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exfoliative
See exfoliation. * * *
exfoliative dermatitis
▪ pathology       generalized redness and scaling of the skin that usually arises as a complication of a preexisting skin disease or of an allergy. More rarely, it may ...
exfoliator
See exfoliation. * * *
exhalant
/eks hay"leuhnt, ek say"-/, adj. 1. exhaling; emitting. n. 2. something that exhales, as the ducts of certain mollusks. Also, exhalent. [1765-75; < L exhalant- (s. of exhalans), ...
exhalation
/eks'heuh lay"sheuhn, ek'seuh-/, n. 1. the act of exhaling. 2. something that is exhaled; vapor; emanation. [1350-1400; ME exalacion < L exhalation- (s. of exhalatio). See ...
exhale
/eks hayl", ek sayl"/, v., exhaled, exhaling. v.i. 1. to emit breath or vapor; breathe out. 2. to pass off as vapor; pass off as an effluence. v.t. 3. to breathe out; emit (air, ...
exhalent
ex·ha·lent (ĕks-hāʹlənt, ĕk-sāʹ-) adj. & n. Variant of exhalant. * * *
exhaust
—exhauster, n. —exhaustible, adj. —exhaustibility, n. /ig zawst"/, v.t. 1. to drain of strength or energy, wear out, or fatigue greatly, as a person: I have exhausted ...
exhaust fan
a fan for ventilating an interior by drawing air from the interior and expelling it outside. [1870-75] * * *
exhaust manifold
Auto. a component of the exhaust system consisting of a collection of tubes, usually of cast iron, that channel the exhaust gases from the cylinders of an engine to the rest of ...
exhaust system
exhaust (def. 13). * * *
exhaust velocity
Rocketry. the velocity, relative to a rocket, at which exhaust gases leave the nozzle of the rocket's engine. * * *
exhaust-gas recirculation
/ig zawst"gas'/, Auto. a method of returning part of the exhaust gases to an engine by means of a valve (EGR valve) in order to reduce the combustion temperature, which leads to ...
exhaustedly
See exhaust. * * *
exhauster
See exhaustedly. * * *
exhaustibility
See exhaustedly. * * *
exhaustible
See exhaustedly. * * *
exhausting
—exhaustingly, adv. /ig zaw"sting/, adj. producing or tending to produce fatigue, weariness, or the like: an exhausting day; an exhausting child. [1530-40; EXHAUST + -ING2] * * ...
exhaustingly
See exhaustedly. * * *
exhaustion
/ig zaws"cheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of exhausting. 2. the state of being exhausted. 3. extreme weakness or fatigue. 4. the total consumption of something: the exhaustion ...
exhaustion, method of
▪ mathematics       in mathematics, technique invented by the classical Greeks to prove propositions regarding the areas and volumes of geometric figures. Although it ...
exhaustive
—exhaustively, adv. —exhaustiveness, n. /ig zaws"tiv/, adj. 1. exhausting a subject, topic, etc.; comprehensive; thorough: He published an exhaustive study of Greek vases. 2. ...
exhaustively
See exhaustive. * * *
exhaustiveness
See exhaustively. * * *
exhaustivity
See exhaustively. * * *
exhaustless
—exhaustlessly, adv. —exhaustlessness, n. /ig zawst"lis/, adj. inexhaustible. [1705-15; EXHAUST + -LESS] * * *
exhaustlessly
See exhaustless. * * *
exhaustlessness
See exhaustlessly. * * *
exhaustpipe
exhaust pipe n. See tailpipe. * * *
exhausttrail
exhaust trail n. A condensation trail that is visible when water vapor in aircraft exhaust mixes with the air in the vehicle's wake and saturates it. * * *
exhedra
/ek see"dreuh, eks hee"-/, n., pl. exhedrae /-dree/. exedra. * * *
exhibit
—exhibitable, adj. —exhibitor, exhibiter, exhibitant, n. /ig zib"it/, v.t. 1. to offer or expose to view; present for inspection: to exhibit the latest models of cars. 2. to ...
exhibiter
exhibiter [ex ib′itər] n. EXHIBITOR * * * See exhibitor. * * *
exhibition
/ek'seuh bish"euhn/, n. 1. an exhibiting, showing, or presenting to view. 2. a public display, as of the work of artists or artisans, the products of farms or factories, the ...
exhibition game
an unofficial game played under regular game conditions between professional teams, usually as a part of preseason training or as a fund-raising event. * * *
exhibitioner
/ek'seuh bish"euh neuhr/, n. Brit. a student who receives an exhibition. [1565-75; EXHIBITION + -ER1] * * *
exhibitionism
/ek'seuh bish"euh niz'euhm/, n. 1. a tendency to display one's abilities or to behave in such a way as to attract attention. 2. Psychiatry. a disorder characterized esp. by a ...
exhibitionist
—exhibitionistic, adj. —exhibitionistically, adv. /ek'seuh bish"euh nist/, n. 1. a person who behaves in ways intended to attract attention or display his or her powers, ...
exhibitionistic
See exhibitionist. * * *
exhibitive
—exhibitively, adv. /ig zib"i tiv/, adj. serving for exhibition; tending to exhibit. [1590-1600; < NL exhibitivus. See EXHIBIT, -IVE] * * *
exhibitively
See exhibitive. * * *
exhibitor
exhibitor [eg zib′it ər, igzib′it ər] n. one that exhibits; esp., a) a person, company, etc. that enters an exhibit as in a fair, show, or competition ☆ b) the owner or ...
exhibitory
/ig zib"i tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj. pertaining to or intended for exhibition or display. [1600-10; < LL exhibitorius relating to showing, displaying. See EXHIBIT, -TORY1] * * *
exhibits
➡ museums * * *
exhilarant
/ig zil"euhr euhnt/, adj. 1. exhilarating. n. 2. something that exhilarates. [1795-1805; < L exhilarant- (s. of exhilarans), prp. of exhilarare to gladden. See EXHILARATE, ...
exhilarate
—exhilaratingly, adv. —exhilarator, n. /ig zil"euh rayt'/, v.t., exhilarated, exhilarating. 1. to enliven; invigorate; stimulate: The cold weather exhilarated the walkers. 2. ...
exhilarating
ex·hil·a·rat·ing (ĭg-zĭlʹə-rā'tĭng) adj. Causing exhilaration; invigorating.   ex·hilʹa·rat'ing·ly adv. * * *
exhilaratingly
See exhilarating. * * *
exhilaration
/ig zil'euh ray"sheuhn/, n. 1. exhilarated condition or feeling. 2. the act of exhilarating. [1615-25; < LL exhilaration- (s. of exhilaratio). See EXHILARATE, -ION] Syn. 1. ...
exhilarative
/ig zil"euh ray'tiv, -euhr euh tiv/, adj. tending to exhilarate. Also, exhilaratory /ig zil"euhr euh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/. [1860-65; EXHILARATE + -IVE] * * *
exhilarator
See exhilarative. * * *
exhort
—exhorter, n. —exhortingly, adv. /ig zawrt"/, v.t. 1. to urge, advise, or caution earnestly; admonish urgently. v.i. 2. to give urgent advice, recommendations, or ...
exhortation
/eg'zawr tay"sheuhn, ek'sawr-/, n. 1. the act or process of exhorting. 2. an utterance, discourse, or address conveying urgent advice or recommendations. [1350-1400; ME ...
exhortative
—exhortatively, adv. /ig zawr"teuh tiv/, adj. 1. serving or intended to exhort. 2. pertaining to exhortation. Also, exhortatory /ig zawr"teuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/. [1400-50; late ...
exhortatory
exhortatory [eg zôr′tətiv, ig zôr′tətiveg zôr′tə tôr΄ē, igzôr′tə tôr΄ē] adj. 〚ME < LL exhortatorius〛 of, or having the nature of, exhortation; meant to ...
exhorter
See exhort. * * *
exhumation
See exhume. * * *
exhume
—exhumation /eks'hyoo may"sheuhn/, n. —exhumer, n. /ig zoohm", -zyoohm", eks hyoohm"/, v.t., exhumed, exhuming. 1. to dig (something buried, esp. a dead body) out of the ...
exhumer
See exhumation. * * *
exhypothesi
ex hy·poth·e·si (ĕks' hī-pŏthʹĭ-sī') adv. By hypothesis.   [New Latin ex hypothesī: Latin ex, out of, by + Latin hypothesī, ablative of hypothesis, hypothesis.] * * *
exigeant
/ek"si jeuhnt/; Fr. /eg zee zhahonn"/, adj. exigent. [ < F] * * *
exigence
ex·i·gence (ĕkʹsə-jəns) n. Exigency. * * *
exigency
/ek"si jeuhn see, ig zij"euhn-/, n., pl. exigencies. 1. exigent state or character; urgency. 2. Usually, exigencies. the need, demand, or requirement intrinsic to a circumstance, ...
exigent
—exigently, adv. /ek"si jeuhnt/, adj. 1. requiring immediate action or aid; urgent; pressing. 2. requiring a great deal, or more than is reasonable. Also, exigeant. [1400-50; ...
exigently
See exigent. * * *
exigible
/ek"si jeuh beuhl/, adj. liable to be exacted; requirable. [1600-10; < F; see EXIGENT, -IBLE] * * *
exiguity
ex·i·gu·i·ty (ĕk'sĭ-gyo͞oʹĭ-tē) n. The quality or condition of being scanty or meager. * * *
exiguous
—exiguity /ek'si gyooh"i tee/, exiguousness, n. —exiguously, adv. /ig zig"yooh euhs, ik sig"-/, adj. scanty; meager; small; slender: exiguous income. [1645-55; < L exiguus ...
exiguously
See exiguous. * * *
exiguousness
See exiguously. * * *
exilarch
/eg"zeuh lahrk', ek"seuh-/, n. one of a line of hereditary rulers of the Jewish community in Babylonia from about the 2nd century A.D. to the beginning of the 11th ...
exile
—exilable, adj. —exiler, n. /eg"zuyl, ek"suyl/, n., v., exiled, exiling. n. 1. expulsion from one's native land by authoritative decree. 2. the fact or state of such ...
exile and banishment
▪ law       prolonged absence from one's country imposed by vested authority as a punitive measure. It most likely originated among early civilizations from the practice ...
exilian
See exilic. * * *
exilic
/eg zil"ik, ek sil"-/, adj. pertaining to exile, esp. that of the Jews in Babylon. Also, exilian. [1870-75; EXILE + -IC] * * *
Eximbank
Eximbank or Ex-Im Bank [eks′im baŋk΄] n. a U.S. government agency that aids in the exporting of U.S. goods and services by making or guaranteeing loans to foreign buyers of ...
eximious
—eximiously, adv. /eg zim"ee euhs/, adj. Obs. distinguished; eminent; excellent. [1540-50; < L eximius select, distinguished, excellent (deriv. of eximere to take out, remove), ...
exine
/ek"seen, -suyn/, n. Bot. the outer coat of a spore, esp. a pollen grain. Also, extine. [1880-85; EX-1 + -INE1] * * *
exist
—exister, n. /ig zist"/, v.i. 1. to have actual being; be: The world exists, whether you like it or not. 2. to have life or animation; live. 3. to continue to be or live: ...
existence
/ig zis"teuhns/, n. 1. the state or fact of existing; being. 2. continuance in being or life; life: a struggle for existence. 3. mode of existing: They were working for a better ...
existence theorem
Math. any theorem that asserts the existence of some specified mathematical object. [1895-1900] * * *
existent
/ig zis"teuhnt/, adj. 1. existing; having existence. 2. now existing. n. 3. a person or thing that exists. [1555-65; < L existent- (s. of existens), prp. of existere to EXIST; ...
existential
—existentially, adv. /eg'zi sten"sheuhl, ek'si-/, adj. 1. pertaining to existence. 2. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of existentialism: an existential hero. [1685-95; < ...
existential psychology
1. psychology limited to the observation and description of existent data as the content of experience. 2. the psychological theories or doctrines of existentialism, esp. those ...
existential quantifier
Logic. a quantifier indicating that the sentential function within its scope is true for at least one value of the variable included in the quantifier. Also called particular ...
existentialism
—existentialist, adj., n. —existentialistic, adj. —existentialistically, adv. /eg'zi sten"sheuh liz'euhm, ek'si-/, n. Philos. a philosophical attitude associated esp. with ...
existentialist
See existentialism. * * *
existentially
See existential. * * *
exit
exit1 /eg"zit, ek"sit/, n. 1. a way or passage out: Please leave the theater by the nearest exit. 2. any of the marked ramps or spurs providing egress from a highway: Take the ...
exit poll
—exit polling. a poll taken of a small percentage of voters as they leave the polls, used to forecast the outcome of an election or determine the reasons for voting ...
exit polls
➡ elections * * *
exit pupil
Optics. the ridge of the entrance pupil of an optical system, indicating the place where the pupil of the eye should be placed to view the object. Also called eye point. * * *
exit tax
a tax formerly imposed on certain Soviet citizens who had been educated at government expense in the Soviet Union and wished to emigrate. [1970-75] * * *
exitpoll
exit poll n. A poll taken of a sample of voters as they leave a polling place, used especially to predict the outcome of an election or determine the opinions and characteristics ...
exlibris
ex li·bris (ĕks līʹbrĭs, lēʹ-) n. pl. ex libris See bookplate.   [From Latin ex librīs, from the books : ex, from + librīs, ablative pl. of liber, book.] * * *
Exmoor
/eks"moor, -mawr, -mohr/, n. a moorland in SW England, in Somersetshire and Devonshire: the scene of Blackmore's novel, Lorna Doone. * * * ▪ region, England, United ...
Exmoor pony
➡ Exmoor * * *
Exmouth
▪ England, United Kingdom       town, East Devon district, administrative and historic county of Devon, England, on the east side of the mouth of the River Exe on the ...
Exmouth Gulf
Inlet of the Indian Ocean, Western Australia. Located between North West Cape and the mainland, the gulf is 55 mi (90 km) long and 30 mi (48 km) across the mouth. Fishing, ...
exnihilo
ex ni·hi·lo (ĕks nēʹə-lō', nīʹ-, nĭʹ-) adv. & adj. Out of nothing.   [Latin ex nihilō: ex, out of + nihilō, ablative of nihil, nothing.] * * *
exo-
a combining form meaning "outside," "outer," "external," used in the formation of compound words: exocentric. Also, ex-. [ < Gk, comb. form of éxo outside] * * *
exobiological
See exobiology. * * *
exobiologist
See exobiological. * * *
exobiology
—exobiological /ek'soh buy'euh loj"i keuhl/, adj. —exobiologist, n. /ek'soh buy ol"euh jee/, n. the study of life beyond the earth's atmosphere, as on other planets. Also ...
exobiota
/ek'soh buy oh"teuh/, n. extraterrestrial life. [EXO- + BIOTA] * * *
exocarp
/ek"soh kahrp'/, n. Bot. epicarp. [1835-45; EXO- + -CARP] * * *
exocentric
/ek'soh sen"trik/, adj. Gram. not having the same syntactic function in the sentence as any one of its immediate constituents. In the garden is an exocentric construction, since ...
Exocet
/ek"soh set'/, Trademark. a winged, radar-guided French anti-ship missile, launched from the surface or an aircraft, that skims the waves at close to the speed of sound. * * *
exocrine
/ek"seuh krin, -kruyn', -kreen'/, Anat., Physiol. adj. 1. secreting to an epithelial surface. 2. of or pertaining to an exocrine gland or its secretion. n. 3. an external ...
exocrine gland
any of several glands, as the salivary glands, that secrete externally through a duct. [1925-30] * * *
exocrinegland
exocrine gland n. An externally secreting gland, such as a salivary gland or sweat gland that releases its secretions directly or through a duct. * * *
exocrinology
/ek'soh kreuh nol"euh jee, -kruy-/, n. the study of the exocrine glands and their secretions. [EXOCRINE + -O- + -LOGY] * * *
exocyclic
ex·o·cy·clic (ĕk'sō-sīʹklĭk, -sĭkʹlĭk) adj. External to a chemical ring structure: an exocyclic double bond. * * *
exocytose
/ek'soh suy tohs", -tohz"/, v.i., exocytosed, exocytosing. Physiol. (of a cell) to extrude by means of exocytosis. [back formation from EXOCYTOSIS] * * *
exocytosis
—exocytotic /ek'soh suy tot"ik/, adj. /ek'soh suy toh"sis/, n. Physiol. the transport of material out of a cell by means of a sac or vesicle that first engulfs the material and ...
exocytotic
See exocytose. * * *
Exod
Exod abbrev. Bible Exodus * * *
Exod.
Exodus. * * *
exodermis
—exodermal, adj. /ek'seuh derr"mis/, n. Bot. a temporary, protective layer of cells in some roots, as in certain orchids. [1895-1900; EXO- + -DERMIS] * * *
exodontia
ex·o·don·tia (ĕk'sə-dŏnʹshə, -shē-ə) n. Exodontics. * * *
exodontics
/ek'seuh don"tiks/, n. (used with a sing. v.) the branch of dentistry dealing with the extraction of teeth. Also, exodontia /ek'seuh don"sheuh, -shee euh/. [EX-3 + -ODONT- + ...
exodontist
/ek'seuh don"tist/, n. a specialist in exodontics. [1910-15; EXODONT(ICS) + -IST] * * *
exodos
/ek"seuh dos'/, n., pl. exodoi /-doy'/. (in ancient Greek drama) the final scene or departure, esp. in tragedy and usually Old Comedy: usually following the last stasimon. [ < Gk ...
exodus
/ek"seuh deuhs/, n. 1. a going out; a departure or emigration, usually of a large number of people: the summer exodus to the country and shore. 2. the Exodus, the departure of ...
exoenzyme
/ek'soh en"zuym/, n. Biochem. an enzyme, as pepsin, that functions outside the cell producing it. Also called ectoenzyme. Cf. endoenzyme. [1920-25; EXO- + ENZYME] * * *
exoergic
/ek'soh err"jik/, adj. Chem. exothermic (opposed to endoergic). [1940-45; EXO- + (SYN)ERGIC] * * *
exoerythrocytic
/ek'soh euh rith'reuh sit"ik/, adj. Pathol. outside of erythrocytes, as in the development of several malarial parasites in the liver. [1940-45; EXO- + ERYTHROCYTIC] * * *
exofficio
ex of·fi·ci·o (ĕks' ə-fĭshʹē-ō') adv. & adj. Abbr. e.o. By virtue of office or position.   [Latin ex officiō: ex, from + officiō, ablative of officium, office.] * * *
exogamic
See exogamy. * * *
exogamous
See exogamic. * * *
exogamy
—exogamous /ek sog"euh meuhs/, exogamic /ek'seuh gam"ik/, adj. /ek sog"euh mee/, n. 1. marriage outside a specific tribe or similar social unit. Cf. endogamy. 2. Biol. the ...
exogamy and endogamy
Practices controlling the relation of the sexes in the selection of marital partners. Exogamous groups require their members to marry outside the group, sometimes even ...
exogen
exogen [ek′sə jən, ek′səjen΄] n. 〚< Fr exogène: see EXO- & -GEN〛 former term for DICOTYLEDON * * *
exogenetic
/ek'soh jeuh net"ik/, adj. 1. Also, exogenic /ek'seuh jen"ik/, exogenous. Geol. arising from or relating to the surface of the earth (opposed to endogenetic). 2. exogenous (defs. ...
exogenous
—exogenism, n. —exogenously, adv. /ek soj"euh neuhs/, adj. 1. originating from outside; derived externally. 2. Bot. a. (of plants, as the dicotyledons) having stems that grow ...
exogenously
See exogenous. * * *
Exogyra
▪ paleontology       extinct molluscan genus common in shallow-water marine deposits of the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods (from 208 to 66.4 million years ago). Exogyra ...
exon
exon1 /ek"son/, n. (in Britain) one of four yeomen of the guard who act as commanding officers in the absence of higher authority. Also called exempt. [1645-55; earlier exant, ...
exonarthex
/ek'soh nahr"theks/, n. a covered walk, vestibule, or narthex situated before a narthex; an outer narthex. [1840-50; EXO- + NARTHEX] * * *
exonerate
—exoneration, n. —exonerative, adj. —exonerator, n. /ig zon"euh rayt'/, v.t., exonerated, exonerating. 1. to clear, as of an accusation; free from guilt or blame; ...
exoneration
See exonerate. * * *
exonerative
See exoneration. * * *
exonic
See exon. * * *
exonuclease
ex·o·nu·cle·ase (ĕk'sō-no͞oʹklē-ās', -āz', -nyo͞oʹ-) n. Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of single nucleotides from the end of a DNA or RNA ...
exonumia
/ek'seuh nooh"mee euh, -nyooh"-/, n.pl. items, as tokens or medals, that resemble money but are not intended to circulate as money. [1965-70; EXO- + NUM(ISMATIC) + -IA] * * *
exonumist
/ek'seuh nooh"mist, -nyooh"-, ek"seuh nooh'-, -nyooh'-/, n. a person who collects exonumia. [EXONUM(IA) + -IST] * * *
exonym
ex·o·nym (ĕkʹsō-nĭm) n. A name by which one people or social group refers to another and by which the group so named does not refer to itself. * * *
exopathic
/ek'seuh path"ik/, adj. Pathol. noting or pertaining to a disease whose cause is outside the body. [1880-85; EXO- + -PATHIC] * * *
exopeptidase
/ek'soh pep"ti days', -dayz'/, n. Biochem. any enzyme that catalyzes the removal of an amino acid from the end of a polypeptide chain. Cf. endopeptidase. [1935-40; EXO- + ...
exoperidium
/ek'soh peuh rid"ee euhm/, n., pl. exoperidia /-rid"ee euh/. Mycol. the outer of the two layers into which the peridium is divided. [EXO- + PERIDIUM] * * *
exophasia
/ek'soh fay"zheuh, -zhee euh/, n. ordinary, vocalized, audible speech. Cf. endophasia. [ < NL; see EXO-, -PHASIA] * * *
exophora
—exophoric /ek'seuh fawr"ik, -for"-/, adj. /ek sof"euhr euh/, n. Gram. the use of a word or phrase to refer to something in the extralinguistic environment, as that in Look at ...
exophthalmic
ex·oph·thal·mic (ĕk'səf-thălʹmĭk) adj. 1. Of or relating to exophthalmos. 2. Characterized by the prominence of the eyeballs. * * *
exophthalmic goiter
Pathol. enlargement of the thyroid gland accompanied by exophthalmos, usually due to hyperthyroidism. [1875-80] * * *
exophthalmicgoiter
exophthalmic goiter n. See Graves' disease. * * *
exophthalmos
—exophthalmic, adj. /ek'sof thal"meuhs, -mos/, n. Pathol. protrusion of the eyeball from the orbit, caused by disease, esp. hyperthyroidism, or injury. Also, exophthalmus ...
exopodite
—exopoditic /ek sop'euh dit"ik/, adj. /ek sop"euh duyt'/, n. Zool. the outer or lateral branch of a two-branched crustacean leg or appendage. Cf. endopodite, protopodite. Also, ...
exopterygote
/ek'soh ter"i goht'/, adj. 1. belonging or pertaining to the class Exopterygota, comprising the insects that undergo incomplete metamorphosis. n. 2. an exopterygote insect. [ < ...
exor.
executor. * * *
exorable
—exorability, n. /ek"seuhr euh beuhl/, adj. susceptible of being persuaded or moved by entreaty. [1555-65; < L exorabilis, equiv. to exora(re) to prevail upon, move by entreaty ...
exorbitance
/ig zawr"bi teuhns/, n. the quality of being exorbitant; excessiveness. Also, exorbitancy. [1400-50; late ME exorbitaunce; see EXORBITANT, -ANCE] * * *
exorbitant
—exorbitantly, adv. /ig zawr"bi teuhnt/, adj. exceeding the bounds of custom, propriety, or reason, esp. in amount or extent; highly excessive: to charge an exorbitant price; ...
exorbitantly
See exorbitant. * * *
exorcise
—exorcisement, n. —exorciser, n. /ek"sawr suyz', -seuhr-/, v.t., exorcised, exorcising. 1. to seek to expel (an evil spirit) by adjuration or religious or solemn ceremonies: ...
exorciser
See exorcise. * * *
exorcism
—exorcismal /ek'sawr siz"meuhl, -seuhr/, exorcisory /ek"sawr suy"zeuh ree, -seuhr/, exorcistical, exorcistic, adj. /ek"sawr siz'euhm, -seuhr-/, n. 1. the act or process of ...
exorcist
/ek"sawr sist, -seuhr-/, n. 1. a person who practices exorcism. 2. Rom. Cath. Ch. a. a member of the second-ranking of the four minor orders. b. the order itself. Cf. acolyte ...
exordial
See exordium. * * *
exordium
—exordial, adj. /ig zawr"dee euhm, ik sawr"-/, n., pl. exordiums, exordia /-dee euh/. 1. the beginning of anything. 2. the introductory part of an oration, treatise, ...
exoskeletal
See exoskeleton. * * *
exoskeleton
—exoskeletal, adj. /ek'soh skel"i tn/, n. Zool. an external covering or integument, esp. when hard, as the shells of crustaceans (opposed to endoskeleton). [1840-50; EXO- + ...
exosmosis
—exosmotic /ek'sos mot"ik, -soz-/, adj. —exosmotically, adv. /ek'sos moh"sis, ek'soz-/, n. 1. Biol. osmosis toward the outside of a cell or vessel. 2. Physical Chem. the flow ...
exosmotic
See exosmosis. * * *
exosphere
—exospherical /ek'seuh sfer"i keuhl, -sfear"-/, exospheric, adj. /ek"soh sfear'/, n. the highest region of the atmosphere, where the air density is so low that a fast-moving ...
exospheric
See exosphere. * * *
exospore
—exosporal /ek'seuh spawr"euhl, -spohr"-, ek sos"peuhr-/, exosporous, adj. /ek"seuh spawr', -spohr'/, n. Bot., Mycol. the outer coat of a spore. [1855-60; EXO- + SPORE] * * *
exosporium
ex·o·spor·i·um (ĕk'sō-spôrʹē-əm, -spōrʹ-) n. pl. ex·o·spor·i·a (-ē-ə) See exine.   [New Latin : exo- + Greek sporā, spore; See sper-. * * *
exostosis
—exostosed, adj. —exostotic /ek'so stot"ik, -seuh-/, adj. /ek'so stoh"sis, -seuh-/, n., pl. exostoses /-seez/. Pathol. the abnormal formation of a bony growth on a bone or ...
exoteric
—exoterically, adv. —exotericism, n. /ek'seuh ter"ik/, adj. 1. suitable for or communicated to the general public. 2. not belonging, limited, or pertaining to the inner or ...
exoterica
/ek'seuh ter"i keuh/, n.pl. ideas, principles, writings, or the like, of an exoteric nature. [ < LL, neut. pl. of exotericus EXOTERIC] * * *
exoterically
See exoteric. * * *
exothermic
—exothermically, exothermally, adv. —exothermicity /ek'soh theuhr mis"i tee/, n. /ek'soh therr"mik/, adj. Chem. noting or pertaining to a chemical change that is accompanied ...
exothermically
See exothermic. * * *
exotic
—exotically, adv. —exoticness, n. /ig zot"ik/, adj. 1. of foreign origin or character; not native; introduced from abroad, but not fully naturalized or acclimatized: exotic ...
exotic dancer
stripper (def. 3). [1950-55] * * *
exotic pets
➡ pets * * *
exotic shorthair
exotic shorthair n. any of a breed of domestic cat, bred by crossing a Persian cat and an American shorthair, with a dense, soft coat, longer than that of other shorthairs, and ...
exotica
/ig zot"i keuh/, n.pl. exotic things or objects. [1875-80; < L, neut. pl. of EXOTICUS EXOTIC] * * *
exotically
See exotic. * * *
exoticism
—exoticist, n. /ig zot"euh siz'euhm/, n. 1. tendency to adopt what is exotic. 2. exotic quality or character. 3. anything exotic, as a foreign word or idiom. Also, exotism ...
exoticness
See exotically. * * *
exotoxin
—exotoxic, adj. /ek'soh tok"sin/, n. Biochem. a soluble toxin excreted by a microorganism. Cf. endotoxin. [1915-20; EXO- + TOXIN] * * * ▪ biochemistry       a ...
exotropia
/ek'seuh troh"pee euh/, n. Ophthalm. strabismus in which one or both eyes turn outward. [1895-1900; EXO- + Gk -tropia a turning; see TROPE, -IA] * * *
exotropic
See exotropia. * * *
exp
exp abbrev. 1. expenses 2. experience 3. experiment 4. expiration 5. expires 6. export 7. express * * * exp abbr. 1. exponent. 2. exponential. * * *
exp.
1. expenses. 2. expired. 3. exponential. 4. export. 5. exported. 6. exporter. 7. express. * * *
expand
—expandable, expandible, adj. —expandability, expandibility, n. /ik spand"/, v.t. 1. to increase in extent, size, volume, scope, etc.: Heat expands most metals. He hopes to ...
expandable
See expand. * * *
expanded
—expandedness, n. /ik span"did/, adj. 1. increased in area, bulk, or volume; enlarged: an expanded version of a story. 2. spread out; extended: the expanded frontiers of the ...
expanded code.
See under zip code. * * *
expanded metal
sheet metal slotted and stretched to make a stiff network with openings of various patterns, used for lathing, wastebaskets, and various decorative and semistructural ...
expanded plastic
plastic that is made light and spongy by the introduction of pockets of gas or air. Also called foamed plastic, plastic foam. [1940-45] * * *
expander
/ik span"deuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that expands. 2. Electronics. a transducer that produces an output with a range of voltages greater than that of the input signal. Cf. ...
expanding universe
Astron. a representation of the universe, based on the observed redshifts of distant galaxies, in which the galaxies are assumed to be receding from each other at a speed ...
expandinguniverse theory
ex·pand·ing universe theory (ĭk-spănʹdĭng) n. 1. The cosmological theory holding that the universe is expanding, based on the interpretation of the color shift in the ...
expandor
ex·pan·dor (ĭk-spănʹdər) n. A transducer designed for a given range of input voltages that produces a larger range of output voltages. * * *
expanse
/ik spans"/, n. 1. an uninterrupted space or area; a wide extent of anything: an expanse of water. 2. something that is spread out, esp. over a relatively large area: that great ...
expansibility
See expansible. * * *
expansible
—expansibility, n. /ik span"seuh beuhl/, adj. capable of being expanded: Most metals are expansible. [1685-95; < L expans(us) (see EXPANSE) + -IBLE] * * *
expansile
/ik span"sil, -suyl/, adj. 1. capable of expanding; such as to expand. 2. pertaining to expansion. [1720-30; EXPANS(ION) + -ILE] * * *
expansion
—expansional, adj. /ik span"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of expanding. 2. the state or quality of being expanded. 3. the amount or degree of expanding. 4. an expanded, ...
expansion attic
an attic space designed or suitable to be finished as a living space. * * *
expansion bit.
See expansive bit. * * *
expansion bolt
Building Trades. a bolt inserted into a hole drilled in masonry and mechanically expanded to serve as an anchor for shelves, timbers, etc. * * *
expansion card
Computers. a card in a computer on which additional chips can be mounted to expand the computer's capabilities. * * *
expansion chamber
Physics. See cloud chamber. [1930-35] * * *
expansion joint
a joint between two parts of a structure, machine, etc., permitting expansion, as from heat, without structural damage. [1840-50] * * *
expansion slot
Computers. a connection in a computer, esp. a microcomputer, to which a new board can be added to expand the computer's capabilities. [1980-85] * * *
expansion team
Sports. a new team in a league, composed largely of players from established league teams and formed when the league expands its membership. [1965-70] * * *
expansion wave
a shock wave that expands the medium through which it is transmitted. Cf. compression wave. * * *
expansionary
/ik span"sheuh ner'ee/, adj. tending toward expansion: an expansionary economy. [1935-40; EXPANSION + -ARY] * * *
expansionboard
expansion board n. See expansion card. * * *
expansionbolt
expansion bolt n. A bolt having an attachment that expands as the bolt is driven into a surface. * * *
expansioncard
expansion card n. A circuit board that can be installed to enhance a computer's capabilities, as by increasing memory or improving graphics. Also called expansion board. * * *
expansionism
—expansionist, n., adj. —expansionistic, adj. /ik span"sheuh niz'euhm/, n. a policy of expansion, as of territory or currency: the colonial expansionism of Europe in the 19th ...
expansionist
See expansionism. * * *
expansionistic
See expansionist. * * *
expansionslot
expansion slot n. A long narrow socket in a computer into which an expansion card can be inserted. * * *
expansive
—expansively, adv. —expansiveness, n. /ik span"siv/, adj. 1. having a wide range or extent; comprehensive; extensive: expansive mountain scenery. 2. (of a person's character ...
expansive bit
Carpentry. an adjustable bit for drilling holes of different sizes. Also, expansion bit. * * *
expansive classification
Library Science. a system of classifying books and other materials consisting of seven classification schemes, each after the first being progressively further subdivided. * * *
expansively
See expansive. * * *
expansiveness
See expansively. * * *
expansivity
/ek'span siv"i tee/, n. 1. the quality or state of being expansive; expansiveness. 2. Physics. See coefficient of expansion. [1830-40; EXPANSIVE + -ITY] * * *
exparte
ex par·te (ĕks pärʹtē) adv. & adj. 1. Law. From or on one side only, with the other side absent or unrepresented: testified ex parte; an ex parte hearing. 2. From a ...
expat
/eks payt"/, n. Informal. an expatriate: a favorite hangout for expats. [1960-65; by shortening] * * *
expatiate
—expatiation, n. —expatiator, n. /ik spay"shee ayt'/, v.i., expatiated, expatiating. 1. to enlarge in discourse or writing; be copious in description or discussion: to ...
expatiation
See expatiate. * * *
expatriate
—expatriation, n. v. /eks pay"tree ayt'/ or, esp. Brit., /-pa"tree-/; adj., n. /eks pay"tree it, -ayt'/ or, esp. Brit., /-pa"tree-/, v., expatriated, expatriating, adj., ...
expatriation
See expatriate. * * *
expect
—expectable, adj. —expectably, adv. —expectedly, adv. —expectedness, n. —expecter, n. —expectingly, adv. /ik spekt"/, v.t. 1. to look forward to; regard as likely to ...
expectable
See expect. * * *
expectably
See expectable. * * *
expectance
ex·pec·tance (ĭk-spĕkʹtəns) n. Expectancy. * * *
expectancy
/ik spek"teuhn see/, n., pl. expectancies. 1. the quality or state of expecting; expectation; anticipatory belief or desire. 2. the state of being expected. 3. an object of ...
expectant
—expectantly, adv. /ik spek"teuhnt/, adj. 1. having expectations; expecting: an excited, expectant audience. 2. pregnant; expecting: an expectant mother. 3. characterized by ...
expectantly
See expectant. * * *
expectation
—expectational, adj. —expectationist, n. /ek'spek tay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or the state of expecting: to wait in expectation. 2. the act or state of looking forward or ...
expectation of life.
See life expectancy. [1715-25] * * *
Expectation Sunday
the Sunday before Whitsunday. * * *
Expectation Week
the ten days between Ascension Day and Whitsunday. [1615-25] * * *
expectational
See expectation. * * *
expectative
/ik spek"teuh tiv/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to expectation. 2. characterized by expectation. [1480-90; < ML expectativus. See EXPECTATION, -IVE] * * *
expected value
Statistics, Math. See mathematical expectation. [1945-50] * * *
expectedly
See expectable. * * *
expectedness
See expectable. * * *
expectedvalue
ex·pect·ed value (ĭk-spĕkʹtĭd) n. 1. The sum of all possible values for a random variable, each value multiplied by its probability of occurrence. 2. The integral of the ...
expectorant
/ik spek"teuhr euhnt/, Med., Pharm. adj. 1. promoting the discharge of phlegm or other fluid from the respiratory tract. n. 2. an expectorant medicine. [1775-85; < L expectorant- ...
expectorate
—expectorator, n. /ik spek"teuh rayt'/, v., expectorated, expectorating. v.i. 1. to eject or expel matter, as phlegm, from the throat or lungs by coughing or hawking and ...
expectoration
/ik spek'teuh ray"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of expectorating. 2. matter that is expectorated. [1665-75; EXPECTORATE + -ION] * * *
expedience
ex·pe·di·ence (ĭk-spēʹdē-əns) n. Expediency. * * *
expediency
/ik spee"dee euhn see/, n., pl. expediencies. 1. the quality of being expedient; advantageousness; advisability. 2. a regard for what is politic or advantageous rather than for ...
expedient
—expediently, adv. /ik spee"dee euhnt/, adj. 1. tending to promote some proposed or desired object; fit or suitable for the purpose; proper under the circumstances: It is ...
expediential
/ik spee'dee en"sheuhl/, adj. pertaining to or regulated by expediency. [1840-50; EXPEDIENT + -IAL] * * *
expedientially
See expediential. * * *

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