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Слова на букву gano-hipp (15990)

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Harlech
a town in Gwynedd in Wales. It is famous for its castle, on a high rock above the town, built in 1289. * * * ▪ Wales, United Kingdom  castle and village, Gwynedd county, ...
Harleian Library
/hahr"lee euhn/ a large library of manuscripts collected by the British statesman Robert Harley and his son and now housed in the British Museum. [ < NL Harleianus of, belonging ...
Harlem
/hahr"leuhm/, n. 1. a section of New York City, in the NE part of Manhattan. 2. a tidal river in New York City, between the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx, which, with ...
Harlem Globetrotters
an African-American basketball team that plays exhibition games in the US and around the world, doing tricks with the balls to music to show their skills and make people laugh. ...
Harlem Renaissance
a renewal and flourishing of black literary and musical culture during the years after World War I in the Harlem section of New York City. Also called Black Renaissance. * * ...
Harlem River
Harlem River tidal river separating Manhattan Island from the Bronx &, with Spuyten Duyvil Creek, connecting the East River with the Hudson: c. 8 mi (12.9 km) * * *
Harlemite
/hahr"leuh muyt'/, n. a native or inhabitant of Harlem. [1885-90; HARLEM + -ITE1] * * *
HarlemRiver
Harlem River A channel in New York City separating the northern end of Manhattan Island from the Bronx. With Spuyten Duyvil Creek it connects the Hudson and East rivers. * * *
harlequin
—harlequinism, n. /hahr"leuh kwin, -kin/, n. 1. (often cap.) a comic character in commedia dell'arte and the harlequinade, usually masked, dressed in multicolored, ...
harlequin beetle
▪ insect       large tropical American beetle with an elaborate variegated pattern of black with muted red and greenish yellow markings on its wing ...
harlequin bug
a black stink bug, Murgantia histrionica, having red and yellow markings, that feeds on cabbages and other cruciferous plants. Also called cabbage bug, calicoback, calico bug, ...
harlequin cabbage bug
▪ insect       a species of insect in the stinkbug family, Pentatomidae (order Heteroptera), that sucks sap and chlorophyll from crops, such as cabbage, causing them to ...
harlequin duck
a small diving duck, Histrionicus histrionicus, of North America and Iceland, the male of which has bluish-gray plumage marked with black, white, and chestnut. [1765-75] * * *
harlequin opal
a variety of opal having patches of various colors. [1870-75] * * *
Harlequin Romance{™}
a US series of romantic fiction books published by Harlequin since the 1960s. The company started by publishing books by the British publisher Mills & Boon in the US. It ...
harlequin snake
☆ harlequin snake n. the E American coral snake (Micrurus fulvius) * * *
harlequin table
a writing or dressing table having a central set of compartments that rise when drop leaves are raised. * * *
harlequinade
/hahr'leuh kwi nayd", -ki-/, n. 1. a pantomime, farce, or similar play in which Harlequin plays the principal part. 2. buffoonery. [1770-80; < F arlequinade. See HARLEQUIN, ...
harlequinbug
harlequin bug n. A flat-bodied, brightly colored stinkbug (Murgantia histrionica) that is destructive to cabbage and other cruciferous plants. Also called calicoback. * * *
harlequinesque
/hahr'leuh kwi nesk", -ki-/, adj. in the manner of a harlequin. [1880-85; HARLEQUIN + -ESQUE] * * *
Harlequins
(also NEC Harlequins, also (infml Quins) n [pl] an English Rugby Union club based in Twickenham, south-west London. The team’s shirt has many colours and it has been one of the ...
Harley
/hahr"lee/, n. Robert, 1st Earl of Oxford, 1661-1724, British statesman. * * * (as used in expressions) Arnold Henry Harley Granville Barker Harley Harley Robert 1st earl of ...
Harley Street
a street in London, England: noted for the eminent doctors who have offices there. * * *
Harley, Robert, 1st earl of Oxford
born Dec. 5, 1661, London, Eng. died May 21, 1724, London English politician. Elected to Parliament in 1688, he led a coalition of Whigs and moderate Tories. He was speaker of ...
Harley-Davidson{™}
n a famous and expensive US motorcycle. Harley-Davidsons are long and heavy, with fairly old-fashioned yet powerful engines that make a loud sound. William Harley and Arthur ...
Harlingen
/hahr"lin jeuhn/, n. a city in S Texas. 43,543. * * * ▪ Texas, United States       city, Cameron county, southern Texas, U.S., 28 miles (45 km) northwest of ...
harlot
/hahr"leuht/, n. a prostitute; whore. [1175-1225; ME: young idler, rogue < OF herlot, of obscure orig.] * * *
harlotry
/hahr"leuh tree/, n. prostitution. [1275-1325; ME harlotrie. See HARLOT, -RY] * * *
Harlow
/hahr"loh/, n. 1. Jean, 1911-37, U.S. motion-picture actress. 2. a town in W Essex, in SE England. 80,300. 3. a male given name. * * * ▪ England, United Kingdom  new town ...
Harlow, Jean
orig. Harlean Carpenter born March 3, 1911, Kansas City, Mo., U.S. died June 7, 1937, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. film actress. She worked as an extra and played bit parts before ...
Harlow,Jean
Harlow, Jean. Originally Harlean Carpenter. 1911-1937. American actress known for her beauty and sardonic wit. Her films include Hell's Angels (1930) and Red Dust (1932). * * *
harm
—harmer, n. /hahrm/, n. 1. physical injury or mental damage; hurt: to do him bodily harm. 2. moral injury; evil; wrong. v.t. 3. to do or cause harm to; injure; damage; hurt: to ...
HARM
/hahrm/, n. Mil. a U.S. air-to-surface missile designed to detect and destroy radar sites by homing on their emissions. [H(igh-speed) A(nti) R(adiation) M(issile)] * * *
harm'sway
harm's way (härmz) n. A risky position; danger: a place for the children that is out of harm's way; ships that sail into harm's way. * * *
Harman
(1950– ) a British barrister and Labour politician who has been a Member of Parliament since 1982. She held several important positions in the Labour Shadow Cabinet before ...
Harman, Martin Coles
▪ British financier byname  King Of Lundy   born 1885, Steyning, Sussex, Eng. died Dec. 5, 1954, Oxted, Surrey       English financier and one of the few private ...
harmattan
/hahr'meuh tan"/, n. (on the west coast of Africa) a dry, parching land breeze, charged with dust. [1665-75; said to be < Twi haramata] * * * ▪ wind       hot, dry wind ...
harmful
—harmfully, adv. —harmfulness, n. /hahrm"feuhl/, adj. causing or capable of causing harm; injurious: a harmful idea; a harmful habit. [bef. 1000; ME; OE hearmful. See HARM, ...
harmfully
See harmful. * * *
harmfulness
See harmfully. * * *
harmine
harmine [här′mēn΄] n. an alkaloid drug, C13H12N2O, present in ayahuasca and used in medicine as a stimulant * * * ▪ drug       hallucinogenic alkaloid found in the ...
harmless
—harmlessly, adv. —harmlessness, n. /hahrm"lis/, adj. 1. without the power or desire to do harm; innocuous: He looks mean but he's harmless; a harmless Halloween prank. 2. ...
harmlessly
See harmless. * * *
harmlessness
See harmlessly. * * *
Harmodius and Aristogiton
▪ Greek tyrannicide died 514 BC  the tyrannoktonoi, or “tyrannicides,” who according to popular, but erroneous, legend freed Athens from the Peisistratid tyrants. They ...
Harmon, Tom
▪ American athlete byname of  Thomas Dudley Harmon   born Sept. 28, 1919, Rensselaer, Ind., U.S. died March 15, 1990, Los Angeles, Calif.       American football ...
Harmonia
/hahr moh"nee euh/, n. Class. Myth. the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite and wife of Cadmus. * * * ▪ Greek mythology       in Greek mythology, the daughter of Ares and ...
harmonic
—harmonically, adv. —harmonicalness, n. /hahr mon"ik/, adj. 1. pertaining to harmony, as distinguished from melody and rhythm. 2. marked by harmony; in harmony; concordant; ...
harmonic analysis
Math. 1. the calculation of Fourier series and their generalization. 2. the study of Fourier series and their generalization. Also called Fourier analysis. [1865-70] * * * ▪ ...
harmonic conjugates
Math. two points whose cross ratio with two specified points equals -1. [1880-85] * * *
harmonic construction
▪ mathematics  in projective geometry, determination of a pair of points C and D that divides a line segment AB harmonically (see Figure—>), that is, internally and ...
Harmonic Drive
▪ machine component       mechanical speed-changing device, invented in the 1950s, that operates on a different principle from, and has capabilities beyond the scope of, ...
harmonic function
▪ mathematics       mathematical function of two variables having the property that its value at any point is equal to the average of its values along any circle around ...
harmonic interval.
See under interval (def. 6). * * *
harmonic law
Astron. See under Kepler's laws. * * *
harmonic mean
Statistics. the mean obtained by taking the reciprocal of the arithmetic mean of the reciprocals of a set of nonzero numbers. [1880-85] * * *
harmonic minor scale
Music. See minor scale (def. 1). [1880-85] * * *
harmonic motion
Physics. periodic motion consisting of one or more vibratory motions that are symmetric about a region of equilibrium, as the motion of a vibrating string of a musical ...
harmonic progression
Math. a series of numbers the reciprocals of which are in arithmetic progression. [1865-70] * * *
harmonic series
Math. 1. a series in which the reciprocals of the terms form an arithmetic progression. 2. the divergent infinite series, 1 + 1/2 + 1/3 + 1/4 + 1/5 +. ... [1865-70] * * *
harmonic tone
Music. a tone produced by suppressing the fundamental tone and bringing into prominence one of its overtones. * * *
harmonica
/hahr mon"i keuh/, n. 1. Also called mouth organ. a musical wind instrument consisting of a small rectangular case containing a set of metal reeds connected to a row of holes, ...
harmonically
See harmonic. * * *
harmonicanalysis
harmonic analysis n. The study of functions given by a Fourier series or analogous representations, such as periodic functions and functions on topological groups. * * *
harmonicmean
harmonic mean n. The reciprocal of the arithmetic mean of the reciprocals of a specified set of numbers. * * *
harmonicmotion
harmonic motion n. A periodic vibration, as of a violin string, in which the motions are symmetrical about a region of equilibrium. Such a vibration may have only one frequency ...
harmonicon
/hahr mon"i keuhn/, n. 1. harmonica (def. 1). 2. orchestrion. [1815-25; n. use of Gk harmonikón, neut. of harmonikós HARMONIC] * * *
harmonicprogression
harmonic progression n. A sequence of quantities whose reciprocals form an arithmetic progression, such as 11, /31, /51, /7,.... * * *
harmonics
/hahr mon"iks/, n. Music. 1. (used with a sing. v.) the science of musical sounds. 2. (used with a pl. v.) the partials or overtones of a fundamental tone. Cf. overtone (def. ...
harmonicseries
harmonic series n. 1. Mathematics. A series whose terms are in harmonic progression, especially the series 1 + 1/2 + 1/3 + 1/4 +.... 2. Music. A series of tones consisting of a ...
harmonious
—harmoniously, adv. —harmoniousness, n. /hahr moh"nee euhs/, adj. 1. marked by agreement in feeling, attitude, or action: a harmonious group. 2. forming a pleasingly ...
harmoniously
See harmonious. * * *
harmoniousness
See harmoniously. * * *
harmonist
/hahr"meuh nist/, n. 1. a person skilled in harmony. 2. a person who makes a harmony, as of the Gospels. [1560-70; HARMON(Y) + -IST] * * *
Harmonist
/hahr"meuh nist/, n. a member of a celibate religious sect that emigrated from Germany to Pennsylvania in 1803. Also, Harmonite. Also called Rappist, Rappite. [1815-25; after ...
harmonistic
—harmonistically, adv. /hahr'meuh nis"tik/, adj. 1. pertaining to a harmonist or harmony. 2. pertaining to the collation and harmonizing of parallel passages, as of the ...
harmonistically
See harmonistic. * * *
harmonium
/hahr moh"nee euhm/, n. an organlike keyboard instrument with small metal reeds and a pair of bellows operated by the player's feet. [1840-50; Latinization of Gk harmónion, ...
harmonization
See harmonize. * * *
harmonize
—harmonizable, adj. —harmonization, n. —harmonizer, n. /hahr"meuh nuyz'/, v., harmonized, harmonizing. v.t. 1. to bring into harmony, accord, or agreement: to harmonize ...
harmonizer
See harmonization. * * *
harmony
/hahr"meuh nee/, n., pl. harmonies. 1. agreement; accord; harmonious relations. 2. a consistent, orderly, or pleasing arrangement of parts; congruity. 3. Music. a. any ...
harmost
/hahr"most/, n. a person serving the ancient Spartans as governor of a subject or conquered town. [1765-75; < Gk harmostés, deriv. of harmózein to regulate, govern, join] * * *
harmotome
/hahr"meuh tohm'/, n. a zeolite mineral related to stilbite, occurring in twinned crystals. [1795-1805; < F < Gk harmó(s) joint + -tomos -TOME] * * * ▪ mineral  hydrated ...
Harmsworth
/hahrmz"werrth/, n. 1. Alfred Charles William, Viscount Northcliffe, 1865-1922, English journalist, publisher, and politician. 2. his brother, Harold Sidney, 1st Viscount ...
Harmsworth Cup
▪ motorboat racing award formally  British International Trophy for Motorboats        motorboat racing award established in 1903 by the British publisher Sir Alfred ...
Harmsworth,Alfred Charles William
Harms·worth (härmzʹwûrth'), Alfred Charles William. Viscount Northcliffe. 1865-1922. British newspaper publisher who founded the Daily Mail (1896) and the Daily Mirror ...
Harnack
/hahrdd"nahk/, n. Adolf von /ah"dawlf feuhn/, 1851-1930, German Protestant theologian, born in Estonia. * * *
Harnack, Adolf von
▪ German theologian and church historian in full  Adolf Karl Gustav von Harnack  born , May 7, 1851, Dorpat, Estonia, Russian Empire [now Tartus, Estonia] died June 10, ...
harness
—harnesser, n. —harnessless, adj. —harnesslike, adj. /hahr"nis/, n. 1. the combination of straps, bands, and other parts forming the working gear of a draft animal. Cf. ...
harness eye
Textiles. the eyelet on a heddle or on harness cords. Cf. mail2 (def. 3). * * *
harness hitch
a hitch forming a loop around a rope, esp. one formed at the end of a bowline. * * *
harness horse
1. a horse used for pulling vehicles. 2. a horse used in harness racing. [1885-90] * * *
harness race
—harness racing. a trotting or pacing race for Standardbred horses harnessed to sulkies. [1900-05] * * *
harness racing
➡ racing * * * Horse-racing sport. In harness racing, Standardbred horses are harnessed to lightweight, two-wheeled, bodiless (seat-only) vehicles known as sulkies. The ...
harnessed antelope
any African antelope of the genus Tragelaphus, esp. the bushbuck, having the body marked with white stripes and spots that resemble a harness, and, in the male, long, gently ...
harnessedantelope
har·nessed antelope (härʹnĭst) n. See bushbuck. * * *
harnesser
See harness. * * *
harnessrace
harness race n. A horserace between pacers or trotters harnessed to sulkies.   harness racing n. * * *
harnessracing
See harness race. * * *
Harnett
/hahr"nit/, n. William Michael, 1848-92, U.S. painter. * * *
Harnett, William
▪ American painter born Aug. 10, 1848, Clonakilty, County Cork, Ire. died Oct. 29, 1892, New York City       U.S. still-life painter who was one of the masters of ...
Harnett, William (Michael)
born Aug. 10, 1848, Clonakilty, Ire. died Oct. 29, 1892, New York, N.Y., U.S. Irish-born U.S. still-life painter. Brought to Philadelphia as a child, he was trained as an ...
Harney Peak
/hahr"nee/ a mountain in SW South Dakota: the highest peak in the Black Hills. 7242 ft. (2207 m). * * * ▪ mountain, South Dakota, United States  highest point (7,242 feet ...
HarneyPeak
Har·ney Peak (härʹnē) A mountain, 2,208.8 m (7,242 ft) high, of southwest South Dakota. It is the highest elevation of the Black Hills and the highest point in the state. * ...
Harnoy, Ofra
▪ 1997       On March 26, 1996, Canadian cellist Ofra Harnoy, who had already established a reputation as an internationally acclaimed virtuoso of classical music, stood ...
Haro Strait
▪ strait, North America       passage of the eastern North Pacific, lying between Vancouver and Saturna islands of the province of British Columbia, Canada (west), and ...
Haro, Luis Méndez de
▪ minister of Spain born February 17, 1598, Valladolid, Spain died November 26, 1661, Madrid       chief minister and favourite of King Philip IV (reigned 1621–65), ...
Harold
/har"euhld/, n. a male given name. * * * (as used in expressions) Alexander Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander 1st Earl Arlen Harold Barton Sir Derek Harold Richard Bloom ...
Harold I
("Harefoot") died 1040, king of England 1035-40 (son of Canute). * * * known as Harold Harefoot died March 17, 1040, Oxford, Eng. King of England (1035–40). The ...
Harold II
1022?-66, king of England 1066: defeated by William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings (son of Earl Godwin). * * * known as Harold Godwineson born с 1020 died Oct. 14, ...
Harold Lloyd
➡ Lloyd (I) * * *
Harold Macmillan
➡ Macmillan * * *
Harold Nicolson
➡ Nicolson * * *
Harold Pinter
➡ Pinter * * *
Harold Robbins
➡ Robbins (I) * * *
Harold Shipman
➡ Shipman * * *
Harold Sydney Harmsworth
➡ Rothermere * * *
Harold Wilson
➡ Wilson (II) * * *
HaroldI
Har·old I (hărʹəld), Known as “Harold Harefoot.” Died 1040. King of England (1035-1040). The illegitimate son of Canute, Harold claimed the English throne after his ...
HaroldII
Harold II, 1022?-1066. King of England (1066) and the last of the Anglo-Saxon monarchs. He succeeded Edward the Confessor and was killed fighting the invasion of William the ...
HaroldIII
Harold III, Called “Harold Hardrada.” 1015-1066. King of Norway (1045-1066) who invaded England in 1066 and was killed in a battle against Harold II. * * *
haroseth
Seph. /khah rddaw"set/; Ashk. /khah rddoh"sis/, n. Hebrew. a mixture of chopped nuts and apples, wine, and spices that is eaten at the Seder meal on Passover: traditionally ...
Haroun-al-Raschid
/hah roohn"ahl rah sheed"/; Arab. /hah rddoohn"ahrdd'rddah sheed"/, n. See Harun al-Rashid. * * *
Harounal-Raschid
Ha·roun al-Ra·schid (hä-ro͞onʹ äl-rä-shēdʹ) See Harun al-Rashid. * * *
harp
—harplike, adj. /hahrp/, n. 1. a musical instrument consisting of a triangular frame formed by a soundbox, a pillar, and a curved neck, and having strings stretched between the ...
harp seal
a northern earless seal, Pagophilus groenlandicus, with pale-yellow fur darkening to gray with age, of coasts, drifting ice, and seas of the North Atlantic Ocean, hunted for its ...
Harpagus
▪ Median general flourished 6th century BC       Median general who first served Astyages, the last king of the Median Empire, but later deserted to the Achaemenid ...
Harpellales
▪ order of fungi       order of fungi (phylum Glomeromycota, kingdom Fungi) with a vegetative body (thallus) consisting of single or branched filaments (hyphae). Members ...
harper
/hahr"peuhr/, n. 1. a person who plays the harp. 2. a person who harps on a subject. 3. Numis. harp (def. 5). [bef. 900; ME; OE hearpere. See HARP, -ER1] * * * (as used in ...
Harper
/hahr"peuhr/, n. 1. James, 1795-1869, and his brothers John, 1797-1875, (Joseph) Wesley, 1801-70, and Fletcher, 1806-77, U.S. printers and publishers. 2. a male or female given ...
Harper brothers
U.S. printers and publishers. The two oldest brothers, James (1795–1869) and John (1797–1875) established J. & J. Harper in 1817; their siblings Joseph (1801–70) and ...
Harper Woods
a city in SE Michigan, near Detroit. 16,361. * * *
Harper's Magazine
Monthly magazine published in New York, N.Y., U.S., one of the oldest and most prestigious literary and opinion journals in the U.S. Founded in 1850 as Harper's New Monthly ...
Harper, Frances E.W.
▪ American author and social reformer in full  Frances Ellen Watkins Harper , née  Frances Ella Watkins  born September 24, 1825, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. died February ...
Harper, Ida A. Husted
▪ American journalist and suffragist née  Ida A. Husted  born Feb. 18, 1851, Fairfield, Ind., U.S. died March 14, 1931, Washington, D.C.  journalist and suffragist, ...
Harper, Michael S.
▪ American poet in full  Michael Steven Harper   born March 18, 1938, New York, N.Y., U.S.       African-American poet whose sensitive, personal verse is concerned ...
Harper, Robert Almer
▪ American biologist born Jan. 21, 1862, Le Claire, Iowa, U.S. died May 12, 1946, Bedford, Va.  American biologist who identified the details of reproduction in the ...
Harper, Stephen
▪ 2007       In January 2006 the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) won more than 36% of the vote in the country's general election, finishing with 125 of the 308 seats ...
Harper, William Rainey
▪ American educator born July 24, 1856, New Concord, Ohio, U.S. died Jan. 10, 1906, Chicago       U.S. Hebraist, who served as leader of the Chautauqua Institution and ...
Harpers (and Queen)
a British magazine published once a month and written mainly for rich people, especially women. It contains articles about fashion and the social life of the upper classes. * * *
Harpers Ferry
/hahr"peuhrz/ a town in NE West Virginia at the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers: site of John Brown's raid 1859. 361. Also, Harper's Ferry. * * * ▪ West ...
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
National preserve, West Virginia, U.S., in the Blue Ridge at the point where West Virginia, Virginia, and Maryland converge. Authorized as a national monument in 1944 and a ...
HarpersFerry
Har·pers Ferry (härʹpərz) A locality of extreme northeast West Virginia. It was the scene of John Brown's rebellion (1859), in which he briefly seized the U.S. arsenal ...
Harper’s
an intellectual US magazine known for its news articles, essays and short stories. The oldest US magazine, it was started in 1850 by Harper and Brothers and has been owned since ...
Harpignies, Henri
▪ French painter born June 28, 1819, Valenciennes, Fr. died Aug. 28, 1916, Saint-Prive  French landscape painter and engraver whose finest works include watercolours ...
harping
/hahr"ping/, n. Shipbuilding. any of several horizontal members at the ends of a vessel for holding cant frames in position until the shell planking or plating is attached. Also, ...
harpist
/hahr"pist/, n. a person who plays the harp, esp. professionally. [1605-15; HARP + -IST] * * *
harpoon
—harpooner, n. —harpoonlike, adj. /hahr poohn"/, n. 1. a barbed, spearlike missile attached to a rope, and thrown by hand or shot from a gun, used for killing and capturing ...
harpoon gun
a small cannon for shooting harpoons. [1810-20] * * *
harpooner
See harpoon. * * *
harpoongun
harpoon gun n. A small cannonlike apparatus used to fire harpoons. * * *
harpseal
harp seal n. An earless seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans whose pups are hunted for their fine white fur.   [From the shape of the markings ...
harpsichord
—harpsichordist, n. /hahrp"si kawrd'/, n. a keyboard instrument, precursor of the piano, in which the strings are plucked by leather or quill points connected with the keys, in ...
harpsichordist
See harpsichord. * * *
Harpur, Charles
▪ Australian poet born Jan. 23, 1813, Windsor, N.S.W., Australia died June 10, 1868, Windsor       early Australian poet, best known for poems on Australian themes that ...
Harpy
—harpylike, adj. /hahr"pee/, n., pl. Harpies. 1. Class. Myth. a ravenous, filthy monster having a woman's head and a bird's body. 2. (l.c.) a scolding, nagging, bad-tempered ...
harpy eagle
a large, powerful eagle, Harpia harpyja, of tropical America: an endangered species. [1820-30] * * *
harquebus
/hahr"kweuh beuhs/, n., pl. harquebuses. any of several small-caliber long guns operated by a matchlock or wheel-lock mechanism, dating from about 1400. Also, harquebuse, ...
harquebusier
/hahr'kweuh beuh sear"/, n. a soldier armed with a harquebus. Also, arquebusier. [1540-50; < MF; see HARQUEBUS, -IER2] * * *
Harran
Har·ran (hä-ränʹ) See Haran. * * * ▪ ancient city, Turkey also spelled  Haran , Roman  Carrhae        ancient city of strategic importance, now a village, in ...
Harrar
/hahr"euhr/, n. Harar. * * *
Harrell, Tom
▪ 1997       Tall, lean Tom Harrell stands hunched forward on the bandstand, head bowed, a private man seemingly lost in a world of his own. Until, that is, he raises ...
Harrer, Heinrich
▪ 2007       Austrian explorer and writer (b. July 6, 1912, Hüttenberg, Austria-Hungary—d. Jan. 7, 2006, Friesach, Austria), chronicled his mountain-climbing exploits ...
harridan
/hahr"i dn/, n. a scolding, vicious woman; hag; shrew. [1690-1700; perh. alter of F haridelle thin, worn-out horse, large, gaunt woman (compared with the initial element of haras ...
harrier
harrier1 /har"ee euhr/, n. 1. a person who or thing that harries. 2. any of several short-winged hawks of the genus Circus that hunt over meadows and marshes and prey on reptiles ...
Harrier jump jet
➡ Harrier * * *
Harries, Carl Dietrich
▪ German chemist born Aug. 5, 1866, Luckenwalde, Ger. died Nov. 3, 1923, Berlin       German chemist and industrialist who developed the ozonolysis process (Harries ...
Harriet
/har"ee euht/, n. a female given name, form of Harry. Also, Harriette, Harrietta /har'ee et"euh/. * * * (as used in expressions) Martineau Harriet Monroe Harriet Stowe Harriet ...
Harriet Beecher Stowe
➡ Stowe * * *
Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom Defies Simon Legree (1852)
▪ Primary Source       Few attacks upon slavery were as effective as Harriet Beecher Stowe s Uncle Tom s Cabin. First written as a serial for the abolitionist journal ...
Harriet Harman
➡ Harman * * *
Harriet Tubman
➡ Tubman * * *
Harrigan, Edward
▪ American actor, producer, and playwright byname  Ned Harrigan   born Oct. 26, 1845?, New York City died June 6, 1911, New York City       American actor, producer, ...
Harriman
/har"euh meuhn/, n. 1. Edward Henry, 1848-1909, U.S. financier and railroad magnate. 2. his son, W(illiam) Averell /ay"veuhr euhl/, 1891-1986, U.S. diplomat: governor of New York ...
Harriman, (William)Averell
Harriman, (William) Averell. 1891-1986. American financier and diplomat who held a number of public offices, including ambassador to the USSR (1943-1946) and U.S. secretary of ...
Harriman, Edward H(enry)
born , Feb. 25, 1848, Hempstead, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 9, 1909, near Turner, N.Y. U.S. financier and railroad magnate. After working as an office boy and then a stockbroker on ...
Harriman, Edward Henry
▪ American financier born , Feb. 25, 1848, Hempstead, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 9, 1909, near Turner, N.Y.       American financier and railroad magnate, one of the leading ...
Harriman, Florence Jaffray
▪ American diplomat née  Florence Jaffray Hurst  born July 21, 1870, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Aug. 31, 1967, Washington, D.C.       U.S. diplomat, noted for her ...
Harriman, Pamela Beryl Digby Churchill Hayward
▪ 1998       British-born socialite and American political figure (b. March 20, 1920, Farnborough, Hampshire, Eng.—d. Feb. 5, 1997, Paris, France), made a name for ...
Harriman, W Averell
▪ American diplomat born Nov. 15, 1891, New York City died July 26, 1986, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., U.S.  statesman who was a leading U.S. diplomat in relations with the Soviet ...
Harriman, W(illiam) Averell
born Nov. 15, 1891, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 26, 1986, Yorktown Heights, N.Y. U.S. diplomat. The son of Edward H. Harriman, he worked for the Union Pacific Railroad Co. ...
Harriman,Edward Henry
Har·ri·man (hărʹə-mən), Edward Henry. 1848-1909. American railway magnate. He joined J.P. Morgan and James J. Hill to form the Northern Securities Company, a railroad ...
Harrington, James
▪ British philosopher Harrington also spelled  Harington   born Jan. 7, 1611, Upton, Northamptonshire, Eng. died Sept. 11, 1677, London  English political philosopher ...
Harrington, Oliver Wendell
▪ 1996       African-American cartoonist and illustrator who used humour and satire to criticize racism and other social problems in the U.S.; he immigrated to France in ...
Harrington, Padraig
▪ 2008 born Aug. 31 1971, Dublin, Ire.  It was an emotional moment for golfer Padraig Harrington in May 2007 when he became the first home player since 1982 to win the Irish ...
Harrington, William Stanhope, 1st earl of, Viscount Petersham of Petersham
▪ British diplomat also called (from 1730)  Baron Harrington  born c. 1690 died December 8, 1756, Westminster, near London, England       British diplomat and ...
Harriot, Thomas
▪ English mathematician and astronomer also spelled  Hariot  born 1560, Oxford, Eng. died July 2, 1621, London       mathematician, astronomer, and investigator of ...
Harris
/har"is/, n. 1. Benjamin, c1660-c1720, English journalist who published the first newspaper in America 1690. 2. Frank, 1856-1931, U.S. writer, born in Ireland. 3. Joel Chandler ...
Harris movement
▪ religious movement       largest mass movement toward Christianity in West Africa, named for the prophet William Wadé Harris (c. 1850–1929), a Grebo of Liberia and ...
Harris poll
n any of the studies of public opinion carried out by the US company Harris Interactive. * * *
Harris Treaty
▪ Japanese-United States history       (July 29, 1858), agreement that secured commercial and diplomatic privileges for the United States in Japan and constituted the ...
Harris Tweed
Trademark. a brand of heavy, handwoven woolen fabric made in the Outer Hebrides. * * *
Harris tweed{™}
n [U] a type of thick woollen cloth for making coats, jackets, etc. It is woven by hand on the islands of Harris and Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, off the west coast of Scotland. ...
Harris, Alexander
▪ British author born Feb. 7, 1805, London died Feb. 1, 1874, Copetown, Ont., Can.       English author whose Settlers and Convicts; or, Recollections of Sixteen Years' ...
Harris, Barbara Clementine
▪ American bishop born June 12, 1930, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.    African American clergywoman and social activist who was the first female bishop in the Anglican ...
Harris, Benjamin
▪ British journalist flourished 1673–1716       English bookseller and writer who was the first journalist in the British-American colonies.       An ardent ...
Harris, Ed
▪ American actor in full  Edward Allen Harris  born Nov. 28, 1950, Tenafly, N.J., U.S.       American actor acclaimed for the intensity of his performances, most ...
Harris, Eddie
▪ 1997       U.S. jazz musician who played tenor saxophone with a high, pure sound, as exemplified in his 1961 hit recording of the theme from the film Exodus. He also ...
Harris, Emmylou
▪ American singer and songwriter born April 12, 1947, Birmingham, Ala., U.S.    American singer and songwriter who ranged effortlessly among folk (folk music), pop, rock, ...
Harris, Frank
▪ American journalist byname of  James Thomas Harris   born Feb. 14, 1856, County Galway, Ire. died Aug. 26, 1931, Nice, Fr.  Irish-born American journalist and man of ...
Harris, George Washington
▪ American humorist born March 20, 1814, Allegheny City, near Pittsburgh died Dec. 11, 1869, on a train en route to Knoxville, Tenn., U.S.       American humorist who ...
Harris, Joel Chandler
born Dec. 9, 1848, Eatonton, Ga., U.S. died July 3, 1908, Atlanta, Ga. U.S. writer. He became known as a humorist in his pieces for various newspapers, including (1876–1900) ...
Harris, Louis
▪ American journalist and pollster born January 6, 1921, New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.       pollster, public-opinion (public opinion) analyst, and columnist. He founded ...
Harris, Mark
▪ 2008 Mark Harris Finkelstein        American novelist born Nov. 19, 1922, Mount Vernon, N.Y. died May 30, 2007, Santa Barbara, Calif. was the author of the baseball ...
Harris, Marvin
▪ 2002       American anthropologist and theoretician (b. Aug. 18, 1927, New York, N.Y.—d. Oct. 25, 2001, Gainesville, Fla.), was a prominent anthropologist known for ...
Harris, Maxwell Henley
▪ 1996       Australian avant-garde poet, editor, and publisher (b. April 13, 1921—d. Jan. 13, 1995). * * *
Harris, Mike
▪ 1996       On June 26, 1995, Mike Harris was sworn in as the 22nd premier of Ontario. His Progressive Conservative Party (PCP) had won a legislative majority in the ...
Harris, Patricia Roberts
▪ American public official née  Patricia Roberts  born May 31, 1924, Mattoon, Ill., U.S. died March 23, 1985, Washington, D.C.       American public official, the ...
Harris, Phil
▪ 1996       U.S. singer and bandleader who as a member, 1936-52, of Jack Benny's radio ensemble played the part of Benny's bourbon-swigging foil; he later starred with ...
Harris, Renatus
▪ European organ maker also called René Harris born c. 1652, , France died , August or September 1724, Bristol?, Eng.       English organ builder whose fine ...
Harris, Rene Reynaldo
▪ 2009       Nauruan politician born Nov. 11, 1947?, Nauru died July 5, 2008, Nauru served four times (April 27, 1999–April 20, 2000; March 30, 2001–Jan. 9, 2003; ...
Harris, Richard
▪ Irish actor born October 1, 1930, Limerick, Ireland died October 25, 2002, London, England       Irish actor of stage and screen who became known as much for his ...
Harris, Richard St. John
▪ 2003       Irish actor (b. Oct. 1, 1930, Limerick, Ire.—d. Oct. 25, 2002, London, Eng.), had a sometimes-uneven career notable not only for his formidable talent in ...
Harris, Roy
orig. LeRoy Ellsworth Harris born Feb. 12, 1898, near Chandler, Okla., U.S. died Oct. 1, 1979, Santa Monica, Calif. U.S. composer. He farmed and did odd jobs to support his ...
Harris, Sir Arthur Travers, 1st Baronet
born April 13, 1892, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, Eng. died April 5, 1984, Goring-on-Thames, Oxfordshire British air officer. He served in World War I and after the war in ...
Harris, Townsend
born Oct. 3, 1804, Sandy Hill, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 25, 1878, New York City U.S. diplomat. He served as president of New York City's board of education and helped found the ...
Harris, William Torrey
▪ American educator and philosopher born Sept. 10, 1835, North Killingley, Conn., U.S. died Nov. 5, 1909, Providence, R.I.       U.S. educator, probably the most widely ...
Harris, Wilson
▪ Guyanan writer in full  Theodore Wilson Harris,  byname  Kona Waruk  born March 24, 1921, New Amsterdam, British Guiana [now Guyana]       Guyanese author noted ...
Harris, Zellig S.
▪ American scholar in full  Zellig Sabbetai Harris  born Oct. 23, 1909, Balta, Russia died May 22, 1992, New York, N.Y., U.S.       Russian-born American scholar ...
Harris,Benjamin
Har·ris (hărʹĭs), Benjamin. fl. 1673-1713. English publisher and journalist in Massachusetts. His Publick Occurrences was the first newspaper printed in America (1690). * * *
Harris,Joel Chandler
Harris, Joel Chandler. 1848-1908. American writer and journalist who wrote Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings (1880) and its many sequels. * * *
Harris,Julie
Harris, Julie. Born 1925. American actress noted for her performances in a number of plays and films, including The Member of the Wedding (play, 1950; film, 1952). * * *
Harris,Roy Ellsworth
Harris, Roy Ellsworth. 1898-1979. American composer known especially for his folk-inspired symphonies. * * *
Harris,Zellig Sabbatai
Harris, Zellig Sabbatai. 1909-1992. Ukrainian-born American linguist who revolutionized linguistic study by developing mathematical linguistics and by pioneering an effort to ...
Harrisburg
/har"is berrg'/, n. a city in and the capital of Pennsylvania, in the S part, on the Susquehanna River. 53,264. * * * City (pop., 2000: 48,950), capital of Pennsylvania, U.S. ...
Harrison
/har"euh seuhn/, n. 1. Benjamin, 1726?-91, American political leader (father of William Henry Harrison). 2. Benjamin, 1833-1901, twenty-third president of the U.S. 1889-93 ...
Harrison Birtwistle
➡ Birtwistle * * *
Harrison Ford
➡ Ford (III) * * *
Harrison red
1. a pigment consisting of a paratoluidine toner, characterized by its brilliant red color and tendency to bleed. 2. pimento (def. 3). [perh. after B. Harrison (d. 1929), ...
Harrison, Anna
▪ American first lady née  Anna Tuthill Symmes  born July 25, 1775, Morristown, New Jersey, U.S. died February 25, 1864, North Bend, Ohio  American first lady (March ...
Harrison, Benjamin
born Aug. 20, 1833, North Bend, Ohio, U.S. died March 13, 1901, Indianapolis, Ind. 23rd president of the U.S. (1889–93). The grandson of William H. Harrison, the 9th ...
Harrison, Caroline
▪ American first lady née  Caroline Lavinia Scott  born October 1, 1832, Oxford, Ohio, U.S. died October 25, 1892, Washington, D.C.  American first lady (1889–92), the ...
Harrison, Elizabeth
▪ American educator born Sept. 1, 1849, Athens, Ky., U.S. died Oct. 31, 1927, San Antonio, Texas       American educator, a major force in establishing standards and a ...
Harrison, Francis Burton
▪ United States governor general of Philippines born Dec. 18, 1873, New York City died Nov. 21, 1957, Flemington, N.J., U.S.       U.S. governor general of the ...
Harrison, Frederic
▪ British author born Oct. 18, 1831, London died Jan. 14, 1923, Bath, Somerset, Eng.  English author who publicized the Positivism of the French sociologist Auguste Comte in ...
Harrison, G Donald
▪ American organ designer born April 21, 1889, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, Eng. died June 14, 1956, New York City       English-born U.S. organ designer and builder, who ...
Harrison, George
▪ 2002       British musician, singer, and songwriter (b. Feb. 25, 1943, Liverpool, Eng.—d. Nov. 29, 2001, Los Angeles, Calif.), was the lead guitarist of the Beatles, ...
Harrison, Jim
▪ American author byname of  James Thomas Harrison   born Dec. 11, 1937, Grayling, Mich., U.S.       American novelist and poet known for his lyrical treatment of the ...
Harrison, John
born March 1693, Foulby, Yorkshire, Eng. died March 24, 1776, London British horologist. The son of a carpenter, in 1735 he invented the first practical marine chronometer. He ...
Harrison, Lou Silver
▪ 2004       American composer (b. May 14, 1917, Portland, Ore.—d. Feb. 2, 2003, Lafayette, Ind.), was a tireless experimenter who created memorable melodies as he ...
Harrison, Peter
▪ British architect born June 14, 1716, York, Yorkshire, Eng. died April 30, 1775, New Haven, Conn.       British-American architect who became popular through his ...
Harrison, Ross Granville
▪ American zoologist born Jan. 13, 1870, Germantown, Pa., U.S. died Sept. 30, 1959, New Haven, Conn.       American zoologist who developed the first successful ...
Harrison, Sir Rex
orig. Reginald Carey Harrison born March 5, 1908, Huyton, Lancashire, Eng. died June 2, 1990, New York, N.Y., U.S. British actor. He made his debut in films and on the London ...
Harrison, Thomas
▪ English general born 1616, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, Eng. died Oct. 13, 1660, London       English Parliamentarian general and a leader in the Fifth ...
Harrison, Tony
▪ English writer born April 30, 1937, Leeds, West Yorkshire, Eng.       English poet, translator, dramatist, and filmmaker whose work expressed the tension between his ...
Harrison, Wallace K
▪ American architect born Sept. 28, 1895, Worcester, Mass., U.S. died Dec. 2, 1981, New York, N.Y.  American architect best known as head of the group of architects that ...
Harrison, William Henry
born Feb. 9, 1773, Charles City county, Va. died April 4, 1841, Washington, D.C., U.S. Ninth president of the U.S. (1841). Born into a politically prominent family, he enlisted ...
Harrison,Benjamin
I. Har·ri·son1 (hărʹĭ-sən), Benjamin. 1726-1791. American Revolutionary leader who served as a member of the Continental Congress (1774-1778) and was also governor of ...
Harrison,George
Harrison, George. Born 1943. British singer and songwriter who was formerly lead guitarist with the Beatles. His best-known compositions include “Here Comes the Sun” and ...
Harrison,Peter
Harrison, Peter. 1716-1775. British-born American architect noted as the designer of King's Chapel in Boston and Christ Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts. * * *
Harrison,Sir Reginald Carey
Harrison, Sir Reginald Carey. Known as “Rex.” 1908-1990. British actor best remembered for his portrayal of Professor Henry Higgins in the Broadway musical and film versions ...
Harrison,William Henry
Harrison, William Henry. 1773-1841. The ninth President of the United States (1841). He died of pneumonia after one month in office. * * *
Harrisonburg
/har"euh seuhn berrg'/, n. a city in N Virginia. 19,671. * * *
Harrod, Sir Roy
▪ British economist born Feb. 13, 1900, London died March 9, 1978, Holt, Norfolk, Eng.       British economist who pioneered the economics of dynamic growth and the ...
Harrods
a large, fashionable and expensive department store in the Knightsbridge area of central London, England. It claims to be able to supply any article and provide any service. It ...
Harrodsburg
▪ Kentucky, United States       city, seat of Mercer county, central Kentucky, U.S., near the Salt River, in the Bluegrass region, 32 miles (51 km) southwest of ...
Harrogate
a spa town (= one where there are springs of mineral water considered healthy to drink) in North Yorkshire, England. Many retired people live there. It has a large conference ...
Harrovian
/heuh roh"vee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to Harrow. n. 2. a pupil or former pupil of Harrow. [1860-65; < NL Harrovi(a) Harrow + -AN] * * *
harrow
harrow1 —harrower, n. /har"oh/, n. 1. an agricultural implement with spikelike teeth or upright disks, drawn chiefly over plowed land to level it, break up clods, root up ...
Harrow
/har"oh/, n. 1. a borough of Greater London, in SE England. 201,300. 2. a boarding school for boys, founded in 1571 at Harrow-on-the-Hill, an urban district near London, ...
Harrow School
➡ Harrow * * * Independent boarding school for boys in Harrow, Greater London, England. Its founder, John Lyon (d. 1592), was a yeoman of neighboring Preston who yearly set ...
harrower
See harrow1. * * *
harrowing
—harrowingly, adv. /har"oh ing/, adj. extremely disturbing or distressing; grievous: a harrowing experience. [1800-10; HARROW1 + -ING2] Syn. painful, agonizing, tormenting, ...
harrumph
/heuh rumf"/, v.i. 1. to clear the throat audibly in a self-important manner: The professor harrumphed good-naturedly. 2. to express oneself gruffly. [1935-40; imit.] * * *


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