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ineffective
—ineffectively, adv. —ineffectiveness, n. /in'i fek"tiv/, adj. 1. not effective; not producing results; ineffectual: ineffective efforts; ineffective remedies. 2. inefficient ...
ineffectively
See ineffective. * * *
ineffectiveness
See ineffectively. * * *
ineffectual
—ineffectuality, ineffectualness, n. —ineffectually, adv. /in'i fek"chooh euhl/, adj. 1. not effectual; without satisfactory or decisive effect: an ineffectual remedy. 2. ...
ineffectuality
See ineffectual. * * *
ineffectually
See ineffectuality. * * *
ineffectualness
See ineffectuality. * * *
inefficacious
—inefficaciously, adv. —inefficaciousness, inefficacity /in'ef i kas"i tee/, n. /in'ef i kay"sheuhs/, adj. not able to produce the desired effect; ineffective. [1650-60; IN-3 ...
inefficaciously
See inefficacious. * * *
inefficaciousness
See inefficaciously. * * *
inefficacy
/in ef"i keuh see/, n. lack of power or capacity to produce the desired effect. [1605-15; < LL inefficacia. See IN-3, EFFICACY] * * *
inefficiency
/in'i fish"euhn see/, n., pl. inefficiencies for 2. 1. the quality or condition of being inefficient; lack of efficiency. 2. an instance of inefficiency: This work is riddled ...
inefficient
—inefficiently, adv. /in'i fish"euhnt/, adj. 1. not efficient; unable to effect or achieve the desired result with reasonable economy of means. 2. lacking in ability, ...
inefficiently
See inefficient. * * *
inegalitarian
/in'i gal'i tair"ee euhn/, adj. not egalitarian; lacking in or disdaining equality. [1935-40; IN-3 + EGALITARIAN] * * *
inelastic
—inelasticity /in'i la stis"i tee/, n. /in'i las"tik/, adj. 1. not elastic; lacking flexibility or resilience; unyielding. 2. Econ. relatively unresponsive to changes, as ...
inelastic collision
Mech. a collision in which the total kinetic energy of the colliding bodies or particles is not the same after the collision as it was before (opposed to elastic collision). * * *
inelasticcollision
inelastic collision n. A collision between two particles in which part of their kinetic energy is transformed to another form of energy. The total amount of energy remains the ...
inelasticity
See inelastic. * * *
inelasticscattering
inelastic scattering n. The scattering of particles resulting from inelastic collision. * * *
inelegance
/in el"i geuhns/, n. 1. the quality or state of being inelegant; lack of elegance. 2. something that is inelegant or ungraceful. [1720-30; INELEG(ANT) + -ANCE] * * *
inelegancy
/in el"i geuhn see/, n., pl. inelegancies. inelegance. [1720-30; INELEG(ANT) + -ANCY] * * *
inelegant
—inelegantly, adv. /in el"i geuhnt/, adj. not elegant; lacking in refinement, gracefulness, or good taste. [1500-10; < L inelegant- (s. of inelegans). See IN-3, ELEGANT] * * *
inelegantly
See inelegant. * * *
ineligibility
See ineligible. * * *
ineligible
—ineligibility, ineligibleness, n. —ineligibly, adv. /in el"i jeuh beuhl/, adj. 1. not eligible; not permitted or suitable: Employees are ineligible in this contest. 2. ...
ineligibly
See ineligibility. * * *
ineloquence
See ineloquent. * * *
ineloquent
—ineloquence, n. —ineloquently, adv. /in el"euh kweuhnt/, adj. not eloquent. [1520-30; < LL ineloquent- (s. of ineloquens). See IN-3, ELOQUENT] * * *
ineloquently
See ineloquence. * * *
ineluctability
See ineluctable. * * *
ineluctable
—ineluctability, n. —ineluctably, adv. /in'i luk"teuh beuhl/, adj. incapable of being evaded; inescapable: an ineluctable destiny. [1615-25; < L ineluctabilis, equiv. to in- ...
ineluctably
See ineluctability. * * *
ineludible
—ineludibly, adv. /in'i looh"deuh beuhl/, adj. not eludible; inescapable. [1655-65; IN-3 + ELUDE + -IBLE] * * *
inenarrable
/in'i nar"euh beuhl/, adj. incapable of being described or narrated. [1400-50; late ME < L inenarrabilis, equiv. to in- IN-3 + enarrabilis describable, explicable; see E-, ...
inept
—ineptly, adv. —ineptness, n. /in ept", i nept"/, adj. 1. without skill or aptitude for a particular task or assignment; maladroit: He is inept at mechanical tasks. She is ...
ineptitude
/in ep"ti toohd', -tyoohd', i nep"-/, n. 1. quality or condition of being inept. 2. an inept act or remark. [1605-15; < L ineptitudo. See INEPT, -I-, -TUDE] * * *
ineptly
See inept. * * *
ineptness
See ineptly. * * *
inequality
/in'i kwol"i tee/, n., pl. inequalities. 1. the condition of being unequal; lack of equality; disparity: inequality of size. 2. social disparity: inequality between the rich and ...
inequilateral
—inequilaterally, adv. /in'ee kweuh lat"euhr euhl/, adj. not equilateral; having unequal sides. [1655-65; IN-3 + EQUILATERAL] * * *
inequitable
—inequitableness, n. —inequitably, adv. /in ek"wi teuh beuhl/, adj. not equitable; unjust or unfair: an inequitable decision. [1660-17; IN-3 + EQUITABLE] * * *
inequitably
See inequitable. * * *
inequity
/in ek"wi tee/, n., pl. inequities for 2. 1. lack of equity; unfairness; favoritism or bias. 2. an unfair circumstance or proceeding. [1550-60; IN-3 + EQUITY] * * *
inequivalve
/in ee"kweuh valv'/, adj. (of a bivalve mollusk) having the valves of the shell unequal in shape and size. [1770-80; IN-3 + EQUI- + VALVE] * * *
ineradicability
See ineradicable. * * *
ineradicable
—ineradicableness, n. —ineradicably, adv. /in'i rad"i keuh beuhl/, adj. not eradicable; not capable of being eradicated, rooted out, or completely removed. [1810-20; IN-3 + ...
ineradicably
See ineradicability. * * *
inerasable
—inerasableness, n. —inerasably, adv. /in'i ray"seuh beuhl/, adj. not erasable; incapable of being erased or effaced. [1805-15; IN-3 + ERASABLE] * * *
inerrable
inerrable [in er′ə bəl, inʉr′ə bəl] adj. 〚L inerrabilis〛 not erring; infallible inerrability n. * * *
inerrancy
/in er"euhn see, -err"-/, n. 1. lack of error; infallibility. 2. the belief that the Bible is free from error in matters of science as well as those of faith. Cf. creationism ...
inerrant
—inerrancy, n. —inerrantly, adv. /in er"euhnt, -err"-/, adj. free from error; infallible. [1645-55; < L inerrant-, equiv. to in- IN-3 + errant-, s. of errans prp. of errare ...
inerrantism
in·er·ran·tism (ĭn-ĕrʹən-tĭz'əm) n. Belief in the inerrancy or literal truth of a particular writing or document.   in·erʹran·tist' adj. & n. * * *
inerrantist
See inerrantism. * * *
inerratic
/in'i rat"ik/, adj. not erratic or wandering; fixed: an inerratic star. [1645-55; IN-3 + ERRATIC] * * *
inert
—inertly, adv. —inertness, n. /in errt", i nerrt"/, adj. 1. having no inherent power of action, motion, or resistance (opposed to active): inert matter. 2. Chem. having ...
inert gas
Chem. See noble gas. [1900-05] * * *
inertance
/in err"tns, i nerr"-/, n. Acoustics. the effect of inertia in an acoustic system, an impeding of the transmission of sound through the system. Also called acoustic inertance, ...
inertgas
inert gas n. See noble gas. * * *
inertia
—inertial, adj. /in err"sheuh, i nerr"-/, n. 1. inertness, esp. with regard to effort, motion, action, and the like; inactivity; sluggishness. 2. Physics. a. the property of ...
inertia, moment of
Quantitative measure of the rotational inertia of a body. As a rotating body spins about an external or internal axis (either fixed or unfixed), it opposes any change in the ...
inertial
See inertia. * * *
inertial force
▪ physics also called  Fictitious Force,         any force invoked by an observer to maintain the validity of Isaac Newton's second law of motion in a reference frame ...
inertial guidance
Navig. a guidance system for an aerospace vehicle, in which self-contained devices determine the vehicle's course on the basis of the directions and magnitudes of the ...
inertial guidance system
An electronic system that continuously monitors the position, velocity, and acceleration of a vehicle, usually a submarine, missile, or airplane, and thus provides navigational ...
inertial mass
Physics. 1. the mass of a body as determined by the second law of motion from the acceleration of the body when it is subjected to a force that is not due to gravity. 2. the ...
inertial system
Physics. a frame of reference in which a body remains at rest or moves with constant linear velocity unless acted upon by forces: any frame of reference that moves with constant ...
inertial upper stage
a U.S. two-stage, solid-propellant rocket used to boost a relatively heavy spacecraft from a low earth orbit into a planetary trajectory or an elliptical transfer orbit. Abbr.: ...
inertialframe
inertial frame n. A reference system in which the Newtonian law of motion is valid, specifically one in which a mass m subjected to a force F moves in accordance with the ...
inertialguidance
inertial guidance n. Guidance of an aircraft or spacecraft in which gyroscopic and accelerometer data are used by a computer to maintain a predetermined course. Also called ...
inertially
See inertial. * * *
inertialplatform
inertial platform n. The sensing devices used in inertial guidance and the platform on which they are mounted. * * *
inertly
See inert. * * *
inertness
See inertly. * * *
inescapable
—inescapableness, n. —inescapably, adv. /in'euh skay"peuh beuhl/, adj. incapable of being escaped, ignored, or avoided; ineluctable: inescapable responsibilities. [1785-95; ...
inescapably
See inescapable. * * *
inessential
—inessentiality, n. /in'i sen"sheuhl/, adj. 1. not essential; not necessary; nonessential. 2. without essence; insubstantial. n. 3. that which is not essential. [1670-80; IN-3 ...
inessentiality
See inessential. * * *
inessive
/in es"iv/, Gram. adj. 1. noting a case, as in Finnish, whose distinctive function is to indicate place in or within which. n. 2. the inessive case. [1885-90; < L iness(e) to be ...
inestimable
—inestimability, inestimableness, n. —inestimably, adv. /in es"teuh meuh beuhl/, adj. 1. incapable of being estimated or assessed. 2. too large or great to be estimated or ...
inestimably
See inestimable. * * *
inevitability
See inevitable. * * *
inevitable
—inevitability, inevitableness, n. —inevitably, adv. /in ev"i teuh beuhl/, adj. 1. unable to be avoided, evaded, or escaped; certain; necessary: an inevitable conclusion. 2. ...
inevitably
See inevitability. * * *
inexact
—inexactly, adv. —inexactness, n. /in'ig zakt"/, adj. not exact; not strictly precise or accurate. [1820-30; IN-3 + EXACT] * * *
inexactitude
/in'ig zak"ti toohd', -tyoohd'/, n. 1. the quality or state of being inexact or inaccurate; inexactness. 2. an instance of this. [1780-90; < F; see IN-3, EXACTITUDE] * * *
inexactly
See inexact. * * *
infeasibility
See infeasible. * * *
infeasible
—infeasibility, infeasibleness, n. /in fee"zeuh beuhl/, adj. not feasible; impracticable. [1525-35; IN-3 + FEASIBLE] * * *
infeasibly
See infeasibility. * * *
infect
—infectant, adj. —infectedness, n. —infector, infecter, n. /in fekt"/, v.t. 1. to affect or contaminate (a person, organ, wound, etc.) with disease-producing germs. 2. to ...
infectee
/in'fek tee", in fek-/, n. a person who has been infected, esp. with a disease. [INFECT + -EE] * * *
infection
/in fek"sheuhn/, n. 1. an act or fact of infecting; state of being infected. 2. an infecting with germs of disease, as through the medium of infected insects, air, water, or ...
infectious
—infectiously, adv. —infectiousness, n. /in fek"sheuhs/, adj. 1. communicable by infection, as from one person to another or from one part of the body to another: infectious ...
infectious anemia of horses
Vet. Pathol. See swamp fever (def. 2). Also called equine infectious anemia. * * *
infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis
▪ animal disease also called  pinkeye, or infectious keratitis,         an inflammation of the conjunctiva or the cornea of the eye in cattle as the result of an ...
infectious bovine rhinotracheitis
/ruy'noh tray'kee uy"tis/, Vet. Pathol. an infectious disease of cattle, characterized by inflammation and congestion of the respiratory passages and caused by a herpes virus. ...
infectious canine hepatitis.
See Rubarth's disease. * * *
infectious disease
Introduction       in medicine, a process caused by a microorganism that impairs a person's health. An infection, by contrast, is the invasion of and replication in the ...
infectious ectromelia
Vet. Pathol. ectromelia (def. 2). * * *
infectious hepatitis
infectious hepatitis n. HEPATITIS A * * *
infectious hepatitis.
See hepatitis A. [1940-45] * * *
infectious laryngotracheitis
/leuh ring"goh tray'kee uy"tis, -ring'-/, Vet. Pathol. a viral disease of adult chickens, characterized by inflammation and hemorrhage of the larynx and trachea and, in many ...
infectious mononucleosis
Pathol. an acute, infectious form of mononucleosis associated with Epstein-Barr virus, characterized by sudden fever and a benign swelling of lymph nodes. Also called glandular ...
infectiousenterohepatitis
infectious enterohepatitis n. See blackhead. * * *
infectioushepatitis
infectious hepatitis n. See hepatitis A. * * *
infectiously
See infectious. * * *
infectiousmononucleosis
infectious mononucleosis n. A common, acute, infectious disease, usually affecting young people, caused by Epstein-Barr virus and characterized by fever, swollen lymph nodes, ...
infectiousness
See infectiously. * * *
infective
—infectiveness, infectivity, n. /in fek"tiv/, adj. infectious. [1350-1400; ME < ML infectivus. See INFECT, -IVE] * * *
infectiveness
See infective. * * *
infectivity
See infectiveness. * * *
infecund
—infecundity /in'fi kun"di tee/, n. /in fee"keuhnd, -fek"euhnd/, adj. not fecund; unfruitful; barren. [1375-1425; late ME infecounde < L infecundus. See IN-3, FECUND] * * *
infelicitous
—infelicitously, adv. /in'feuh lis"i teuhs/, adj. 1. inapt, inappropriate, or awkward; malapropos: an infelicitous remark. 2. not felicitous, happy, or fortunate; ...
infelicitously
See infelicitous. * * *
infelicity
/in'feuh lis"i tee/, n., pl. infelicities for 3, 5. 1. the quality or state of being unhappy; unhappiness. 2. misfortune; bad luck. 3. an unfortunate circumstance; misfortune. 4. ...
infer
—inferable, inferible, inferrible, adj. —inferably, adv. —inferrer, n. /in ferr"/, v., inferred, inferring. v.t. 1. to derive by reasoning; conclude or judge from premises ...
inferable
See infer. * * *
inferably
See inferable. * * *
inference
/in"feuhr euhns, -freuhns/, n. 1. the act or process of inferring. 2. something that is inferred: to make rash inferences. 3. Logic. a. the process of deriving the strict logical ...
inferential
—inferentially, adv. /in'feuh ren"sheuhl/, adj. of, pertaining to, by, or dependent upon inference. [1650-60; < ML inferenti(a) INFERENCE + -AL1] * * *
inferentially
See inferential. * * *
inferior
—inferiority /in fear'ee awr"i tee, -or"-/, n. —inferiorly, adv. /in fear"ee euhr/, adj. 1. lower in station, rank, degree, or grade (often fol. by to): a rank inferior to ...
inferior conjunction
Astron. the alignment of an inferior planet between the sun and the earth. Cf. superior conjunction. [1825-35] * * *
inferior goods
Econ. commodities that are less in demand as consumer income rises. Cf. superior goods. * * *
inferior ovary
Bot. an ovary positioned below the receptacle of a flower, as in members of the iris family. [1875-80] * * *
inferior planet
Astron. either of the two planets whose orbits are inside the orbit of the earth: Venus and Mercury. Cf. superior planet. * * *
inferior vena cava.
See under vena cava. Also called postcava. [1830-40] * * *
inferiority
See inferior. * * *
inferiority complex
1. Psychiatry. intense feeling of inferiority, producing a personality characterized either by extreme reticence or, as a result of overcompensation, by extreme ...
inferioritycomplex
inferiority complex n. A persistent sense of inadequacy or a tendency to self-diminishment, sometimes resulting in excessive aggressiveness through overcompensation. * * *
inferiorly
See inferiority. * * *
infernal
—infernality, n. —infernally, adv. /in ferr"nl/, adj. 1. hellish; fiendish; diabolical: an infernal plot. 2. extremely troublesome, annoying, etc.; outrageous: an infernal ...
infernal machine
a concealed or disguised explosive device intended to destroy life or property. [1800-10] * * *
infernally
See infernal. * * *
infernalmachine
infernal machine n. An explosive device designed to harm or destroy, especially with criminal intent. * * *
inferno
/in ferr"noh/; for 3 also It. /een ferdd"naw/, n., pl. infernos. 1. hell; the infernal regions. 2. a place or region that resembles hell: The ironworks was an inferno of molten ...
infero-
infero- [in′fə rō΄] 〚< L inferus: see INFERIOR〛 combining form below and [inferoanterior] * * *
inferoanterior
/in'feuh roh an tear"ee euhr/, adj. below and in front. [1840-50; INFER(IOR) + -O- + ANTERIOR] * * *
inferrer
See inferable. * * *
infertile
—infertilely, adv. —infertility, infertileness, n. /in ferr"tl/ or, esp. Brit., /-tuyl/, adj. not fertile; unproductive; sterile; barren: infertile soil. [1590-1600; < L ...
infertility
in·fer·til·i·ty (ĭn'fər-tĭlʹĭ-tē) n. 1. Absent or diminished fertility. 2. The persistent inability to conceive a child. * * * Inability of a couple to conceive and ...
infest
—infester, n. /in fest"/, v.t. 1. to live in or overrun to an unwanted degree or in a troublesome manner, esp. as predatory animals or vermin do: Sharks infested the ...
infestation
/in'fe stay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of infesting; state of being infested. 2. a harassing or troublesome invasion: an infestation of ants. [1375-1425; late ME infestacio(u)n < LL ...
infester
See infestation. * * *
infeudation
infeudation [in΄fyo͞o dā′shən] n. 〚ML infeudatio < pp. of infeudare, to enfeoff < in-, in + feodum: see FEUD2〛 in feudal law, the granting of an estate in fee; ...
infibulate
in·fib·u·late (ĭn-fĭbʹyə-lāt') tr.v. in·fib·u·lat·ed, in·fib·u·lat·ing, in·fib·u·lates To close off or obstruct the genitals of, especially by sewing ...
infibulation
/in fib'yeuh lay"sheuhn/, n. 1. the stitching together of the vulva, often after a clitoridectomy, leaving a small opening for the passage of urine and menstrual blood. 2. the ...
infidel
/in"fi dl, -del'/, n. 1. Relig. a. a person who does not accept a particular faith, esp. Christianity. b. (in Christian use) an unbeliever, esp. a Muslim. c. (in Muslim use) a ...
infidelity
/in'fi del"i tee/, n., pl. infidelities. 1. marital disloyalty; adultery. 2. unfaithfulness; disloyalty. 3. lack of religious faith, esp. Christian faith. 4. a breach of trust or ...
infield
/in"feeld'/, n. 1. Baseball. a. the diamond. b. the positions played by the first baseman, second baseman, third baseman, and shortstop, taken collectively. c. the infielders ...
infield hit
Baseball. a base hit that does not reach the outfield. [1910-15] * * *
infield out
Baseball. a put-out recorded by a member of the infield. [1925-30] * * *
infielder
/in"feel'deuhr/, n. Baseball. any of the four defensive players stationed around the infield. [1865-70, Amer.; INFIELD + -ER1] * * *
infighter
See infighting. * * *
infighting
—infighter, n. /in"fuy'ting/, n. 1. fighting at close range. 2. fighting between rivals, people closely associated, members of a group, etc.; internecine contention. 3. ...
infill
/in"fil'/, v.t. 1. to fill in: The old stream beds have been infilled with sediment. n. 2. the planned conversion of empty lots, underused or rundown buildings, and other ...
infiltrate
—infiltrative /in"fil tray'tiv, in fil"treuh-/, adj. —infiltrator /in"fil tray'teuhr, in fil"tray-/, n. /in fil"trayt, in"fil trayt'/, v., infiltrated, infiltrating, ...
infiltration
/in'fil tray"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of infiltrating. 2. the state of being infiltrated. 3. something that infiltrates; an infiltrate. 4. Mil. a. a method of attack in ...
infiltration capacity
the maximum rate at which a soil in a given condition will absorb water. Also called infiltration rate. [1930-35] * * *
infiltration gallery
a conduit, built in permeable earth, for collecting ground water. * * *
infiltrative
See infiltrate. * * *
infiltrator
See infiltrative. * * *
infiltrometer
/in'fil trom"i teuhr/, n. a device used to measure the infiltration capacity of a soil. [1935-40; INFILTR(ATION) + -O- + -METER] * * *
infimum
/in fuy"meuhm, -fee"-/, n. Math. See greatest lower bound. Abbr.: inf [1935-40; < L, n. use of neut. of infimus lowest (superl. of inferus low)] * * *
infin
infin abbrev. infinitive * * *
infin.
infinitive. * * *
infinite
—infinitely, adv. —infiniteness, n. /in"feuh nit/, adj. 1. immeasurably great: an infinite capacity for forgiveness. 2. indefinitely or exceedingly great: infinite sums of ...
infinite baffle
Audio. a loudspeaker enclosure that totally separates sound emanating from the rear of the speaker cone from sound emanating in front, so as to prevent mutual interference. * * *
infinite decimal
Math. See nonterminating decimal. [1790-1800] * * *
infinite integral
Math. See improper integral (def. 1). * * *
infinite product
Math. a sequence of numbers in which an infinite number of terms are multiplied together. * * *
infinite regress
Philos. causal or logical relationship of terms in a series without the possibility of a term initiating the series. [1830-40] * * *
infinite series
Math. a sequence of numbers in which an infinite number of terms are added successively in a given pattern; the sequence of partial sums of a given sequence. [1790-1800] * * ...
infinitely
See infinite. * * *
infiniteness
See infinitely. * * *
infinitesimal
—infinitesimality, infinitesimalness, n. —infinitesimally, adv. /in'fin i tes"euh meuhl/, adj. 1. indefinitely or exceedingly small; minute: infinitesimal vessels in the ...
infinitesimal calculus
the differential calculus and the integral calculus, considered together. [1795-1805] * * *
infinitesimalcalculus
infinitesimal calculus n. Differential and integral calculus. * * *
infinitesimally
See infinitesimal. * * *
infinitival
—infinitivally, adv. /in'fin i tuy"veuhl/, adj. Gram. of or pertaining to the infinitive. [1865-70; INFINITIVE + -AL1] * * *
infinitive
—infinitively, adv. /in fin"i tiv/, Gram. n. 1. a verb form found in many languages that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs, and that names the action or state ...
infinitive clause
Gram. a clause containing an infinitive as its main or only verb form, as to speak clearly in Try to speak clearly. Also called infinitive phrase. * * *
infinitize
/in fin"i tuyz'/, v.t., infinitized, infinitizing. to free from limitations of space, time, circumstance, etc.; cause to become infinite. Also, esp. Brit., infinitise. [1910-15; ...
infinitude
/in fin"i toohd', -tyoohd'/, n. 1. infinity: divine infinitude. 2. an infinite extent, amount, or number. [1635-45; INFIN(ITE) + -itude, on the model of MAGNITUDE, MULTITUDE] * * ...
infinity
/in fin"i tee/, n., pl. infinities. 1. the quality or state of being infinite. 2. something that is infinite. 3. infinite space, time, or quantity. 4. an infinite extent, amount, ...
infirm
—infirmly, adv. —infirmness, n. /in ferrm"/, adj. 1. feeble or weak in body or health, esp. because of age; ailing. 2. unsteadfast, faltering, or irresolute, as persons or ...
infirmarian
/in'feuhr mair"ee euhn/, n. (in a religious house) a person who nurses the sick. [1660-70; INFIRM(ARY) + -ARIAN] * * *
infirmary
/in ferr"meuh ree/, n., pl. infirmaries. 1. a place for the care of the infirm, sick, or injured; hospital or facility serving as a hospital: a school infirmary. 2. a ...
infirmity
/in ferr"mi tee/, n., pl. infirmities for 1, 3. 1. a physical weakness or ailment: the infirmities of age. 2. quality or state of being infirm; lack of strength. 3. a moral ...
infirmly
See infirm. * * *
infitāḥ
▪ Egyptian history Arabic:  “opening”   program of economic liberalization in Egypt initiated by Pres. Anwar el-Sādāt (Sādāt, Anwar el-) in the early ...
infix
—infixion /in fik"sheuhn/, n. v. /in fiks", in"fiks'/; n. /in"fiks'/, v.t. 1. to fix, fasten, or drive in: He infixed the fatal spear. 2. to implant: to infix a habit. 3. to ...
infl.
1. influence. 2. influenced. * * *
inflagrante delicto
in flagrante delicto adv. Flagrante delicto.   [New Latin in flagrante dēlictō: Latin in, in; see in-2 + Medieval Latin flagrante dēlictō, while the crime is blazing; see ...
inflame
—inflamedness /in flay"mid nis/, n. —inflamer, n. —inflamingly, adv. /in flaym"/, v., inflamed, inflaming. v.t. 1. to kindle or excite (passions, desires, etc.). 2. to ...
inflamer
See inflame. * * *
inflammability
See inflammable. * * *
inflammable
—inflammability, inflammableness, n. —inflammably, adv. /in flam"euh beuhl/, adj. 1. capable of being set on fire; combustible; flammable. 2. easily aroused or excited, as to ...
inflammably
See inflammability. * * *
inflammation
/in'fleuh may"sheuhn/, n. 1. Pathol. redness, swelling, pain, tenderness, heat, and disturbed function of an area of the body, esp. as a reaction of tissues to injurious ...
inflammatorily
See inflammatory. * * *
inflammatory
—inflammatorily, adv. /in flam"euh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj. 1. tending to arouse anger, hostility, passion, etc.: inflammatory speeches. 2. Pathol. of or caused by ...
inflammatory bowel disease
any intestinal inflammatory disease, esp. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, of unknown cause. Abbr.: IBD * * * ▪ pathology  chronic inflammation of the intestines ...
inflammatorybowel disease
inflammatory bowel disease n. Abbr. IBD A chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, especially Crohn's disease or an ulcerative form of colitis, characterized by ...
inflatable
/in flay"teuh beuhl/, adj. 1. capable of being inflated. 2. designed or built to be inflated before use. n. 3. an inflatable object, device, or structure, esp. a small rubber ...
inflate
—inflater, inflator, n. /in flayt"/, v., inflated, inflating. v.t. 1. to distend; swell or puff out; dilate: The king cobra inflates its hood. 2. to cause to expand or distend ...
inflated
—inflatedly, adv. —inflatedness, n. /in flay"tid/, adj. 1. distended with air or gas; swollen. 2. puffed up, as with pride. 3. turgid or bombastic: his inflated prose. 4. ...
inflater
See inflator. * * *
inflation
/in flay"sheuhn/, n. 1. Econ. a persistent, substantial rise in the general level of prices related to an increase in the volume of money and resulting in the loss of value of ...
inflationary
/in flay"sheuh ner'ee/, adj. of, pertaining to, reflective of, or causing inflation: inflationary prices. [1915-20; INFLATION + -ARY] * * *
inflationary spiral
Econ. See under spiral (def. 7). [1930-35] * * *
inflationary universe
Astron. a version of the big bang theory in which the universe underwent very rapid growth during the first fraction of a second before it settled down to its current rate of ...
inflationaryspiral
inflationary spiral n. A trend toward ever higher levels of inflation primarily as a result of continuing interactive increases in wages and prices. * * *
inflationaryuniverse
inflationary universe n. A model of the universe in which the early universe undergoes a period of exponentially rapid expansion, required to develop the high degree of ...
inflationism
/in flay"sheuh niz'euhm/, n. the policy or practice of inflation through expansion of currency or bank deposits. [1915-20; INFLATION + -ISM] * * *
inflationist
/in flay"sheuh nist/, n. an advocate of inflation through expansion of currency or bank deposits. [1865-70, Amer.; INFLATION + -IST] * * *
inflator
See inflate. * * *
inflect
—inflectedness, n. —inflective, adj. —inflector, n. /in flekt"/, v.t. 1. to modulate (the voice). 2. Gram. a. to apply inflection to (a word). b. to recite or display all ...
inflection
—inflectionless, adj. /in flek"sheuhn/, n. 1. modulation of the voice; change in pitch or tone of voice. 2. Also, flection. Gram. a. the process or device of adding affixes to ...
inflection point
Math. a point on a curve at which the curvature changes from convex to concave or vice versa. Also called flex point, point of inflection. [1715-25] * * *
inflectional
—inflectionally, adv. /in flek"sheuh nl/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or used in inflection: an inflectional ending. 2. Ling. pertaining to or noting a language, as Latin, ...
inflectionally
See inflectional. * * *
inflectionpoint
inflection point n. A moment of dramatic change, especially in the development of a company, industry, or market. * * *
inflective
See inflect. * * *
inflector
See inflective. * * *
inflexed
/in flekst"/, adj. Bot., Zool. inflected; bent or folded downward or inward: an inflexed leaf. [1655-65; < L inflex(us), ptp. of inflectere to bend in (see INFLECT) + -ED2] * * *
inflexibility
See inflexible. * * *
inflexible
—inflexibility, inflexibleness, n. —inflexibly, adv. /in flek"seuh beuhl/, adj. 1. not flexible; incapable of or resistant to being bent; rigid: an inflexible steel rod. 2. ...
inflexibleness
See inflexibility. * * *
inflexibly
See inflexibility. * * *
inflexion
/in flek"sheuhn/, n. Chiefly Brit. inflection. * * *
inflict
—inflictable, adj. —inflicter, inflictor, n. —inflictive, adj. /in flikt"/, v.t. 1. to impose as something that must be borne or suffered: to inflict punishment. 2. to ...
inflicter
See inflict. * * *
infliction
/in flik"sheuhn/, n. 1. the act of inflicting. 2. something inflicted, as punishment or suffering. [1525-35; < LL infliction- (s. of inflictio). See INFLICT, -ION] * * *
inflictive
See inflicter. * * *
inflictor
See inflicter. * * *
inflorescence
—inflorescent, adj. /in'flaw res"euhns, -floh-, -fleuh-/, n. 1. a flowering or blossoming. 2. Bot. a. the arrangement of flowers on the axis. b. the flowering part of a ...
inflorescent
See inflorescence. * * *
inflow
/in"floh'/, n. something that flows in; influx. [1645-55; IN-1 + FLOW] * * *
influence
—influenceable, adj. —influencer, n. /in"flooh euhns/, n., v., influenced, influencing. n. 1. the capacity or power of persons or things to be a compelling force on or ...
Influence of host crystal on the lifetime and emission colour of the excited phosphors
▪ Table Influence of host crystal on the lifetime and emission colour of the excited phosphors host crystal activator time (second) emission colour tetragonal zinc ...
influence peddler
—influence peddling. a person who arranges to obtain favors, as government contracts, from high officials on behalf of others for a fee. [1945-50, Amer.] * * *
influenceable
See influence. * * *
influencepeddler
See influence peddling. * * *
influencepeddling
influence peddling n. The practice of using one's influence with persons in authority to obtain favors or preferential treatment for another, usually in return for ...
influencer
See influenceable. * * *
influent
/in"flooh euhnt/, adj. 1. flowing in. n. 2. a tributary. 3. Ecol. a plant or animal that has an important effect on the biotic balance in a community. [1400-50; late ME < L ...
influential
—influentially, adv. /in'flooh en"sheuhl/, adj. 1. having or exerting influence, esp. great influence: three influential educators. n. 2. a person who exerts or can exert ...
influentially
See influential. * * *
influenza
—influenzal, adj. —influenzalike, adj. /in'flooh en"zeuh/, n. 1. Pathol. an acute, commonly epidemic disease, occurring in several forms, caused by numerous rapidly mutating ...
influenza epidemic of 1918–19
or Spanish influenza epidemic Most severe influenza outbreak of the 20th century. It apparently started as a fairly mild strain in a U.S. army camp in early March 1918. Troops ...
influenzal
See influenza. * * *
influx
/in"fluks'/, n. 1. act of flowing in. 2. an inflow (opposed to outflux): an influx of tourists. 3. the place at which one stream flows into another or into the sea. 4. the mouth ...
info
/in"foh/, n. Informal. information. [1910-15; by final shortening] * * *
infold
infold1 /in fohld"/, v.t. enfold. infold2 /in fohld"/, v.t., v.i. to invaginate (defs. 2-4). [IN-1 + FOLD1; cf. ENFOLD] * * *
infolder
See infold. * * *
infolding
/in fohl"ding/, n. invagination. [INFOLD2 + -ING1] * * *
infoldment
See infolder. * * *
infomercial
/in'feuh merr"sheuhl, -foh-/, n. Radio and Television. a long commercial that informs or instructs, esp. in an original and entertaining manner: an infomercial on making ...
infopreneur
/in'f'oh preuh nerr", -noor", -nyoor"/, n. a person whose business is gathering, processing, and providing information to advertising, marketing, and other firms. [1985-90; ...
inform
inform1 —informable, adj. —informingly, adv. /in fawrm"/, v.t. 1. to give or impart knowledge of a fact or circumstance to: He informed them of his arrival. 2. to supply ...
informal
—informally, adv. /in fawr"meuhl/, adj. 1. without formality or ceremony; casual: an informal visit. 2. not according to the prescribed, official, or customary way or manner; ...
informality
/in'fawr mal"i tee/, n., pl. informalities for 2. 1. the state of being informal; absence of formality. 2. an informal act. [1590-1600; IN-3 + FORMALITY] * * *
informally
See informal. * * *


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