. 2. the state of being disqualified. 3. something that disqualifies. [1705-15; DISQUALI(FY) + -FICATION] * ...
disqualify
—disqualifiable, adj. /dis kwol"euh fuy'/, v.t., disqualified, disqualifying. 1. to deprive of qualification or fitness; render unfit; incapacitate. 2. to deprive of legal, ...
disquantity
/dis kwon"ti tee/, v.t., disquantitied, disquantitying. Obs. to diminish in quantity; make less. [1595-1605; DIS- + QUANTITY] * * *
disquiet
—disquietedly, adv. —disquietedness, n. —disquietly, adv. /dis kwuy"it/, n. 1. lack of calm, peace, or ease; anxiety; uneasiness. v.t. 2. to deprive of calmness, ...
disquieting
—disquietingly, adv. /dis kwuy"i ting/, adj. causing anxiety or uneasiness; disturbing: disquieting news. [1570-80; DISQUIET + -ING2] * * *
disquietingly
See disquiet. * * *
disquietly
See disquietingly. * * *
disquietness
See disquietingly. * * *
disquietude
/dis kwuy"i toohd', -tyoohd'/, n. the state of disquiet; uneasiness. [1700-10; DIS-1 + QUIETUDE] * * *
disquisition
—disquisitional, adj. /dis'kweuh zish"euhn/, n. a formal discourse or treatise in which a subject is examined and discussed; dissertation. [1595-1605; < L disquisition- (s. of ...
Disraeli
/diz ray"lee/, n. Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield ("Dizzy"), 1804-81, British statesman and novelist: prime minister 1868, 1874-80. * * *
Disraeli, Benjamin, earl of Beaconsfield
born Dec. 21, 1804, London, Eng. died April 19, 1881, London British politician and author who was twice prime minister (1868, 1874–80). Of Italian-Jewish descent, he was ...
Disraeli, Benjamin, Earl Of Beaconsfield, Viscount Hughenden Of Hughenden
▪ prime minister of United Kingdom Introduction byname  Dizzy  born December 21, 1804, London, England died April 19, 1881, London  British statesman (Parliament) and ...
Disraeli,Benjamin
Dis·rae·li (dĭz-rāʹlē), Benjamin. First Earl of Beaconsfield. Known as “Dizzy.” 1804-1881. British politician and novelist. He served as prime minister (1868 and ...
disrate
/dis rayt"/, v.t., disrated, disrating. to reduce to a lower rating or rank. [1805-15; DIS-1 + RATE1] * * *
disregard
—disregardable, adj. —disregarder, n. /dis'ri gahrd"/, v.t. 1. to pay no attention to; leave out of consideration; ignore: Disregard the footnotes. 2. to treat without due ...
disregarder
See disregard. * * *
disregardful
—disregardfully, adv. —disregardfulness, n. /dis'ri gahrd"feuhl/, adj. neglectful; careless. [1630-40; DIS-1 + REGARDFUL] * * *
disrelated
—disrelation, n. /dis'ri lay"tid/, adj. lacking relation or connection; unrelated. [1890-95; DIS-1 + RELATED] * * *
disrelish
/dis rel"ish/, v.t. 1. to have a distaste for; dislike. n. 2. distaste; dislike. [1540-50; DIS-1 + RELISH] * * *
disremember
/dis'ri mem"beuhr/, v.t. Southern and South Midland U.S. to fail to remember; forget. [1805-15; DIS-1 + REMEMBER] * * *
disrepair
/dis'ri pair"/, n. the condition of needing repair; an impaired or neglected state. [1790-1800; DIS-1 + REPAIR] * * *
disreputability
See disreputable. * * *
disreputable
—disreputability, disreputableness, n. —disreputably, adv. /dis rep"yeuh teuh beuhl/, adj. 1. not reputable; having a bad reputation: a disreputable barroom. 2. ...
disreputableness
See disreputability. * * *
disreputably
See disreputability. * * *
disreputation
/dis rep'yeuh tay"sheuhn/, n. Archaic. disrepute. [1595-1605; DIS-1 + REPUTATION] * * *
disrepute
/dis'ri pyooht"/, n. bad repute; low regard; disfavor (usually prec. by in or into): Some literary theories have fallen into disrepute. [1645-55; DIS-1 + REPUTE] Syn. disfavor, ...
disrespect
/dis'ri spekt"/, n. 1. lack of respect; discourtesy; rudeness. v.t. 2. to regard or treat without respect; regard or treat with contempt or rudeness. [1605-15; DIS-1 + ...
disrespectability
See disrespectable. * * *
disrespectable
—disrespectability, n. /dis'ri spek"teuh beuhl/, adj. not respectable. [1805-15; DIS-1 + RESPECTABLE] * * *
disrespectful
—disrespectfully, adv. —disrespectfulness, n. /dis'ri spekt"feuhl/, adj. characterized by, having, or showing disrespect; lacking courtesy or esteem: a disrespectful remark ...
disrespectfully
See disrespectful. * * *
disrespectfulness
See disrespectfully. * * *
disrobe
—disrobement, n. —disrober, n. /dis rohb"/, v.t., v.i., disrobed, disrobing. to undress. [1575-85; DIS-1 + ROBE; cf. MF desrober] * * *
disrober
See disrobe. * * *
disroot
/dis rooht", -root"/, v.t. to uproot; dislodge. [1605-15; DIS-1 + ROOT1] * * *
disrupt
—disrupter, disruptor, n. /dis rupt"/, v.t. 1. to cause disorder or turmoil in: The news disrupted their conference. 2. to destroy, usually temporarily, the normal continuance ...
disrupter
See disrupt. * * *
disruption
/dis rup"sheuhn/, n. 1. forcible separation or division into parts. 2. a disrupted condition: The state was in disruption. [1640-50; < L disruption- (s. of disruptio), equiv. to ...
disruptive
—disruptively, adv. —disruptiveness, n. /dis rup"tiv/, adj. causing, tending to cause, or caused by disruption; disrupting: the disruptive effect of their rioting. [1835-45; ...
disruptive discharge
Elect. the sudden, large increase in current through an insulating medium resulting from complete failure of the medium under electrostatic stress. * * *
disruptively
See disruptive. * * *
disruptiveness
See disruptively. * * *
disruptor
See disrupter. * * *
disrupture
/dis rup"cheuhr/, n. interruption; disruption. [1775-85; DISRUPT + -URE] * * *
diss.
diss. abbr. dissertation. * * *
dissatisfaction
/dis'sat is fak"sheuhn, dis sat'-/, n. 1. the state or attitude of not being satisfied; discontent; displeasure. 2. a particular cause or feeling of displeasure or ...
dissatisfactory
—dissatisfactoriness, n. /dis'sat is fak"teuh ree, dis sat'-/, adj. causing dissatisfaction; unsatisfactory: dissatisfactory service. [1600-10; DIS-1 + SATISFACTORY] * * *
dissatisfied
—dissatisfiedly, adv. —dissatisfiedness, n. /dis sat"is fuyd'/, adj. 1. not satisfied or pleased; discontented. 2. showing dissatisfaction: a dissatisfied look. [1665-75; ...
dissatisfiedly
See dissatisfied. * * *
dissatisfy
/dis sat"is fuy'/, v.t., dissatisfied, dissatisfying. to cause to be displeased, esp. by failing to provide something expected or desired. [1660-70; DIS-1 + SATISFY] * * *
dissave
—dissaver, n. /dis sayv"/, v.i., dissaved, dissaving. 1. to withdraw or spend savings, esp. to meet increased living expenses. 2. to save little or nothing or to go into debt, ...
dissd.
dissd. abbr. dissolved. * * *
disseat
/dis seet"/, v.t. Archaic. to unseat. [1605-1615; DIS-1 + SEAT] * * *
dissect
—dissectible, adj. —dissector, n. /di sekt", duy-/, v.t. 1. to cut apart (an animal body, plant, etc.) to examine the structure, relation of parts, or the like. 2. to examine ...
dissected
/di sek"tid, duy-/, adj. 1. Bot. deeply divided into numerous segments, as a leaf. 2. Phys. Geog. separated, by erosion, into many closely spaced crevices or gorges, as the ...
dissectible
See dissect. * * *
dissection
/di sek"sheuhn, duy-/, n. 1. the act of dissecting. 2. something that has been dissected. 3. a detailed, part-by-part analysis. [1575-85; < L dissection- (s. of dissectio), ...
dissector
dissector [di sek′tər, dī sek′tər, dī′sek΄tər] n. 1. a person who dissects 2. an instrument used in dissecting * * * See dissectible. * * *
dissector tube
Electronics. See image dissector. * * *
disseise
dis·seise (dĭs-sēzʹ) v. Variant of disseize. * * *
disseisin
dis·sei·sin (dĭs-sēʹzĭn) n. Variant of disseizin. * * *
disseize
—disseizor, n. /dis seez"/, v.t., disseized, disseizing. Law. to deprive (a person) of seizin, or of the possession, of a freehold interest in land, esp. wrongfully or by ...
disseizee
/dis'see zee", dis see zee"/, n. a person who is disseized. [1535-40; DISSEIZE + -EE] * * *
disseizin
/dis see"zin/, n. Law. 1. the act of disseizing. 2. the state of being disseized. [1250-1300; ME disseisine < AF. See DIS-1, SEIZIN] * * *
dissemblance
dissemblance1 /di sem"bleuhns/, n. dissimilarity; unlikeness. [1425-75; late ME < MF dessemblance. See DIS-1, SEMBLANCE] dissemblance2 /di sem"bleuhns/, n. dissembling; ...
dissemble
—dissembler, n. —dissemblingly, adv. /di sem"beuhl/, v., dissembled, dissembling. v.t. 1. to give a false or misleading appearance to; conceal the truth or real nature of: to ...
dissembler
See dissemblance. * * *
dissemblingly
See dissemblance. * * *
disseminate
—dissemination, n. —disseminative, adj. —disseminator, n. /di sem"euh nayt'/, v.t., disseminated, disseminating. to scatter or spread widely, as though sowing seed; ...
disseminated
dis·sem·i·nat·ed (dĭ-sĕmʹə-nā'tĭd) adj. Spread over a large area of a body, tissue, or organ. * * *
dissemination
See disseminate. * * *
disseminator
See dissemination. * * *
disseminule
/di sem"euh nyoohl'/, n. Bot. any propagative part of a plant, as a bud, seed, or spore, that is capable of disseminating the plant. [1900-05; prob. DISSEMIN(ATE) + -ULE] * * *
dissension
/di sen"sheuhn/, n. 1. strong disagreement; a contention or quarrel; discord. 2. difference in sentiment or opinion; disagreement. [1300-50; ME dissenciun, dissensio(u)n < AF < L ...
dissensus
dissensus [dis sen′səs] n. lack of consensus; discord * * *
dissent
—dissentingly, adv. /di sent"/, v.i. 1. to differ in sentiment or opinion, esp. from the majority; withhold assent; disagree (often fol. by from): Two of the justices dissented ...
dissenter
/di sen"teuhr/, n. 1. a person who dissents, as from an established church, political party, or majority opinion. 2. (sometimes cap.) an English Protestant who dissents from the ...
dissentience
See dissentient. * * *
dissentient
—dissentience, dissentiency, n. —dissentiently, adv. /di sen"sheuhnt/, adj. 1. dissenting, esp. from the opinion of the majority. n. 2. a person who dissents. [1615-25; < L ...
dissenting opinion
Law. (in appellate courts) an opinion filed by a judge who disagrees with the majority decision of a case. Also called dissent. * * *
dissentingly
See dissent. * * *
dissentingopinion
dis·sent·ing opinion (dĭ-sĕnʹtĭng) n. See dissent. * * *
dissentious
/di sen"sheuhs/, adj. contentious; quarrelsome. [1550-60; DISSENT + -IOUS] * * *
dissepiment
—dissepimental, adj. /di sep"euh meuhnt/, n. 1. Anat., Zool. a partition or septum in a tissue. 2. Bot. one of the partitions formed within ovaries and fruits by the coherence ...
dissepimental
See dissepiment. * * *
dissert
/di serrt"/, v.i. to discourse on a subject. [1615-25; < L dissertare to set forth at length (freq. of disserere to arrange in order), equiv. to dis- DIS-1 + ser- put together + ...
dissertate
—dissertator, n. /dis"euhr tayt'/, v.i., dissertated, dissertating. to discuss a subject fully and learnedly; discourse. [1760-70; prob. back formation from DISSERTATION] * * *
dissertation
—dissertational, adj. —dissertationist, n. /dis'euhr tay"sheuhn/, n. 1. a written essay, treatise, or thesis, esp. one written by a candidate for the degree of Doctor of ...
dissertator
See dissertate. * * *
disserve
/dis serrv"/, v.t., disserved, disserving. to be a disservice to; serve harmfully or injuriously. [1610-20; DIS-1 + SERVE] * * *
disservice
/dis serr"vis/, n., v., disserviced, disservicing. n. 1. harmful or injurious service; an ill turn. v.t. 2. to provide inadequate or faulty service to: Small shippers are most ...
dissever
—disseverance, disseverment, disseveration, n. /di sev"euhr/, v.t. 1. to sever; separate. 2. to divide into parts. v.i. 3. to part; separate. [1250-1300; ME des(s)everen < OF ...
disseverance
See dissever. * * *
disseverment
See disseverance. * * *
dissidence
/dis"i deuhns/, n. disagreement: political dissidence. [1650-60; < L dissidentia, equiv. to dissid- (see DISSIDENT) + -entia -ENCE] Syn. See dissent. * * *
dissident
—dissidently, adv. /dis"i deuhnt/, n. 1. a person who dissents. adj. 2. disagreeing or dissenting, as in opinion or attitude: a ban on dissident magazines. [1525-35; < L ...


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