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Слова на букву de k-enol (15990)

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dough
—doughlike, adj. /doh/, n. 1. flour or meal combined with water, milk, etc., in a mass for baking into bread, cake, etc.; paste of bread. 2. any similar soft, pasty mass. 3. ...
dough bird
the Eskimo curlew. [1825-35, Amer.] * * *
dough hook
an attachment for a food processor or electric mixer, for kneading dough. * * *
doughbelly
/doh"bel'ee/, n., pl. doughbellies. stoneroller (def. 1). [DOUGH + BELLY] * * *
doughboy
/doh"boy'/, n. 1. Informal. an American infantryman, esp. in World War I. 2. a rounded mass of dough, boiled or steamed as a dumpling or deep-fried and served as a hot ...
Dougherty wagon
/daw"euhr tee, dah"-, dawr"euh-, dahr"euh-/ a horse- or mule-drawn passenger wagon having doors on the side, transverse seats, and canvas sides that can be rolled down. [1900-05, ...
doughface
/doh"fays'/, n. U.S. Hist. 1. a Northerner who sympathized with the South during the controversies over new territories and slavery before the Civil War. 2. a congressman from a ...
doughfoot
/doh"foot'/, n., pl. doughfeet /-feet'/, doughfoots. Informal. an infantryman in the U.S. Army, esp. in World War II. [1940-45; DOUGH + FOOT, perh. b. DOUGHBOY and FOOT ...
doughiness
See doughy. * * *
doughnut
/doh"neuht, -nut'/, n. 1. a small cake of sweetened or, sometimes, unsweetened dough fried in deep fat, typically shaped like a ring or, when prepared with a filling, a ball. 2. ...
dought
/dowt/, v. a pt. of dow. * * *
doughtily
See doughty. * * *
doughtiness
See doughtily. * * *
doughty
—doughtily, adv. —doughtiness, n. /dow"tee/, adj., doughtier, doughtiest. steadfastly courageous and resolute; valiant. [bef. 1000; ME; OE dohtig worthy, equiv. to *doht ...
Doughty
/dow"tee/, n. Charles Montagu /mon"teuh gyooh'/, 1843-1926, English traveler and writer. * * *
Doughty, Charles Montagu
▪ British traveler born Aug. 19, 1843, Theberton Hall, Leiston, Suffolk, Eng. died Jan. 20, 1926, Sissinghurst, Kent       British traveller, widely regarded as one of ...
doughy
—doughiness, n. /doh"ee/, adj., doughier, doughiest. of or like dough, esp. in being soft and heavy or pallid and flabby: a doughy consistency; a fat, doughy face. [1595-1605; ...
Douglas
/dug"leuhs/, n. 1. Sir James ("the Black Douglas"), 1286-1330, Scottish military leader. 2. James, 2nd Earl of, 1358?-88, Scottish military leader. 3. Kirk (Issur Danielovitch ...
Douglas Adams
➡ Adams (II) * * *
Douglas bag
an airtight bag used to collect expired air for analysis of oxygen consumption. [1960-65; named after Claude G. Douglas (1882-1963), British physiologist] * * *
Douglas Fairbanks
➡ Fairbanks * * *
Douglas fir
a coniferous tree, Pseudotsuga menziesii, of western North America, often more than 200 ft. (60 m) high, having reddish-brown bark, flattened needles, and narrow, light-brown ...
Douglas MacArthur
➡ MacArthur * * *
Douglas SBD
dauntless (def. 2). * * *
Douglas scale
▪ oceanography        Douglas sea and swell scale either of two arbitrary series of numbers from 0 to 9, used separately or in combination to define qualitatively the ...
Douglas sea and swell scale
▪ Table sea swell low moderate heavy no short or long short average ...
Douglas, Aaron
born May 26, 1899, Topeka, Kan., U.S. died Feb. 2, 1979, Nashville, Tenn. U.S. painter and graphic artist. In 1925 he moved to New York City, where he joined the burgeoning ...
Douglas, Archibald Douglas, 4th earl of, Duc De Touraine
▪ Scottish military officer byname  Tyneman   born c. 1369 died Aug. 17, 1424, Verneuil, Fr.       Scottish commander in the Scottish and French wars with the English ...
Douglas, Clifford
▪ British economist in full  Clifford Hugh Douglas,   born Jan. 20, 1879, Stockport, Cheshire, Eng. died Sept. 29, 1952, Dundee, Scot.       British economist and ...
Douglas, Dame Mary
▪ 2008 Margaret Mary Tew        British social anthropologist born March 25, 1921, San Remo, Italy died May 16, 2007, London, Eng. examined structure in societies of ...
Douglas, David
▪ Scottish botanist born 1798, Scone, Perthshire, Scot. died July 12, 1834, Sandwich [Hawaiian] Islands       Scottish botanist who was a traveller and botanical ...
Douglas, Donald
▪ American engineer born April 6, 1892, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 1, 1981, Palm Springs, Calif.  U.S. aircraft designer who founded the Douglas Aircraft ...
Douglas, Gawin, Bishop of Dunkeld
▪ Scottish bishop and poet Gawin also spelled  Gavin   born 1475? died September 1522, London       Scottish poet and first British translator of the Aeneid. As a ...
Douglas, George
▪ Scottish author pseudonym of  George Douglas Brown   born Jan. 26, 1869, Ochiltree, Ayrshire, Scot. died Aug. 28, 1902, London       Scottish novelist who was ...
Douglas, Helen Mary Gahagan
▪ American actress and politician née  Helen Mary Gahagan   born Nov. 25, 1900, Boonton, N.J., U.S. died June 28, 1980, New York, N.Y.       American actress and ...
Douglas, James
▪ American engineer born Nov. 4, 1837, Quebec died June 25, 1918, New York City  Canadian-born U.S. mining engineer, industrialist, and philanthropist who contributed ...
Douglas, James Douglas, 2nd earl of
▪ Scottish leader born c. 1358 died August 1388, Otterburn, Roxburghshire, Scot.       Scottish leader in wars against the English in the late 14th ...
Douglas, James Douglas, 9th earl of
▪ Scottish leader born 1426 died July 14, 1488, Lindores Abbey, Fife, Scot.       last of the first line of the earls of Douglas, caught in the internal wars of ...
Douglas, Jesse
▪ American mathematician born July 3, 1897, New York, New York, U.S. died October 7, 1965, New York       American mathematician who was awarded one of the first two ...
Douglas, Keith Castellain
▪ British poet born , Jan. 20, 1920, Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent, Eng. died June 9, 1944, Normandy, Fr.       British poet who is remembered for his irony, eloquence, ...
Douglas, Kirk
orig. Issur Danielovitch later Isadore Demskey born Dec. 9, 1916, Amsterdam, N.Y., U.S. U.S. film actor and producer. He had minor Broadway roles before making his film debut ...
Douglas, Marjory Stoneman
▪ 1999       American author and environmentalist (b. April 7, 1890, Minneapolis, Minn.—d. May 14, 1998, Miami, Fla.), helped dispel the centuries-long revulsion that ...
Douglas, Michael
born Sept. 25, 1944, New Brunswick, N.J., U.S. U.S. actor and producer. The son of Kirk Douglas, he made his film acting debut in 1969 and began his career as a producer with ...
Douglas, Mike
▪ 2007 Michael Delaney Dowd, Jr.        American television personality and singer (b. Aug. 11, 1925, Chicago, Ill.—d. Aug. 11, 2006, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.), was ...
Douglas, Norman
▪ British author born , Dec. 8, 1868, Thüringen, Austria died Feb. 9, 1952, Capri, Italy       essayist and novelist who wrote of southern Italy, where he lived for ...
Douglas, Sir James
born Aug. 15, 1803, Demerara, British Guiana died Aug. 2, 1877, Victoria, B.C., Can. Canadian statesman, known as "the father of British Columbia. " He joined the Hudson's Bay ...
Douglas, Stephen A
▪ United States senator born April 23, 1813, Brandon, Vt., U.S. died June 3, 1861, Chicago  U.S. politician, leader of the Democratic Party, and orator who espoused the cause ...
Douglas, Stephen A(rnold)
born April 23, 1813, Brandon, Vt., U.S. died June 3, 1861, Chicago, Ill. U.S. politician. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (1843–47) and Senate ...
Douglas, Tommy
orig. Thomas Clement Douglas born Oct. 20, 1904, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scot. died Feb. 24, 1986, Ottawa, Ont., Can. Scottish-born Canadian politician. His family immigrated ...
Douglas, William Douglas, 1st earl of
▪ Scottish noble also called  Earl Of Mar  born c. 1327 died May 1384, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scot.       Scottish lord of the Douglases, prominent in the dynastic and ...
Douglas, William Douglas, 8th earl of
▪ Scottish noble born c. 1425 died Feb. 22, 1452, Stirling, Stirling, Scot.       prominent Scottish lord during the reign of James II of Scotland.       The ...
Douglas, William O(rville)
born , Oct. 16, 1898, Maine, Minn., U.S. died Jan. 19, 1980, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist and public official. He attended Columbia University Law School, where he edited the ...
Douglas, William O.
▪ United States jurist born , Oct. 16, 1898, Maine, Minn., U.S. died Jan. 19, 1980, Washington, D.C.  public official, legal educator, and associate justice of the U.S. ...
Douglas,Kirk
Douglas, Kirk. Originally Issur Danielovitch. Born 1916. American actor noted for his portrayal of tough characters in films such as Champion (1949) and The Bad and the Beautiful ...
Douglas,Stephen Arnold
Douglas, Stephen Arnold. Called “the Little Giant.” 1813-1861. American politician who served as U.S. representative (1843-1847) and senator (1847-1861) from Illinois. He ...
Douglas,William Orville
Douglas, William Orville. 1898-1980. American jurist who served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1939-1975). * * *
Douglas-Home
/dug"leuhs hyoohm"/, n. Alexander Frederick, (Baron Home of the Hirsel), born 1903, British statesman and politician: prime minister 1963-64. * * *
Douglas-Home, Sir Alec
orig. Alexander Frederick later Baron Home (of the Hirsel of Coldstream) born July 2, 1903, London, Eng. died Oct. 9, 1995, The Hirsel, Coldstream, Berwickshire, Scot. British ...
Douglas-Home, William
▪ British playwright born June 3, 1912, Edinburgh, Scot. died Sept. 28, 1992, Kilmeston, Hampshire, Eng.       British playwright who, in four decades, created more ...
Douglas-Home,Sir Alexander Frederick
Doug·las-Home (dŭg'ləs-hyo͞omʹ), Sir Alexander Frederick. 1903-1995. British politician who served as prime minister (1963-1964). He renounced his peerage in order to take ...
Douglasfir
Douglas fir Pseudotsuga menziesii Wendy Smith n. A tall evergreen timber tree (Pseudotsuga menziesii formerly P. taxifolia) of northwest North America, having short needles and ...
Douglass
/dug"leuhs/, n. 1. Frederick, 1817-95, U.S. ex-slave, abolitionist, and orator. 2. a male given name. * * *
Douglass, Andrew Ellicott
▪ American astronomer and archaeologist born , July 5, 1867, Windsor, Vt., U.S. died March 20, 1962, Tucson, Ariz.       American astronomer and archaeologist who ...
Douglass, Frederick
orig. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey born February 1818?, Tuckahoe, Md., U.S. died Feb. 20, 1895, Washington, D.C. U.S. abolitionist. The son of a slave mother and a ...
Douglass,Frederick
Doug·lass (dŭgʹləs), Frederick. 1817-1895. American abolitionist and journalist who escaped from slavery (1838) and became an influential lecturer in the North and abroad. ...
Douhet, Giulio
born May 30, 1869, Caserta, Italy died Feb. 15, 1930, Rome Italian general. He served as commander of Italy's first aviation unit, the Aeronautical Battalion (1912–15). In ...
Doukhobor
/dooh"koh bawr'/, n. a member of an independent religious sect originating in Russia in the 18th century, believing in the supreme authority of the inner voice and in the ...
Doukhobors
Doukhobors [do͞o′kə bôrz΄] pl.n. alt. sp. of DUKHOBORS * * * or Dukhobors (Russian: "Spirit Wrestler") Member of a Russian peasant religious sect. Its members, most of ...
doula
/dooh"leuh/, n., pl. doulas. a woman who assists women during labor and after childbirth. [1975-80; < Mod Gk, female servant] * * *
Doulton ware
▪ pottery       English pottery established in 1815 by John Doulton at Lambeth, London, in association with John Watts and known as Doulton and Watts. The company became ...
doum
doum [do͞om] n. 〚Fr < Ar dawm〛 an African palm tree (Hyphaene thebaica) bearing an edible fruit that has a taste and consistency somewhat like gingerbread; gingerbread ...
doum nut
also spelled  Dhoum Nut,         the nut of the doum palm (Hyphaene thebaica), native to Upper Egypt, Sudan, Kenya, and Tanzania. Also called the gingerbread palm, the ...
doum palm
/doohm/. See doom palm. * * *
douma
/dooh"mah/, n. duma. * * *
Doumer, Paul
▪ president of France born March 22, 1857, Aurillac, Fr. died May 6, 1932, Paris  the 13th president of the French Third Republic whose term was cut short by an assassin's ...
Doumergue
/dooh merddg"/, n. Gaston /ganns tawonn"/, 1863-1937, French statesman: president of France 1924-31. * * *
Doumergue, Gaston
▪ president of France born Aug. 1, 1863, Aigues-Vives, Fr. died June 18, 1937, Aigues- Vives  French political figure whose term as 12th president of the Third Republic was ...
doup
/dowp/, n. Scot. 1. the bottom, end, or butt of something. 2. the buttocks. [1505-15; cf. ON daup] * * *
douppioni
/dooh'pee oh"nee/, n. an irregular silk thread reeled from two or more entangled cocoons and producing a coarse yarn generally used in fabrics such as shantung or pongee. Also, ...
dour
—dourly, adv. —dourness, n. /door, doweur, dow"euhr/, adj. 1. sullen; gloomy: The captain's dour look depressed us all. 2. severe; stern: His dour criticism made us regret ...
doura
/door"euh/, n. durra. Also, dourah. * * *
dourine
/doo reen"/, n. Vet. Pathol. an infectious disease of horses, affecting the genitals and hind legs, caused by a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma equiperdum. [1880-85; < F; cf. Ar ...
Douris
flourished early 5th century BC, Greece Greek vase painter. He was known for his work in red-figure pottery, which exhibit his fine draftsmanship and rhythmic composition. He ...
dourly
See dour. * * *
dourness
See dourly. * * *
Douro
Port. /doh"rddoo/, n. a river in SW Europe, flowing W from N Spain through N Portugal to the Atlantic. ab. 475 mi. (765 km) long. Spanish, Duero. * * *
Douro River
Spanish Duero ancient Durius. River in Spain and Portugal. The third-longest in the Iberian Peninsula, it rises in the Sierra de Urbión in central Spain, and crosses the ...
douroucouli
/door'euh kooh"lee/, n. a small, nocturnal South American monkey of the genus Aotus, having large, owllike eyes: in danger of extinction. Also, douricouli /door'i kooh"lee/. Also ...
douse
/dows/, v., doused, dousing, n. v.t. 1. to plunge into water or the like; drench: She doused the clothes in soapy water. 2. to splash or throw water or other liquid on: The ...
douser
/dow"seuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that douses. 2. dowser. [1880-85; DOUSE + -ER1] * * *
douter
/dow"teuhr, dooh"-/, n. an implement for snuffing out candles, consisting either of a scissorlike device with two broad flat blades or of a cone at the end of a handle. [1615-25; ...
Douvillier, Suzanne Théodore Vaillande
▪ American dancer née  Suzanne Théodore Vaillande,  also called  Madame Placide   born Sept. 28, 1778?, Dôle, France died Aug. 30, 1826, New Orleans, La., ...
Douw
Du. /dow/, n. Gerrard Du. /gay"rddahrddt/. See Dou, Gerard. * * *
doux
/dooh/, adj. (of champagne) very sweet. [1940-45; < F < L dulcis savory, sweet] * * *
douzaine
/dooh zen"/, n., pl. douzaines /-zen"/. French. a bet in roulette on 12 numbers simultaneously so as to share in any that win. [lit., dozen] * * *
douzepers
/doohz"pearz'/, n.pl., sing., douzeper /-pear'/. 1. Fr. Legend. the 12 peers or paladins represented in old romances as attendants of Charlemagne. 2. Fr. Hist. the 12 great ...
douzième
/dooh'zee em"/; Fr. /dooh zyem"/, n., pl. douzièmes /-zee emz"/; Fr. /-zyem"/. (in Swiss watchmaking) the 12th part of a ligne, used mainly to gauge the thickness of a ...
DOVAP
/doh"vap/, n. Electronics. a system for plotting the trajectory of a missile or other rapidly moving long-range object by means of the Doppler effect exhibited by radio waves ...
dove
dove1 —dovelike, dovish, adj. —dovishness, n. /duv/, n. 1. any bird of the family Columbidae, esp. the smaller species with pointed tails. Cf. pigeon (def. 1). 2. a pure ...
Dove
/duv/, n. 1. Arthur, 1880-1946, U.S. painter. 2. Rita, born 1952, U.S. poet and educator: U.S. poet laureate 1993. * * * Any of certain birds of the pigeon family ...
dove color
—dove-colored, adj. /duv/ warm gray with a slight purplish or pinkish tint. [1590-1600] * * *
Dove Cottage
a house in the village of Grasmere in the English Lake District where the poet William Wordsworth lived with his sister Dorothy from 1799 to 1808, after which it became the home ...
Dove prism
Optics. a prism that inverts a beam of light, often used in a telescope to produce an erect image. Also called erecting prism, reversing prism, rotating prism. [named after ...
dove tree
▪ plant also called  handkerchief tree   (species Davidia involucrata), small flowering tree, in the family Nyssaceae, with showy creamy bracts (modified leaves) ...
Dove, Arthur G.
▪ American painter in full  Arthur Garfield Dove   born August 2, 1880, Canandaigua, New York, U.S. died November 23, 1946, Huntingdon, New York       American ...
Dove, Rita
▪ American author in full  Rita Frances Dove  born August 28, 1952, Akron, Ohio, U.S.    African American writer and teacher who was poet laureate of the United States ...
Dove, Rita (Frances)
born Aug. 28, 1952, Akron, Ohio, U.S. U.S. writer and teacher. She studied writing at the University of Iowa and published the first of several chapbooks of her poetry in 1977. ...
Dove, Ulysses
▪ 1997       U.S. dancer and choreographer who created dances for many of the leading U.S. and European companies and for the Philip Glass opera The Civil Wars (b. Jan. ...
dovecote
/duv"koht'/, n. 1. a structure, usually at a height above the ground, for housing domestic pigeons. 2. flutter the dovecotes, to cause a stir in a quiet or conservative ...
dovekie
/duv"kee/, n. 1. a small, short-billed, black and white auk, Alle alle, of northern Atlantic and Arctic oceans. 2. Brit. the black guillemot. Also, dovekey. [1815-25; DOVE1 + ...
doven
/dah"veuhn/, v.i., v.t. Yiddish. daven. * * *
Dover
/doh"veuhr/, n. 1. a seaport in E Kent, in SE England: point nearest the coast of France. 101,700. 2. Strait of. French, Pas de Calais. a strait between England and France, ...
Dover's powder
Pharm. a powder containing ipecac and opium, used as an anodyne, diaphoretic, and antispasmodic. [1795-1805; named after T. Dover (1660-1742), English physician] * * *
Dover'spowder
Do·ver's powder (dōʹvərz) n. A powdered drug containing ipecac and opium, formerly used to relieve pain and induce perspiration.   [After Thomas Dover (1660-1742), British ...
Dover, Strait of
French Pas de Calais ancient Fretum Gallicum. Channel separating southeastern England from northwestern France. Connecting the English Channel with the North Sea, it is about ...
Dover, Treaty of
(1670) Pact between Charles II of England and Louis XIV in which Charles promised to support French policy in Europe in return for a French subsidy that would free him from ...
Dover,Strait of
Dover, Strait of In French Pas de Ca·lais (pä də kă-lāʹ, kălʹā, kä-lĕʹ). A narrow channel at the eastern end of the English Channel between southeast England and ...
dovetail
—dovetailer, n. /duv"tayl'/, n. Carpentry. 1. a tenon broader at its end than at its base; pin. 2. a joint formed of one or more such tenons fitting tightly within ...
dovetail hinge
a strap hinge having leaves which are narrower at their junction than at their other extremities. * * *
dovetail plane
Carpentry. a plane for cutting tongues and grooves with parallel or inclined sides. * * *
dovetail saw
a backsaw for fine woodworking, as dovetailing. [1805-15] * * *
dovetailed
/duv"tayld'/, adj. Heraldry. noting a partition line or a charge, as an ordinary, having a series of indentations suggesting dovetails. [1715-25; DOVETAIL + -ED3] * * *
dovish
See dove1. * * *
dovishness
See dovish. * * *
Dovre Mountains
▪ mountains, Norway Norwegian  Dovrefjell,         range in south-central Norway. Extending about 100 miles (160 km) from east to west and about 40 miles from north ...
Dovzhenko
/deuhv zheng"koh/; Russ. /duv zhen"keuh/, n. Alexander P. /u lyi ksahndrdd"/, 1894-1956, Russian motion-picture director. * * *
Dovzhenko, Aleksandr
▪ Soviet director in full,  Aleksandr Petrovich Dovzhenko  born Sept. 11 [Aug. 30, old style], 1894, Sosnitsy, Ukraine, Russia died Nov. 26, 1956, Moscow  a motion-picture ...
dow
dow1 /dow, doh/, v.i., dowed or dought /dowt/, dowing. Scot. and North Eng. 1. to be able. 2. to thrive; prosper; do well. [bef. 900; ME dowen, doghen, OE dugan to be worthy; c. ...
Dow
/dow/, n. 1. Gerrard Du. /gay"rddahrddt/. See Dou, Gerard. 2. Herbert Henry, 1866-1930, U.S. chemist, inventor, and industrialist. * * * (as used in expressions) Dow Chemical ...
Dow Chemical Co.
Leading U.S. petrochemical company that manufactures chemicals, pharmaceuticals, consumer goods, paint, and many other products for industrial and home use. It was founded in ...
Dow Chemical Company
▪ American company       American chemical and plastics manufacturer that is one of the world's leading suppliers of chemicals, plastics, synthetic fibres, and ...
Dow Jones Average
/dow/, Trademark. any of the indexes published by Dow Jones & Company, a financial publishing firm in New York City, showing the average closing prices of the representative ...
Dow Jones industrial average
Dow Jones industrial average or Dow Jones n. 〚< The Dow Jones Averages, trademark of Dow Jones & Company, Inc.〛 a stock market index based upon the current prices of thirty ...
Dow metal
Trademark. a brand name applied to any of various magnesium alloys containing more than 85 percent magnesium, characterized by extreme lightness. * * *
Dow, Charles Henry
▪ American journalist born Nov. 6, 1851, Sterling, Conn., U.S. died Dec. 4, 1902, Brooklyn, N.Y.  American journalist who cofounded Dow Jones & Company, a financial news ...
Dow, Herbert H(enry)
born Feb. 26, 1866, Belleville, Ont., Can. died Oct. 15, 1930, Rochester, Minn., U.S. U.S. inventor and manufacturer. After attending college in Cleveland, Dow developed and ...
Dow, Herbert H.
▪ American chemist in full  Herbert Henry Dow   born Feb. 26, 1866, Belleville, Ont., Can. died Oct. 15, 1930, Rochester, Minn., U.S.       pioneer in the American ...
Dow, Neal
▪ American politician born March 20, 1804, Portland, Me., U.S. died Oct. 2, 1897, Portland       American politician and temperance advocate whose Maine Law of 1851 ...
Dow,Charles Henry
Dow (dou), Charles Henry. 1851-1902. American economist and publisher who with Edward D. Jones (1856-1920) established Dow Jones & Company, Inc. (1882), a publisher of financial ...
Dow,Herbert Henry
Dow, Herbert Henry. 1866-1930. American chemist and manufacturer who developed and patented more than 100 chemical processes and founded the Dow Chemical Company (1897). * * *
Dow-Jones Average
(also the Dow-Jones Index, also infml the Dow) any of several numbers produced on each day of trade by the New York Stock Exchange. They each represent the total average price of ...
Dow-Jones Index
➡ Dow-Jones Average * * *
Dow-Jones Industrial Average
➡ Dow-Jones Average * * *
Dow.
dowager. * * *
Dowa Highlands
▪ hills, Malaŵi also called  Chitembwe-mwera Highlands,         central Malaŵi, rectangular formation covering an area of about 360 square miles (930 sq km); they ...
dowable
/dow"euh beuhl/, adj. Law. 1. subject to the provision of a dower: dowable land. 2. entitled to dower. [1425-75; late ME < AF; see ENDOW, -ABLE] * * *
dowager
—dowagerism, n. /dow"euh jeuhr/, n. 1. a woman who holds some title or property from her deceased husband, esp. the widow of a king, duke, etc. (often used as an additional ...
dowager's hump
a type of kyphosis, common in older women, in which the shoulders become rounded and the upper back develops a hump: caused by osteoporosis resulting in skeletal deformity. Cf. ...
dowager'shump
dow·a·ger's hump (douʹə-jərz) n. An abnormal curvature of the spine that is primarily manifested as a rounded hump in the upper back. Typically affecting older women, the ...
Dowden
/dowd"n/, n. Edward, 1843-1913, Irish critic and poet. * * *
Dowden, Edward
▪ Irish critic born May 3, 1843, Cork, County Cork, Ire. died April 4, 1913, Dublin  Irish critic, biographer, and poet, noted for his critical work on Shakespeare ...
dowdily
See dowdy. * * *
dowdiness
See dowdily. * * *
Dowding, Hugh Caswall Tremenheere Dowding, 1st Baron
▪ British air chief marshal born April 24, 1882, Moffat, Dumfriesshire, Scot. died Feb. 15, 1970, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, Eng.  British air chief marshal and head of Fighter ...
dowdy
dowdy1 —dowdily, adv. —dowdiness, n. —dowdyish, adj. —dowdyism, n. /dow"dee/, adj., dowdier, dowdiest, n., pl. dowdies. adj. 1. not stylish; drab; old-fashioned: Why do ...
dowdyish
See dowdily. * * *
dowel
/dow"euhl/, n., v., doweled, doweling or (esp. Brit.) dowelled, dowelling. n. 1. Also called dowel pin. Carpentry. a pin, usually round, fitting into holes in two adjacent pieces ...
Dowell
(1943– ) the director of the British Royal Ballet (1988–2001). He joined the Royal Ballet as a dancer in 1961 and often danced with Antoinette Sibley in roles created for ...
dower
—dowerless, adj. /dow"euhr/, n. 1. Law. the portion of a deceased husband's real property allowed to his widow for her lifetime. 2. dowry (def. 1). 3. a natural gift or ...
dower chest
a Pennsylvania Dutch hope chest bearing the initials of the owner. [1880-85] * * *
dower house
Brit. the dwelling that is intended for or occupied by the widowed mother of the owner of an ancestral estate. [1860-65] * * *
dowery
/dow"euh ree, dow"ree/, n., pl. doweries. dowry. * * *
dowf
/dowf, doohf/, adj. Scot. and North Eng. dull; stupid. [1475-85; < ON daufr DEAF, dull] * * *
dowie
—dowily, adv. —dowiness, n. /dow"ee, doh"ee/, adj. Scot. and North Eng. dull; melancholy; dismal. Also, dowy. [1500-10; var. of dolly, equiv. to DULL + -LY] * * *
Dowie, John Alexander
▪ American religious leader born May 25, 1847, Edinburgh died March 9, 1907, City of Zion, Ill., U.S.       U.S. evangelist and faith healer who founded the Christian ...
dowitcher
/dow"ich euhr/, n. any of several long-billed, snipelike shore birds of North America and Asia, esp. Limnodromus griseus. [1835-45, Amer.; perh. < N Iroquoian; cf. Mohawk ...
Dowiyogo, Bernard
▪ 2004       Nauruan politician (b. Feb. 14, 1946, Nauru—d. March 9, 2003, Washington, D.C.), served six times (1976–78, 1989–95, 1996, 1998–99, 2000–01, 2003) ...
DowJones Averages
Dow Jones Averages A trademark used for three indexes of the relative price of selected industrial, transportation, and utility stocks based on a formula developed and ...
Dowlaiswaram
▪ India       town, northeastern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India, on the Godavari River delta. Dowlaiswaram is located at the source of the great delta, and a ...
Dowland
/dow"leuhnd/, n. John, 1563-1626, English lutenist and composer. * * *
Dowland, John
born 1562/63, Westminster, London, Eng. died Jan. 21, 1626, London English composer and lutenist. Educated at Oxford, he was refused a court position in 1594 and, believing his ...
dowlas
/dow"leuhs/, n. a coarse linen or cotton cloth. [1485-95; after Daoulas in Brittany; r. late ME douglas, popular substitution for dowlas] * * *
down
down1 /down/, adv. 1. from higher to lower; in descending direction or order; toward, into, or in a lower position: to come down the ladder. 2. on or to the ground, floor, or ...
Down
/down/, n. 1. a county in SW Northern Ireland. 311,876; 952 sq. mi. (2466 sq. km). Co. seat: Downpatrick. 2. an administrative district in this county. 49,500; 253 sq. mi. (654 ...
down card
Cards. a card that is dealt and played face down, as in blackjack and stud poker. * * *
down East
1. in, to, or into New England. 2. New England. 3. in, to, or into the state of Maine. 4. the state of Maine. 5. Canadian. a. in, to, or into the Maritime Provinces. b. the ...
Down Eastern
See DownEaster. * * *
Down in the Valley
a US folk song about a man who asks a woman if she loves him. Kurt Weill wrote an opera (1948) with the same name, based on the song. It begins: Down in the valley, the valley so ...
down payment
1. an initial amount paid at the time of purchase, in installment buying, time sales, etc. 2. any initial or partial payment, gift, favor, or recompense, as to reduce one's ...
down quark
Physics. the quark having electric charge -1/3 times the elementary charge, with strangeness, charm, and other quark quantum numbers equal to 0. Also called d quark. [1975-80] * ...
Down syndrome
Pathol. a genetic disorder, associated with the presence of an extra chromosome 21, characterized by mild to severe mental retardation, weak muscle tone, a low nasal bridge, and ...
down under
1. Australia or New Zealand. 2. in, to, or into Australia or New Zealand. [1895-1900] * * *
Down's syndrome
Pathol. See Down syndrome. * * *
Down'ssyndrome
Down's syndrome (dounz) n. Variant of Down syndrome. * * *
down-
down- [doun] combining form down [downhill] * * *
down-and-dirty
/down"euhn derr"tee/ adj. Informal. 1. unscrupulous; nasty: a down-and-dirty election campaign. 2. earthy; funky. [1985-90] * * *
down-and-out
/down"euhnd owt", -euhn/, adj. 1. without any money, or means of support, or prospects; destitute; penniless. 2. without physical strength or stamina; disabled; incapacitated. 3. ...
down-at-heel
/down"euht heel"/, adj. of a shabby, run-down appearance; seedy: He is rapidly becoming a down-at-heel drifter and a drunk. Also, down-at-the-heel, down-at-heels, ...
down-bow
/down"boh'/, n. Music. (in bowing on a stringed instrument) a stroke bringing the tip of the bow toward the strings. [1890-95; DOWN1 + BOW2] * * *
down-easter
/down'ee"steuhr/, n. 1. a full-rigged ship built in New England in the late 19th century, usually of wood and relatively fast. 2. a native or inhabitant of Maine. 3. a native or ...
down-home
/down"hohm"/, adj. of, pertaining to, or exhibiting the simple, familiar, or folksy qualities associated with one's family or with rural areas, esp. of the southern U.S.: ...
down-market
/down"mahr'kit/, Chiefly Brit. adj. 1. appealing or catering to lower-income consumers; widely affordable or accessible. adv. 2. in a down-market way. [1970-75] * * *
down-the-line
/down"dheuh luyn"/, adj. 1. complete, full, unreserved, or whole-hearted: a down-the-line endorsement. adv. 2. fully; completely; whole-heartedly: Will you support it ...
down-to-earth
/down"tooh errth", -teuh-/, adj. practical and realistic: a down-to-earth person. [1925-30] Syn. hard-headed, sensible, sober, pragmatic. * * *
downbeat
/down"beet'/, n. Music. 1. the downward stroke of a conductor's arm or baton indicating the first or accented beat of a measure. 2. the first beat of a measure. adj. 3. gloomy or ...
downburst
/down"berrst'/, n. a strong downward current of air from a cumulonimbus cloud, often associated with intense thunderstorms. [DOWN1 + BURST] * * *
downcast
—downcastly, adv. —downcastness, n. /down"kast', -kahst'/, adj. 1. directed downward, as the eyes. 2. dejected in spirit; depressed. n. 3. overthrow or ruin. 4. a downward ...
downcome
/down"kum'/, n. 1. a downcomer. 2. Archaic. descent or downfall; comedown; humiliation. [1505-15; DOWN1 + COME] * * *
downcomer
/down"kum'euhr/, n. a pipe, tube, or passage for conducting fluid materials downward. [1865-70; DOWN1 + COMER] * * *
downcourt
/down"kawrt", -kohrt"/, Basketball. adv. 1. to or into the opposite end of the court. adj. 2. directed to or into the opposite end of the court. [1950-55; DOWN1 + COURT] * * *
downcurved
/down"kerrvd'/, adj. curved downward at the edges or end: his downcurved mouth conveyed his disappointment; downcurved beak. [DOWN1 + CURVED] * * *
downcycle
/down"suy'keuhl/, n. a downward course in the business cycle. [1975-80; DOWN1 + CYCLE] * * *
downdraft
/down"draft', -drahft'/, n. 1. a downward current, as of air: a downdraft in a mine shaft. 2. a downward movement, as of the stock market. [1780-90; DOWN1 + DRAFT] * * *
DownEast
Down East also down East (doun ēstʹ) New England, especially Maine.   Down Eastʹer or down-Eastʹer (doun-ēʹstər) n. Down Eastʹern adj. * * *
DownEaster
See Down East. * * *
downer
/dow"neuhr/, n. 1. Informal. a. a depressant or sedative drug, esp. a barbiturate. b. a depressing experience, person, or situation. 2. Animal Husb. an old or diseased animal, ...
Downer, Alexander John Gosse
▪ 1995       Political dynasties are rare in Australia, where the widespread egalitarian ethos works against inherited wealth and power. Thus, when Alexander Downer ...
downers
➡ drugs * * *
Downers Grove
/dow"neuhrz/ a city in NE Illinois, near Chicago. 39,274. * * *
DownersGrove
Dow·ners Grove (dou'nərz) A village of northeast Illinois, a manufacturing suburb of Chicago. Population: 46,858. * * *
Downey
/dow"nee/, n. a city in SW California, near Los Angeles. 82,602. * * * ▪ California, United States       city, Los Angeles county, southern California, U.S. Situated ...
Downey, June Etta
▪ American psychologist born July 13, 1875, Laramie, Wyo., U.S. died Oct. 11, 1932, Trenton, N.J.       American psychologist and educator whose studies centred on the ...
Downey, Morton, Jr.
▪ 2002       American television talk-show host (b. Dec. 9, 1933, New York, N.Y.—d. March 12, 2001, Los Angeles, Calif.), pioneered tabloid-style television as the ...
Downey, Robert, Jr.
▪ 2009 Robert John Downey, Jr.  born April 4, 1965, New York, N.Y.       Though Robert Downey, Jr., had long been considered one of Hollywood's most gifted and ...
downfall
—downfallen, adj. /down"fawl'/, n. 1. descent to a lower position or standing; overthrow; ruin. 2. something causing ruin, failure, etc.: Liquor was his downfall. 3. a fall, as ...
downfallen
downfallen [doun′fôl΄ən] adj. fallen; ruined * * * down·fall·en (dounʹfô'lən) adj. Fallen, as from high position; ruined. * * *
downfield
/down"feeld"/, adv., adj. Football. past the line of scrimmage and at or toward the goal line of the defensive team: He sent his receivers downfield. Downfield blocking is ...
downgrade
—downgrader, n. /down"grayd'/, n., adj., adv., v., downgraded, downgrading. n. 1. a downward slope, esp. of a road. 2. on the downgrade, in a decline toward an inferior state ...
downgrowth
/down"grohth'/, n. something that grows or has grown in a downward direction: The posterior pituitary is a downgrowth of the brain. [DOWN1 + GROWTH] * * *
downhaul
/down"hawl'/, n. Naut. any of various lines for pulling down a sail or a yard, as for securing in a lowered position when not in use. [1660-70; DOWN1 + HAUL] * * *
downhearted
—downheartedly, adv. —downheartedness, n. /down"hahr"tid/, adj. dejected; depressed; discouraged. [1645-55; DOWN1 + HEARTED] Syn. downcast, despondent, disheartened, ...
downheartedly
See downhearted. * * *
downheartedness
See downheartedly. * * *
downhill
adv., adj. /down"hil"/; n. /down"hil'/, adv. 1. down the slope of a hill; downward. 2. into a worse or inferior condition: The business has been going downhill. adj. 3. going or ...
downhill skiing
—downhill skier. the sport of skiing down a slope, usually making turns and various maneuvers. Cf. cross-country skiing. * * * ▪ winter sport       ski (skiing) race ...
downhiller
/down"hil"euhr/, n. 1. a skier who competes in downhill races, esp. in the downhill. 2. a downhill skier (contrasted with cross-country skier). [1965-70; DOWNHILL + -ER1] * * *
downhold
/down"hohld'/, n. the act of keeping spending, expenses, losses, inflation, etc., as low as possible or advisable. [DOWN1 + HOLD1] * * *
downhole
/down"hohl'/, n. 1. a hole dug or drilled downward, as in a mine or a petroleum or gas well. adj. 2. occurring or situated in such a hole. [DOWN1 + HOLE] * * *
downiness
downiness [dou′nē nis] n. the quality of being downy * * *
Downing
/dow"ning/, n. Andrew Jackson, 1815-52, U.S. landscape architect. * * *
Downing Street
1. a street in W central London, England: cabinet office; residence of the prime minister. 2. the British prime minister and cabinet. * * *
Downing Street Declaration
a statement about Northern Ireland made by the British and Irish prime ministers, John Major and Albert Reynolds, in London in December 1993. The Declaration tried to push ...
Downing, Andrew Jackson
born Oct. 30, 1815, Newburgh, N.Y., U.S. died July 28, 1852, vicinity of Yonkers, N.Y. U.S. horticulturist, landscape gardener, and architect. He educated himself in landscape ...
Downing, Sir George
▪ English diplomat born 1623, Dublin, Ire. died July 1684, Cambridgeshire, Eng.       English diplomat and financial administrator who helped precipitate two wars with ...
Downing,Andrew Jackson
Dow·ning (douʹnĭng), Andrew Jackson. 1815-1852. American landscape architect and horticulturist who wrote the classic A Treatise on Landscape Gardening (1841) and designed ...
DowningStreet
I. Downing Street1 A thoroughfare of Westminster in London, England, off Whitehall. No. 10 Downing Street is the official residence of the first lord of the Treasury, who is ...
downlight
/down"luyt'/, n. a lamp, often a light bulb set in a metal cylinder, mounted on or recessed into the ceiling so that a beam of light is directed downward. [DOWN1 + LIGHT1] * * *
downlink
/down"lingk'/, n. 1. a transmission path for data or other signals from a communications satellite or airborne platform to an earth station. adj. 2. pertaining to such ...
download
/down"lohd'/, v.t. Computers. to transfer (software, data, character sets, etc.) from a distant to a nearby computer, from a larger to a smaller computer, or from a computer to a ...
Downpatrick
Town (pop., 1991: 10,113), seat of Down district, Northern Ireland. It is on the southwestern end of Strangford Lough. Formerly a MacDunleary stronghold, it was seized in 1177 ...
downpayment
down payment n. A partial payment made at the time of purchase, with the balance to be paid later. * * *
downpipe
/down"puyp'/, n. Brit. downspout. [1855-60; DOWN1 + PIPE1] * * *
downplay
/down"play'/, v.t. to treat or speak of (something) so as to reduce emphasis on its importance, value, strength, etc.: The press has downplayed the president's role in the ...
downpour
/down"pawr', -pohr'/, n. a heavy, drenching rain. [1805-15; DOWN1 + POUR] * * *
downquark
down quark n. Abbr. d A quark with a charge of - 1/3, a mass about 20 times that of the electron, and a downward spin. It is a component of protons and neutrons. * * *
downrange
adj. /down"raynj'/; adv. /down"raynj"/, adj., adv. Rocketry. being in the designated path from a launch pad to the point on a course generally taken as the target: The signal was ...
downrate
/down"rayt'/, v.t., downrated, downrating. to lower the rate of: to downrate the speed of an economic recovery. [DOWN1 + RATE1] * * *
downrigger
down·rig·ger (dounʹrĭg'ər) n. Nautical A trolling rig that consists of a weighted cable attached below the boat to a fishing line, used to troll live bait at or near the ...
downright
—downrightly, adv. —downrightness, n. /down"ruyt'/, adj. 1. thorough; absolute; out-and-out: a downright falsehood. 2. frankly direct; straightforward: a downright person. 3. ...
downriver
/down"riv"euhr/, adv., adj. with or in the direction of the current of a river: logs floating downriver. [1885-90; DOWN1 + RIVER1] * * *
Downs
Downs (dounz) Two roughly parallel ranges of chalk hills in southeast England. The North Downs extend about 161 km (100 mi) from west to east; the South Downs, about 105 km (65 ...
Downs, The
/downz/ 1. a range of low ridges in S and SW England. 2. a roadstead in the Strait of Dover, between SE England and Goodwin Sands. * * *
downscale
/down"skayl'/, adj., v., downscaled, downscaling. adj. 1. located at, moving toward, or of or for the middle or lower end of a social or economic scale: The discount store caters ...
downshift
/down"shift'/, v.i. 1. to shift an automotive transmission or vehicle into a lower gear. 2. to become less active; slow down: The economy seems to be downshifting. v.t. 3. to ...
downshifter
See downshift. * * *
downside
/down"suyd'/, n. 1. the lower side or part. 2. a downward trend, esp. in stock prices. 3. a discouraging or negative aspect. adj. 4. of or involving a decline, esp. in stock ...
Downside School
an English Roman Catholic public school(1) for boys (and, from 2005, girls) at Downside, near Bath. The school was started in France in 1606 because at that time Roman Catholic ...
downsize
/down"suyz'/, v., downsized, downsizing, adj. v.t. 1. to design or manufacture a smaller version or type of: The automotive industry downsized its cars for improved fuel ...
downslide
/down"sluyd'/, n. a decline or downward trend, as of prices. [1925-30; DOWN1 + SLIDE] * * *
downslope
downslope [doun′slōp′] adv., adj. toward the bottom of a hill; downhill * * *
downspin
/down"spin'/, n. spin (def. 22). [DOWN1 + SPIN] * * *
downspout
/down"spowt'/, n. a pipe for conveying rain water from a roof or gutter to the ground or to a drain. Also called drainspout; Brit., downpipe. [1895-1900; DOWN1 + SPOUT] * * *
downstage
adv., n. /down"stayj"/; adj. /down"stayj'/, Theat. adv. 1. at or toward the front of the stage. adj. 2. of or pertaining to the front of the stage. n. 3. the front half of the ...
downstairs
adv., n. /down"stairz"/; adj. /down"stairz'/, adv. 1. down the stairs. 2. to or on a lower floor. adj. 3. Also, downstair. pertaining to or situated on a lower floor, esp. the ...
downstate
—downstater, n. n., adv. /down"stayt"/; adj. /down"stayt'/ n. 1. the southern part of a U.S. state. adj. 2. located in or characteristic of this part: The downstate precincts ...


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