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Слова на букву de k-enol (15990)

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Dumont d'Urville, Jules-Sébastien-César
▪ French explorer born , May 23, 1790, Condé-sur-Noireau, Fr. died May 8, 1842, near Meudon  French navigator who commanded voyages of exploration to the South Pacific ...
Dumont, François
▪ French painter born Jan. 7, 1751, Lunéville, Fr. died Aug. 27, 1831, Paris       one of the greatest miniature painters.       He studied for a time under ...
Dumont, Rene
▪ 2002       French agronomist (b. March 13, 1904, Cambrai, France—d. June 18, 2001, Fontenay-sous-Bois, France), unsuccessfully ran for president of France in 1974 on ...
dumortierite
/dooh mawr"tee euh ruyt', dyooh-/, n. a mineral, aluminum borosilicate. [1880-85; < F, named after Eugène Dumortier, 19th-century French paleontologist; see -ITE1] * * *
Dumouriez, Charles-François du Périer
▪ French general born Jan. 25, 1739, Cambrai, France died March 14, 1823, Turville Park, Buckinghamshire, Eng.  French general who won signal victories for the French ...
dump
—dumper, n. /dump/, v.t. 1. to drop or let fall in a mass; fling down or drop heavily or suddenly: Dump the topsoil here. 2. to empty out, as from a container, by tilting or ...
dump scow.
See hopper barge. * * *
dump truck
a usually open-topped truck having a body that can be tilted to discharge its contents, as sand or gravel, through an open tailgate. Also, dumptruck. [1925-30, Amer.] * * *
dumpcart
/dump"kahrt'/, n. a cart with a body that can be tilted or a bottom that can be opened downward to discharge the contents. [1865-70, Amer.; DUMP + CART] * * *
dumper
dumper [dum′pər] n. Slang a container into which refuse is dumped * * * See dump. * * *
dumpily
See dumpy1. * * *
dumpiness
See dumpily. * * *
dumping-ground
/dum"ping grownd'/, n. dump (def. 18). [1855-60, Amer.] * * *
dumpish
—dumpishly, adv. —dumpishness, n. /dum"pish/, adj. depressed; sad. [1535-45; DUMP(S) + -ISH1] * * *
dumpling
/dump"ling/, n. 1. a rounded mass of steamed and seasoned dough, often served in soup or with stewed meat. 2. a dessert consisting of a wrapping of dough enclosing sliced apples ...
dumps
/dumps/, n. a depressed state of mind (usually prec. by in the): to be in the dumps over money problems. [1515-25; cf. G dumpf dull, MD domp haze] * * *
dumpsite
/dump"suyt'/, n. dump (def. 18). [DUMP + SITE] * * *
Dumpster
/dump"steuhr/, Trademark. a brand of large metal bin for refuse designed to be hoisted onto a specially equipped truck for emptying or hauling away. * * *
Dumpster diving
➡ Dumpster * * *
Dumpster{™}
n a US make of very large metal container for rubbish, left in the street or near a place where there is building work. Dumpster diving is taking things, including food, from ...
dumptruck
dump truck n. A heavy-duty truck having a bed that tilts backward to dump loose material. * * *
dumpy
dumpy1 /dum"pee/, adj., dumpier, dumpiest. dumpish; dejected; sulky. [1610-20; DUMP(S) + -Y1] dumpy2 —dumpily, adv. —dumpiness, n. /dum"pee/, adj., dumpier, dumpiest. short ...
dumpy level
Survey. an instrument consisting of a spirit level mounted under and parallel to a telescope, the latter being rigidly attached to its supports. [1830-40] * * *
dumpylevel
dumpy level n. A surveyor's instrument having a short telescope fixed rigidly to a horizontally rotating table. * * *
Dumuzi
/dooh"moo zee/, n. the Sumerian god of pastures and vegetation: the consort of Inanna. Cf. Tammuz. * * *
Dumuzi-Abzu
In Mesopotamian religion, a Sumerian fertility goddess. The city goddess of Kinirsha in the southeastern marshland region, she represented the power of new life in the marshes. ...
Dumuzi-Amaushumgalana
In Mesopotamian religion, a Sumerian god who represented the power of growth and new life in the date palm. He was the young bridegroom of the fertility goddess Inanna or ...
Dumyat
/doom yaht"/, n. Arabic name of Damietta. * * * ▪ governorate, Egypt       muḥāfaẓah (governorate) in the Nile River delta, Lower Egypt, on the Mediterranean ...
dun
dun1 /dun/, v., dunned, dunning, n. v.t. 1. to make repeated and insistent demands upon, esp. for the payment of a debt. n. 2. a person, esp. a creditor, who duns another. 3. a ...
Dun & Bradstreet
☆ Dun & Bradstreet [dun′ən brad′strēt΄ ] service mark for an agency furnishing subscribers with information as to the financial standing and credit rating of ...
Dun and Bradstreet
a US company that is the largest source of business information in the world. It publishes several books each year and regular news about the financial situation and organization ...
Dun Cow, The Book of the
▪ Irish literature Irish  Lebor na h-Uidre or  Leabhar na h-Uidhri        oldest surviving miscellaneous manuscript in Irish literature, so called because the ...
dun fly
Angling. a dun-colored artificial fly that resembles the larval stage of certain real flies. [1400-50; late ME] * * *
Dun Laoghaire
/dun lair"euh/ a seaport in E Republic of Ireland, near Dublin. 54,405. Also, Dunleary. * * *
Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown
▪ county, Ireland Irish  Dhún Laoghaire–Ráth ah Dúin        county in the province of Leinster, east-central Ireland. The county of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown ...
Duna
/doo"no/, n. Hungarian name of the Danube. * * *
Düna
/dyuu"nah/, n. German name of the Dvina. * * *
Dünaburg
/dyuu"nah boorddk'/, n. German name of Daugavpils. * * *
Dunai
Dunai [do͞o′nī΄] Russ. name for the DANUBE * * *
Dunaj
/doo"nuy/, n. Czech and Slovak name of the Danube. * * *
Dunajec River
River, southern Poland. Rising in the Tatra Mountains near the Slovakia border, it flows about 156 mi (251 km) northeast into the Vistula River. It was the scene of heavy ...
Dunajská Streda
▪ town, Slovakia Hungarian  Dunaszerdahely        town, southwestern Slovakia, on the highway and railway line between Bratislava and Komárno. Dunajská Streda is ...
dunam
dunam [doon′əm] n. in Israel, a unit of land measure equal to 1,000 square meters (about 1/ 4 acre) * * *
Dunant
Fr. /dyuu nahonn"/, n. Jean Henri Fr. /zhahonn ahonn rddee"/, 1828-1910, Swiss banker and philanthropist: founder of the Red Cross; Nobel peace prize 1901. * * *
Dunant, (Jean-) Henri
born May 8, 1828, Geneva, Switz. died Oct. 30, 1910, Heiden Swiss humanitarian. An eyewitness to the Battle of Solferino, he organized emergency aid services for the Austrian ...
Dunant, Henri
▪ Swiss humanitarian in full  Jean-Henri Dunant  born May 8, 1828, Geneva, Switzerland died October 30, 1910, Heiden  Swiss humanitarian, founder of the Red Cross (Red ...
Dunant,Jean Henri
Du·nant (do͞o-näɴʹ, dü-), Jean Henri. 1828-1910. Swiss philanthropist who founded the International Red Cross (1864). He shared the 1901 Nobel Peace Prize. * * *
Dunarea
/doo"neuh rddyah/, n. Rumanian name of the Danube. * * *
Dunash Ben Labrat
▪ Hebrew poet Labrat also spelled  Librat,  also called  Al-abrad, or Adonina Ha-levi  born c. 920, , Fès, Mor.? died c. 990, , Córdoba?       Hebrew poet, ...
Dunash Ben Tamim
▪ Jewish physician also called  Adonim, or Abu Sahl   born c. 900 died c. 960       Jewish physician and one of the first scholars to make a comparative study of the ...
Dunav
Dunav [do͞o′näv΄] Bulg. name for the DANUBE * * *
Dunaway, (Dorothy) Faye
born Jan. 14, 1941, Bascom, Fla., U.S. U.S. film actress. She acted in several off-Broadway plays (1962–67) before making her film debut in The Happening (1967). She became ...
Dunaway, Faye
▪ American actress in full  Dorothy Faye Dunaway  born Jan. 14, 1941, Bascom, Fla., U.S.       American actress known for her tense, absorbing performances. She ...
Dunbar
/dun"bahr/ for 1; /dun bahr"/ for 2, 3, n. 1. Paul Laurence, 1872-1906, U.S. poet. 2. William, c1460-c1520, Scottish poet. 3. a town in the Lothian region, in SE Scotland, at the ...
Dunbar Nelson, Alice
▪ American author in full  Alice Ruth Dunbar Nelson, née Moore  born July 19, 1875, New Orleans, La., U.S. died Sept. 18, 1935, Philadelphia, Pa.       novelist, ...
Dunbar, Battle of
▪ British history       (Sept. 3, 1650), decisive engagement in the English Civil Wars, in which English troops commanded by Oliver Cromwell (Cromwell, Oliver) defeated ...
Dunbar, Paul Laurence
born June 27, 1872, Dayton, Ohio, U.S. died Feb. 9, 1906, Dayton U.S. author. The son of former slaves, Dunbar became the first African American writer to try to live by his ...
Dunbar, William
born 1460/65, Scotland died before 1530 Scottish poet. He was attached to the court of James IV. Of the more than 100 poems attributed to him, most are short occasional pieces, ...
Dunbar,Paul Laurence
Dun·bar (dŭnʹbär), Paul Laurence. 1872-1906. American writer primarily noted for his poetry, which reflects Black American life and dialect. * * *
Dunbar,William
Dun·bar (dŭn-bärʹ), William. 1460?-1520?. Scottish poet known for his allegorical works, such as The Thrissill and the Rois (1503), and an elegy on bygone poets, Lament of ...
Dunbarton
/dun bahr"tn/, n. Dumbarton (def. 1). * * *
Dunbartonshire
▪ former county, Scotland, United Kingdom also called  Dumbartonshire,  Dunbarton , or  Dumbarton        historic county of west-central Scotland, northwest and ...
Dunblane
a town in central Scotland. In March 1996 a local man called Thomas Hamilton shot and killed 16 children and a teacher in a Dunblane nursery school, before killing himself. ...
Duncan
/dung"keuhn/, n. 1. Isadora, 1878-1927, U.S. dancer: pioneer in modern dance. 2. Robert, 1919-88, U.S. poet. 3. a city in S Oklahoma. 22,517. 4. a male given name. * * * (as ...
Duncan Hines{™}
a name for a US range of mixtures for baking different types of cakes. They are produced by Aurora Foods and were named after a US food expert who used to travel around the ...
Duncan I
died 1040, king of Scotland 1030-40: murdered by Macbeth. * * * died Aug. 1, 1040, near Elgin, Moray, Scot. King of the Scots (1034–40). The grandson of King Malcolm II, his ...
Duncan II
▪ king of Scotland died 1094  king of Scotland (1093–94), son of Malcolm III and grandson of Duncan I.       For many years (1072?–87) Duncan lived as a hostage ...
Duncan Phyfe
/dung"keuhn fuyf"/ of, pertaining to, or resembling the furniture made by Duncan Phyfe, esp. the earlier pieces in the Sheraton and Directoire styles. * * *
Duncan Smith, Iain
▪ 2002       On Sept. 13, 2001, in the wake of its second successive crushing general election defeat, the U.K.'s Conservative Party elected as its leader a right-wing ...
Duncan, Arne
▪ American education administrator born Nov. 6, 1964, Chicago, Ill., U.S.       American education administrator who was chief executive officer of the Chicago Public ...
Duncan, David Douglas
born Jan. 23, 1916, Kansas City, Mo., U.S. U.S. photojournalist. After graduating from college, he became a freelance photographer. In 1946 he joined the staff of Life magazine ...
Duncan, Dudley
▪ 2005       American sociologist (b. Dec. 2, 1921, Nocona, Texas—d. Nov. 16, 2004, Santa Barbara, Calif.), showed that education was more influential than social ...
Duncan, Isadora
orig. Angela Duncan born May 26, 1877, or May 27, 1878, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Sept. 14, 1927, Nice, Fr. U.S. interpretive dancer. She rejected the conventions of ...
Duncan, Otis Dudley
▪ American sociologist born December 2, 1921, Nocona, Texas, U.S. died November 16, 2004, Santa Barbara, California       American sociologist whose study of the black ...
Duncan, Robert
▪ American poet original name  Edward Howard Duncan,  adopted name  Robert Edward Symmes  born Jan. 7, 1919, Oakland, Calif., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1988, San ...
Duncan, Ronald
▪ British author in full  Ronald Frederick Henry Duncan   born Aug. 6, 1914, Salisbury, Rhodesia [now Harare, Zimb.] died June 3, 1982, Barnstaple, Devon, ...
Duncan, Tim
▪ 2006  In game seven of the 2005 National Basketball Association (NBA) finals, Tim Duncan of the San Antonio Spurs proved why he was called the “ultimate winner.” ...
Duncan, Todd
▪ 1999       American baritone who was the first to perform the role of Porgy in George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess, was the first black to sing with the New York City ...
Duncan,Isadora
Dun·can (dŭngʹkən), Isadora. 1878-1927. American dancer whose use of simple costumes and free movement greatly influenced modern dance. * * *
Duncanville
/dung"keuhn vil'/, n. a town in N Texas. 27,781. * * *
dunce
—duncical, duncish, adj. —duncishly, adv. /duns/, n. a dull-witted, stupid, or ignorant person; dolt. [1520-30; after John DUNS SCOTUS, whose writings were attacked by the ...
dunce cap
a tall, cone-shaped hat formerly worn by slow or lazy students as a punishment in school. Also, dunce's cap. Also called fool's cap. [1830-40] * * *
duncecap
dunce cap also dunce's cap (dŭnʹsĭz) n. A cone-shaped paper cap, formerly placed on the head of a slow or lazy pupil. Also called fool's cap. * * *
Dunciad, The
/dun"see ad'/ a poem (1728-42) by Pope, satirizing various contemporary writers. * * *
Dundalk
/dun"dawk/ for 1; /dun dawk", -dawlk"/ for 2, n. 1. a town in central Maryland, near Baltimore. 71,293. 2. a seaport in NE Republic of Ireland. 25,610. * * * ▪ Ireland Irish ...
Dundas
/dun"deuhs, dun das"/, n. a town in SE Ontario, in S Canada, near Hamilton. 19,586. * * * ▪ Greenland formerly  Thule,    former Greenlandic (Eskimo) settlement of Umanak ...
Dundee
/dun dee", dun"dee/, n. a seaport in E Scotland, on the Firth of Tay: administrative center of the Tayside. 194,732. * * * City and royal borough (pop., 2001: 145,663), eastern ...
Dundee cake
n [C, U] (esp BrE) a large rich cake containing dried fruit and usually decorated on the top with almonds. * * *
Dundee City
➡ Dundee * * *
Dundee, Angelo
▪ American boxing trainer original name  Angelo Mirena, Jr.   born August 30, 1923, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.       American professional boxing trainer and ...
Dundee, Chris
▪ 1999       American fight promoter who was responsible for the rise of Miami Beach, Fla., as a boxing centre; the eight world championship fights he promoted during ...
Dundee, John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st Viscount of, Lord Graham Of Claverhouse
▪ Scottish soldier born 1649? died July 17/18, 1689, Pass of Killiecrankie, Perth, Scot.  Scottish soldier, known as “Bonnie Dundee,” who in 1689 led an uprising in ...
dunder
/dun"deuhr/, n. the thick lees from boiled sugar-cane juice used in the distillation of rum. [1785-95; alter. of Sp redundar to overflow] * * *
dunderhead
—dunderheaded, adj. —dunderheadedness, n. /dun"deuhr hed'/, n. a dunce; blockhead; numbskull. Also called dunderpate /dun"deuhr payt'/. [1615-25; appar. < D dunder(kop) ...
dunderheaded
See dunderhead. * * *
Dunderlands
▪ valley, Norway       valley, along the lower course of the Rana River, north-central Norway. On the Arctic Circle, it extends about 30 miles (50 km) northeast from ...
Dundo
▪ Angola  mining town, northeastern Angola. It lies 15 miles (24 km) south of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo) border. Founded near a site where diamonds were ...
Dundonald, Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of
▪ British admiral born Dec. 14, 1775, Annesfield, Lanarkshire, Scot. died Oct. 30, 1860, London, Eng.       British admiral, who ranks among the greatest of British ...
dundrearies
/dun drear"eez/, n.pl. (sometimes cap.) long, full sideburns or muttonchop whiskers. Also called dundreary whiskers. [1860-65; after the sideburns worn by actor Edward A. Sothern ...
dùndún pressure drum
▪ musical instrument       double-membrane, hourglass-shaped drum of the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria. It is capable of imitating the tones and glides of the ...
dune
/doohn, dyoohn/, n. a sand hill or sand ridge formed by the wind, usually in desert regions or near lakes and oceans. [1780-90; < F, OF < MD duna; c. DOWN3] * * *
dune buggy
a small, lightweight, open automotive vehicle equipped with oversize, low-pressure tires for traveling along sand beaches, over dunes, etc. Also called beach buggy. [1955-60] * * ...
dune grass.
See sea lyme grass. * * *
dune-buggy
/doohn"bug'ee, dyoohn"-/, v.i., dune-buggied, dune-buggying. to drive or ride in a dune buggy. * * *
dunebuggy
dune buggy n. A recreational vehicle having oversize tires designed for use on sand dunes or beaches, especially a light vehicle with a modified engine mounted on an open ...
Dunedin
/dun ee"din/, n. 1. a seaport on SE South Island, in New Zealand. 120,426. 2. a town in W Florida. 30,203. * * * ▪ New Zealand  city and port, Otago local government ...
duneland
/doohn"land', dyoohn"-/, n. a tract of land dominated by sand dunes, often bordering on a beach. [1920-25; DUNE + -LAND] * * *
Dunér, Nils Christofer
▪ Swedish astronomer born May 21, 1839, Billeberga, Sweden died Nov. 10, 1914, Stockholm       Swedish astronomer who studied the rotational period of the ...
Dunes, Battle of the
▪ European history       (June 14, 1658), military victory of French and English forces led by Henri de La Tour d'Auvergne, Viscount de Turenne, attacking Spanish forces ...
Dunfermline
/dun ferrm"lin, -ferm"-, dum-/, n. 1. an administrative district in E Scotland, in the Fife region. 120 sq. mi. (311 sq. km); 125,027. 2. a city in this district, near the Firth ...
dung
—dungy, adj. /dung/, n. 1. excrement, esp. of animals; manure. v.t. 2. to manure (ground) with or as if with dung. [bef. 1000; ME, OE; c. LG, G dung; cf. Icel dyngja heap, ...
dung beetle
any of various scarab beetles that feed on or breed in dung. [1625-35] * * * Any member of one subfamily (Scarabaeinae) of scarab beetles, which shapes manure into a ball ...
dung fly
also called  cordylurid,         any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera, that are yellow or brown in colour and are common in pastures. In most ...
Dungannon
District (pop., 2001: 47,735), Northern Ireland. Created in 1973, it extends from Lough Neagh to the district of Fermanagh and from the foothills of the Sperrin Mountains to the ...
dungaree
/dung'geuh ree"/, n. 1. dungarees, a. work clothes, overalls, etc., of blue denim. b. See blue jeans. 2. blue denim. [1605-15; < Hindi dungri kind of coarse cloth] * * *
Dungarpur
▪ India       town, southern Rajasthan (Rājasthān) state, northwestern India. An agricultural market centre, it is linked by road with Udaipur as well as with ...
Dungarvan
▪ Ireland Irish  Dún Garbhán (“Garbhan's Fort”)        market town, seaport, urban district, and administrative centre of County Waterford, Ireland, on the Bay ...
dungbeetle
dung beetle n. Any of various beetles of the family Scarabaeidae that form balls of dung on which they feed and in which they lay their eggs. * * *
Dungeness
a place on the coast of Kent in England where there are two nuclear power stations. The artist Derek Jarman created a garden there that is kept as a work of art. * * * ▪ ...
Dungeness crab
/dun"jeuh nes', dun'jeuh nes"/ an edible crab, Cancer magister, of shallow Pacific coastal waters from northern California to Alaska. [1920-25; after Dungeness, village in NW ...
Dungenesscrab
Dun·ge·ness crab (dŭnʹjə-nĕs', -nĭs) n. An edible crab (Cancer magister) common along the Pacific coast from Alaska to northern California.   [AfterDungeness, a town of ...
dungeon
/dun"jeuhn/, n. 1. a strong, dark prison or cell, usually underground, as in a medieval castle. 2. the keep or stronghold of a castle; donjon. [1250-1300; ME dungeo(u)n, ...
Dungeons and Dragons
Trademark. a role-playing game set in a fantasy world resembling the Middle Ages. Abbr: D&D. * * *
dunghill
/dung"hil'/, n. 1. a heap of dung. 2. a repugnantly filthy or degraded place, abode, or situation. [1275-1325; ME; see DUNG, HILL] * * *
Dungkar Lobsang Trinley
▪ 1998       Tibetan historian and Buddhist scholar who at the age of four was recognized as the eighth reincarnation of the Lama of the Dungkar monastery—Dungkar ...
dungy
dungy [duŋ′ē] adj. dungier, dungiest of, like, or soiled with dung; filthy; vile * * * See dung. * * *
Dunham
/dun"euhm/, n. Katherine, born 1910?, U.S. dancer and choreographer. * * *
Dunham, Katherine
born June 22, 1910, Joliet, Ill., U.S. U.S. dancer, choreographer, and anthropologist noted for her interpretation of tribal and ethnic dances. In 1931 she opened a dance ...
Dunhill, Thomas Frederick
▪ British composer born Feb. 1, 1877, London, Eng. died March 13, 1946, Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire       British composer known for his light operas and ...
Dunhill{™}
a British company that makes tobacco products, men’s clothes, leather goods and gifts. * * *
Dunhuang
▪ China Introduction Wade-Giles romanization  Tun-huang   city, western Gansu sheng (province), northwestern China. Situated in an oasis in the Gansu-Xinjiang desert ...
duniewassal
/dooh'nee wos"euhl/, n. a gentleman, esp. a cadet of a ranking family, among the Highlanders of Scotland. [1555-65; < ScotGael duine uasal; duine man, uasal noble, well-born (OIr ...
dunite
/dooh"nuyt, dun"uyt/, n. a coarse-grained igneous rock composed almost entirely of olivine. [1865-70; named after Mt. Dun in New Zealand, where it is found; see -ITE1] * * ...
dunitic
See dunite. * * *
Duniway, Abigail Jane Scott
▪ American suffragist née  Abigail Jane Scott  born Oct. 22, 1834, Groveland, Ill., U.S. died Oct. 11, 1915, Portland, Ore.  American pioneer, suffragist, and writer, ...
dunk
—dunkable, adj., n. —dunker, n. /dungk/, v.t. 1. to dip (a doughnut, cake, etc.) into coffee, milk, or the like, before eating. 2. to submerge in a liquid: She dunked the ...
Dunk Island
▪ island, Coral Sea       island in the Family Islands group, 3 miles (5 km) off the coast of northeastern Queensland, Australia. It lies north of the entrance to ...
dunk shot
Basketball. a shot in which a player near the basket jumps with the ball and attempts to thrust it through the basket with one hand or both hands held above the rim. Also called ...
Dunkeld
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       historic cathedral city in Perth and Kinross council area, historic county of Perthshire, Scotland. It is situated on the left bank of ...
Dunker
/dung"keuhr/, n. a member of the Church of the Brethren, a denomination of Christians founded in Germany in 1708 and later reorganized in the U.S., characterized by the practice ...
Dunkerque
Dunkerque [dën kerk′] Fr. name for DUNKIRK * * *
Dunkers
☆ Dunkers [duŋ′kərdzduŋ′kərz ] pl.n. 〚Ger tunker, dipper < tunken (see DUNK): so named from practice of immersion〛 a sect of German-American Baptists opposed to ...
dunking
/dung"king/, n. the action of plunging or being plunged into water or other liquid: Learning to canoe cost her several dunkings. [1915-20; DUNK + -ING1] * * *
Dunkin’ Donuts{™}
the largest group of shops in the world selling doughnuts (= small, sweet, ring-shaped cakes) and coffee. They also sell other baked products. In 2004, there were more than ...
Dunkirk
/dun"kerrk/, n. 1. French, Dunkerque /dueonn kerddk"/. a seaport in N France: site of the evacuation of a British expeditionary force of over 330,000 men under German fire May ...
Dunkirk Evacuation
(1940) In World War II, the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force and other Allied troops, cut off by the Germans, from the French seaport of Dunkirk (Dunkerque) to ...
dunkshot
dunk shot n. Basketball A shot made by jumping and slamming the ball down through the basket. Also called stuff shot. * * *
Dunlap
/dun"lap/, n. William, 1766-1839, U.S. dramatist, theatrical producer, and historian. * * *
dunlin
/dun"lin/, n. a common sandpiper, Calidris alpina, that breeds in the northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere. [1525-35; var. of dunling. See DUN2, -LING1] * * * ▪ ...
Dunlop
/dun lop", dun"lop/, n. John Boyd, 1840-1921, Scottish inventor of the pneumatic tire. * * *
Dunlop Holdings PLC
▪ British company       subsidiary company of BTR PLC, and the major British manufacturer of tires and other rubber products. It is headquartered in ...
Dunlop, John Boyd
▪ British veterinary surgeon born Feb. 5, 1840, Dreghorn, Ayrshire, Scot. died Oct. 23, 1921, Dublin  inventor who developed the pneumatic rubber tire. In 1867 he settled in ...
Dunmore
/dun mawr", -mohr"; dun"mawr, -mohr/, n. 1. John Murray, 4th Earl of, 1732-1809, Scottish colonial governor in America. 2. a borough in NE Pennsylvania, near Scranton. 16,781. * ...
Dunmore, John Murray, 4th Earl of, Viscount Of Fincastle, Lord Murray Of Blair, Moulin, And Tillemot
▪ British royal governor of Virginia born 1730? died Feb. 25 or Mar. 5, 1809, Ramsgate, Kent, Eng.       British royal governor of Virginia on the eve of the American ...
Dunmore,Fourth Earl of
Dun·more (dŭn-môrʹ, -mōrʹ), Fourth Earl of Title of John Murray. 1732-1809. British colonial governor of Virginia (1771-1776) who opposed the independence of the colonies ...
Dunmow Flitch
a very large piece of bacon which is regularly given in the Essex village of Great Dunmow as a prize to a man and woman who can prove that, after being married for at least a ...
Dunn, Douglas
▪ British writer and critic in full  Douglas Eaglesham Dunn   born Oct. 23, 1942, Inchinnan, Renfrewshire, Scot.       Scottish writer and critic, best known for his ...
dunnage
/dun"ij/, n., v., dunnaged, dunnaging. n. 1. baggage or personal effects. 2. loose material laid beneath or wedged among objects carried by ship or rail to prevent injury from ...
Dunne
/dun/, n. 1. Finley Peter /fin"lee/, 1867-1936, U.S. humorist. 2. John Gregory, born 1932, U.S. writer. * * *
Dunne, Finley Peter
born July 10, 1867, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died April 24, 1936, New York, N.Y. U.S. journalist and humorist. A son of Irish immigrants, Dunne began contributing Irish-dialect ...
Dunne, Irene
▪ American actress original name  Irene Marie Dunn  born Dec. 20, 1898, Louisville, Ky., U.S. died Sept. 4, 1990, Los Angeles, Calif.  American motion-picture and stage ...
Dunne, John Gregory
▪ 2004       American writer (b. May 25, 1932, Hartford, Conn.—d. Dec. 30, 2003, New York, N.Y.), wrote both fiction and nonfiction that showed his interest in the ...
Dunnet Head
a place in Scotland which is the most northern part of the British mainland. The most northern point in the whole of Britain, including its islands, is a rock called Muckle ...
Dunnett, Sir Alastair MacTavish
▪ 1999       Scottish journalist who served as editor of the Daily Record from 1946 to 1955 and of the Scotsman from 1956 to 1972 and turned the latter paper from dull ...
Dunning, John R
▪ American physicist born Sept. 24, 1907, Shelby, Neb., U.S. died Aug. 25, 1975, Key Biscayne, Fla.       American nuclear physicist whose experiments in nuclear ...
dunnite
/dun"uyt/, n. an ammonium picrate explosive used as a bursting charge for armor-piercing projectiles and in high-explosive shells; explosive D. [named after Col. B. W. Dunn ...
dunno
/deuh noh"/, Pron. Spelling. don't know: Who did it? I dunno! [1835-45] * * *
dunnock
/dun"euhk/, n. Brit. See hedge sparrow. [1425-75; late ME dunoke, donek. See DUN2, -OCK] * * * ▪ bird also called  hedge sparrow  or  hedge accentor         a ...
Dunnville
/dun"vil/, n. a town in SE Ontario, in S Canada. 11,353. * * *
dunny
/dun"ee/, n., pl. dunnies. Australian Slang. an outside privy; outhouse. [1780-90; shortening of earlier dial. and criminal argot dunnekin outhouse, of obscure orig.] * * *
Dunois
/dyuu nwann"/, n. Jean /zhahonn/, Comte de, ("Bastard of Orleans"), 1403?-68; French military leader: relieved by Joan of Arc and her troops when besieged at Orleans. * * *
Dunois, Jean d'Orléans, comte de
▪ French military commander (count of),byname  The Bastard Of Orleans,  French  Le Bâtard D'orléans  born 1403, Paris, Fr. died Nov. 24, 1468, L'Haÿ-les-Roses  French ...
Dunoon
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       small burgh (town), Argyll and Bute council area, historic county of Argyllshire, western Scotland, on the northwestern shore of the ...
Dunphy, Don
▪ 1999       American radio and television sports announcer known especially as the voice of boxing; during his 50-year career he broadcast more than 2,000 fights, 200 ...
Dunqulah
▪ The Sudan also spelled  Dongola or Dunkula         town, northern Sudan. It lies on the west bank of the Nile River, about 278 miles (448 km) northwest of ...
Duns
▪ Scotland, United Kingdom       small burgh (town), Scottish Borders council area, historic county of Berwickshire, southeastern Scotland. It is the historic county ...
Duns Scotus
/dunz skoh"teuhs/ John ("Doctor Subtilis"), 1265?-1308, Scottish scholastic theologian. * * *
Duns Scotus, John
born 1266, Duns, Lothian, Scot. died Nov. 8, 1308, Cologne Medieval Scottish philosopher and Scholastic theologian. He studied and taught at Oxford, where he joined the ...
Duns Scotus,John
Duns Sco·tus (dŭnz skōʹtəs), John. Known as “the Subtle Doctor.” 1265?-1308. Scottish Franciscan friar, philosopher, and theologian whose commentary on Lombard's ...
Dunsany
/dun say"nee/, n. Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett /mawr"tn draks plung"ket, -kit, mohr"-/, 18th Baron ("Lord Dunsany"), 1878-1957, Irish dramatist, poet, and essayist. * * *
Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th baron of
▪ Irish dramatist born July 24, 1878, London died Oct. 25, 1957, Dublin  Irish dramatist and storyteller, whose many popular works combined imaginative power with ...
Dunsinane
/dun"seuh nayn', dun'seuh nayn"/, n. a hill NE of Perth, in central Scotland: a ruined fort on its summit is traditionally called Macbeth's Castle. 1012 ft. (308 m). * * * ▪ ...
Dunstable
/dun"steuh beuhl/, n. John, c1390-1453, English composer. Also, Dunstaple /dun"steuh peuhl/. * * * ▪ England, United Kingdom       town, South Bedfordshire district, ...
Dunstable, John
born с 1385, England died Dec. 24, 1453, London English composer. His life and career are almost completely obscure. After his death he came to be credited with the ...
Dunstan
/dun"steuhn/, n. Saint 1. A.D. c925-988, English statesman: archbishop of Canterbury 961-978. 2. a male given name: from an Old English word meaning "stone hill." * * *
Dunstan of Canterbury, Saint
born с 909, near Glastonbury, Eng. died May 19, 988, Canterbury; feast day May 19 Archbishop of Canterbury. He served as a chief adviser to the kings of Wessex, beginning with ...
Dunstan, Donald Allan
▪ 2000       Australian politician whose progressive policies during his tenure as premier of South Australia (1967–68 and 1970–79) helped improve social services ...
Dunstan,Saint
Dun·stan (dŭnʹstən), Saint. 924-988. English prelate. As bishop of Winchester (957) and archbishop of Canterbury (959-978) he attempted to integrate the Danes and the ...
Dunster
▪ England, United Kingdom       town (“parish”), West Somerset district, administrative and historic county of Somerset, England. It lies at the edge of Exmoor ...
Dunster, Henry
▪ American minister and educator baptized Nov. 26, 1609, Bury, Lancashire, Eng. died Feb. 27, 1659, Scituate, Massachusetts Bay Colony [now in Massachusetts, ...
dunt
dunt1 /dunt, doont/, Scot. n. 1. a hard blow or hit, esp. one that makes a dull sound; thump. v.t. 2. to strike, esp. with a dull sound. [1375-1425; late ME; c. SW dunt ...
Dunwich
▪ England, United Kingdom       village (“parish”), Suffolk Coastal district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, England, on the North Sea coast. The ...
duo
/dooh"oh, dyooh"oh/, n., pl. duos. 1. Music. duet. 2. two persons commonly associated with each other; couple. 3. two animals or objects of the same sort; two things ordinarily ...
duo-
a combining form meaning "two," used in the formation of compound words: duologue. [comb. form of Gk dýo, L duo TWO] * * *
duodecagon
/dooh'euh dek"euh gon', dyooh'-/, n. Geom. dodecagon. * * *
duodecastyle
/dooh'euh dek"euh stuyl', dyooh'-/, adj. dodecastyle. * * *
duodecillion
—duodecillionth, n., adj. /dooh'oh di sil"yeuhn, dyooh'-/, n., pl. duodecillions, (as after a numeral) duodecillion, adj. n. 1. a cardinal number represented in the U.S. by 1 ...
duodecillionth
See duodecillion. * * *
duodecimal
—duodecimality, n. —duodecimally, adv. /dooh'euh des"euh meuhl, dyooh'-/, adj. 1. pertaining to twelfths or to the number 12. 2. proceeding by twelves. n. 3. one of a system ...
duodecimo
/dooh'euh des"euh moh', dyooh'-/, n., pl. duodecimos, adj. n. 1. Also called twelvemo. a book size of about 5 × 71/2 in. (13 × 19 cm), determined by printing on sheets folded ...
duodenal
/dooh'euh deen"l, dyooh'-; dooh od"n euhl, dyooh-/, adj. of or pertaining to the duodenum. [1835-45; DUODEN(UM) + -AL1] * * *
duodenal ulcer
Pathol. a peptic ulcer located in the duodenum. * * *
duodenary
/dooh'euh den"euh ree, -dee"neuh ree, dyooh'-/, adj. duodecimal. [1675-85; < L duoden(i) twelve each + -ARY] * * *
duodenitis
/dooh'oh di nuy"tis, dyooh'-; dooh od'n uy"tis, dyooh-/, n. Pathol. inflammation of the duodenum. [1850-55; DUODEN(UM) + -ITIS] * * *
duodenojejunostomy
/dooh'euh dee'noh ji jooh nos"teuh mee, dyooh'-, dooh od'n oh-, dyooh-/, n., pl. duodenojejunostomies. Surg. the formation of an artificial connection between the duodenum and ...
duodenum
/dooh'euh dee"neuhm, dyooh'-; dooh od"n euhm, dyooh-/, n., pl. duodena /dooh'euh dee"neuh, dyooh'-; dooh od"n euh, dyooh-/, duodenums. Anat., Zool. the first portion of the small ...
duologue
/dooh"euh lawg', -log', dyooh"-/, n. 1. a conversation between two persons; dialogue. 2. a dramatic performance or piece in the form of a dialogue limited to two ...
Duolun
▪ China Wade-Giles romanization  To-lun , Mongolian  Dolon Nor  or  Doloon Nuur        town, southeast-central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China. ...
duomo
/dwoh"moh/, n., pl. duomos, duomi /-mee/. cathedral, esp. in Italy. [1540-50; < It; see DOME] * * *
Duong
▪ king of Cambodia also spelled  Duang   born 1796 died Oct. 19, 1860, Oudong, Cambodia       king of Cambodia by 1841, formally invested in 1848, the last Cambodian ...
Duong Van Minh
▪ 2002 “Big Minh”        South Vietnamese general (b. Feb. 16, 1916, Long An province, French Indochina—d. Aug. 6, 2001, Pasadena, Calif.), was a key member of the ...
duopoly
/dooh op"euh lee, dyooh-/, n., pl. duopolies. the market condition that exists when there are only two sellers. Cf. monopoly (def. 1), oligopoly. [1915-20; DUO- + (MONO)POLY] * * ...
duopsony
/dooh op"seuh nee, dyooh-/, n., pl. duopsonies. the market condition that exists when there are only two buyers. Cf. monopsony, oligopsony. [DU(O)- + -opsony < Gk opsonía ...
duotone
/dooh"euh tohn', dyooh"-/, adj. 1. of two tones or colors. n. 2. a picture in two tones or colors. 3. Print. a. a method of printing an illustration either in a dark and a tinted ...
duotype
/dooh"euh tuyp', dyooh"-/, n. Print. two halftone plates made from a monochrome original but etched differently to create two values of intensity when superimposed in ...
duoviri
▪ ancient Roman politics also spelled  Duumviri,  singular  Duovir, or Duumvir,         in ancient Rome, a magistracy of two men. Duoviri perduellionis were two ...
dup
/dup/, v.t., dupped, dupping. Archaic. to open. [1540-50; contr. of DO1 + UP; cf. DOFF, DON2] * * *
dup.
duplicate. * * *
dupability
See dupe. * * *
dupable
See dupability. * * *
Dupain, Max
▪ Australian photographer in full  Maxwell Spencer Dupain  born April 22, 1911, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia died July 27, 1992, Sydney       Australian ...
Dupanloup, Félix-Antoine-Philibert
▪ bishop of Orléans born Jan. 3, 1802, Saint-Félix, Fr. died Oct. 11, 1878, Lacombe  Roman Catholic bishop of Orléans who was a clerical spokesman for the liberal wing of ...
Duparc, (Marie-Eugène-) Henri
born Jan. 21, 1848, Paris, France died Feb. 12, 1933, Mont-de-Marsan French song composer. He studied music with César Franck while also studying law. His composing career ...
Duparc, Henri
▪ French composer original name  Henri Fouques-duparc   born Jan. 21, 1848, Paris, Fr. died Feb. 12, 1933, Mont-de-Marsan  French composer known for his original and ...
dupe
dupe1 —dupable, adj. —dupability, n. —duper, n. /doohp, dyoohp/, n., v., duped, duping. n. 1. a person who is easily deceived or fooled; gull. 2. a person who ...
duper
See dupability. * * *
Duperron, Jacques Davy
▪ French cardinal born Nov. 25, 1556, Bern died Sept. 5, 1618, Paris  French cardinal, remembered especially for his part in the conversion of King Henry IV of France to ...
dupery
/dooh"peuh ree, dyooh"-/, n., pl. duperies for 1. 1. an act, practice, or instance of duping. 2. the state of one who is duped. [1750-60; < F duperie. See DUPE1, -ERY] * * *
Dupin, Louis Ellies
▪ French historian born June 17, 1657, Paris died June 6, 1719, Paris  French church historian whose history of Christian literature, Nouvelle Bibliothèque des auteurs ...
dupion
/dooh"pee ohn'/, n. 1. a cocoon formed jointly by two silkworms. 2. douppioni. Also, dupioni /dooh'pee oh"nee/. [1820-30; alter. of F doupion < It doppione, equiv. to doppi(e) ...
duplation
/dooh play"sheuhn, dyooh-/, n. multiplication by two; doubling. [1375-1425; late ME < L duplation-, s. of duplatio a doubling, equiv. to duplat(us) (dupl(us) DUPLE + -atus -ATE1) ...
duple
/dooh"peuhl, dyooh"-/, adj. 1. having two parts; double; twofold. 2. Music. having two or sometimes a multiple of two beats in a measure: duple meter. [1535-45; < L duplus ...
duple rhythm
Pros. a rhythmic pattern created by a succession of disyllabic feet. [1880-85] * * *
duple time
Music. characterized by two beats to the measure. Also called duple measure, two-part time. [1715-25] * * *
Dupleix
/dyuu pleks"/, n. Joseph François /zhoh zef" frddahonn swann"/, Marquis, 1697-1763, French colonial governor of India 1724-54. * * *
Dupleix, Joseph-François
born 1697, Landrecies, France died Nov. 10, 1763, Paris French colonial administrator who attempted to establish a French empire in India. His father, a director of the French ...
Duplessis, Maurice Le Noblet
▪ Canadian politician born , April 20, 1890, Trois-Rivières, Que., Can. died Sept. 7, 1959, Schefferville, Que.       Canadian politician who controlled Quebec's ...
Duplessis-Mornay
Fr. /dyuu ple see mawrdd nay"/, n. Philippe /fee leep"/. See Mornay, Philippe de. * * *
duplex
—duplexity, n. /dooh"pleks, dyooh"-/, n. 1. See duplex apartment. 2. See duplex house. 3. paper or cardboard having different colors, finishes, or stocks on opposite sides. 4. ...
duplex apartment
an apartment with rooms on two connected floors. Also called duplex. [1935-40, Amer.] * * *
duplex house
a house having separate apartments for two families, esp. a two-story house having a complete apartment on each floor and two separate entrances. Also called duplex. * * *
duplex lock
a lock capable of being opened either by a master key or a change key, each operating its own mechanism. * * *
duplex process
any of several methods for making steel in which the process is begun in one furnace and finished in another. [1900-05] * * *
duplex pump
a pair of direct-acting steam pumps so arranged that each pump begins its working stroke just as the other finishes its working stroke, so that the rate of flow of the fluid is ...
duplexapartment
duplex apartment n. An apartment having rooms on two adjoining floors connected by an inner staircase. * * *
duplexer
/dooh"plek seuhr, dyooh"-/, n. Electronics. an automatic electronic switching device that permits the use of the same antenna for transmitting and receiving. [1950-55; DUPLEX + ...
duplexity
See duplex. * * *
duplicable
—duplicability, duplicatability, n. /dooh"pli keuh beuhl, dyooh"-/, adj. capable of being duplicated. Also, duplicatable /dooh"pli kay'teuh beuhl, dyooh"-/. [DUPLIC(ATE) + ...
duplicatable
See duplicable. * * *
duplicate
—duplicative, adj. n., adj. /dooh"pli kit, dyooh"-/; v. /dooh"pli kayt', dyooh"-/, n., v., duplicated, duplicating, adj. n. 1. a copy exactly like an original. 2. anything ...
duplicate bridge
a form of contract bridge used in tournaments in which contestants play the identical series of deals, with each deal being scored independently, permitting individual scores to ...
duplicately
See duplicable. * * *
duplicating machine
1. a duplicator, esp. one for making identical copies of documents, letters, etc. 2. profiler. [1890-95] * * *       a device for making duplicate copies from a master ...
duplication
/dooh'pli kay"sheuhn, dyooh'-/, n. 1. an act or instance of duplicating. 2. the state of being duplicated. 3. a duplicate. 4. Genetics. a type of chromosomal aberration in which ...
duplication of the cube
Geom. the insoluble problem of constructing a cube having twice the volume of a given cube, using only a ruler and compass. [1650-60] * * *
duplicative
See duplicable. * * *
duplicator
/dooh"pli kay'teuhr, dyooh"-/, n. a machine for making duplicates, as a mimeograph. [1890-95; DUPLICATE + -OR2] * * *
duplicatory
See duplicable. * * *
duplicature
/dooh"pli keuh choor', -keuh cheuhr, -kay'cheuhr, dyooh"-/, n. a folding or doubling of a part on itself, as a membrane. [1680-90; < NL duplicatura. See DUPLICATE, -URE] * * *
duplicatus
/dooh'pli kay"teuhs, dyooh'-/, adj. Meteorol. (of a cloud) consisting of superposed layers that sometimes partially merge. [ < L: doubled; see DUPLICATE] * * *
duplicitous
—duplicitously, adv. /dooh plis"i teuhs, dyooh-/, adj. marked or characterized by duplicity. [1960-65; DUPLICIT(Y) + -OUS] * * *
duplicitously
See duplicitous. * * *
duplicitousness
See duplicitously. * * *
duplicity
/dooh plis"i tee, dyooh-/, n., pl. duplicities for 1. 1. deceitfulness in speech or conduct; speaking or acting in two different ways concerning the same matter with intent to ...
dupondius
/dooh pon"dee euhs, dyooh-/, n., pl. dupondii /-dee uy'/. a coin of ancient Rome, equal to two asses. [1595-1605; < L, equiv. to du(o) TWO + pond(us) weight, POUND2 + -ius adj. ...


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