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foin
/foyn/, Archaic. n. 1. a thrust with a weapon. v.i. 2. to thrust with a weapon; lunge. [1325-75; ME (v.), appar. < OF foine fish spear < L fuscina] * * *
Foïsm
—Foïst, n. /foh"iz euhm/, n. Chinese Buddhism. [FO + -ISM] * * *
foison
/foy"zeuhn/, n. Archaic. 1. abundance; plenty. 2. abundant harvest. [1250-1300; ME foisoun < MF foison < L fusion- (s. of fusio) an outpouring. See FUSION] * * *
foist
/foyst/, v.t. 1. to force upon or impose fraudulently or unjustifiably (usually fol. by on or upon): to foist inferior merchandise on a customer. 2. to bring, put, or introduce ...
Foix
Historical region, southern France. It corresponds approximately to the modern département of Ariège in the région of Midi-Pyrénées. Foix was a quasi-independent power from ...
Fokine
/foh keen"/, n. Michel Mikhaylovich /mi shel" mi huy"leuh vich/, 1880-1942, Russian choreographer and ballet dancer, in the U.S. after 1925. * * *
Fokine, Michel
orig. Mikhail Mikhaylovich Fokine born April 23, 1880, St. Petersburg, Russia died Aug. 22, 1942, New York, N.Y., U.S. Russian-born U.S. dancer and choreographer. He trained ...
Fokine,Michel
Fo·kine (fô-kēnʹ, fō-), Michel. 1880-1942. Russian-born American choreographer often considered the founder of modern ballet. His works, such as Petrouchka (1916), ...
Fokker
/fok"euhr/; Du. /fok"euhrdd/, n. 1. Anthony Herman Gerard Du. /ahn toh"nee herdd"mahn gay"rddahrddt/, 1890-1939, Dutch airplane designer and builder. 2. an aircraft designed or ...
Fokker, Anthony
orig. Anton Herman Gerard Fokker born April 6, 1890, Kediri, Java, Netherlands East Indies died Dec. 23, 1939, New York, N.Y., U.S. Dutch-U.S. aircraft designer and ...
Fokker, Anthony Herman Gerard
▪ Dutch aircraft manufacturer born April 6, 1890, Kediri, Java, Netherlands East Indies died Dec. 23, 1939, New York City  Dutch airman and pioneer aircraft manufacturer ...
Fokker,Anthony Herman Gerard
Fok·ker (fŏkʹər, fôʹkər), Anthony Herman Gerard. 1890-1939. Dutch-born American aircraft designer and manufacturer who revolutionized aerial warfare by synchronizing a ...
fol
fol abbrev. 1. folio(s) 2. following * * *
fol.
1. folio. 2. (in prescriptions) a leaf. [ < L folium] 3. followed. 4. following. * * *
folacin
/fol"euh sin/, n. Biochem. See folic acid. [1945-50; FOL(IC) AC(ID) + -IN2] * * *
Folard, Jean-Charles, chevalier de
▪ French military officer born Feb. 13, 1669, Avignon, Fr. died March 23, 1752, Avignon       French soldier and military theorist who championed the use of infantry ...
folate
fo·late (fōʹlāt') n. 1. A salt or ester of folic acid. 2. See folic acid.   [folic acid + -ate2.] * * *
fold
fold1 —foldable, adj. /fohld/, v.t. 1. to bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself. 2. to bring into a compact form by bending and laying parts together (often fol. by up): ...
fold-down
/fohld"down'/, adj. designed to be folded out for use and collapsed when not in use: a fold-down tray on the back of an airplane seat; a fold-down trailer for camping. [adj. use ...
Folda
▪ fjord, Nordland, Norway       fjord, northern Norway. The fjord's mouth opens into Vest Fjord of the Norwegian Sea and is 25 miles (40 km) northeast of the town of ...
foldable
See fold1. * * *
foldaway
/fohld"euh way'/, adj. 1. designed to be folded out of the way when not in use: a foldaway bed. n. 2. an object, as a bed, that can be folded and stored away when not in ...
foldboat
/fohld"boht'/, n. faltboat. * * *
folder
/fohl"deuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that folds. 2. a printed sheet, as a circular or timetable, folded into a number of usually pagelike sections. 3. a folded sheet of light ...
folderol
/fol"deuh rol'/, n. falderal. * * *
folding chair
a chair that can be collapsed flat for easy storage or transport. [1670-80] * * *
folding door
a door with hinged sections that can be folded flat against one another when opened. [1605-15] * * *
folding money
Informal. See paper money. [1925-30] * * *
folding rule.
See zigzag rule. * * *
foldingdoor
fold·ing door (fōlʹdĭng) n. A door with hinged or pleated sections that fold together when the door is opened. * * *
foldingmoney
folding money n. Paper money. * * *
foldout
/fohld"owt'/, n. 1. a page larger than the trim size of a magazine or book, folded one or more times so as not to extend beyond the pages; gatefold. adj. 2. that must be unfolded ...
foldup
/fohld"up'/, n. 1. something, as a chair or bed, that can be folded up and stored away when not in use. 2. termination or closing: the foldup of the town's newspaper. 3. a giving ...
Folengo, Teofilo
▪ Italian author original name  Girolamo Folengo   born Nov. 8, 1491, Mantua [Italy] died Dec. 9, 1544, near Bassano Campese, Republic of Venice  Italian popularizer of ...
Foley
/foh"lee/, adj. of or pertaining to motion-picture sound effects or soundtracks: a Foley artist; the Foley editor. [after Jack Foley, sound-effect pioneer at Universal Pictures ...
Foley catheter
an indwelling catheter used for draining urine from the bladder and having an inflatable part at the bladder end that allows the tube to be kept in place for variable time ...
Folger Shakespeare Library
▪ research centre, Washington, District of Columbia, United States       research centre in Washington, D.C., for the study of William Shakespeare (Shakespeare, ...
Folger, Henry Clay
▪ American lawyer and business executive born June 18, 1857, New York, N.Y., U.S. died June 11, 1930, Brooklyn, N.Y.  American lawyer, business executive, and founder of the ...
folia
folia1 /foh"lee euh/, n. pl. of folium. folia2 /feuh lee"euh/, n. a wild and noisy Portuguese carnival dance accompanied by tambourines, performed at a frantic pace by men ...
folía
Sp. /faw lee"ah/, n., pl. folías Sp. /-lee"ahs/. an early medieval Iberian dance accompanied by mime and songs, performed during celebrations of the solstice and New Year ...
foliaceous
—foliaceousness, n. /foh'lee ay"sheuhs/, adj. 1. of, like, or of the nature of a plant leaf; leaflike. 2. bearing leaves or leaflike parts. 3. pertaining to or consisting of ...
foliage
—foliaged, adj. /foh"lee ij/, n. 1. the leaves of a plant, collectively; leafage. 2. leaves in general. 3. the representation of leaves, flowers, and branches in painting, ...
foliage plant
any plant grown chiefly for its attractive leaves. [1860-65] * * *
foliaged
foliaged [fō′lēijd] adj. having foliage: often in hyphenated compounds [dark-foliaged] * * * See foliage. * * *
foliageplant
foliage plant n. A plant cultivated chiefly for its ornamental leaves. * * *
foliar
/foh"lee euhr/, adj. of, pertaining to, or having the nature of a leaf or leaves. [1870-75; < NL foliaris. See FOLIUM, -AR1] * * *
foliate
adj. /foh"lee it, -ayt'/; v. /foh"lee ayt'/, adj., v., foliated, foliating. adj. 1. covered with or having leaves. 2. like a leaf, as in shape. 3. Also, foliated. Archit. a. ...
foliated
/foh"lee ay'tid/, adj. 1. shaped like a leaf or leaves: foliated ornaments. 2. Also, foliate. Petrol., Mineral. consisting of thin and separable laminae. 3. Archit. foliate (def. ...
foliated joint
a joint between the rabbeted and overlapping edges of two boards, forming a continuous surface on each side. [1870-75] * * *
foliation
/foh'lee ay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of putting forth leaves. 2. the state of being in leaf. 3. Bot. a. the arrangement of leaves within a bud. b. the arrangement of ...
foliature
/foh"lee euh cheuhr/, n. a cluster of leaves; foliage. [1670-80; < LL foliatura foliage. See FOLIATE, -URE] * * *
folic
/foh"lik, fol"ik/, adj. of or derived from folic acid. [ < L fol(ium) FOLIUM + -IC] * * *
folic acid
Biochem. a water-soluble vitamin that is converted to a coenzyme essential to purine and thymine biosynthesis: deficiency causes a form of anemia. [1940-45] * * * or ...
folic acid deficiency anemia
▪ pathology also called  folate deficiency anemia        type of anemia resulting from a deficient intake of the vitamin folic acid (folate). Folic acid, a B ...
folic-acid-deficiency anemia
Anemia resulting from too little folic acid, needed for red-blood-cell maturation (see erythrocyte). White-cell and platelet levels are also often low. Progressive ...
folicacid
fo·lic acid (fōʹlĭk, fŏlʹĭk) n. A yellowish-orange compound, C19H19N7O6, of the vitamin B complex group, occurring in green plants, fresh fruit, liver, and yeast. Also ...
folie
/faw lee"/, n., pl. folies /-lee"/. French. madness; insanity. [1795-1805] * * *
folie à deux
/fo lee" euh dooh"/; Fr. /faw lee ann due"/, pl. folies à deux /fo leez" euh dooh"/; Fr. /faw lee zann due"/. Psychiatry. the sharing of delusional ideas by two people who are ...
folie àdeux
fo·lie à deux (fô-lē' ä dœʹ, fŏl'ē) n. A condition in which symptoms of a mental disorder, such as the same delusional beliefs or ideas, occur simultaneously in two ...
folie de grandeur
Fr. /faw leedeu grddahonn duerdd"/, pl. folies de grandeur Fr. /faw leedeu grddahonn duerdd"/. Psychiatry. a delusion of grandeur; megalomania. Also, folie des grandeurs Fr. /faw ...
Folies Bergère
Fr. /faw lee berdd zherdd"/ a Parisian music hall founded in 1869 and noted for the lavish spectacle and mildly risqué content of its entertainments. [ < F: the Bergère ...
Folies-Bergère
Music hall and variety theatre in Paris. It opened in 1869 and soon became a major music hall, presenting operettas and pantomimes. By the 1890s its repertory also included ...
Foligno
▪ Italy Latin  Fulginium,         town, Umbria regione, central Italy. It lies along the Topino River, southeast of Perugia. Originally an Umbrian settlement, the ...
foliicolous
/foh'lee ik"euh leuhs/, adj. 1. growing on leaves, as certain liverworts. 2. parasitic on leaves, as certain fungi. [1870-75; FOL(IUM) + -I- + -COLOUS] * * *
foliiferous
/foh'lee if"euhr euhs/, adj. Bot. bearing leaves or leaflike structures. [1820-30; FOL(IUM) + -I- + -FEROUS] * * *
folinic acid
/foh lin"ik/, Biochem., Pharm. a crystalline, slightly water-soluble solid, C20H23N7O7, produced by fermentation or derived from folic acid, used in medicine in the treatment of ...
folio
/foh"lee oh'/, n., pl. folios, adj., v., folioed, folioing. n. 1. a sheet of paper folded once to make two leaves, or four pages, of a book or manuscript. 2. a volume having ...
folio verso
/foh"lee oh' werdd"soh/; Eng. /foh"lee oh' verr"soh/, Latin. the back of the page. * * *
foliolate
/foh"lee euh layt'/, adj. Bot. pertaining to or consisting of leaflets (often used in combination, as bifoliolate). [1865-70; < NL foliolatus. See FOLIOLE, -ATE1] * * *
foliole
/foh"lee ohl'/, n. Bot. 1. a leaflet, as of a compound leaf. 2. a small leaflike organ or appendage. [1785-95; < F < LL foliolum, equiv. to L foli(um) leaf + -olum -OLE1] * * *
foliose
/foh"lee ohs'/, adj. 1. Bot. leafy. 2. Mycol. having a leaflike thallus loosely attached to a surface, as certain lichens. Cf. crustose, fruticose. Also, folious /foh"lee ...
folium
/foh"lee euhm/, n., pl. folia /-lee euh/. 1. a thin leaflike stratum or layer; a lamella. 2. Geom. a loop; part of a curve terminated at both ends by the same node. Equation: x3 ...
folivore
—folivorous /foh liv"euhr euhs/, adj. /foh"leuh vawr', -vohr'/, n. any chiefly leaf-eating animal or other organism, as the koala of Australia that subsists on ...
folk
/fohk/, n. 1. Usually, folks. (used with a pl. v.) people in general: Folks say there wasn't much rain last summer. 2. Often, folks. (used with a pl. v.) people of a specified ...
folk art
—folk-art, adj. —folk artist. artistic works, as paintings, sculpture, basketry, and utensils, produced typically in cultural isolation by untrained often anonymous artists ...
folk artist
See folk-art. * * *
folk clubs
➡ folk music and songs * * *
folk dance
—folk dancer. —folk dancing. 1. a dance that originated among, and has been transmitted through, the common people. Cf. court dance. 2. a piece of music for such a ...
folk dancer
See folk-dance. * * *
folk dancing
See folk-dance. * * * Folk dances are traditional dances in which everyone can take part. They are danced to folk tunes and have sequences of steps that are repeated several ...
folk etymology
1. a modification of a linguistic form according either to a falsely assumed etymology, as Welsh rarebit from Welsh rabbit, or to a historically irrelevant analogy, as bridegroom ...
Folk festivals
➡ folk music and songs * * *
folk high school
▪ Scandinavian education       type of residential school for adults that is standard in Scandinavian countries and has also been adopted elsewhere in Europe. The ...
folk literature
Introduction also called  folklore  or  oral tradition        the lore (traditional knowledge and beliefs) of cultures having no written language. It is transmitted ...
folk mass
a liturgical mass in which traditional music is replaced by folk music. [1960-65] * * *
folk medicine
health practices arising from superstition, cultural traditions, or empirical use of native remedies, esp. food substances. [1895-1900] * * *
folk museum
n a museum that displays interesting or historical objects that were part of the local people’s everyday lives, such as clothes and tools. Many British towns and cities have ...
folk music
1. music, usually of simple character and anonymous authorship, handed down among the common people by oral tradition. 2. music by known composers that has become part of the ...
folk music and songs
Traditional British folk music has many different forms, including songs and ballads. Many folk songs relate to the lives of ordinary people in past centuries; others tell of ...
folk psychology
Ways of conceptualizing mind and the mental that are implicit in our ordinary, everyday attributions of mental states to ourselves and others. Philosophers have adopted ...
folk rock
—folk-rocker, n. a style of music combining characteristics of rock-'n'-roll and folk music, often exemplified by protest songs to a rock-'n'-roll beat, and at its height of ...
folk singer
a singer who specializes in folk songs, usually providing his or her own accompaniment on a guitar. [1895-1900] * * *
folk singing
the singing of folk songs, esp. by a group of people. [1905-10] * * *
folk society
Sociol. an often small, homogeneous, and isolated community or society functioning chiefly through primary contacts and strongly attached to its traditional ways of living. * * ...
folk song
1. a song originating among the people of a country or area, passed by oral tradition from one singer or generation to the next, often existing in several versions, and marked ...
folk songs
➡ folk music and songs * * *
folk tale
1. a tale or legend originating and traditional among a people or folk, esp. one forming part of the oral tradition of the common people. 2. any belief or story passed on ...
folk-art
See folk art. * * *
folk-dance
See folk dance. * * *
folk-music
See folk music. * * *
folk-rock
☆ folk-rock [fōk′räk΄ ] n. music with a rhythmic rock-and-roll beat combined with words in folk-song style * * * folk-rock or folk rock (fōkʹrŏk') n. A variety of ...
folk-sing
/fohk"sing'/, n. an informal gathering for the singing of folk songs. * * *
folkart
folk art also folk-art (fōkʹärt') n. Art originating among the common people of a nation or region and usually reflecting their traditional culture, especially everyday or ...
folkdance
folk dance or folk·dance (fōkʹdăns') n. 1. a. A traditional dance originating among the common people of a nation or region. b. The music accompanying such a dance. 2. A ...
Folkers, Karl August
▪ American chemist born September 1, 1906, Decatur, Illinois, U.S. died December 9, 1997, Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire       American chemist whose research on vitamins ...
Folkestone
/fohk"steuhn/, n. a seaport in E Kent, in SE England, on the Strait of Dover. 43,760. * * * ▪ England, United Kingdom       town, Shepway district, administrative and ...
Folketing
/fohl"keuh ting'/, n. 1. the unicameral parliament of Denmark. 2. Hist. the lower house of the Rigsdag. Also, Folkething /fohl"keuh ting'/. [ < Dan; see FOLK, THING2] * * *
folketymology
folk etymology n. Change in the form of a word or phrase resulting from a mistaken assumption about its composition or meaning, as in shamefaced for earlier shamfast, “bound by ...
folkie
/foh"kee/, n., adj., folkier, folkiest. Informal. n. 1. See folk singer. adj. 2. of or pertaining to folk singers or folk music. Also, folky. [1960-65; FOLK (SINGER) + -IE] * * *
folkish
—folkishness, n. /foh"kish/, adj. 1. of or resembling the common people: folkish crafts. 2. resembling or based on folklore, folk music, or folk dances: a violin concerto that ...
folkishly
See folkish. * * *
folkishness
See folkishly. * * *
folklife
/fohk"luyf'/, n. the everyday life of the common people, esp. of a particular region, country, or period: 18th-century New England folklife. [1920-25; FOLK + LIFE] * * *
folklinguistics
folk linguistics n. (used with a sing. verb) Popular belief or speculation about how language is used. * * *
folklore
—folklorist, n. —folkloristic, adj. /fohk"lawr', -lohr'/, n. 1. the traditional beliefs, legends, customs, etc., of a people; lore of a people. 2. the study of such lore. 3. ...
folkloric
—folklorically, adv. /fohk"lawr'ik, -lohr'-/, adj. based on or resembling folklore: folkloric music. [1880-85; FOLKLORE + -IC] * * *
folklorico
/fohk lawr"i koh, -lohr"-/, n. 1. Mexican folk dancing, esp. a program or repertoire of such dances. adj. 2. containing, using, or performing folklorico: a visiting folklorico ...
folklorish
See folkloric. * * *
folklorist
See folkloric. * * *
folkloristic
See folkloric. * * *
folkloristics
folk·lor·is·tics (fōk'lô-rĭsʹtĭks, -lō-) n. (used with a sing. verb) See folklore. * * *
folkmagic
folk magic n. The practice of using charms, spells, or rituals to attempt to control natural or chance events or to influence the behavior or emotions of others. * * *
Folkman, (Moses) Judah
▪ 2009       American surgeon and medical researcher born Feb. 24, 1933, Cleveland, Ohio died Jan. 14, 2008, Denver, Colo. spent four decades investigating the ...
Folkman, Judah
▪ 1999       "If you have cancer and you are a mouse, we can take good care of you," remarked cancer researcher Judah Folkman in 1998. He was referring to a new ...
folkMass
folk Mass also folk mass n. A Mass in which folk music is used as part of the service instead of liturgical music. * * *
folkmedicine
folk medicine n. Traditional medicine as practiced by nonprofessional healers or embodied in local custom or lore, generally involving the use of natural and especially herbal ...
folkmoot
/fohk"mooht'/, n. (formerly, in England) a general assembly of the people of a shire, town, etc. Also, folkmote, folkmot /fohk"moht'/. [bef. 1000; ME; OE folcmot folk meeting. ...
folkmusic
folk music n. 1. Music originating among the common people of a nation or region and spread about or passed down orally, often with considerable variation. 2. Contemporary music ...
folknik
/fohk"nik/, n. Slang. a devotee or performer of folk music. [1965-70, Amer.; FOLK (MUSIC) + -NIK] * * *
folkright
/fohk"ruyt'/, n. a law or right of the people as opposed to that of the privileged classes. [bef. 1000; ME; OE folcriht. See FOLK, RIGHT] * * *
folksily
See folksy. * * *
folksiness
See folksily. * * *
folksinger
folk·sing·er or folk sing·er (fōkʹsĭng'ər) n. A singer of folksongs.   folk singing n. * * *
folksinging
See folksinger. * * *
folksong
folk song also folk·song (fōkʹsông', -sŏng') n. 1. A song belonging to the folk music of a people or area, often existing in several versions or with regional variations. 2. ...
folksy
—folksiness, n. /fohk"see/, adj., folksier, folksiest. 1. friendly or neighborly; sociable. 2. very informal; familiar; unceremonious: The politician affected a folksy ...
folktale
folk·tale or folk tale (fōkʹtāl') n. A story or legend forming part of an oral tradition. * * *
folkway
☆ folkway [fōk′wā΄ ] n. 〚first used (1906) by SUMNER William Graham〛 any way of thinking, feeling, behaving, etc. common to members of the same social group: see ...
folkways
/fohk"wayz'/, n.pl. Sociol. the ways of living, thinking, and acting in a human group, built up without conscious design but serving as compelling guides of conduct. [FOLK + ...
folky
/foh"kee/, n., pl. folkies, adj., folkier, folkiest. Informal. folkie. [1935-40; FOLK + -Y2] * * *
foll.
following. * * *
Follen, Adolf Ludwig
▪ German poet also called  August Adolf Follenius   born Jan. 21, 1794, Giessen, Hesse died Dec. 26, 1855, Bern       German political and Romantic poet, an important ...
Follen, Karl
▪ American educator in full  Karl Theodor Christian Follen,  also called  Charles Follen  born Sept. 4, 1796, Romrod, Brandenburg, Prussia [Germany] died Jan. 13/14, 1840, ...
Follett, Mary Parker
▪ American sociologist born , Sept. 3, 1868, Quincy, Mass., U.S. died Dec. 18, 1933, Boston, Mass.       American author and sociologist who was a pioneer in the study ...
follicle
/fol"i keuhl/, n. 1. Anat. a. a small cavity, sac, or gland. b. one of the small ovarian sacs containing an immature ovum; Graafian follicle. 2. Bot. a dry seed vessel, or pod, ...
follicle mite
any mite of the family Demodicidae, parasitic in hair follicles of various mammals, including humans. [1920-25] * * *
follicle-stimulating hormone
/fol"i keuhl stim'yeuh lay'ting/, Biochem. See FSH [1945-50] * * * ▪ biochemistry       one of two gonadotropic hormones (i.e., hormones concerned with the regulation ...
folliclemite
follicle mite n. Any of various tiny mites of the genus Demodex that infest the hair follicles of mammals. * * *
folliclestimulating hormone
follicle stimulating hormone n. Abbr. FSH A gonadotropic hormone of the anterior pituitary gland that stimulates the growth of follicles in the ovary and induces the formation of ...
follicular
/feuh lik"yeuh leuhr/, adj. 1. pertaining to, consisting of, or resembling a follicle or follicles; provided with follicles. 2. Pathol. affecting or originating in a follicle or ...
follicular phase
a stage of the menstrual cycle, from onset of menstruation to ovulation. Cf. luteal phase. * * *
follicularcell
follicular cell n. An epithelial cell lining a follicle, such as that of the thyroid or ovary. * * *
folliculate
fol·lic·u·late (fə-lĭkʹyə-lĭt) also fol·lic·u·lat·ed (-lā'tĭd) adj. Having or consisting of a follicle or follicles. * * *
folliculin
/feuh lik"yeuh lin/, n. Biochem. estrone. [1925-30; < L follicul(us) (see FOLLICLE) + -IN2] * * *
folliculitis
/feuh lik'yeuh luy"tis/, n. Pathol. inflammation of hair follicles. [1855-60; < L follicul(us) (see FOLLICLE) + -ITIS] * * *
follies
☆ follies [fäl′ēz΄] n. 〚pl. of FOLLY 〛 a revue: usually used as part of the title * * *
follis
/fol"is/, n., pl. folles /fol"eez/. 1. a bag of copper or bronze coins with a fixed weight, used as money of account in the later Roman Empire. 2. a silver-plated copper coin of ...
follow
—followable, adj. /fol"oh/, v.t. 1. to come after in sequence, order of time, etc.: The speech follows the dinner. 2. to go or come after; move behind in the same direction: ...
follow shot
1. Motion Pictures, Television. a traveling shot made as the camera moves along with the subject: a follow shot of the buffalo stampede, taken from a low-flying helicopter. 2. ...
follow the leader
a child's game in which players, one behind the other, follow a leader and must repeat or follow everything he or she does. [1825-35] * * *
follow-my-leader
(AmE follow-the-leader) n [U] a children’s game in which one player is the ‘leader’ and the others must do exactly what the leader does, such as jumping, holding out their ...
follow-on
/fol"oh on', -awn'/, adj. following or evolving as the next logical step: Aircraft manufacturers can expect follow-on sales for spare parts. [1875-80; n. use of v. phrase follow ...
follow-the-leader
➡ follow-my-leader * * *
follow-through
/fol"oh throoh', -throoh"/, n. 1. the completion of a motion, as in the stroke of a tennis racket. 2. the portion of such a motion after the ball has been hit. 3. the act of ...
follow-up
/fol"oh up'/, n. 1. the act of following up. 2. an action or thing that serves to increase the effectiveness of a previous one, as a second or subsequent letter, phone call, or ...
follower
/fol"oh euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that follows. 2. a person who follows another in regard to his or her ideas or belief; disciple or adherent. 3. a person who imitates, ...
followership
/fol"oh euhr ship'/, n. 1. the ability or willingness to follow a leader. 2. a group of followers or supporters; following. [1925-30; FOLLOWER + -SHIP] * * *
following
/fol"oh ing/, n. 1. a body of followers, attendants, adherents, etc. 2. the body of admirers, attendants, patrons, etc., of someone or something: That television show has a large ...
followingshot
following shot n. A shot in a movie in which the camera follows behind or along with a moving subject. * * *
followshot
follow shot n. 1. A shot in a movie in which the camera follows the action of a subject from a fixed position. 2. Games. A follow in billiards. * * *
folly
/fol"ee/, n., pl. follies for 2-6. 1. the state or quality of being foolish; lack of understanding or sense. 2. a foolish action, practice, idea, etc.; absurdity: the folly of ...
Folquet De Marseille
▪ Provençal troubadour and clergyman also called  Foulques De Toulouse   born c. 1155, , Marseille?, Provence [France] died Dec. 25, 1231, Toulouse       Provençal ...
Folsom
/fohl"seuhm/, n. a town in central California. 11,003. /fohl"seuhm/, adj. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a prehistoric North American cultural tradition extensive in the ...
Folsom complex
Prehistoric culture of North America on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains that is known from stone tools. It is characterized by leaf-shaped flint projectile points having ...
Folsom man
1. a Paleo-Indian of the Folsom tradition. 2. a human skull found in Midland, Texas, that is believed to be contemporary with the Folsom tradition. [1930-35, Amer.] * * *
Folsom point
a flint point characteristic of the Folsom tradition, typically leaf-shaped and fluted, with small basal extensions, and used on a projectile, as a spear, for hunting ...
Foltz, Clara Shortridge
▪ American lawyer and reformer née  Clara Shortridge  born July 16, 1849, probably New Lisbon, Ind., U.S. died Sept. 2, 1934, Los Angeles, Calif.       lawyer and ...
Fomalhaut
/foh"meuhl hawt', -meuh loh'/, n. Astron. a star of the first magnitude and the brightest star in the constellation Piscis Austrinus. [1585-95; < SpAr fam al-hawt mouth of the ...
foment
—fomenter, n. /foh ment"/, v.t. 1. to instigate or foster (discord, rebellion, etc.); promote the growth or development of: to foment trouble; to foment discontent. 2. to apply ...
fomentation
/foh'men tay"sheuhn/, n. 1. encouragement of discord, rebellion, etc.; instigation. 2. the application of warm liquid, ointments, etc., to the surface of the body. 3. the liquid, ...
fomenter
See foment. * * *
fomes
/foh"meez/, n., pl. fomites /fom"i teez', foh"mi-/. Usually, fomites. Med. any agent, as clothing or bedding, that is capable of absorbing and transmitting the infecting organism ...
fomite
fo·mite (fōʹmīt') n. An inanimate object or substance that is capable of transmitting infectious organisms from one individual to another.   [Back-formation from New Latin ...
Fomorian
/foh mawr"ee euhn/, n. Irish Legend. one of a race of pirates or sea demons who raided and pillaged Ireland but were finally defeated: sometimes associated with the hostile ...
Fon
/fon/, n., pl. Fons, (esp. collectively) Fon for 1. 1. a member of a people living mainly in Benin. 2. the Kwa language, very closely related to Ewe, spoken by the Fon people. * ...
fond
fond1 /fond/, adj., fonder, fondest. 1. having a liking or affection for (usually fol. by of): to be fond of animals. 2. loving; affectionate: to give someone a fond look. 3. ...
Fond du Lac
/fon" deuh lak', joo lak'/ a city in E Wisconsin, on Lake Winnebago. 35,863. * * * ▪ Wisconsin, United States       city, seat (1844) of Fond du Lac county, ...
fonda
/fawn"dah/; Eng. /fon"deuh/, n., pl. fondas /-dahs/; Eng. /-deuhz/. Spanish. an inn or restaurant. * * *
Fonda
/fon"deuh/, n. 1. Henry, 1905-82, U.S. actor. 2. his daughter Jane, born 1937, U.S. actress. * * *
Fonda, Henry
▪ American actor in full  Henry Jaynes Fonda  born May 16, 1905, Grand Island, Nebraska, U.S. died August 12, 1982, Los Angeles, California       American stage and ...
Fonda, Henry (Jaynes)
born May 16, 1905, Grand Island, Neb., U.S. died Aug. 12, 1982, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. actor. He achieved success on Broadway in The Farmer Takes a Wife (1934), which led him ...
Fonda, Jane
▪ American actress in full  Jane Seymour Fonda   born Dec. 21, 1937, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American motion-picture actress who was also noted for her political ...
Fonda, Jane (Seymour)
born Dec. 21, 1937, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. film actress, political activist, and fitness enthusiast. The daughter of actor Henry Fonda, she made her film debut in Tall Story ...
Fonda,Henry
Fon·da (fŏnʹdə), Henry. 1905-1982. American actor noted for his portrayal of decent, down-to-earth individuals in films such as The Grapes of Wrath (1940) and On Golden Pond ...
fondant
/fon"deuhnt/; Fr. /fawonn dahonn"/, n. 1. a thick, creamy sugar paste, the basis of many candies. 2. a candy made of this paste. [1875-80; < F: lit., melting, prp. of fondre to ...
Fondi
▪ Italy Latin  Fundi,         town, Lazio (Latium) regione, south-central Italy. It lies along the Appian Way at the foot of the Aurunci Mountains, northeast of ...
fondle
—fondler, n. —fondlingly, adv. /fon"dl/, v., fondled, fondling. v.t. 1. to handle or touch lovingly, affectionately, or tenderly; caress: to fondle a precious object; to ...
fondler
See fondle. * * *
fondly
/fond"lee/, adv. 1. in a fond manner; lovingly or affectionately: He looked fondly at his child. 2. Archaic. with complacent credulity; foolishly. [1300-50; ME; see FOND1, -LY] * ...
fondness
/fond"nis/, n. 1. the state or quality of being fond. 2. tenderness or affection. 3. doting affection. 4. a liking or weakness for something: He has a fondness for sweets. 5. ...
fondu
/fon dooh", -dyooh", fon"dooh, -dyooh/ for 1; Fr. /fawonn dyuu"/ for 1, 2, adj., n., pl. fondus Fr. /-dyuu"/ for 2. adj. 1. fondue (def. 4). n. 2. Ballet. a slow bending of the ...
fondue
/fon dooh", -dyooh", fon"dooh, -dyooh/; Fr. /fawonn dyuu"/, n., pl. fondues /-doohz", -dyoohz", -doohz, -dyoohz/; Fr. /-dyuu"/, adj. Cookery. n. 1. a saucelike dish of Swiss ...
Fong
/fawng, fong/, n. Hiram L(eong) /lee awng", -ong"/, born 1907, U.S. lawyer and senator from Hawaii 1959-77. * * *
Fongafale
Fongafale [fôŋ΄gə fä′lā] capital of Tuvalu: pop. c. 3,000 * * * Fon·ga·fa·le (fŏn'gə-fäʹlē) The capital of Tuvalu, on Funafuti Island in the southern Pacific ...
fons et origo
/fawns" et oh rddee"goh/; Eng. /fonz" et oh ruy"goh, oh ree"-/, Latin. source and origin. * * *
Fonseca
/fon say"keuh/; Sp. /fawn se"kah/, n. Gulf of, a bay of the Pacific Ocean in W Central America, bordered by El Salvador on the W, Honduras on the NE, and Nicaragua on the S. ab. ...
Fonseca, Gonzalo
▪ 1998       Uruguayan-born artist whose stone sculptures reflected architectural and archaeological influences; after leaving his homeland, he settled in Paris and then ...
Fonseca, Gulf of
Inlet of the Pacific Ocean, Central America. Bounded by El Salvador to the northwest, Honduras to the northeast, and Nicaragua to the southeast, it reaches inland about 40 mi ...
Fonseca, Manuel da
▪ Portuguese author born Oct. 15, 1911, Santiago-do-Cacém, Port. died March 11, 1993, Lisbon       Portuguese novelist and poet who wrote realistic works about his ...
Fonseca, Manuel Deodoro da
▪ president of Brazil born Aug. 5, 1827, Alagôas, Braz. died Aug. 23, 1892, Rio de Janeiro  nominal leader of the coup that toppled Emperor Pedro II. He became the first ...
Fonseca,Gulf of
Fon·se·ca (fôn-sāʹkə, fōn-sĕʹkä), Gulf of An inlet of the Pacific Ocean in western Central America bordered by El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua. * * *
font
font1 /font/, n. 1. a receptacle, usually of stone, as in a baptistery or church, containing the water used in baptism. 2. a receptacle for holy water; stoup. 3. a productive ...
font name
a Christian name; baptismal name; first name. [1655-65] * * *
Font-de-Gaume
▪ cave, Dordogne, France       cave near Les Eyzies, in Dordogne, France, known for its lavish prehistoric wall paintings (mural).       First discovered as a ...
Fontaine, Hippolyte
▪ French engineer born 1833, Dijon, Fr. died 1917, Paris       French engineer who discovered that a dynamo (electric generator) can be operated in reverse as an ...
Fontainebleau
/fon"tin bloh'/; Fr. /fawonn ten bloh"/, n. a town in N France, SE of Paris: famous palace, long a favorite residence of French kings; extensive forest. 19,595. * * * Château ...
Fontainebleau School
a group of artists, many of them Italian and Flemish, who worked on the decorations of the palace of Fontainebleau in the 16th century. * * *
Fontainebleau, school of
French and foreign artists associated with the court at Fontainebleau in the 16th century. In 1528 Francis I began to rebuild the palace and hired Rosso Fiorentino and Francesco ...
fontal
/fon"tl/, adj. 1. pertaining to or coming from a fountain or spring. 2. pertaining to or being the source of something: fontal concepts. 3. of or pertaining to a font, as of ...
Fontana
/fon tan"euh/; for 1 also It. /fawn tah"nah/, n. 1. Domenico /deuh men"i koh'/; It. /daw me"nee kaw'/, 1543-1607, Italian architect. 2. a city in S California. 37,109. * * ...
Fontana, Carlo
▪ Italian architect born 1634/38, Bruciate, near Como, Milan died 1714, Rome  Italian architect, engineer, and publisher whose prolific studio produced widely imitated ...
Fontana, Domenico
▪ Italian architect born 1543, Melide, Milan [Italy] died June 28, 1607, Naples  Italian architect who worked on St. Peter's Basilica (Saint Peter's Basilica) and other ...
Fontana, Lavinia
▪ Italian painter born 1552, Bologna died Aug. 11, 1614, Rome       Italian painter of the Mannerist school, one of the first women to execute large, publicly ...
Fontane, Theodor
born Dec. 30, 1819, Neuruppin, Brandenburg died Sept. 20, 1898, Berlin German writer. He began his career as a journalist and wrote books based on his travels before turning to ...
fontanel
/fon'tn el"/, n. Anat. one of the spaces, covered by membrane, between the bones of the fetal or young skull. Also, fontanelle. [1375-1425; late ME fontinel < MF fontanele little ...
Fontanes, Louis, marquis de
▪ French scholar born March 6, 1757, Niort, France died March 17, 1821, Paris       French man of letters who represented Catholic and conservative opinion during the ...
fontange
/fawonn tahonnzh"/, n., pl. fontanges /-tahonnzh"/. Often, fontanges. commode (def. 4). [1680-90; < F, named after Marie Angélique de Scorraille de Roussilles, Duchess of ...
Fontanne
/fon tan"/, n. Lynn, 1887-1983, U.S. actress, born in England (wife of Alfred Lunt). * * *
Fontanne,Lynn
Fon·tanne (fŏn-tănʹ), Lynn. 1887?-1983. British-born American actress who in 1922 married Alfred Lunt, with whom she performed in many stage productions, including Pygmalion ...
Fontéchevade
▪ anthropological and archaeological site, France       a cave site in southwestern France known for the 1947 discovery of ancient human remains and tools probably ...
Fontenelle, Bernard Le Bovier, sieur de
▪ French author and scientist born Feb. 11, 1657, Rouen, Fr. died Jan. 9, 1757, Paris  French scientist and man of letters, described by Voltaire as the most universal mind ...
Fontenoy, Battle of
▪ European history       (May 11, 1745), confrontation that led to the French conquest of Flanders during the War of the Austrian Succession. It was the most famous ...
Fontevrault-l'Abbaye
▪ village, France also spelled  Fontevraud,         village near Saumur, Maine-et-Loire département, Pays de la Loire région, France. It lies near the confluence of ...
Fonteyn
/fon tayn"/, n. Dame Margot /mahr"goh/, (Margaret Hookham), 1919-91, English ballerina. * * *
Fonteyn, Dame Margot
orig. Margaret Hookham born May 18, 1919, Reigate, Surrey, Eng. died Feb. 21, 1991, Panama City, Pan. British ballerina. She debuted with the Vic-Wells Ballet (later Royal ...
Fonteyn,Dame Margot
Fon·teyn (fŏn-tānʹ), Dame Margot. 1919-1991. British ballerina who joined the Royal Ballet in 1934 and began her acclaimed partnership with Rudolf Nureyev in 1962. * * *
fontina
/fon tee"neuh/, n. a type of Italian cheese, semisoft to firm, made of cow's or sheep's milk. [1935-40; < It < Upper It dial. (Val d'Aosta), of uncert. orig.] * * * ▪ ...
Fonvizin, Denis Ivanovich
▪ Russian dramatist born April 3 [April 14, New Style], 1744/45, Moscow, Russia died Dec. 1 [Dec. 12], 1792, St. Petersburg       playwright who satirized the cultural ...
foo dog
foo dog [fo͞o] n. 1. a fierce-looking dog with a lion's mane, used as a motif in East Asian art 2. a figurine or statue in the form of this dog * * *
Foochow
/fooh"chow"/; Chin. /fooh"joh"/, n. 1. Older Spelling. Fuzhou. 2. Also called Northern Min. a dialect of Chinese spoken in and around Foochow. Cf. Min. * * *
food
—foodless, adj. —foodlessness, n. /foohd/, n. 1. any nourishing substance that is eaten, drunk, or otherwise taken into the body to sustain life, provide energy, promote ...
food additive
additive (def. 4). * * * ▪ food processing Introduction       any of various chemical substances added to foods to produce specific desirable effects. Additives such ...
Food and Agriculture Organization
the agency of the United Nations that institutes and administers programs, esp. in underdeveloped countries, for improving farming methods and increasing food production. Abbr.: ...
Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
UN agency whose purpose is to improve nutrition and eliminate hunger by coordinating the efforts of governments in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. It also assists ...
Food and Drug Administration
U.S. Govt. a division of the Department of Health and Human Services that protects the public against impure and unsafe foods, drugs, and cosmetics. Abbr.: FDA * * * ▪ United ...
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1927, it inspects, tests, approves, and sets safety standards for foods and food additives, drugs, ...
food bank
an agency, group, or center that collects food and distributes it to the needy. * * *
food chain
1. Ecol. a series of organisms interrelated in their feeding habits, the smallest being fed upon by a larger one, which in turn feeds a still larger one, etc. 2. the chain from a ...
food colouring
▪ food processing       any of numerous dyes, pigments, or other additives used to enhance the appearance of fresh and processed foods. Colouring ingredients include ...
food court
a space, as in a shopping mall, with a concentration of fast-food stalls and usually a common eating area. [1980-85] * * *
food cycle
food cycle n. Ecol. FOOD WEB * * *
food fish
any fish used for food by human beings. [1860-65] * * *
food grain
any cereal grain produced for human consumption. [1875-80] * * *
food mill
a hand-operated kitchen device for puréeing fruits and vegetables. * * *
food of the gods
asafetida. * * *
food poisoning
an acute gastrointestinal condition characterized by such symptoms as headache, fever, chills, abdominal and muscular pain, nausea, diarrhea, and prostration, caused by foods ...
food preservation
Any method by which food is protected against spoilage by oxidation, bacteria, molds, and microorganisms. Traditional methods include dehydration, smoking, salting, controlled ...
Food preservatives
▪ Table Food preservatives chemical agent mechanism of action Antioxidants ascorbic acid oxygen scavenger butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) free radical scavenger butylated ...
food processing
      any of a variety of operations by which raw foodstuffs are made suitable for consumption, cooking, or storage. A brief treatment of food processing follows. For ...
food processor
—food processing. an electric appliance with interchangeable blades within a closed container into which food is inserted for slicing, shredding, mincing, chopping, puréeing, ...
Food Programme
a BBC radio programme about food. As well as discussing different dishes and styles of cooking, it also investigates the relationships between food and health, for example ...
food pyramid
Ecol. (of a food chain) successive levels of predation in a food chain represented schematically as a pyramid because upper levels normally consist of decreasing numbers of ...
food science
the study of the nature of foods and the changes that occur in them naturally and as a result of handling and processing. [1965-70] * * *
food service
the preparation, delivery, serving, etc., of ready-to-eat foods: The cafeteria employs over 20 people in food service. * * *
food stamp
any of the coupons sold or given under a federal program to eligible needy persons and redeemable for food at designated grocery stores or markets. Also called food ...


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