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Johnson, Philip C.
▪ American architect in full  Philip Cortelyou Johnson   born July 8, 1906, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. died Jan. 25, 2005, New Canaan, Conn.   American architect and critic ...
Johnson, Philip Cortelyou
▪ 2006  American architect (b. July 8, 1906, Cleveland, Ohio—d. Jan. 25, 2005, New Canaan, Conn.), wielded great influence in American architectural design, playing a ...
Johnson, Rafer
▪ American athlete and executive in full  Rafer Lewis Johnson   born August 18, 1935, Hillsboro, Texas, U.S.    American athlete, who won a gold medal in the decathlon at ...
Johnson, Rafer (Lewis)
born Aug. 18, 1935, Hillsboro, Texas, U.S. U.S. decathlete. While a student at UCLA, he won the decathlon gold medal at the 1955 Pan-American Games. At the 1960 Olympic Games ...
Johnson, Reverdy
▪ American lawyer and politician born May 21, 1796, Annapolis, Md., U.S. died Feb. 10, 1876, Annapolis       constitutional lawyer, U.S. senator from Maryland ...
Johnson, Richard M
▪ vice president of United States born 1780, near Louisville, Va. [now in Kentucky], U.S. died Nov. 19, 1850, Frankfort, Ky.  ninth vice president of the United States ...
Johnson, Richard M(entor)
born 1780, near Louisville, Va., U.S. died Nov. 19, 1850, Frankfort, Ky. U.S. politician. He practiced law in Kentucky before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives ...
Johnson, Robert
born с 1911, Hazlehurst, Miss., U.S. died Aug. 16, 1938, near Greenwood, Miss. U.S. blues guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Born to a sharecropping family, he learned ...
Johnson, Robert L.
▪ American businessman in full  Robert Louis Johnson  born April 8, 1946, Hickory, Miss., U.S.       American businessman, founder of Black Entertainment Television ...
Johnson, Robert Wood
born , Feb. 15, 1845, Carbondale, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 7, 1910, New Brunswick, N.J. U.S. manufacturer. He began his career as a pharmacist and drug broker. In 1885 he founded ...
Johnson, Samuel
known as Dr. Johnson born Sept. 18, 1709, Lichfield, Staffordshire, Eng. died Dec. 13, 1784, London British man of letters, one of the outstanding figures of 18th-century ...
Johnson, Samuel Curtis
▪ 2005       American business executive (b. March 2, 1928, Racine, Wis.—d. May 22, 2004, Racine), served for more than 30 years, until 2000, as head of S.C. Johnson & ...
Johnson, Sir William, 1st Baronet
born 1715, Smithtown, County Meath, Ire. died July 11, 1774, near Johnstown, N.Y. British colonial official. In 1737 he emigrated from Ireland and settled in New York's Mohawk ...
Johnson, Thomas
▪ United States governor and jurist born Nov. 4, 1732, Calvert county, Md. [U.S.] died Oct. 26, 1819, Rose Hill, near Frederick, Md.       American Revolutionary War ...
Johnson, Tom
▪ 2008 Thomas Christian Johnson        Canadian ice hockey player and coach born Feb. 18, 1928, Baldur, Man. died Nov. 21, 2007, Falmouth, Mass. played 15 seasons ...
Johnson, Tommy
▪ American musician born c. 1896, , Terry, Miss., U.S. died Nov. 1, 1956, Crystal Springs, Miss.       African-American singer-guitarist, one of the most evocative and ...
Johnson, U Alexis
▪ 1998       American diplomat who sat at numerous negotiating tables during his 42-year career in the Foreign Service, culminating in his role as chief U.S. negotiator ...
Johnson, Uwe
▪ German author born July 20, 1934, Cammin, Germany   found dead March 12, 1984, Sheerness, Kent, England       German author noted for his experimental style. Many of ...
Johnson, Walter
▪ American athlete in full  Walter Perry Johnson , byname  The Big Train   born November 6, 1887, Humboldt, Kansas, U.S. died December 10, 1946, Washington, ...
Johnson, Walter (Perry)
born Nov. 6, 1887, Humboldt, Kan., U.S. died Dec. 10, 1946, Washington, D.C. U.S. baseball pitcher. Johnson had perhaps the greatest fastball in the history of the game. A ...
Johnson, William
▪ United States jurist born Dec. 27, 1771, Charleston, S.C. died Aug. 4, 1834, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.       associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1804 ...
Johnson,Andrew
John·son (jŏnʹsən), Andrew. 1808-1875. The 17th President of the United States (1865-1869). Elected Vice President (1864), he succeeded the assassinated Abraham Lincoln as ...
Johnson,Claudia Alta Taylor
Johnson, Claudia Alta Taylor. Known as “Lady Bird.” Born 1912. First Lady of the United States (1963-1969) as the wife of President Lyndon Johnson. She directed a nationwide ...
Johnson,Earvin
Johnson, Earvin. Known as “Magic.” Born 1959. American basketball player. As a guard for the Los Angeles Lakers (1979-1991), he led his team to five world championships and ...
Johnson,Eyvind
John·son (yo͝onʹsôn), Eyvind. 1900-1976. Swedish writer whose works, notably four semiautobiographical novels collectively titled Novels of Olaf (1934-1937), concern his ...
Johnson,James Price
John·son (jŏnʹsən), James Price. 1894-1955. American pianist and composer noted for his ragtime compositions and show tunes, including “The Charleston” (1923), from the ...
Johnson,James Weldon
Johnson, James Weldon. 1871-1938. American writer and educator who was a founder and secretary (1916-1930) of the NAACP. His books include The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man ...
Johnson,John Arthur
Johnson, John Arthur. Known as “Jack.” 1878-1946. American prizefighter. He was the first Black world heavyweight champion (1908-1915). * * *
Johnson,Lyndon Baines
Johnson, Lyndon Baines. 1908-1973. The 36th President of the United States (1963-1969), who succeeded to the office after John F. Kennedy was assassinated. He won the 1964 ...
Johnson,Michael
Johnson, Michael. Born 1967. American runner. At the 1995 World Championships he became the first person to win both the 200 and 400 meters. He holds world-record times in both ...
Johnson,Philip Cortelyou
Johnson, Philip Cortelyou. Born 1906. American architect who designed the New York State Theater at Lincoln Center (1964) and the American Telephone and Telegraph Headquarters ...
Johnson,Robert
Johnson, Robert. 1911-1938. American singer and guitarist. A legendary representative of the Delta blues tradition, his recordings influenced many later blues performers. * * *
Johnson,Samuel
Johnson, Samuel. Known as “Dr. Johnson.” 1709-1784. British writer and lexicographer. The leading literary figure in the second half of the 18th century, he wrote Dictionary ...
Johnson,Sir William
Johnson, Sir William. 1715-1774. British-born American pioneer and public official. In the French and Indian Wars he defeated the French at Lake George (1755) and captured ...
Johnson,Thomas
Johnson, Thomas. 1732-1819. American politician and jurist. He was the first governor of Maryland (1777-1779) and served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court ...
Johnson,Walter Perry
Johnson, Walter Perry. Known as “Big Train.” 1887-1946. American baseball player. A right-handed pitcher for the Washington Senators (1907-1929), he won 20 or more games a ...
Johnson,William Julius
Johnson, William Julius. Known as “Judy.” 1899-1989. American baseball player who is considered among the finest third basemen in history. During his 19 seasons in the Negro ...
Johnson-Sirleaf, Ellen
▪ 2007  On Jan. 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was sworn in as president of Liberia. In her inaugural speech she vowed to end civil strife and corruption, establish unity, ...
JohnsonCity
Johnson City A city of northeast Tennessee east-northeast of Knoxville. Settled in the 1760s, it is a railroad junction and manufacturing center. Population: 49,381. * * *
Johnsonese
/jon'seuh neez", -nees"/, n. a literary style characterized by rhetorically balanced, often pompous phraseology and an excessively Latinate vocabulary: so called from the style ...
Johnsongrass
Johnson grass n. A coarse perennial Mediterranean grass (Sorghum halepense) cultivated for forage but often a troublesome weed. Also called Egyptian millet.   [After William ...
Johnsonian
—Johnsonianism, n. —Johnsonianly, adv. /jon soh"nee euhn/, adj. 1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Samuel Johnson or his works. 2. having the quality of ...
Johnsonnoise
Johnson noise n. See thermal noise.   [After John Bertrand Johnson (1887-1970), Swedish-born American physicist.] * * *
Johnston
/jon"steuhn, -seuhn/, n. 1. Albert Sidney, 1803-62, Confederate general in the U.S. Civil War. 2. Joseph Eggleston, 1807-91, Confederate general in the U.S. Civil War. 3. Mary, ...
Johnston Atoll
Johnston Atoll Introduction Johnston Atoll - Background: Both the US and the Kingdom of Hawaii annexed Johnston Atoll in 1858, but it was the ...
Johnston's organ
/jon"steuhnz/, Entomol. a sense organ in the second segment of the antenna of an insect, sensitive to movements of the antenna's flagellum, as when the insect is in ...
Johnston, Albert Sidney
▪ Confederate general born Feb. 2, 1803, Washington, Ky., U.S. died April 6, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn.  Confederate general during the American Civil War (1861–65); his death in ...
Johnston, David Claypoole
▪ American cartoonist born March 1799, Philadelphia died Nov. 8, 1865, Dorchester, Mass., U.S.       American cartoonist who, strongly influenced by the English ...
Johnston, Edward
▪ British calligrapher born Feb. 11, 1872, Uruguay died Nov. 26, 1944, Ditchling, Sussex, Eng.  British teacher of calligraphy who had a widespread influence on 20th-century ...
Johnston, Henrietta
▪ American artist original name  Henrietta Deering  born before 1670, probably Ireland   buried March 7, 1729, Charles Towne, South Carolina [now Charleston, South ...
Johnston, Jennifer
▪ Irish author in full  Jennifer Prudence Johnston  born Jan. 12, 1930, Dublin, Ire.       Irish novelist whose works deal with political and cultural tensions in ...
Johnston, Joseph E
▪ Confederate general born Feb. 3, 1807, near Farmville, Va., U.S. died March 21, 1891, Washington, D.C.  Confederate general who never suffered a direct defeat during the ...
Johnston, Joseph E(ggleston)
born Feb. 3, 1807, near Farmville, Va., U.S. died March 21, 1891, Washington, D.C. U.S. Army officer. He graduated from West Point and served in the Mexican War. At the start ...
Johnston, Ollie
▪ 2009 Oliver Martin Johnston, Jr.        American animator born Oct. 31, 1912, Palo Alto, Calif. died April 14, 2008, Sequim, Wash. was a member of Walt Disney's ...
Johnston, Sir Harry Hamilton
▪ British explorer born June 12, 1858, London died Aug. 31, 1927, Woodsetts House, near Worksop, Nottinghamshire, Eng.  British explorer, botanist, and pioneer colonial ...
Johnston,Albert Sidney
John·ston (jŏnʹstən), Albert Sidney. 1803-1862. American Confederate general in the Civil War. He was defeated by Ulysses S. Grant at Shiloh (1862). * * *
Johnston,Joseph Eggleston
Johnston, Joseph Eggleston. 1807-1891. American Confederate general in the Civil War who surrendered to William Tecumseh Sherman in 1865. * * *
Johnstown
/jonz"town'/, n. a city in SW Pennsylvania: disastrous flood 1889. 35,496. * * * ▪ New York, United States       city, seat (1838) of Fulton county, east-central New ...
Johnstown Flood
Disastrous flood (1889) in the town of Johnstown, Pa. , U.S. Johnstown lies at the confluence of the Conemaugh River and Stony Creek; at the time of the flood it was a leading ...
JohnXXIII
John XXIII, Originally Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli. 1881-1963. Pope (1958-1963) who convoked the Second Vatican Council (1962), the first general council of the Church in almost a ...
Johor
▪ state, Malaysia formerly  Johore         state of Malaysia, southernmost state of Peninsular (West) Malaysia. Its 250-mile (400-km) coastline along the Strait of ...
Johor Bahru
▪ Malaysia Johor also spelled  Johore,  Bahru also spelled  Baharu        city, southern West Malaysia. It lies at the southern end of the Malay Peninsula and is ...
JohorBaharu
Jo·hor Ba·ha·ru (jə-hôrʹ bə-häʹro͞o, jə-hōrʹ) also Jo·hore Bah·ru (bäʹro͞o) A city of Malaysia on the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula opposite Singapore ...
Johore
/jeuh hawr", -hohr"/, n. a state in Malaysia, on S Malay Peninsula. 1,277,180; 7330 sq. mi. (18,985 sq. km). Also, Johor. * * *
Johore Bahru
/bah"rooh/ a city in and the capital of Johore state, Malaysia, in the S part. 136,229. * * *
Johore Strait
Northern arm of the Singapore Strait between the Republic of Singapore and the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. It is 30 mi (50 km) long and 0.75 mi (1.2 km) wide. Its ...
Joiada
/joy"euh deuh/, n. Douay Bible. Jehoiada. * * *
joie de vivre
/zhwanndeu vee"vrddeu/, French. a delight in being alive; keen, carefree enjoyment of living. [lit., joy of living] * * *
joiede vivre
joie de vi·vre (zhwä' də vēʹvrə) n. Hearty or carefree enjoyment of life.   [French : joie, joy + de, of + vivre, to live, living.] * * *
join
—joinable, adj. /joyn/, v.t. 1. to bring in contact, connect, or bring or put together: to join hands; to join pages with a staple. 2. to come into contact or union with: The ...
joinder
/joyn"deuhr/, n. 1. the act of joining. 2. Law. a. the joining of causes of action in a suit. b. the joining of parties in a suit. c. the acceptance by a party to an action of an ...
joinder and impleader
▪ law       in law, processes whereby additional parties or additional claims are brought into suits because addressing them is necessary or desirable for the successful ...
joiner
/joy"neuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that joins. 2. a carpenter, esp. one who constructs doors, window sashes, paneling, and other permanent woodwork. 3. a person who belongs to ...
joiner door
Shipbuilding. a door of wood or light metal set in a nonwatertight bulkhead. * * *
joinery
/joy"neuh ree/, n. 1. the craft or trade of a joiner. 2. woodwork made by a joiner. [1670-80; JOINER + -Y3] * * *
joint
/joynt/, n. 1. the place at which two things, or separate parts of one thing, are joined or united, either rigidly or in such a way as to permit motion; juncture. 2. a connection ...
joint account
a bank account in the names of two or more persons or parties and subject to withdrawals by each. * * *
joint and last survivor annuity
Insurance. an annuity payable until the death of the last of two or more designated persons, though sometimes with reduced amounts after the first such person dies. * * *
joint bar
one of a pair of bars used to join two rails longitudinally. * * *
Joint Chiefs of Staff
U.S. Mil. the Chiefs of Staff of the Army and the Air Force, the commandant of the Marine Corps, and the Chief of Naval Operations, together with a chairman selected from one of ...
joint committee
Govt. a committee appointed from both houses of a bicameral legislature in order to reach a compromise on their differences concerning a particular issue. [1770-80, Amer.] * * *
joint custody
custody, as of a child whose parents are separated, in which two or more people share responsibility. Cf. sole custody. [1975-80] * * *
joint disease
Introduction       any of the diseases or injuries that affect human joints (joint). arthritis is no doubt the best-known joint disease, but there are also many others. ...
Joint distribution of X and Y
▪ Table Joint distribution of X and Y i row sum = ...
joint family
a type of extended family composed of parents, their children, and the children's spouses and offspring in one household. Also called joint household. [1875-80] * * * ▪ ...
joint ill
Vet. Pathol. an infectious disease of newborn foals characterized by swollen inflamed joints and high fever, usually fatal. Also called navel ill. [1890-95] * * *
joint issue
Philately. one of two or more stamps that are issued jointly by two governments to commemorate an event of common historical interest. * * *
joint life annuity
Insurance. an annuity, the payments of which cease at the death of the first of two or more specified persons. * * *
joint life insurance
life insurance covering two or more persons, the benefits of which are paid after the first person dies. * * *
Joint Rapid Reaction Force
➡ armed forces * * *
joint resolution
a resolution adopted by both branches of a bicameral legislative assembly and requiring the signature of the chief executive to become law. [1830-40, Amer.] * * *
joint return
a U.S. income-tax return reporting the combined income of a married couple. * * *
joint runner
(in plumbing) incombustible materials for packing a joint to be caulked with lead. * * *
joint session
a joint meeting, as of both houses of a bicameral legislature: The president addressed a joint session of Congress on the crisis in Central America. [1860-65, Amer.] * * *
joint stock
1. stock or capital divided into a number of shares. 2. a pool of stock held in common. [1605-15] * * *
joint stool
a low wood stool having turned legs with all parts joined by a mortise joint. [1400-50; late ME] * * *
joint tenancy
Law. a holding of property, either real or personal, by two or more persons with each sharing the undivided interest, the entire tenancy passing to the survivor or survivors. Cf. ...
joint tenant
Law. one of two or more persons who hold property in joint tenancy. Cf. tenant in common. * * *
joint venture
—joint venturer. —joint venturing. a business enterprise in which two or more companies enter a temporary partnership. Abbr.: JV, J.V. * * *
joint-stock company
/joynt"stok"/ 1. an association of individuals in a business enterprise with transferable shares of stock, much like a corporation except that stockholders are liable for the ...
joint-stockcompany
joint-stock company (jointʹstŏkʹ) n. A business whose capital is held in transferable shares of stock by its joint owners. * * *
joint-venture
/joynt"ven"cheuhr/, v., joint-ventured, joint-venturing. Informal. v.i. 1. to establish or enter a joint venture or partnership. v.t. 2. to establish or run as a joint venture. * ...
JointChiefs of Staff
Joint Chiefs of Staff (joint) n. Abbr. JCS The principal military advisory group to the President of the United States, composed of the chiefs of the Army, Navy, and Air Force ...
jointcompound
joint compound n. A substance similar to plaster used to cover joints or the heads of screws or nails in plasterboard. * * *
jointed
—jointedly, adv. —jointedness, n. /joyn"tid/, adj. 1. having or provided with joints. 2. formed with knots or nodes. [1375-1425; late ME; see JOINT, -ED3] * * *
jointer
/joyn"teuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that joints. 2. a tool or machine used in making joints. 3. Agric. a device with a triangular head, used with a plow to bury trash. 4. Law ...
jointer plane
Carpentry. a plane for truing the edges of boards, planing large surfaces, etc. [1815-25] * * *
jointless
/joynt"lis/, adj. 1. without a joint; lacking a joint. 2. formed as a single piece, without jointing. [1550-60; JOINT + -LESS] * * *
jointly
/joynt"lee/, adv. together; in combination or partnership; in common: My brother and I own the farm jointly. [1300-50; ME; see JOINT, -LY] * * *
jointprobability
joint probability n. The probability that two or more specific outcomes will occur in an event. * * *
jointresolution
joint resolution n. A resolution passed by both houses of a bicameral legislature and eligible to become a law if signed by the chief executive or passed over the chief ...
jointress
/joyn"tris/, n. Law. a woman on whom a jointure has been settled. [1595-1605; JOINT(E)R + -ESS] Usage. See -ess. * * *
joints and joinery
In architecture, the connection of construction materials. All joints are carefully detailed by the architect with concern for strength, movement, penetration by the elements, ...
jointstock
joint stock n. Stock or capital funds of a company held jointly or in common by its owners. * * *
jointure
—jointured, adj. —jointureless, adj. /joyn"cheuhr/, n. Law. 1. an estate or property settled on a woman in consideration of marriage, to be owned by her after her husband's ...
jointventure
joint venture n. A partnership or conglomerate, formed often to share risk or expertise: a joint venture between the film companies. * * *
jointweed
☆ jointweed [joint′wēd΄ ] n. a plant (Polygonella articulata) of the buckwheat family, with threadlike leaves, jointed stems, and clusters of small, white flowers * * *
jointworm
/joynt"werrm'/, n. the larva of any of several chalcid flies of the family Eurytomidae, esp. of the genus Harmolita, that feeds within the stems of grasses, often causing a gall ...
Joinvile
/zhoyonn vee"li/, n. a seaport in S Brazil. 88,647. Also, Joinville. * * *
Joinville
Fr. /zhwaonn veel"/ for 1; Port. /zhoyonn vee"li/ for 2, n. 1. Jean de /zhahonn deuh/, 1224?-1317, French chronicler. 2. Joinvile. * * * ▪ Brazil also spelled  Joinvile ...
Joinville, François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, prince de
▪ French naval officer born Aug. 14, 1818, Neuilly, Fr. died June 16, 1900, Paris  naval officer and writer on military topics who was prominent in the modernization of the ...
Joinville, Jean, sire de
born с 1224, Joinville, Champagne died Dec. 24, 1317, Joinville French chronicler. A member of the lesser nobility of Champagne, Joinville became friends with Louis IX while ...
Joinville,Jean de
Join·ville (zhwăɴ-vēlʹ), Jean de. 1224?-1317. French chronicler who wrote Histoire de Saint Louis (1309), the principal source on the life of Louis IX. * * *
joist
—joistless, adj. /joyst/, n. 1. any of a number of small, parallel beams of timber, steel, reinforced concrete, etc., for supporting floors, ceilings, or the like. v.t. 2. to ...
Jōjitsu
▪ Buddhism Chinese  Ch'eng-shih         minor school of Buddhist philosophy introduced into Japan from China during the Nara period (710–784). The school holds that ...
jojoba
/hoh hoh"beuh/, n. a shrub, Simmondsia chinensis (or S. californica), of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico, bearing seeds that are the source of an oil (jojoba oil) used in ...
Jokai
/yaw"koy/, n. Maurus /mow"rddoos/ or Mór /mawrdd/, 1825-1904, Hungarian novelist. * * *
Jókai, Mór
▪ Hungarian author born Feb. 18, 1825, Komárom, Hung. died May 5, 1904, Budapest  most important Hungarian novelist of the 19th century. Jókai's collected works (published ...
joke
—jokeless, adj. —jokingly, adv. /johk/, n., v., joked, joking. n. 1. something said or done to provoke laughter or cause amusement, as a witticism, a short and amusing ...
jokebook
/johk"book'/, n. a book of jokes. [1950-55; JOKE + BOOK] * * *
joker
/joh"keuhr/, n. 1. a person who jokes. 2. one of two extra playing cards in a pack, usually imprinted with the figure of a jester, used in some games as the highest card or as a ...
Joker, the
▪ fictional character       comic-book character and arch-nemesis of DC Comics' superhero Batman. The Joker is noted for his clownlike appearance and sick ...
jokester
/johk"steuhr/, n. a joker, esp. a practical joker. [1875-80; JOKE + -STER] * * *
jokey
—jokily, adv. —jokiness, n. /joh"kee/, adj., jokier, jokiest. lacking in seriousness; frivolous: The editorial had an offensively jokey tone for such an important ...
jokily
See jokey. * * *
jokiness
See jokily. * * *
joking relationship
▪ sociology       relationship between two individuals or groups that allows or requires unusually free verbal or physical interaction. The relationship may be mutual ...
jokingly
See joke. * * *
Jokjakarta
/jok'jeuh kahr"teuh, johk'-/, n. Jogjakarta. * * *
joktaleg
/jok"teuh leg'/, n. Brit. Dial. jockteleg. * * *
Jökulsá á Fjöllum
▪ river, Iceland       river, northeastern Iceland, fed by the northern meltwaters of the Vatna Glacier in east-central Iceland; it flows northward for 128 miles (206 ...
joky
/joh"kee/, adj., jokier, jokiest. jokey. [JOKE + -Y1] * * *
Jolas, Eugene and Maria
▪ American editors Maria Jolas née  Maria McDonald  Respectively,   born Oct. 26, 1894, Union City, N.J., U.S. died May 26, 1952, Paris born January 1893, Louisville, ...
jole
/johl/, n. jowl2. * * *
jolie laide
jolie laide [zhō̂ lē led′] n. 〚Fr, lit., pretty ugly woman〛 a girl or woman oddly attractive though not conventionally beautiful * * *
Jolie, Angelina
▪ 2008 Angelina Voight  born June 4, 1975, Los Angeles, Calif.  In 2007 American actress Angelina Jolie, one of Hollywood's brightest stars, continued to light up the screen ...
Joliet
/joh'lee et"/; for 1 also Fr. /zhaw lye"/, n. 1. Louis /lwee/, 1645-1700, French explorer of the Mississippi, born in Canada. 2. a city in NE Illinois. 77,956. * * * ▪ ...
Joliette
Fr. /zhaw lyet"/, n. a city in S Quebec, in E Canada. 16,987. * * *
Joliot-Curie
/zhaw lyoh"kyuu rddee"/, n. 1. Irène /ee rdden"/, (Irène Curie), 1897-1956, French nuclear physicist: Nobel prize for chemistry 1935 (daughter of Pierre and Marie Curie). 2. ...
Joliot-Curie, (Jean-) Frédéric
orig. Jean-Frédéric Joliot born March 19, 1900, Paris, France died Aug. 14, 1958, Arcouest French physical chemist. In 1926 he married Irène Curie (1900–58), daughter of ...
Joliot-Curie, Frédéric and Irène
▪ French chemists original names (until 1926)  Jean-Frédéric Joliot  and  Irène Curie  Respectively,   born March 19, 1900, Paris, France died Aug. 14, 1958, ...
Joliot-Curie, Irène
Jo·liot-Cu·rie (zhô-lyō'kyo͝orʹē, -kyo͝o-rēʹ, -kü-), Irène. 1897-1956. French physicist. She shared a 1935 Nobel Prize with her husband, Frédéric Joliot-Curie ...
Jolivet
/zhaw lee ve"/, n. André /ahonn drdday"/, 1905-74, French composer. * * *
Jolivet, André
▪ French composer born Aug. 8, 1905, Paris, France died Dec. 19/20, 1974, Paris       French composer noted for his sophisticated, expressive experiments with rhythm ...
Jolley, Elizabeth
▪ 2008 Monica Elizabeth Knight        British-born Australian novelist and short-story writer born June 4, 1923 , Birmingham, Eng. died Feb. 13, 2007 , Perth, ...
jollier
/jol"ee euhr/, n. a person who jollies, esp. a person who uses teasing flattery in order to gain a desired aim. [1895-1900, Amer.; JOLLY + -ER1] * * *
Jolliet, Louis
born before Sept. 21, 1645, probably Beaupré, near Quebec died after May 1700, Quebec province French Canadian explorer and cartographer. He led an expedition in the Great ...
Jolliet,Louis
Jol·li·et also Jo·li·et (jōʹlē-ĕt', jō'lē-ĕtʹ, zhô-lyāʹ), Louis. 1645-1700. French-Canadian explorer of the upper Mississippi Valley who with Jacques Marquette ...
jollification
/jol'euh fi kay"sheuhn/, n. jolly merrymaking; jolly festivity. [1800-10; JOLLY + -FICATION] * * *
jollify
/jol"euh fuy'/, v.t., v.i., jollified, jollifying. to make or become jolly or merry. [1815-25; JOLLY + -FY] * * *
jollily
See jolly. * * *
jolliness
See jollily. * * *
jollity
/jol"i tee/, n., pl. jollities. 1. jolly or merry mood, condition, or activity; gaiety. 2. jollities, jolly festivities. [1250-1300; ME jolite < OF, equiv. to joli(f) gay (see ...
jolly
—jollily, adv. —jolliness, n. /jol"ee/, adj., jollier, jolliest, v., jollied, jollying, n., pl. jollies, adv. adj. 1. in good spirits; gay; merry: In a moment he was as jolly ...
Jolly balance
/jol"ee, yol"ee/ a spring balance used for determining the density of a sample by comparison of its weight in air and water. [named after Philipp von Jolly (d. 1884), German ...
jolly boat
1. a light boat carried at the stern of a sailing vessel. 2. a small pleasure sailboat for use in sheltered waters. [1720-30; jolly < Dan jolle YAWL] * * *
jolly jumper
Naut. any light sail set above a skysail; flying kite. [1880-85] * * *
Jolly Roger
/roj"euhr/ a flag flown by pirates, having the device of a white skull and crossbones on a black field. [1775-85] * * *
Jolly, George
▪ English actor and manager died 1673?       actor-manager who, after obscure beginnings, emerged as the leader of the last troupe of English strolling players in a ...
jollyboat
jol·ly·boat (jŏlʹē-bōt') n. A medium-sized ship's boat used for rough work and minor tasks.   [Origin unknown.] * * *
JollyRoger
Jol·ly Rog·er (jŏlʹē rŏjʹər) n. A black flag bearing the emblematic white skull and crossbones of a pirate ship.   [Origin unknown.] * * *
Jolo
/haw law"/, n. 1. an island in the SW Philippines: the main island of the Sulu Archipelago. 237,683; 345 sq. mi. (894 sq. km). 2. a seaport on this island. 52,429. * * * ▪ ...
Jolson
/johl"seuhn/, n. Al (Asa Yoelson), 1886-1950, U.S. singer and entertainer, born in Russia. * * *
Jolson, Al
orig. Asa Yoelson born May 26, 1886, Srednike, Russia died Oct. 23, 1950, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. Russian-born U.S. singer, songwriter, and blackface comedian. Jolson's ...
Jolson,Al
Jol·son (jōlʹsən), Al. Originally Asa Yoelson. 1886-1950. American entertainer who starred in The Jazz Singer (1927), the first major film with synchronized sound. * * *
jolt
—jolter, n. —joltingly, adv. —joltless, adj. /johlt/, v.t. 1. to jar, shake, or cause to move by or as if by a sudden rough thrust; shake up roughly: The bus jolted its ...
jolter
See jolt. * * *
joltily
See jolter. * * *
jolty
—joltiness, n. /johl"tee/, adj., joltier, joltiest. full of jolts; bumpy. [1825-35; JOLT + -Y1] * * *
jones
/johnz/, n. (sometimes cap.) Slang. 1. heroin. 2. an addiction, esp. to heroin. [1965-70; orig. uncert.] * * * (as used in expressions) Everett LeRoi Jones David Robert ...
Jones
/johnz/, n. 1. Anson /an"seuhn/, 1798-1858, president of the Republic of Texas. 2. Casey /kay"see/, (John Luther Jones), 1864-1900, U.S. locomotive engineer: folk hero of ...
Jones Act
▪ United States [1916] formally  Philippine Autonomy Act of 1916        statute announcing the intention of the United States government to “withdraw their ...
Jones, (Alfred) Ernest
born Jan. 1, 1879, Rhosfelyn, Glamorgan, Wales died Feb. 11, 1958, London, Eng. Welsh psychoanalyst. After he became a member of London's Royal College of Physicians, his ...
Jones, Alfred Gilpin
▪ Canadian statesman born Sept. 24, 1824, Weymouth, Nova Scotia died March 15, 1906, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Can.  Canadian statesman, opponent of confederation, and ...
Jones, Ben
▪ American horse trainer byname  of Benjamin Allyn Jones   born Dec. 31, 1882, Parnell, Mo., U.S. died June 13, 1961, Lexington, Ky.       trainer of U.S. ...
Jones, Bill T.
orig. William Tass Jones born Feb. 15, 1952, Bunnell, Fla., U.S. U.S. dancer and choreographer. He trained in dance and theatre at the State University of New York, ...
Jones, Bob, Jr.
▪ 1998       American clergyman and educator (b. Oct. 19, 1911, Montgomery, Ala.—d. Nov. 12, 1997, Greenville, S.C.), was board chairman and chancellor of Bob Jones ...
Jones, Bobby
in full Robert Tyre Jones, Jr. born March 17, 1902, Atlanta, Ga., U.S. died Dec. 18, 1971, Atlanta U.S. golfer. Jones won 13 major championships between 1923 and 1930, a feat ...
Jones, Brian, and Piccard, Bertrand
▪ 2000       At midday on March 20, 1999, a balloon carrying Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones 11,000 m (36,000 ft) above Mauritania floated past an imaginary finish line ...
Jones, Casey
▪ American engineer byname of  John Luther Jones   born March 14, 1864, southeastern Missouri, U.S. died April 30, 1900, near Vaughan, Miss.       American railroad ...
Jones, Charles Martin
▪ 2003 “Chuck”        American animator (b. Sept. 21, 1912, Spokane, Wash.—d. Feb. 22, 2002, Corona del Mar, Calif.), created some of the world's most famous and ...
Jones, Chuck
in full Charles Martin Jones born Sept. 21, 1912, Spokane, Wash., U.S. died Feb. 22, 2002, Corona del Mar, Calif. U.S. animator. He became a cartoonist for Warner Brothers ...
Jones, David
▪ English artist and writer in full  David Michael Jones  born Nov. 1, 1895, Brockley, Kent, Eng. died Oct. 28, 1974, London       English artist of great originality ...
Jones, Deacon
orig. David Jones born Dec. 9, 1939, Eatonville, Fla., U.S. U.S. football player. He stood 6 ft 5 in. (1.96 m) tall and weighed 250 lbs (113 kg) and could run the 100-yard ...
Jones, Donald Forsha
▪ American agronomist born April 16, 1890, Hutchinson, Kan., U.S. died June 19, 1963, Hamden, Conn.       American geneticist and agronomist who made hybrid corn ...
Jones, E Fay
▪ 2005       American architect (b. Jan. 31, 1921, Pine Bluff, Ark.—d. Aug. 30, 2004, Fayetteville, Ark.), designed Thorncrown Chapel in Eureka Springs, Ark., which ...
Jones, Edward P.
▪ American author in full  Edward Paul Jones  born Oct. 5, 1950, Washington, D.C., U.S.       American novelist and short-story writer whose works depict the effects ...
Jones, Elvin
▪ American musician in full  Elvin Ray Jones   born September 9, 1927, Pontiac, Michigan, U.S. died May 18, 2004, Englewood, New Jersey  American jazz drummer and ...
Jones, Elvin Ray
▪ 2005       American musician (b. Sept. 9, 1927, Pontiac, Mich.—d. May 18, 2004, Englewood, N.J.), began a revolution in jazz drumming with his powerful playing in ...
Jones, Ernest
▪ British psychoanalyst in full  Alfred Ernest Jones   born Jan. 1, 1879, Rhosfelyn, Glamorgan, Wales died Feb. 11, 1958, London, Eng.       psychoanalyst and a key ...
Jones, George
▪ American musician Introduction in full  George Glenn Jones   born Sept. 12, 1931, Saratoga, Texas, U.S.       American honky tonk performer and balladeer considered ...
Jones, George (Glenn)
born Sept. 12, 1931, Saratoga, Texas, U.S. U.S. country music singer and songwriter. He was born to an impoverished family, which moved to Beaumont, Texas, when he was 11 years ...
Jones, Georgeanna Seeger
▪ 2006       American physician (b. July 6, 1912, Baltimore, Md.—d. March 26, 2005, Norfolk, Va.), pioneered (with her husband, Howard W. Jones, Jr.) the development ...
Jones, Henry
▪ English whist player byname  Cavendish   born Nov. 2, 1831, London, Eng. died Feb. 10, 1899, London       English surgeon, the standard authority on whist in his ...
Jones, Henry Arthur
▪ English playwright born Sept. 20, 1851, Grandborough, Buckinghamshire, Eng. died Jan. 7, 1929, London       English playwright who first achieved prominence in the ...
Jones, Howard
▪ American football coach in full  Howard Harding Jones  born Aug. 23, 1885, Excello, Ohio, U.S. died July 27, 1941, Toluca Lake, Calif.       American collegiate ...
Jones, Inigo
born July 15, 1573, Smithfield, London, Eng. died June 21, 1652, London British painter, architect, and designer. The son of a clothworker, he studied painting in Italy and ...
Jones, Jacob
▪ United States naval officer born March 1768, Smyrna, Del. died Aug. 3, 1850, Philadelphia  U.S. naval officer who distinguished himself in the War of 1812 (1812, War ...
Jones, James
▪ American author born Nov. 6, 1921, Robinson, Ill., U.S. died May 9, 1977, Southampton, N.Y.  U.S. novelist best known for From Here to Eternity (1951), a novel about the ...
Jones, James Earl
born Jan. 17, 1931, Arkabutla, Miss., U.S. U.S. actor. He studied acting in New York City and made his Broadway debut in 1957. He was praised for his performance in Othello ...
Jones, James L.
▪ U.S. general and national security adviser in full  James Logan Jones, Jr.  born Dec. 19, 1943, Kansas City, Mo., U.S.       U.S. general who served as commandant ...
Jones, Jennifer
orig. Phyllis Isley born March 2, 1919, Tulsa, Okla., U.S. U.S. film actress. She played leads in minor films from 1939 before coming to the notice of David O. Selznick, who ...
Jones, Jesse H(olman)
▪ American banker and government official born April 5, 1874, Robertson County, Tenn., U.S. died June 1, 1956, Houston, Texas  U.S. banker, businessman, and public official, ...
Jones, Jim
orig. James Warren Jones born May 13, 1931, near Lynn, Ind., U.S. died Nov. 18, 1978, Jonestown, Guyana U.S. leader of a New Religous Movement. He became a preacher in ...
Jones, Jo
▪ American musician byname of  Jonathon Jones   born Oct. 7, 1911, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 3, 1985, New York, N.Y.  black American musician, one of the most ...
Jones, John
▪ Welsh poet [1766-1821] pseudonym  Jac Glan-y-gors   born Nov. 10, 1766, Glanygors near Cerrig-y-Druidion, Denbighshire, Wales died May 21, 1821, ...
Jones, John Paul
orig. John Paul born July 6, 1747, Kirkbean, Kirkcudbright, Scot. died July 18, 1792, Paris, France American naval hero. He went to sea at age 12 and became a ship's master at ...
Jones, Jonah
▪ 2001 Robert Elliott Jones        American jazz musician (b. Dec. 31, 1909, Louisville, Ky.—d. April 30, 2000, New York, N.Y.), played Louis Armstrong-inspired ...
Jones, Lewis Ralph
▪ American botanist born Dec. 5, 1864, Brandon, Wis., U.S. died March 31, 1945, Orlando, Fla.  U.S. botanist and agricultural biologist, one of the first and most ...
Jones, Lois Mailou
▪ American painter and educator born November 3, 1905, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. died June 9, 1998, Washington, D.C.       American painter and educator whose works ...
Jones, Louis Marshall
▪ 1999       American singer and banjo player who for over half a century was a popular member of the Grand Ole Opry and from 1968 to 1993 was featured on the "Hee Haw" ...
Jones, Marion
▪ 2001       In September 2000 American track-and-field (athletics) phenomenon Marion Jones became the first woman in history to win five track-and-field medals (three ...
Jones, Mary Harris
orig. Mary Harris known as Mother Jones born May 1, 1830, Cork, Ire. died Nov. 30, 1930, Silver Spring, Md., U.S. Irish-born U.S. labour organizer. She was brought to the U.S. ...
Jones, Matilda Sissieretta
▪ American opera singer née   Joyner,  byname  Black Patti , or  Madame Jones   born Jan. 5, 1869, Portsmouth, Va., U.S. died June 24, 1933, Providence, ...
Jones, Mother
▪ American labour leader byname of  Mary Harris Jones , née  Mary Harris  born May 1, 1830, Cork, Ire. died Nov. 30, 1930, Silver Spring, Md., U.S.  labour organizer, ...
Jones, Norah
▪ 2004       In pop music the surprise of the year came at the 2003 Grammy Awards when a new star, singer-pianist Norah Jones, and her first CD, Come Away with Me, ...
Jones, Owen
▪ British architect, designer, and artist born Feb. 15, 1809, London died April 19, 1874       English designer, architect, and writer, best known for his standard work ...
Jones, Philly Joe
▪ American musician byname of  Joseph Rudolph Jones   born July 15, 1923, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died Aug. 30, 1985, Philadelphia  black American jazz musician, one of ...
Jones, Quincy
orig. Quincy Delight Jones, Jr. born March 14, 1933, Chicago, Ill., U.S. U.S. composer, bandleader, and producer. Jones joined a combo with his friend Ray Charles in his early ...
Jones, R. William
▪ British sports organizer in full  Renato William Jones  born October 5, 1906, Rome, Italy died April 22, 1981, Munich, Germany       organizer of international ...
Jones, Richard
▪ British economist and clergyman born 1790, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, Eng. died Jan. 26, 1855, Haileybury, Hertfordshire       British economist and ...
Jones, Robert
▪ English composer flourished 1597–1615       songwriter of the school of English lutenists that flourished at the turn of the 17th century.       Little is ...
Jones, Robert Edmond
▪ American theatrical designer born Dec. 12, 1887, Milton, N.H., U.S. died Nov. 26, 1954, Milton       U.S. theatrical and motion-picture designer whose imaginative ...
Jones, Robert Trent, Sr.
▪ 2001       British-born American golf course architect (b. June 20, 1906, Ince, Eng.—d. June 14, 2000, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), was one of the world's leading ...
Jones, Roy, Jr.
▪ 2004       On March 1, 2003, Roy Jones, Jr., became only the second light-heavyweight boxing champion to win a heavyweight title when he won a 12-round decision over ...
Jones, Rufus Matthew
▪ American religious leader and author born Jan. 25, 1863, South China, Maine, U.S. died June 16, 1948, Haverford, Pa.  one of the most respected U.S. Quakers of his time, ...
Jones, Samuel M
▪ American businessman byname  Golden Rule Jones   born August 3, 1846, Ty Mawr, Wales died July 12, 1904, Toledo, Ohio, U.S.       Welsh-born U.S. businessman and ...
Jones, Sir Harold Spencer
▪ British astronomer born March 29, 1890, London, Eng. died Nov. 3, 1960, London  10th astronomer royal of England (1933–55), who organized a program that led to a more ...
Jones, Sir William
born Sept. 28, 1746, London, Eng. died April 27, 1794, Calcutta British orientalist, linguist, and jurist. He completed an authoritative Grammar of the Persian Language in ...
Jones, Spike
orig. Lindley Armstrong Jones born Dec. 14, 1911, Long Beach, Calif., U.S. died May 1, 1965, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. bandleader known for his novelty recordings. Jones played ...
Jones, T.A.D.
▪ American football coach in full  Thomas Albert Dwight Jones , byname  Tad Jones  born Feb. 21, 1887, Excello, Ohio, U.S. died June 19, 1957, New Haven, ...
Jones, Thomas Gwynn
▪ Welsh poet born Oct. 10, 1871, Abergele, Denbighshire, Wales died March 7, 1949, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion  Welsh-language poet and scholar best known for his narrative ...
Jones, Vaughan
▪ New Zealand mathematician in full  Vaughan Frederick Randal Jones  born December 31, 1952, Gisborne, New Zealand       New Zealand mathematician who was awarded the ...
Jones,Charles Martin
Jones, Charles Martin. Known as “Chuck.” Born 1912. American animator and animation director who helped bring to life cartoon characters such as Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck for ...
Jones,Inigo
Jones, Inigo. 1573-1652. English architect who brought the Palladian classical style to England. He designed the Queen's House in Greenwich and the Banqueting Hall in Whitehall, ...
Jones,John Luther
Jones, John Luther. Known as “Casey.” 1864-1900. American locomotive engineer who died trying to stop his train from crashing into another train. The song “The Ballad of ...
Jones,John Paul
Jones, John Paul. 1747-1792. Scottish-born American naval officer. In the American Revolution he raided the British coast and destroyed two warships (1779). * * *
Jones,LeRoi
Jones, LeRoi. See Baraka, Imamu Amiri. * * *
Jones,Mary Harris
Jones, Mary Harris. Known as “Mother Jones.” 1830-1930. Irish-born American labor leader and union organizer. She helped found (1905) the Industrial Workers of the World. * * ...
Jones,Quincy Delight
Jones, Quincy Delight. Born 1933. American musician, composer, and record and television producer. Having spent the early part of his career as a member of several influential ...
Jones,Robert Tyre
Jones, Robert Tyre. Known as “Bobby.” 1902-1971. American golfer who won (1930) the Grand Slam of golf, the amateur and open championships in the United States and Great ...
Jonesboro
/johnz"berr oh, -bur oh/, n. 1. a city in NE Arkansas. 31,530. 2. a town in NE Tennessee: oldest town in Tennessee. 2829. * * * ▪ Arkansas, United States       city, ...
Jonesborough
▪ Tennessee, United States       town, seat of Washington county, northeastern Tennessee, U.S. It lies just west of the northern portion of Cherokee National Forest, ...
Joneses
/john"ziz/, n.pl. one's neighbors, friends, business associates, etc.: Keeping up with the Joneses has put him in debt. [1925-30] * * *
Jonestown
/johnz"town'/, n. a former settlement in N Guyana, NW of Georgetown: site of agricultural commune of an American religious cult called the People's Temple; mass suicide and ...
Jong
(1942– ) a US poet and author. She first became well known for her poetry with Fruits and Vegetables (1971). She then achieved international success with her novel Fear of ...
Jongen, Joseph
▪ Belgian composer in full  Joseph-Marie-Alphonse-Nicolas Jongen   born Dec. 14, 1873, Liège, Belg. died July 12, 1953, Sart-les-Spa, near Liège       composer who ...
Jongkind, Johan Barthold
▪ Dutch artist born June 3, 1819, Lattrop, Neth. died Feb. 9, 1891, Côte-Saint-André, Fr.  painter and printmaker whose small, informal landscapes continued the tradition ...
jongleur
/jong"gleuhr/; Fr. /zhawonn gluerdd"/, n., pl. jongleurs /-gleuhrz/; Fr. /-gluerdd"/. (in medieval France and Norman England) an itinerant minstrel or entertainer who sang songs, ...
Jonker diamond
/jong"keuhr/ a noted diamond weighing 726 carats, discovered in the Transvaal in 1934 and cut into 12 pieces. * * *
Jönköping
/yuen"chue ping/, n. a city in S Sweden. 107,561. * * * ▪ Sweden       city and capital of the län (county) of Jönköping, southern Sweden. It lies at the southern ...
jonnick
/jon"ik/, adj. Brit., Australian Informal. jannock. * * *
jonnycake
jon·ny·cake (jŏnʹē-kāk') n. New England & Upper Midwest Variant of johnnycake. * * *
Jonquière
Fr. /zhawonn kyerdd"/, n. a city in S Quebec, in E Canada. 60,354. * * * ▪ Quebec, Canada       former city, Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean region, southern Quebec ...
jonquil
/jong"kwil, jon"-/, n. a narcissus, Narcissus jonquilla, having long, narrow, rushlike leaves and fragrant, yellow or white flowers. [1620-30; < F jonquille < Sp junquillo, ...

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