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Jackson, Peter
▪ 2004       During 2003 Peter Jackson joined a very exclusive group, the so-called 20/20 club. For producing, directing, and writing a remake of King Kong, he and his ...
Jackson, Philip Douglas
▪ 1997       Although the media delighted in calling attention to his fascination with Eastern philosophy and Native American culture, Phil Jackson, head coach of the ...
Jackson, Rachel
▪ wife of Andrew Jackson née  Rachel Donelson , in full  Rachel Donelson Robards Jackson  born June 15, 1767, near Pittsylvania county, Virginia [U.S.] died December 22, ...
Jackson, Raymond Allen
▪ 1998       British political cartoonist whose irreverent Evening Standard drawings entertained Londoners for some 30 years; he claimed he was the first to produce a ...
Jackson, Reggie
in full Reginald Martinez Jackson born May 18, 1946, Wyncote, Pa., U.S. U.S. baseball player. Jackson excelled in track, football, and baseball in high school. In the major ...
Jackson, Robert H(oughwout)
born Feb. 13, 1892, Spring Creek, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 9, 1954, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist. He pleaded his first case while still a minor and was a lawyer by age 21. He became ...
Jackson, Sheldon
▪ American clergyman born May 18, 1834, Minaville, N.Y., U.S. died May 2, 1909, Asheville, N.C.       American Presbyterian (Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)) minister and ...
Jackson, Shirley
▪ American author in full  Shirley Hardie Jackson  born Dec. 14, 1919, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Aug. 8, 1965, North Bennington, Vt.       American novelist ...
Jackson, Shirley (Hardie)
born Dec. 14, 1919, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Aug. 8, 1965, North Bennington, Vt. U.S. novelist and short-story writer. She is best known for her story "The Lottery" ...
Jackson, Shoeless Joe
▪ American baseball player byname of  Joseph Jefferson Jackson  born July 16, 1888, Greenville, South Carolina, U.S. died December 6, 1951, Greenville  American ...
Jackson, Sir Henry Bradwardine
▪ British naval officer born Jan. 21, 1855, Barnsley, Yorkshire [now in South Yorkshire], Eng. died Dec. 14, 1929, Hayling Island, Hampshire       British naval officer ...
Jackson, Stonewall
orig. Thomas Jonathan Jackson born Jan. 21, 1824, Clarksburg, Va., U.S. died May 10, 1863, Guinea Station, Va. U.S. and Confederate army officer. Despite little formal ...
Jackson, Thomas Jonathan
▪ Confederate general Introduction byname  Stonewall Jackson   born Jan. 21, 1824, Clarksburg, Va. [now in W.Va.], U.S. died May 10, 1863, Guinea Station [now Guinea], ...
Jackson, William
▪ British composer born May 29, 1730, Exeter, Devon, Eng. died July 5, 1803, Exeter       English composer and writer on music, whose opera The Lord of the Manor (1780) ...
Jackson, William Henry
born April 4, 1843, Keesville, N.Y., U.S. died June 30, 1942, New York, N.Y. U.S. photographer. As a boy, he worked for a photographic studio in Troy, N.Y. After the American ...
Jackson,Andrew
Jackson, Andrew. Known as “Old Hickory.” 1767-1845. The seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), who as a general in the War of 1812 defeated the British at New ...
Jackson,Jesse Louis
Jackson, Jesse Louis. Born 1941. American civil rights leader and politician. A Baptist minister, he directed national antidiscrimination efforts (1966-1977) and sought the 1984 ...
Jackson,Joseph Jefferson
Jackson, Joseph Jefferson. Known as “Shoeless Joe.” 1889-1951. American baseball player who had a career batting average of.356, batting over.370 four times and.408 in 1911. ...
Jackson,Mahalia
Jackson, Mahalia. 1911-1972. American singer whose powerful performances and recordings, such as “Move on up a Little Higher” (1945), did much to popularize gospel music ...
Jackson,Thomas Jonathan
Jackson, Thomas Jonathan. Known as “Stonewall.” 1824-1863. American Confederate general who commanded troops at both battles of Bull Run (1861 and 1862) and directed the ...
Jackson-Sherman soil weathering stages
▪ Table       Jackson-Sherman soil weathering stages         characteristic minerals in soil clay fraction       characteristic chemical and physical ...
JacksonHole
Jackson Hole A fertile valley of northwest Wyoming in the Rocky Mountains east of the Teton Range. Named after a fur trapper, David Jackson, who stayed in the region during the ...
Jacksonian
/jak soh"nee euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to Andrew Jackson, his ideas, the period of his presidency, or the political principles or social values associated with him: ...
Jacksonian democracy
n [U] ➡ Jackson (I). * * *
Jacksonianism
See Jacksonian. * * *
Jacksonism
/jak"seuh niz'euhm/, n. the group of political principles or attitudes associated with Andrew Jackson. [1820-30, Amer.; JACKSON + -ISM] * * *
Jacksonville
/jak"seuhn vil'/, n. 1. a seaport in NE Florida, on the St. John's River. 540,898. 2. a city in central Arkansas. 27,589. 3. a city in W Illinois. 20,284. 4. a city in SE North ...
Jacksonville Beach
a city in NE Florida. 15,462. * * *
jackstay
/jak"stay'/, n. Naut. 1. a rod or batten, following a yard, gaff, or boom, to which one edge of a sail is bent. 2. a rail for guiding the movement of the hanks of a sail. 3. a ...
jackstone
/jak"stohn'/, n. 1. jack1 (def. 5a, b). 2. jackstones, (used with a sing. v.) jack1 (def. 5c). [1805-15; earlier chackstone, alter. of checkstone pebble, of uncert. orig.] * * *
jackstraw
/jak"straw'/, n. 1. one of a group of strips of wood or similar objects, as straws or toothpicks, used in the game of jackstraws. 2. jackstraws, (used with a sing. v.) a game in ...
jacky
/jak"ee/, n. (sometimes cap.) Brit. Slang. gin1. [see JACKEY] * * *
Jacky
/jak"ee/, n., pl. Jackies. 1. (often l.c.) a sailor. 2. a male given name, form of Jack. 3. a female given name, form of Jacqueline. * * *
jacky tar
/jak"ee/, Newfoundland. jackatar. * * *
jackyard
/jak"yahrd'/, n. Naut. a small, inclined spar upholding the head of a quadrangular gaff topsail similar in form to a lugsail. [1880-85; JACK1 + YARD2] * * *
Jacmel
Fr. /zhannk mel"/, n. a seaport in S Haiti. 10,000. * * * ▪ Haiti       town and port, on the southern coast of Haiti, 24 miles (39 km) southwest of Port-au-Prince ...
Jacob
/jay"keuhb/ for 1, 3; Fr. /zhann kawb"/ for 2, n. 1. the second son of Isaac, the twin brother of Esau, and father of the 12 patriarchs. Gen. 25:24-34. 2. François /frddahonn ...
Jacob ben Asher
/jay"keuhb ben ash"euhr/ c1269-c1340, Hebrew commentator on the Bible and codifier of Jewish law. * * * born 1269?, Cologne? died 1340?, Toledo, Castile Jewish legal ...
Jacob Epstein
➡ Epstein * * *
Jacob Joseph Of Polonnoye
▪ Polish rabbi in full  Jacob Joseph Ben Tzevi Ha-kohen Katz Of Polonnoye   died c. 1782       rabbi and preacher, the first theoretician and literary propagandist of ...
Jacob Of Edessa
▪ Syrian theologian born c. 640, , ʿEn-deba, Antioch province, Syria [now Antioch, Tur.] died 708       distinguished Christian theologian, historian, philosopher, ...
Jacob Of Serugh
▪ Syrian writer Serugh also spelled  Sarug   born 451, Curtam [now Qurṭmān], Syria died November 521, Baṭnan, Osroëne [now in Turkey]       Syriac writer ...
Jacob's ladder
1. a ladder seen by Jacob in a dream, reaching from the earth to heaven. Gen. 28:12. 2. Naut. a. Also called jack ladder, pilot ladder. a hanging ladder having ropes or chains ...
Jacob's rod
Jacob's rod n. ASPHODEL (sense 1) * * *
Jacob's staff
pl. Jacob's staves. 1. Astron. cross-staff. 2. Survey. a pole providing a firm support for a compass or other instrument. [1540-50] * * *
Jacob's-ladder
/jay"keuhbz lad"euhr/, n. any of various plants belonging to the genus Polemonium, of the phlox family, esp. P. caeruleum (or P. van-bruntiae), having blue, cup-shaped flowers ...
Jacob'sladder
Ja·cob's ladder (jāʹkəbz) n. 1. Nautical. A rope or chain ladder with rigid rungs. 2. Any of various plants of the genus Polemonium, especially P. caeruleum, having blue ...
Jacob, François
Ja·cob (zhä-kôbʹ), François. Born 1920. French geneticist. He shared a 1965 Nobel Prize for the study of regulatory activity in body cells. * * * born June 17, 1920, ...
Jacob, Georges
▪ French furniture maker born July 6, 1739, Cheny, Fr. died July 5, 1814, Paris       founder of a long line of French furniture makers. He was among the first ...
Jacob, Max
▪ French poet born July 12, 1876, Quimper, Fr. died March 5, 1944, Drancy  French poet who played a decisive role in the new directions of modern poetry during the early ...
Jacoba Of Bavaria
▪ duchess of Bavaria Dutch  Jacoba Van Beieren,  French  Jacqueline De Bavière  born July 25, 1401, Le Quesnoy, Flanders [now in France] died Oct. 9, 1436, Teilingen, ...
Jacobābād
▪ Pakistan       city, Sindh province, Pakistan. The city lies at a junction of the Pakistan Western Railway and main roads through Sindh. It was founded in 1847 on the ...
Jacobean
/jak'euh bee"euhn/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to James I of England or to his period. 2. noting or pertaining to the style of architecture and furnishings prevailing in England in ...
Jacobean age
Period in the visual and literary arts during the reign of James I (Latin Jacobus) of England (r. 1603–25). Jacobean architecture combines motifs from the late Gothic period ...
Jacobean lily
a bulbous plant, Sprekelia formosissima, of the amaryllis family, native to Mexico, bearing a large, bright-red flower. Also called Aztec lily. [1745-55; allegedly named after ...
Jacobean literature
Body of works written during the reign of James I of England (1603–25). The successor to Elizabethan literature, Jacobean literature was often dark in mood, questioning the ...
Jacobethan
/jak'euh bee"theuhn/, adj. noting or pertaining to the architecture of England at the beginning of the 17th century. [1930-35; JACO(BEAN) + (ELIZA)BETHAN] * * *
Jacobi
/jeuh koh"bee/; for 2 also Ger. /yah koh"bee/, n. 1. Abraham, 1830-1919, U.S. pediatrician, born in Germany. 2. Karl Gustav Jakob /kahrddl goos"tahf yah"kawp/, 1804-51, German ...
Jacobi, Abraham
▪ European physician born May 6, 1830, Hartum, Westphalia [Germany] died July 10, 1919, Bolton Landing, N.Y., U.S.  German-born physician who established the first clinic for ...
Jacobi, Carl
▪ German mathematician in full  Carl Gustav Jacob Jacobi  born December 10, 1804, Potsdam, Prussia [Germany] died February 18, 1851, Berlin       German mathematician ...
Jacobi, Friedrich Heinrich
▪ German philosopher born Jan. 25, 1743, Düsseldorf, duchy of Berg [Germany] died March 10, 1819, Munich, Bavaria  German philosopher, major exponent of the philosophy of ...
Jacobi, Lotte
▪ American photographer in full  Lotte Johanna Alexandra Jacobi  born August 17, 1896, Thorn, Germany died May 6, 1990, Concord, New Hampshire, ...
Jacobi, Mary Putnam
▪ American physician née  Mary Corinna Putnam  born Aug. 31, 1842, London, Eng. died June 10, 1906, New York, N.Y., U.S.       American physician, writer, and ...
Jacobi, Sir Derek
▪ British actor born October 22, 1938, Leytonstone, East London, England       English actor whose shy, self-effacing private demeanour belied his forceful, commanding ...
Jacobian
Jacobian [jə kō′bē ən] n. 〚after Karl G. J. Jakobi (1804-51), Ger mathematician〛 Math. a determinant whose elements are the first, partial derivatives of a finite ...
Jacobin
—Jacobinic, Jacobinical, adj. —Jacobinism, n. /jak"euh bin/, n. 1. (in the French Revolution) a member of a radical society or club of revolutionaries that promoted the Reign ...
Jacobin Club
or Jacobins Political group of the French Revolution, identified with extreme radicalism and violence. Formed in 1789 as the Society of the Friends of the Constitution, it was ...
Jacobina
/jay'keuh bee"neuh/, n. a female given name. Also, Jacobine /jay"keuh been'/. * * *
Jacobinic
See Jacobin. * * *
Jacobinical
See Jacobinic. * * *
Jacobinism
See Jacobinic. * * *
Jacobinize
—Jacobinization, n. /jak"euh beuh nuyz'/, v.t., Jacobinized, Jacobinizing. to imbue with Jacobinism. Also, esp. Brit., Jacobinise. [1785-95; JACOBIN + -IZE] * * *
Jacobite
—Jacobitic /jak'euh bit"ik/, Jacobitical, adj. —Jacobitism, n. /jak"euh buyt'/, n. 1. a partisan or adherent of James II of England after his overthrow (1688), or of the ...
Jacobite glass
an English drinking glass of the late 17th or early 18th century, engraved with Jacobite mottoes and symbols. [1935-40] * * *
Jacobite rebellions
n [pl] a series of three rebellions which took place in Scotland after James II lost power to William III in 1688. In them the Jacobites tried to return the Stuarts to power in ...
Jacobitical
See Jacobite. * * *
Jacobitism
See Jacobitical. * * *
Jacobs
/jay"keuhbz/, n. 1. Helen Hull, 1908-97, U.S. tennis player. 2. Hirsch(el) /herr"sheuhl/, 1904-70, U.S. thoroughbred horse trainer. * * *
Jacobs, Bernard B.
▪ 1997       U.S. theatrical producer who wielded immense power and influenced the opening and closing of shows for 24 years as joint president of the Shubert ...
Jacobs, Harriet A.
▪ American abolitionist and author in full  Harriet Ann Jacobs  born 1813, Edenton, North Carolina, U.S. died March 7, 1897, Washington, D.C.       American ...
Jacobs, Helen Hull
(1908–1997) U.S. tennis player. Jacobs was the national junior tennis champion in 1924–25. She was first defeated by Helen Wills, who would prove to be her longtime rival, ...
Jacobs, Hirsch
▪ American racehorse trainer born April 8, 1904, New York City died Feb. 13, 1970, Miami Beach       U.S. trainer and breeder of Thoroughbred racehorses, the foremost ...
Jacobs, Jane
orig. Jane Butzner born May 4, 1916, Scranton, Pa., U.S. U.S.-born Canadian urbanologist. She became active in urban community work while living in New York City with her ...
Jacobs, Joseph
▪ English scholar born Aug. 29, 1854, Sydney, N.S.W. [Australia] died Jan. 30, 1916, Yonkers, N.Y., U.S.       Australian-born English folklore scholar, one of the most ...
Jacobs, Klaus Johann
▪ 2009       German-born Swiss entrepreneur and philanthropist born Dec. 3, 1936, Bremen, Ger. died Sept. 11, 2008, Küsnacht, Switz. took control of his family's ...
Jacobs, Marc
▪ 2004       American star designer Marc Jacobs, known for his sartorial fashion interpretations of trends in contemporary art, modeling, and the rock music scene, ...
Jacobs, W.W.
▪ English writer in full  William Wymark Jacobs  born Sept. 8, 1863, London died Sept. 1, 1943, London       English short-story writer best known for his classic ...
Jacobs,Aletta
Ja·cobs (jāʹkəbz), Aletta. 1854-1929. Dutch physician who opened the world's first birth control clinic in Amsterdam in 1882. * * *
Jacobs,Helen Hull
Jacobs, Helen Hull. 1908-1997. American tennis player who won the U.S. Open singles title four times (1932-1935) and the Wimbledon singles title in 1936. * * *
Jacobs,Jane
Jacobs, Jane. Born 1916. American writer whose works, including The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), challenge traditional theories and methods of urban ...
Jacobsen
/yah"kawp seuhn/, n. Jens Peter /yens pay"teuhrdd/, 1847-85, Danish novelist. * * *
Jacobsen, Arne
▪ Danish architect born Feb. 11, 1902, Copenhagen died March 24, 1971, Copenhagen  Danish architect and designer of many important buildings in an austere modern style; he ...
Jacobsen, Jens Peter
▪ Danish author born April 7, 1847, Thisted, Jutland, Denmark died April 30, 1885, Thisted  Danish novelist and poet who inaugurated the Naturalist (naturalism) mode of ...
Jacobsen, Josephine
▪ American poet in full  Josephine Winder Jacobsen , née  Josephine Winder Boylan  born August 19, 1908, Coburg, Ontario, Canada died July 9, 2003, Cockeysville, ...
Jacobsen, Josephine Winder Boylan
▪ 2004       Canadian-born American poet, short-story writer, and critic (b. Aug. 19, 1908, Cobourg, Ont.—d. July 9, 2003, Cockeysville, Md.), from 1971 to 1973 served ...
jacobsite
/jay"keuhb zuyt'/, n. a rare magnetic mineral, manganese iron oxide, MnFe2O4, similar to magnetite. [1865-70; named after Jacobsberg Swedish locality; see -ITE1] * * ...
Jacobson's organ
/jay"keuhb seuhnz/, Anat., Zool. either of a pair of blind, tubular, olfactory sacs in the roof of the mouth, vestigial in humans but well-developed in many animals, esp. ...
Jacobson, Dan
▪ South African novelist born March 7, 1929, Johannesburg, S.Af.       South African-born novelist and short-story writer.       Jacobson was the son of eastern ...
jacobus
/jeuh koh"beuhs/, n., pl. jacobuses. a former gold coin of England issued by James I. [1605-15; Latinized equivalent of JAMES] * * * (as used in expressions) Cats Jacobus Hoff ...
Jacobus De Voragine
▪ archbishop of Genoa also called  Jacob Of Voragine   born 1228/30, Varazze, near Genoa [Italy] died July 13/14, 1298, Genoa       archbishop of Genoa, chronicler, ...
Jacoby, Oswald
▪ American gamester born Dec. 8, 1902, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died June 27, 1984, Dallas, Texas       U.S. Bridge player and authority, actuary, and skilled player of ...
jaconet
/jak"euh net'/, n. 1. a cotton fabric of light weight, usually finished as cambric, lawn, organdy, voile, etc., used in the manufacture of clothing and bandages. 2. a cotton ...
Jacopo
(as used in expressions) Jacopo Robusti Bassano Jacopo Jacopo da Ponte Jacopo della Quercia Jacopo di Piero di Angelo Pontormo Jacopo da Jacopo Carrucci Rosso Giovanni Battista ...
Jacopo della Quercia
orig. Jacopo di Piero di Angelo born с 1374, Siena died Oct. 20, 1438, Bologna, Papal States Italian sculptor active in Siena. He was the son of a goldsmith and wood carver. ...
Jacopone Da Todi
▪ Italian poet original name  Jacopo Dei Benedetti   born c. 1230, , Todi, duchy of Spoleto [now in Italy] died Dec. 25, 1306, Collazzone       Italian religious ...
Jacotot, Jean-Joseph
▪ French educator born March 4, 1770, Dijon, France died July 30, 1840, Paris       French pedagogue and innovator of a universal method of ...
Jacq, Christian
▪ 2001       “Life was so monotonous.” So begins Nefer the Silent, the first volume of The Stone of Light, a series of historical novels about the artists who ...
jacquard
/jak"ahrd, jeuh kahrd"/; Fr. /zhann kannrdd"/, n. (often cap.) 1. a fabric with an elaborately woven pattern produced on a Jacquard loom. 2. See Jacquard loom. [1850-55; named ...
Jacquard card
(in a Jacquard loom) one of a series of perforated cards that control the manipulation of the warp threads and determine the intricate pattern woven on the material. * * *
Jacquard loom
a loom for producing elaborate designs in an intricate weave (Jacquard weave) constructed from a variety of basic weaves. [1850-55; named after J. M. Jacquard (1757-1834), French ...
Jacquard, Joseph-Marie
born July 7, 1752, Lyon, Fr. died Aug. 7, 1834, Oullins French inventor. In 1801 he demonstrated an automatic loom incorporating revolutionary new technology; it was declared ...
Jacquard,Joseph Marie
Jac·quard (jăkʹärd', jə-kärdʹ, zhä-kärʹ), Joseph Marie. 1752-1834. French inventor of the jacquard loom (1801), the first automatic loom able to weave complex ...
Jacqueline
/jak"euh lin, -leen', jak"weuh-/; Fr. /zhannkeu leen"/, n. a female given name. Also, Jacquelyn. * * * (as used in expressions) Cochran Jacqueline Jacqueline Joyner Onassis ...
Jacqueline Wilson
➡ Wilson (III) * * *
Jacquerie
/zhahkeu rddee"/, n. 1. the revolt of the peasants of northern France against the nobles in 1358. 2. (l.c.) any peasant revolt. [ < F, MF, equiv. to jaque(s) peasant (after ...
Jacques
/zhahk/, n. a male given name, French form of Jacob or James. * * * (as used in expressions) Jacques Fournier Besson Jacques Bossuet Jacques Bénigne Brel Jacques Brissot de ...
Jacques Bonhomme
/zhahk baw nawm"/ the contemptuous title given by the nobles to the peasants in the revolt of the Jacquerie in 1358 and adopted by the peasants in subsequent revolts. [ < F: ...
Jacques Cartier, Mount
▪ mountain, Quebec, Canada French  Mont Jacques-cartier,  also called  Tabletop,         mountain on the north side of the Gaspé Peninsula in Gaspesian Provincial ...
Jacquet, Alain-Georges-Frank
▪ 2009       French artist born Feb. 22, 1939, Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris, France died Sept. 4, 2008, New York, N.Y. was one of the most prominent practitioners of ...
Jacquet, Illinois
▪ 2005       American musician and bandleader (b. Oct. 31, 1922, Broussard, La.—d. July 22, 2004, New York, N.Y.), thrilled Jazz at the Philharmonic (JATP) audiences ...
Jacquet, Luc
▪ 2007       In March 2006 French documentary filmmaker Luc Jacquet's La Marche de l'empereur (2005; March of the Penguins) earned an Academy Award for best documentary ...
jactation
/jak tay"sheuhn/, n. 1. boasting; bragging. 2. Pathol. a restless tossing of the body. [1570-80; < L jactation- (s. of jactatio) bragging, equiv. to jactat(us) (ptp. of jactare, ...
jactitation
/jak'ti tay"sheuhn/, n. 1. Law. a false boast or claim that causes injury to another. 2. Pathol. jactation (def. 2). [1625-35; < ML jactitation- (s. of jactitatio) tossing, ...
Jacuí River
River, southern Brazil. It rises in the hills east of Passo Fundo and flows southward and eastward for 280 mi (450 km). At Pôrto Alegre it receives four other rivers and forms ...
jaculate
—jaculation, n. —jaculator, n. —jaculatory /jak"yeuh leuh tawr'ee, -tohr'ee/, adj. /jak"yeuh layt'/, v.t., jaculated, jaculating. to throw or hurl (a dart, javelin, ...
jaculiferous
/jak'yeuh lif"euhr euhs/, adj. Bot., Zool. having dartlike spines. [1850-55; < NL jaculifer dart-bearing (jaculi-, comb. form of L jaculum dart + -fer -FER) + -OUS; see ...
Jacuzzi
/jeuh kooh"zee/, Trademark. a brand name for a device for a whirlpool bath and related products. * * *
jacuzzi{™}
(also Jacuzzi) n a type of bath with streams of warm water that come out below the surface. It was developed by the American Candido Jacuzzi to help his son, who had arthritis (= ...
jade
jade1 —jadelike, adj. /jayd/, n. 1. either of two minerals, jadeite or nephrite, sometimes green, highly esteemed as an ornamental stone for carvings, jewelry, etc. 2. an ...
Jade Bay
▪ bay, Germany German  Jadebusen        bay, Lower Saxony Land (state), northwestern Germany. It is a broad inlet of the North Sea that covers an area of 73 square ...
jade plant
a succulent shrub, Crassula argentea, of the stonecrop family, native to southern Africa, having fleshy, oval leaves, often grown as a houseplant. * * *
Jade, Claude
▪ 2007 Claude Marcelle Jorré        French actress (b. Oct. 8, 1948, Dijon, France—d. Dec. 1, 2006, Boulogne-Billancourt, France), starred as the winsome Christine ...
jaded
—jadedly, adv. —jadedness, n. /jay"did/, adj. 1. dulled or satiated by overindulgence: a jaded appetite. 2. worn out or wearied, as by overwork or overuse. 3. dissipated: a ...
jadedly
See jaded. * * *
jadedness
See jadedly. * * *
jadegreen
jade green n. A light bluish green. * * *
jadeite
/jay"duyt/, n. a mineral, essentially sodium aluminum silicate, NaAlSi2O6, usually fibrous, occurring in compact masses, whitish to dark green: a form of jade. [1860-65; JADE1 + ...
Jadid, Salah al-
▪ 1994       Syrian military officer and Ba'th politician (b. 1926?, Duwayr B'abda, near Jablah, Syria—d. Aug. 19, 1993, Damascus, Syria), was leader of the country ...
Jadida, El
▪ Morocco formerly (until c. 1960)  Mazagan , also spelled  Al Jadīdah        Atlantic port city, north-central Morocco, lying about 55 miles (90 km) southwest of ...
Jadotville
Fr. /zhann doh veel"/, n. former name of Likasi. * * *
Jadwiga
▪ queen of Poland original Hungarian  Hedvig,  German  Hedwig  born 1373/74 died July 17, 1399, Kraków, Poland; canonized June 8, 1997; feast day February ...
Jaeckel, Richard
▪ 1998       American baby-faced tough-guy actor whose 54-year career took him from roles mainly as stereotypical characters in war films and westerns to parts in ...
jaeger
/yay"geuhr/; for 1 also /jay"geuhr/, n. 1. any of several rapacious seabirds of the family Stercorariidae that pursue weaker birds to make them drop their prey. 2. a hunter. 3. a ...
Jaeger{™}
a British chain of shops that sells men’s and women’s clothing. It has a reputation for high quality. Jaeger shops were started to sell clothes based on the ideas of Dr ...
Jael
/jay"euhl/, n. a woman who killed Sisera by hammering a tent pin into his head as he slept. Judges 4:17-22. * * *
Jaén
/hah en"/, n. a city in S Spain, NNW of Granada. 78,156. * * * ▪ Spain       city, capital of Jaén provincia (province) in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous ...
Jaffa
/jaf"euh, jah"feuh/; locally /yah"fah/, n. a former seaport in W Israel, part of Tel Aviv-Jaffa since 1950: ancient Biblical town. Also, Yafo. Ancient, Joppa. * * *
Jaffa cake{™}
n a type of biscuit-shaped cake containing orange jelly and covered on one side with chocolate. Jaffa cakes are made by McVitie’s. * * *
Jaffa orange
a sweet, almost seedless variety of orange grown principally in Israel. [1915-20] * * *
Jaffee, Irving
▪ American speed skater born September 15, 1906, New York, New York, U.S. died March 20, 1981, San Diego, California       American speed skater who won two Olympic ...
Jaffna
/jahf"neuh/, n. a seaport in N Sri Lanka. 112,000. * * * ▪ Sri Lanka       port, northern Sri Lanka. It is situated on a flat, dry peninsula at the island's northern ...
Jafri, Ali Sardar
▪ 2001       Indian poet (b. Nov. 29, 1913, Balrampur, Uttar Pradesh, India—d. Aug. 1, 2000, Mumbai [Bombay], India), crafted progressive Urdu-language verse that ...
jag
jag1 —jagless, adj. /jag/, n., v., jagged, jagging. n. 1. a sharp projection on an edge or surface. v.t. 2. to cut or slash, esp. in points or pendants along the edge; form ...
Jagan, Cheddi
▪ premier, Guyana in full  Cheddi Berret Jagan   born March 22, 1918, Plantation Port Mourant, British Guiana [now Guyana] died March 6, 1997, Washington, D.C., ...
Jagan, Cheddi Berret
▪ 1998       Guyanese politician (b. March 22, 1918, Plantation Port Mourant, British Guiana [now Guyana]—d. March 6, 1997, Washington, D.C.), played a major role in ...
Jagan, Janet Rosenberg
▪ 1999       When she was sworn in on Dec. 19, 1997, American-born Janet Jagan made history on two fronts—becoming the first elected female president in South America ...
Jagan,Cheddi Berret
Ja·gan (jāʹgən), Cheddi Berret. 1918-1997. Guyanese politician who cofounded the People's Progressive Party (1950) and led British Guiana to independence as its chief ...
Jagannath
/jug"euh naht', -nawt'/, n. 1. Hinduism. a name of Krishna or Vishnu. 2. Juggernaut (def. 3). Also, Jagannatha /jug'euh naht"heuh/. [see JUGGERNAUT] * * *
Jagannatha
or Jagannath Form under which Krishna is worshiped at Puri, Orissa, a famous religious center of India. His temple at Puri dates from the 12th century. The Rathayatra, or ...
Jagatai
/jag'euh tuy"/, n. Chagatai. Also, Jaghatai. * * *
Jagdalpur
▪ India also spelled  Jagadalpur        town, Chhattisgarh state, central India, just south of the Indravati River. Surrounded by dense forests, it is connected by ...
Jagello
—Jagellon /yah"geuh lohn', yah'geuh lohn"/, Jagellonian, adj. /yah gel"oh/, n., pl. Jagellos. a member of a dynasty ruling in Bohemia, Hungary, Lithuania, and Poland in the ...
jager
/yay"geuhr/, n. jaeger (defs. 2, 3). Also, jäger. * * *
Jagersfontein
▪ South Africa       town, southwestern Free State province, South Africa, southwest of Bloemfontein. The town is historically known as a diamond-mining (diamond) ...
jagged
—jaggedly, adv. —jaggedness, n. /jag"id/, adj. 1. having ragged notches, points, or teeth; zigzag: the jagged edge of a saw; a jagged wound. 2. having a harsh, rough, or ...
jaggedly
See jagged. * * *
jaggedness
See jaggedly. * * *
jagger
See jag1. * * * (1943–) an English pop musician who is the singer for The Rolling Stones. With Keith Richard he has written many of the band’s songs. He has also acted in ...
jaggery
/jag"euh ree/, n. a coarse, dark sugar, esp. that made from the sap of East Indian palm trees. [1590-1600; < Pg (of India) jágara, jagre < Malayalam chakkara < Skt sarkara ...
jaggies
/jag"eez/, n.pl. a jagged, stairstep effect on curved or diagonal lines that are reproduced in low resolution, as on a printout or computer display. * * *
jaggy
/jag"ee/, adj., jaggier, jaggiest. jagged; notched. [1710-20; JAG1 + -Y1] * * *
Jaghbūb, Al-
▪ oasis, Libya also spelled  Giarabub, or Jarabub        oasis, northeastern Libya, near the Egyptian border. Located at the northern edge of the Libyan Desert on ...
Jagiello
—Jagielon /yah"gyeuh lohn', yah'gyeuh lohn"/, Jagiellonian, adj. /yah gyel"oh/, n., pl. Jagiellos. Jagello. * * *
Jagiellon dynasty
Family of monarchs of Poland-Lithuania, Bohemia, and Hungary that became one of the most powerful in east-central Europe in the 15th–16th centuries. It was founded by Jogaila, ...
jagirdar system
Form of land tenancy introduced in India by the early sultans of Delhi in the early 13th century. Under the system, land, its revenues, and the power to govern it was assigned ...
jagless
See jagger. * * *
Jagr, Jaromir
▪ Czech athlete born Feb. 15, 1972, Kladno, Czech. [now in Czech Republic]    Czech professional ice hockey player who was one of the most prolific point scorers in ...
jaguar
/jag"wahr, -yooh ahr'/; esp. Brit. /jag"yooh euhr/, n. a large spotted feline, Panthera onca, of tropical America, having a tawny coat with black rosettes: now greatly reduced in ...
Jaguaribe River
River, northeastern Brazil. Formed by the junction of the Carapateiro and Trici rivers, it flows northeastward for 350 mi (560 km) to enter the Atlantic Ocean at Aracati. Long ...
jaguarundi
/jah'gweuh run"dee, -gyooh euh-, jag'weuh-, -yooh euh-/, n., pl. jaguarundis. a long-bodied and long-tailed tropical wildcat, Felis yagouaroundi, having a brownish-gray coat and ...
Jaguar{™}
a British car company or one of its cars. Jaguar is famous for its sports cars (e.g. the E-type) and its larger cars of high quality. The company was bought by Ford in 1989. The ...
Jah
Jah (jä) n. In Rastafarianism, God or Jehovah.   [Hebrew yāh. See hwy in Semitic Roots.] * * *
Jahaic languages
also called  Semang, or North Aslian, Languages,         a subbranch of the Aslian branch of the Mon-Khmer family, itself a part of the Austroasiatic stock. The group ...
Jahān Shāh
▪ Turkmen leader Jahān also spelled  Jihān        (reigned c. 1438–67), leader of the Turkmen Kara Koyunlu (q.v.; Black Sheep) in Azerbaijan.       Under ...
Jahangir
/jeuh hahn"gear, yeuh-/, n. 1569-1627, 4th Mogul emperor in India 1605-27 (son of Akbar). Also, Jehangir. * * * or Jehangir born Aug. 31, 1569, Fatehpur, Sikri, India died Oct. ...
Jahannam
▪ Islam       Islāmic (Islām) hell, described somewhat ambiguously in the Qurʾān and by Muḥammad. In one version, hell seems to be a fantastic monster that God can ...
Jahel
/jay"euhl/, n. Douay Bible. Jael. * * *
jāhilīyah
▪ Islam       in Islām, the period preceding the revelation of the Qurʾān to the Prophet Muḥammad. In Arabic the word means “ignorance,” or “barbarism,” and ...
Jāḥiẓ, al-
▪ Muslim theologian and scholar in full  Abū ʿUthmān ʿAmr ibn Baḥr al-Jāḥiẓ   born c. 776, Basra, Iraq died 868/869, Basra       Islamic theologian, ...
Jahn, Friedrich Ludwig
born Aug. 11, 1778, Lanz, Brandenburg, Prussia died Oct. 15, 1852, Freyburg an der Unstrut, Prussian Saxony German educator who founded the Turnverein (gymnastic club) movement ...
Jahn, Helmut
▪ 2001       With the opening in 2000 of the Sony Center in Berlin's Potsdamer Platz, German architect Helmut Jahn showed that at age 60 he had not lost any of his flair ...
Jähn, Sigmund
▪ East German cosmonaut born Feb. 13, 1937, Morgenröthe-Rautenkranz, Vogtland, Ger.       East German cosmonaut (astronaut) who became the first German in ...
Jahra, al-
▪ Kuwait       town and muḥāfaẓah (governorate) in central Kuwait. Located about 30 mi (50 km) west of Kuwait city, the oasis town is the capital of the ...
Jahrzeit
/yahr"tsuyt, yawr"-/, n. Judaism. Yahrzeit. * * *
Jahveh
/yah"ve/, n. Yahweh. Also, Jahve, Jahweh, Jahwe /yah"we/. * * *
Jahvism
/yah"viz euhm/, n. Yahwism. Also, Jahwism /yah"wiz euhm/. * * *
Jahvist
—Jahvistic, Jahwistic, adj. /yah"vist/, n. Yahwist. Also, Jahwist /yah"wist/. * * *
Jahwarid dynasty
▪ Islamic dynasty       Muslim Arab dynasty that ruled Córdoba, Spain, after the dissolution of the Umayyad caliphate of Córdoba (1031), one of the party kingdoms ...
jai alai
/huy" luy', huy" euh luy', huy' euh luy"/ a game resembling handball, played on a three-walled court between two, four, or six players who are equipped with a long, curved wicker ...
jaialai
jai a·lai (hīʹ lī', hīʹ ə-lī', hī' ə-līʹ) n. A court game in which players use a long hand-shaped basket strapped to the wrist to propel a ball against a ...
jail
—jailable, adj. —jailless, adj. —jaillike, adj. /jayl/, n. 1. a prison, esp. one for the detention of persons awaiting trial or convicted of minor offenses. v.t. 2. to take ...
jail delivery
1. a liberation of persons from prison, esp. by force. 2. the act of clearing a jail of prisoners by bringing them to trial, as at the assizes in England. [1425-75; late ME] * * *
jailbait
/jayl"bayt'/, n. Slang. a girl with whom sexual intercourse is punishable as statutory rape because she is under the legal age of consent. [1930-35, Amer.; JAIL + BAIT] * * *
jailbird
/jayl"berrd'/, n. a person who is or has been confined in jail; convict or ex-convict. [1595-1605; JAIL + BIRD] * * *
jailbreak
/jayl"brayk'/, n. an escape from prison, esp. by forcible means. [1905-10, Amer.; JAIL + BREAK] * * *
jailer
/jay"leuhr/, n. 1. a person who is in charge of a jail or section of a jail. 2. a person who forcibly confines another. Also, jailor. [1250-1300; ME gaioler, jaioler, jailer < OF ...
jailhouse
/jayl"hows'/, n., pl. jailhouses /-how'ziz/. a jail or building used as a jail. [1805-15, Amer.; JAIL + HOUSE] * * *
jailhouse lawyer
a prisoner who has taught himself or herself law while serving time, is knowledgeable about technical legal matters, and gives legal advice, esp. to fellow prisoners. [1965-70; ...
jailhouselawyer
jailhouse lawyer n. Slang A prison inmate who is usually self-taught in the law and offers legal consultation within a prison or corrections system. * * *
jailor
jail·or (jāʹlər) n. Variant of jailer. * * *
jails
➡ prisons * * *
Jain
/juyn/, n. 1. an adherent of Jainism. adj. 2. of or pertaining to the Jains or Jainism. Also, Jaina /juy"neuh/, Jainist. [1795-1805;
Jain vrata
▪ Jainism       in Jainism, a religion of India, any of the vows (vratas) that govern the activities of both monks and laymen. The mahavratas, or five “great vows,” ...
Jaina canon
▪ religious texts       the sacred texts of Jainism, a religion of India, whose authenticity is disputed between sects. The Svetambara canon consists principally of 45 ...
Jaina vrata
In Jainism, any of the vows taken by monks, nuns, and lay members. The first five are the mahavratas, or "great vows": nonviolence, truthfulness, not stealing, sexual purity, ...
Jainism
/juy"niz euhm/, n. a dualistic religion founded in the 6th century B.C. as a revolt against current Hinduism and emphasizing the perfectibility of human nature and liberation of ...
Jaintia
▪ historical state, India       in Indian history, a state in Assam, northeastern India, stretching from what is now the northern frontier between Bangladesh and India ...
Jaintia Hills
▪ region, India       physiographic region, eastern Meghalaya (Meghālaya) state, northeastern India. The sparsely populated mountainous region—part of the Meghalaya ...
Jaipur
/juy"poor/, n. 1. a former state in NW India, now part of Rajasthan. 2. a city in and the capital of Rajasthan, in NW India: known as the "pink city" because of its buildings of ...
Jaisalmer
▪ India       town, western Rajasthan (Rājasthān) state, northwestern India. Connected by road with Jodhpur, Barmer, and Phalodi, the town is a major caravan ...
Jajapura
/jah'yeuh poor"euh/, n. Jayapura. Also, Djajapura. * * *
Jajau, Battle of
▪ Mughal war       (June 12, 1707), decisive engagement over succession to the Mughal throne of India following the death of the emperor Aurangzeb. It was fought at ...
Jajce
▪ Bosnia and Herzegovina       town in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 29 miles (47 km) south of Banja Luka, on the Vrbas River. The ancient capital of the Bosnian kings, it ...
jajmani system
▪ Indian culture Hindideriving from the Sanskrit yajamana, “sacrificial patron who employs priests for a ritual”       reciprocal social and economic arrangements ...
jak
/jak/, n. jackfruit. * * *
Jakab, Zsuzsanna
▪ 2006  Hungarian epidemiologist Zsuzsanna Jakab assumed leadership of the newly formed European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) in 2005, taking on the task ...
Jakarta
/jeuh kahr"teuh/, n. a seaport in and the capital of Indonesia, on the NW coast of Java. 4,576,009. Also, Djakarta, Jacarta. Formerly, Batavia. * * * formerly (1949–72) ...
jake
jake1 /jayk/, adj. Slang. satisfactory; OK; fine: Everything's jake with me. [1895-1900; orig. uncert.] jake2 /jayk/, n. Slang. 1. a homemade or bootleg liquor made from or ...
Jake
/jayk/, n. a male given name, form of Jacob. * * *
jakes
/jayks/, n. (usually used with a pl. v.) Chiefly Dial. 1. an outdoor privy; outhouse. 2. a toilet or bedpan. [1525-35; < F Jacques, proper name; cf. JOHN] * * *
Jakes
/jayks/, n. John, born 1932, U.S. novelist. * * *
Jakob
(as used in expressions) Johann Jakob Astor Böhme Jakob Creutzfeldt Jakob disease Mendelssohn Bartholdy Jakob Ludwig Felix Jakob Liebmann Meyer Beer Obrecht Jakob Raskob John ...
Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease
/yah"keuhb kroyts"felt/. See Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. * * *
Jakob-Creutzfeldtdisease
Ja·kob-Creutz·feldt disease (yäʹkôp-kroitsʹfĕlt) n. See Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. * * *
Jakobovits of Regents Park in Greater London, Immanuel Jakobovits, Baron
▪ 2000       German-born cleric who was the outspoken, conservative chief rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Commonwealth (1967–91), a position ...
Jakobson
/yah"keuhb seuhn/, n. Roman /roh"mahn, -meuhn/, 1896-1982, U.S. linguist and scholar, born in Russia. * * *
Jakobson, Roman
▪ American linguist Russian  Roman Osipovich Jakobson   born Oct. 11 [Sept. 29, Old Style], 1896, Moscow, Russia died July 18, 1982, Boston, Mass., U.S.       Russian ...
Jakobson, Roman (Osipovich)
born Oct. 11, 1896, Moscow, Russia died July 18, 1982, Boston, Mass., U.S. Russian-born U.S. linguist. Born and educated in Moscow, Jakobson moved to Prague in 1920; the ...
Jakobson,Roman
Ja·kob·son (yäʹkəb-sən), Roman. 1896-1982. Russian-born American linguist. A founder of modern structural linguistics and modern phonology, he was particularly influential ...
Jakpa, Sumalia Ndewura
▪ West African king flourished 17th century       African king who founded a dynasty in Gonja, in what is now northern Ghana, in the early 17th ...
Jakun
▪ people       any member of an aboriginal people found in the interior eastern portions of the Malay Peninsula. The major Jakun subgroups include the Biduanda, Mantera, ...
Jalal ud-din Rumi
/ja lahl" oohd deen" rddooh"mee, ood-/ 1207-73, Persian poet and mystic. * * *
Jalal-Abad
▪ Kyrgyzstan Russian  Dzhalal-Abad        city, western Kyrgyzstan. Though made a city in 1877, it remained essentially a large village. Given city status again in ...
Jalālābād
▪ Afghanistan formerly  Jalālkot        town, eastern Afghanistan, on the Kābul River, at an altitude of 1,940 ft (590 m). It lies on the route from Kābul, the ...
Jalandhar
▪ India also called  Jullundur        city, north-central Punjab state, northwestern India. Jalandhar is an ancient city; in the 7th century CE it was the capital ...
jalap
—jalapic /ja lap"ik, jah-/, adj. /jal"euhp, jah"leuhp/, n. 1. the dried tuberous root of any of several plants, esp. Exogonium purga, of the morning glory family, or the light ...
Jalapa
/hah lah"pah/, n. a city in and the capital of Veracruz, in E Mexico. 183,216. * * * in full Jalapa Enríquez City (pop., 2000: 373,076), capital of Veracruz state, ...
jalapeño
/hah'leuh payn"yoh/; Sp. /hah'lah pe"nyaw/, n., pl. jalapeños /-payn"yohz/; Sp. /-pe"nyaws/. a hot green or orange-red pepper, the fruit of a variety of Capsicum annuum, used ...
jalapin
/jal"euh pin, jah"leuh-/, n. a resin that is one of the purgative principles of jalap. [1825-35; < NL jalap(a) JALAP + -IN2] * * *
Jalaun
▪ district, India       district, southwestern Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It is on the Ganges (Ganga) (Ganges River) alluvial plain and is bounded by the ...
Jalāyirid
▪ Mongol dynasty       Mongol tribe that supported the Il-Khan Hülegü's rise to power and eventually provided the successors to the Il-Khan dynasty as rulers of Iraq ...
Jalāyirid school
▪ Persian painting  school of miniature painting that flourished in Baghdad, Iraq, under the Jalāyirids, a local dynasty of governors in power from 1336 to 1432. Along with ...
Jaldapara Wildlife Sanctuary
▪ wildlife preserve, India       wildlife preserve in West Bengal state, northeastern India. The preserve was established in 1941 mainly for the protection of the ...
jalee
/jah"lee/, n. (in Indian architecture) decorated and pierced slabs of marble used as a screen. [1895-1900; < Hindi jali network] * * *
Jalgaon
▪ India       city, northern Maharashtra (Mahārāshtra) state, western India. It lies along the road that runs between Mumbai (Bombay) and Nagpur. Although ...
Jalīlī Family
▪ Iraqi family       prominent Iraqi family that ruled the Ottoman pașalik (province) of Mosul (in modern Iraq) in the period 1726–1834. Although the founder of the ...
Jalingo
▪ Nigeria       town, capital of Taraba state, eastern Nigeria. It became a state capital in 1991 after Gongola state was divided into Adamawa and Taraba states. Jalingo ...
Jalisco
/hah lees"kaw/, n. a state in W Mexico, 4,157,000; 31,152 sq. mi. (80,685 sq. km). Cap.: Guadalajara. * * * State (pop., 2000: 6,322,002), west-central Mexico. It covers 31,211 ...
jalopy
/jeuh lop"ee/, n., pl. jalopies. Informal. an old, decrepit, or unpretentious automobile. [1925-30, Amer.; orig. uncert.] * * *
jalor
/jah"leuhr/, n. any of a wide variety of East Indian rowing and sailing ships. Also, jalur. [orig. uncert.] * * * ▪ India also spelled  Jalore  or ...
jalousie
—jalousied, adj. /jal"euh see'/ or, esp. Brit., /zhal"oo zee'/, n. 1. a blind or shutter made with horizontal slats that can be adjusted to admit light and air but exclude rain ...
Jalpaiguri
▪ India       city, northern West Bengal state, northeastern India, just west of the Tista River. The chief agricultural distribution centre of the state, the city is ...
Jaluit Atoll
▪ atoll, Marshall Islands       coral formation in the Ralik (western) chain of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, situated in the west-central Pacific Ocean. The ...
jam
jam1 /jam/, v., jammed, jamming, n. v.t. 1. to press, squeeze, or wedge tightly between bodies or surfaces, so that motion or extrication is made difficult or impossible: The ...
Jam Master Jay
▪ 2003 Jason Mizell        American rap musician and producer (b. Jan. 21, 1965, New York, N.Y.—d. Oct. 30, 2002, New York City), was a member of Run-D.M.C., the first ...


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