Слова на букву john-lowe (15990) Universalium
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Universalium →  !kun-arti arti-boom boom-chri chri-de k de k-enol enol-gano gano-hipp hipp-john john-lowe lowe-moth moth-oik oil-pius pius-ramp ramp-schw schw-stag stag-tils tils-unre unre-work


Слова на букву john-lowe (15990)

<< < 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 > >>
knightbachelor
knight bachelor n. pl. knights bachelors or knight bachelors An English knight of the lowest rank; a bachelor. * * *
knighthead
/nuyt"hed'/, n. Naut. 1. either of a pair of upright members flanking and securing the bowsprit of a ship at the bow, often used as mooring bitts; apostle. 2. a plate at the fore ...
knighthood
/nuyt"hood/, n. 1. the rank or dignity of a knight: to confer knighthood upon him. 2. the profession or vocation of a knight. 3. knightly character or qualities. 4. the body of ...
knightliness
See knightly. * * *
knightly
—knightliness, n. /nuyt"lee/, adj. 1. characteristic of a knight; noble, courageous, and generous: knightly deeds. 2. being or resembling a knight. 3. of or belonging to a ...
Knightof Columbus
Knight of Columbus (nīt) n. pl. Knights of Columbus A member of a benevolent and fraternal society of Roman Catholic men founded in 1882. * * *
Knightof Pythias
Knight of Pythias n. pl. Knights of Pythias A member of a secret, philanthropic fraternal order founded in 1864. * * *
Knighton, Henry
▪ British historian died c. 1396       English chronicler and an Austin (Augustinian) canon at the Abbey of St. Mary of the Meadows in Leicester. He is important for ...
knights bachelor
➡ aristocracy * * *
Knights Hospitalers.
See under Hospitaler (def. 1). * * *
Knights of Columbus
an international fraternal and benevolent organization of Roman Catholic men, founded in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1882. * * * ▪ Roman Catholic ...
Knights of Labor
a secret workingmen's organization formed in 1869 to defend the interests of labor. * * * First important national labour organization in the U.S. Founded in 1869 by Uriah Smith ...
Knights of Malta
the order of Hospitalers. * * * or Hospitallers in full (since 1961) Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes and of Malta. Religious order ...
Knights of Pythias
a fraternal order founded in Washington, D.C., in 1864. * * *
Knights of St. John of Jerusalem.
See under Hospitaler (def. 1). * * *
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.
See Ku Klux Klan (def. 2). * * *
Knights of the Round Table
a legendary order of knights created by King Arthur. * * *
Knights of the Temple of Solomon
➡ Knights Templars * * *
Knights Templars
1. a Masonic order in the U.S. claiming descent from the medieval order of Templars. 2. a pl. of Knight Templar. * * *
Knights, The
a comedy (424 B.C.) by Aristophanes. * * *
Knightsbridge
a district of central London, England, between Kensington and Westminster(1). It is famous for its expensive shops, such as Harrods, and its elegant houses. * * * ▪ ...
Knightsof the Round Table
Knights of the Round Table (nīts) pl.n. In Arthurian legend, the knights of King Arthur's court. * * *
KnightTemplar
Knight Templar n. pl. Knights Templars or Knights Templar 1. A member of an order of knights founded about 1118 to protect pilgrims in the Holy Land during the Second Crusade and ...
Knipling, Edward Fred
▪ 2001       American entomologist (b. March 20, 1909, Port Lavaca, Texas—d. March 17, 2000, Arlington, Va.), was a pioneering entomologist who, with colleague Raymond ...
Knipper-Chekhova, Olga Leonardovna
▪ Russian actress née Knipper born 1869, Glazov, Russia died March 22, 1959, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R.       world-renowned Russian actress and the wife of playwright ...
knish
/knish/, n. Jewish Cookery. a fried or baked turnover or roll of dough with a filling, as of meat, kasha, or potato, often eaten as an appetizer or snack. [1925-30; < Yiddish < ...
knit
—knittable, adj. —knitter, n. /nit/, v., knitted or knit, knitting, n. v.t. 1. to make (a garment, fabric, etc.) by interlocking loops of one or more yarns either by hand ...
knitted
/nit"id/, adj. made by knitting, as a cloth article: a knitted bedspread. [1850-55; KNIT + -ED2] * * *
knitter
See knit. * * *
knitting
/nit"ing/, n. 1. the act of a person or thing that knits. 2. the act of forming a fabric by looping a continuous yarn. 3. knitted work. 4. stick or tend to one's knitting, a. to ...
knitting machine
Machine for textile and garment production. Flatbed machines may be hand-operated or power-driven, and, by selection of colour, type of stitch, cam design, and Jacquard device ...
knitting needle
1. either of two types of instruments used for hand knitting: a straight rod of steel, wood, plastic, etc., pointed at one or both ends, used in pairs, or a single curved, ...
knittingneedle
knitting needle n. A long, thin, pointed rod used in pairs to knit yarn into cloth. * * *
knitwear
/nit"wair'/, n. clothing made of knitted fabric. [1920-25; KNIT + WEAR] * * *
knives
/nuyvz/, n. pl. of knife. * * *
knob
—knoblike, adj. /nob/, n., v., knobbed, knobbing. n. 1. a projecting part, usually rounded, forming the handle of a door, drawer, or the like. 2. a rounded lump or protuberance ...
knob celery
celeriac. * * *
knob latch
a latch having a spring bolt controlled by a knob on one or both sides. * * *
knob lock
a lock having a spring bolt moved by a knob or knobs, and a dead bolt moved by a key. [1805-15] * * *
knobbed
See knob. * * *
knobbiness
See knobbed. * * *
knobble
—knobbler /nob"leuhr/, n. /nob"euhl/, v.t., knobbled, knobbling. 1. to knob (excess stone). 2. Metall. to treat (semirefined puddled iron) on a hearth before shingling to ...
knobbling roll
/nob"ling/, Metalworking. a roll for a rolling mill, having a series of regularly shaped projections and depressions on its face. * * *
knobbly
knobbly [näb′lē] adj. knobblier, knobbliest having or covered with lumps or knobs; knotty * * *
knobby
—knobbiness, n. /nob"ee/, adj., knobbier, knobbiest. 1. full of or covered with knobs: the knobby trunk of a tree. 2. shaped like a knob. [1535-45; KNOB + -Y1] * * *
knobcone pine
/nob"kohn'/ a pine, Pinus attenuata, of the Pacific coast of the U.S., bearing cones with knoblike scales. [1880-85, Amer.; KNOB + CONE] * * *
knobkerrie
/nob"ker'ee/, n. a short, heavy wooden club with a knob on one end, used esp. by native peoples of South Africa for striking and throwing. [1835-45; < Afrik knopkierie, equiv. to ...
knock
—knockless, adj. /nok/, v.i. 1. to strike a sounding blow with the fist, knuckles, or anything hard, esp. on a door, window, or the like, as in seeking admittance, calling ...
knock rummy
Cards. a variety of rummy for two to six players, in which a player can end a game by laying down a hand with any number of points in cards not included in sets. * * *
knock-down
☆ knock-down or drag-out [näk′doun΄ drag′out΄ ] n., adj. Informal 1. characterized by great violence, harshness, animosity, etc. [a knock-down, drag-out argument] 2. an ...
knock-down-drag-out
/nok"down'drag"owt'/, adj. marked by unrelenting violence: a knock-down-drag-out fight. Also, knock-down, drag-out; knock-down-and-drag-out. [1820-30; adj. use of v. phrases ...
knock-knee
—knock-kneed, adj. /nok"nee'/, n. 1. inward curvature of the legs, causing the knees to knock together in walking. 2. knock-knees, the knees of a person whose legs have such ...
knock-kneed
See knock-knee. * * *
knock-knock joke
n a type of joke that depends on the way in which some words in English sound like other words. The person telling the joke says ‘Knock-knock’, someone answers ‘Who’s ...
knock-on effect
/nok"on", -awn"/, Chiefly Brit. a chain reaction. [adj. use of v. phrase knock on] * * *
knockabout
/nok"euh bowt'/, n. 1. Naut. any of various fore-and-aft-rigged sailing vessels having a single jib bent to a stay from the stemhead, no bowsprit being used: usually rigged as a ...
knockdown
/nok"down'/, adj. 1. capable of knocking something down; overwhelming; irresistible: a knockdown blow. 2. constructed in separate parts that can readily be taken apart for easy ...
knockdown-dragout
knock·down-drag·out (nŏkʹdoun'drăgʹout') adj. Marked by roughness, violence, and acrimony: a knockdown-dragout fight. * * *
knocked down
☆ knocked down adj. not assembled: said of furniture, etc. * * *
knocked-down
/nokt"down"/, adj. 1. composed of parts or units that can be disassembled: knocked-down furniture. 2. Informal. condensed, abridged, simplified, unadorned, etc.: a knocked-down ...
knocker
/nok"euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that knocks. 2. a hinged knob, bar, etc., on a door, for use in knocking. 3. Informal. a persistent and carping critic; faultfinder. 4. Slang ...
knocking
▪ internal-combustion engine       in an internal-combustion engine, sharp sounds caused by premature combustion of part of the compressed air-fuel mixture in the ...
Knocking Out Corruption in Boxing
▪ 2001       Boxing was called the sporting world's “red light district” for a good reason—it had been a haven for corruption since the bare-knuckle days when ...
knockoff
/nok"awf', -of'/, n. 1. an act or instance of knocking off. 2. an unlicensed copy of something, esp. fashion clothing, intended to be sold at a lower price than the ...
knockout
/nok"owt'/, n. 1. an act or instance of knocking out. 2. the state or fact of being knocked out. 3. a knockout blow. 4. Informal. a person or thing overwhelmingly attractive, ...
knockout drops
chloral hydrate or any similar rapidly acting drug, esp. one put in a drink secretly to make the drinker unconscious. [1890-95] * * *
knockoutdrops
knockout drops pl.n. Slang A solution, usually of chloral hydrate in alcohol, put into a drink surreptitiously in order to render the drinker unconscious. * * *
knockwurst
/nok"werrst, -woorst/, n. knackwurst. * * *
knoll
knoll1 —knolly, adj. /nohl/, n. a small, rounded hill or eminence; hillock. [bef. 900; ME cnol, OE cnoll; c. Norw knoll hillock; akin to D knol turnip, Icel knollur, G Knollen, ...
Knoll, Erwin
▪ 1995       Austrian-born U.S. editor (b. July 17, 1931, Vienna, Austria—d. Nov. 2, 1994, Madison, Wis.), as editor of the political magazine The Progressive, was ...
Knolles, Richard
▪ English historian born c. 1550, probably Cold Ashby, Northamptonshire, Eng. died July 1610, Sandwich, Kent       English historian who is known chiefly for a study of ...
Knollys, Sir Francis
▪ English statesman born c. 1514 died July 19, 1596       English statesman, loyal supporter of Queen Elizabeth I of England, and guardian of Mary, Queen of Scots, ...
Knoop hardness
▪ mineralogy       a measure of the hardness of a material, calculated by measuring the indentation produced by a diamond tip that is pressed onto the surface of a ...
Knoop scale
/noohp/ a scale of hardness based on the indentation made in the material to be tested by a diamond point. [named after F. Knoop, 20th-century American chemist] * * *
knop
/nop/, n. a small knob or similar rounded protuberance, esp. for ornament. [1325-75; ME; OE cnop; c. D knop, G Knopf] * * *
Knopf
/knopf/, n. Alfred A(braham), 1892-1984, U.S. publisher. * * *
Knopf, Alfred A.
born Sept. 12, 1892, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Aug. 11, 1984, Purchase, N.Y. U.S. publisher. He worked a short time in publishing before he and his wife, Blanche, founded their ...
Knorozov, Yury Valentinovich
▪ Russian linguist Knorozov also spelled  Knorosov  born November 19, 1922, Kharkov, Ukraine, U.S.S.R. [now Kharkiv, Ukraine] died March 31, 1999, Moscow, ...
Knorr, Ludwig
▪ German chemist born Dec. 2, 1859, Munich died June 5, 1921, Jena, Ger.       German chemist who discovered antipyrine.       Knorr was educated at Munich, ...
knosp
/nosp/, n. a budlike ornament. [1800-10; < G Knospe bud; akin to KNOP] * * *
Knossos
—Knossian, adj. /nos"euhs/, n. a ruined city on N central Crete; capital of the ancient Minoan civilization. Also, Cnossus, Gnossus. * * * Ancient royal city, Crete. It was ...
knot
knot1 —knotless, adj. —knotlike, adj. /not/, n., v., knotted, knotting. n. 1. an interlacing, twining, looping, etc., of a cord, rope, or the like, drawn tight into a knob or ...
knot garden
an intricately designed flower or herb garden with plants arranged to create an interlacing pattern, sometimes with fanciful topiary and carefully tended paths. [1510-20] * * *
knot stitch
a stitch that produces a knot on the fabric surface, made by twining the thread about the needle. [1880-85] * * *
knot theory
▪ mathematics       in mathematics, the study of closed curves in three dimensions, and their possible deformations without one part cutting through another. Knots may ...
knotgrass
knotgrass [nät′wēd΄nät′gras΄] n. 1. any of several weedy plants (genus Polygonum) of the buckwheat family; esp., a common weed ( P. aviculare) with slender stems, narrow ...
knothole
/not"hohl'/, n. a hole in a board or plank formed by the falling out of a knot or a portion of a knot. [1720-30; KNOT1 + HOLE] * * *
knotroot
/not"rooht', -root'/, n. See Chinese artichoke. [1830-40, Amer.; KNOT1 + ROOT1] * * *
Knott's Berry Farm
▪ amusement park, California, United States       oldest and one of the largest thematic amusement parks in the United States. It is located in Buena Park, ...
Knott, Frederick Major Paul
▪ 2003       British playwright (b. Aug. 28, 1916, Hankou, China—d. Dec. 17, 2002, New York, N.Y.), wrote only three plays, but two of them met with enormous success. ...
knotted
/not"id/, adj. 1. having knots; knotty. 2. tied in or fastened with a knot. 3. made or ornamented with knots. 4. Bot. having many nodes or nodelike swellings; gnarled. 5. Zool. ...
knotter
/not"euhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that ties knots. 2. a device that ties knots in thread during the manufacture of yarn. 3. a person or thing that takes out or removes ...
knottiness
See knotty. * * *
knotting
/not"ing/, n. a decorative pattern produced by interlacing and tying knots in various yarns, as in macramé and tatting. [1605-15; KNOT1 + -ING1] * * *
Knotts, Don
▪ 2007 Jesse Donald Knotts  American actor (b. July 21, 1924, Morgantown, W.Va.—d. Feb. 24, 2006, Beverly Hills, Calif.), first gained the attention of television audiences ...
knotty
—knottily, adv. —knottiness, n. /not"ee/, adj., knottier, knottiest. 1. having knots; full of knots: a knotty piece of wood. 2. involved, intricate, or difficult: a knotty ...
knotty pine
☆ knotty pine n. pine wood cut and finished to emphasize the decorative quality of the knots, used for some interior finishing and furniture * * *
knotty rhatany.
See under rhatany (def. 1). * * *
knottypine
knotty pine n. Pine wood with a large number of knots, used especially for paneling and furniture. * * *
knotweed
/not"weed'/, n. any of several knotty-stemmed plants belonging to the genus Polygonum, of the buckwheat family. [1570-80; KNOT1 + WEED1] * * *
knout
/nowt/, n. 1. a whip with a lash of leather thongs, formerly used in Russia for flogging criminals. v.t. 2. to flog with the knout. [1710-20; < F < Russ knut, ORuss < ON knutr ...
know
know1 —knower, n. /noh/, v., knew, known, knowing, n. v.t. 1. to perceive or understand as fact or truth; to apprehend clearly and with certainty: I know the situation ...
know-all
/noh"awl'/, n. Informal. a know-it-all. [1880-85] * * *
know-how
/noh"how'/, n. knowledge of how to do something; faculty or skill for a particular activity; expertise: Designing a computer requires a lot of know-how. [1830-40, Amer.; n. use ...
know-it-all
/noh"it awl'/, n. 1. a person who acts as though he or she knows everything and who dismisses the opinions, comments, or suggestions of others. adj. 2. of or characteristic of a ...
know-nothing
—know-nothingism, n. /noh"nuth'ing/, n. 1. an ignorant or totally uninformed person; ignoramus. 2. an agnostic. 3. (caps.) U.S. Hist. a member of a political party (American ...
Know-Nothing Party
(also the Know-Nothings) the popular name for the American Republican Party, later called the American Party, which was established in 1843 with the aim of restricting ...
know-nothingism
See know-nothing. * * *
Know-Nothings
➡ Know-Nothing Party * * *
knowable
—knowableness, knowability, n. /noh"euh beuhl/, adj. capable of being known. [1400-50; late ME; see KNOW1, -ABLE] * * *
knowe
/now, noh/, n. Scot. and North Eng. knoll1. Also, know. * * *
knowed
/nohd/, v. Nonstandard. a pt. and pp. of know1. * * *
knower
See knowable. * * *
knowing
—knowingly, adv. —knowingness, n. /noh"ing/, adj. 1. affecting, implying, or deliberately revealing shrewd knowledge of secret or private information: a knowing glance. 2. ...
knowingly
See knowing. * * *
knowingness
See knowingly. * * *
Knowland, William Fife
▪ American politician born June 26, 1908, Alameda, Calif., U.S. died Feb. 23, 1974, Monte Rio, Calif.       U.S. politician, leader of Senate Republicans in the early ...
knowledge
—knowledgeless, adj. /nol"ij/, n. 1. acquaintance with facts, truths, or principles, as from study or investigation; general erudition: knowledge of many things. 2. familiarity ...
knowledge engineering
the practical application of developments in the field of computer science concerned with artificial intelligence. * * *
knowledgeability
See knowledgeable. * * *
knowledgeable
—knowledgeability, knowledgeableness, n. —knowledgeably, adv. /nol"i jeuh beuhl/, adj. possessing or exhibiting knowledge, insight, or understanding; intelligent; ...
knowledgeably
See knowledgeability. * * *
knowledgebase
knowledge base n. 1. Computer Science. The part of an expert system that contains the facts and rules needed to solve problems. 2. A collection of facts and rules for problem ...
knowledgeengineer
knowledge engineer n. A computer programmer who constructs expert systems.   knowledge engineering n. * * *
knowledgeengineering
See knowledge engineer. * * *
Knowles, John
born Sept. 16, 1926, Fairmont, W.Va., U.S. died Nov. 29, 2001, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. U.S. author. Educated at Yale University, he gained prominence for his first novel, A ...
Knowles, Stanley Howard
▪ 1998       American-born Canadian politician (b. June 18, 1908, Los Angeles, Calif.—d. June 9, 1997, Ottawa, Ont.), was an eloquent defender of social justice during ...
Knowles, William S.
▪ American chemist born June 1, 1917, Taunton, Massachusetts, U.S.       American chemist who, with Noyori Ryōji and K. Barry Sharpless (Sharpless, K. Barry), won the ...
Knowlton, Charles
▪ American physician born May 10, 1800, Templeton, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 20, 1850, Winchendon, Mass.       American physician whose popular treatise on birth control, ...
Knowlton, Frank Hall
▪ American paleobotanist born Sept. 2, 1860, Brandon, Vt., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1926, Ballston, Va.       U.S. paleobotanist and pioneer in the study of prehistoric ...
known
/nohn/, v. 1. pp. of know1. n. 2. a known quantity. * * *
Known or Suspected Chemical Carcinogens
▪ Table Known or suspected chemical carcinogens target organ agents industries tumour type lung tobacco smoke, arsenic, asbestos, crystalline silica, benzo(a)pyrene, ...
known quantity
1. Math. a quantity whose value is given: in algebra, frequently represented by a letter from the first part of the alphabet, as a, b, or c. 2. any factor, circumstance, etc., ...
Knowsley
▪ district, England, United Kingdom       metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Merseyside, historic county of Lancashire, England, just east of Liverpool. ...
Knox
/noks/, n. 1. (William) Frank(lin), 1874-1944, U.S. publisher and government official. 2. Henry, 1750-1806, American Revolutionary general: 1st U.S. secretary of war 1785-94. 3. ...
Knox College
▪ college, Galesburg, Illinois, United States       private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Galesburg, Illinois, U.S. The college, founded in 1837 by ...
Knox, Fort
▪ fort, Kentucky, United States  major U.S. military reservation in Meade, Hardin, and Bullitt counties, northern Kentucky, U.S. It lies 30 miles (48 km) southwest of ...
Knox, Frank
▪ American publisher born Jan. 1, 1874, Boston died April 28, 1944, Washington, D.C.       U.S. newspaper publisher and secretary of the navy during World War II. After ...
Knox, Henry
born July 25, 1750, Boston, Mass. died Oct. 25, 1806, Thomaston, Maine, U.S. American Revolutionary officer. Active in the colonial militia, he joined the Continental Army and ...
Knox, John
born с 1514, near Haddington, East Lothian, Scot. died Nov. 24, 1472, Edinburgh Scottish clergyman, leader of the Scottish Reformation and founder of Scottish ...
Knox, Philander Chase
born May 6, 1853, Brownsville, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1921, Washington, D.C. U.S. lawyer and politician. After admission to the bar in 1875 he became a successful corporation ...
Knox, Ronald
▪ British theologian born Feb. 17, 1888, Kibworth Beauchamp, Leicestershire, Eng. died Aug. 24, 1957, Mells, Somerset  English author, theologian, and dignitary of the Roman ...
Knox, Rose Markward
▪ American businesswoman née  Rose Markward  born Nov. 18, 1857, Mansfield, Ohio, U.S. died Sept. 27, 1950, Johnstown, N.Y.       American businesswoman who was ...
Knox,Henry
Knox (nŏks), Henry. 1750-1806. American Revolutionary soldier who transported 55 captured British cannon from Fort Ticonderoga, New York, to Boston, where George Washington ...
Knox,John
Knox, John. 1514?-1572. Scottish religious reformer and founder of Scottish Presbyterianism. While living in exile (1553-1559) during the reign of Mary Queen of Scots, a ...
Knox-Johnston
(1939– ) a British yachtsman who was the first man to sail alone around the world without stopping. The journey took ten months, from June 1968 to April 1969. He was made a ...
Knoxville
—Knoxvillian, Knoxvillite, n. /noks"vil/, n. a city in E Tennessee, on the Tennessee River. 183,139. * * * City (pop., 2000: 173,890), eastern Tennessee, U.S. In 1785 a treaty ...
KNP
Chess. king's knight's pawn. * * *
kns
See kms. * * *
knš
See kms. * * *
Knt
Knt abbrev. Knight * * *
Knt.
Knight. * * *
knub
/nub/, n. nub. [in modern use prob. sp. var., influenced by KNOB; cf. NUB] * * *
knubbly
/nub"lee/, adj., knubblier, knubbliest. nubbly. * * *
knubby
/nub"ee/, adj., knubbier, knubbiest. nubby. Also, knubbed. * * *
knuck
/nuk/, n. 1. Informal. knuckle. 2. knucks, Slang. a pair of brass knuckles. [by shortening] * * *
knuckle
—knuckly, adj. /nuk"euhl/, n., v., knuckled, knuckling. n. 1. a joint of a finger, esp. one of the articulations of a metacarpal with a phalanx. 2. the rounded prominence of ...
knuckle ball
Baseball. a slow pitch that moves erratically toward home plate, usually delivered by holding the ball between the thumb and the knuckles of the first joints of the first two or ...
knuckle joint
1. a joint forming a knuckle. 2. Mach. a joint between two parts allowing movement in one plane only. [1860-65] * * *
knuckle sandwich
Slang. a punch in the mouth with a clenched fist. [1970-75] * * *
knuckle-duster
/nuk"euhl dus'teuhr/, n. See brass knuckles. [1855-60, Amer.] * * *
knuckleball
knuckle ball or knuck·le·ball (nŭkʹəl-bôl') n. Baseball A slow, randomly fluttering pitch thrown by gripping the ball with the tips or nails of two or three ...
knuckleballer
/nuk"euhl baw'leuhr/, n. Baseball. a pitcher who specializes in throwing knuckle balls. [KNUCKLE BALL + -ER1] * * *
knucklebone
/nuk"euhl bohn'/, n. 1. (in humans) any of the bones forming a knuckle of a finger. 2. (in quadrupeds) a bone homologous with a wrist, ankle, or finger bone of humans, or its ...
knucklehead
—knuckleheaded, adj. /nuk"euhl hed'/, n. Informal. a stupid, bumbling, inept person. [1940-45; KNUCKLE + HEAD] * * *
knucklejoint
knuckle joint n. A hinged joint in which a pin fastens the ends of two rods, one of which has an eye that fits between the two perforated projections of the other. * * *
knuckler
knuck·ler (nŭkʹlər) n. Baseball A knuckle ball. * * *
Knuckles
▪ mountains, Sri Lanka       mountains in Sri Lanka, running north–south to the north of the Mahaweli Ganga Valley, rising to 6,112 ft (1,863 m) at Knuckles Peak, ...
knucklesandwich
knuckle sandwich n. Slang A punch in the mouth. * * *
Knudsen
/noohd"seuhn/; Dan. /knooh"seuhn/, n. William S. (Signius Wilhelm Paul Knudsen), 1879-1948, U.S. industrialist, born in Denmark. * * *
Knudsen, William S
▪ American industrialist original name  Signius Wilhelm Poul Knudsen   born March 25, 1879, Copenhagen died April 27, 1948, Detroit  Danish-born American industrialist, an ...
Knudsen, William Signius
orig. Signius Wilhelm Poul Knudsen born March 25, 1879, Copenhagen, Den. died April 27, 1948, Detroit, Mich., U.S. Danish-U.S. industrialist. He immigrated to the U.S. in ...
knulling
/nul"ing/, n. Archit. a convex molding having a series of members separated by indentations, as a bead and reel. Also, knurling, nulling. [1935-45; var. of KNURLING] * * *
knur
/nerr/, n. a knotty or hard protuberance or growth, as on a tree. [1350-1400; ME knorre, knor; c. MLG, MD, MHG knorre] * * *
knurl
/nerrl/, n. 1. a small ridge or bead, esp. one of a series, as on a button for decoration or on the edge of a thumbscrew to assist in obtaining a firm grip. 2. a knur. v.t. 3. to ...
knurl toe
Furniture. See French foot (def. 1). * * *
knurled
/nerrld/, adj. 1. having small ridges on the edge or surface; milled. 2. having knurls or knots; gnarled. [1605-15; KNURL + -ED3] * * *
knurling
/nerr"ling/, n. 1. a series of knurls, as on a knob. 2. Archit. knulling. [1605-15; KNURL + -ING1] * * *
knurly
/nerr"lee/, adj., knurlier, knurliest. having knurls or knots; gnarled. [1595-1605; KNURL + -Y1] * * *
Knut
/knooht", knyooht"/, n. Canute. * * *
Knuth, Donald E(rvin)
born Jan. 10, 1938, Milwaukee, Wis., U.S. U.S. computer scientist. Knuth earned a Ph.D. in mathematics in 1963 from the California Institute of Technology. A pioneer in ...
Knutsford
▪ England, United Kingdom       town (parish), Macclesfield borough, administrative and historic county of Cheshire, England. It is located on the Cheshire Plain ...
Knyphausen, Wilhelm, Freiherr von
▪ German general born November 4, 1716, Luxembourg died December 7, 1800, Kassel, Hesse-Kassel [Germany]       German soldier who after 1777 commanded “Hessian” ...
KO
n. /kay"oh", kay"oh'/; v. /kay"oh"/, n., pl. KO's, v., KO'd, KO'ing. Slang. n. 1. a knockout in boxing. v.t. 2. to knock unconscious, esp. in a boxing match; knock out. Also, ...
Ko Hŭi-dong
▪ Korean artist born 1886, Korea died 1965, Korea       Korean artist who pioneered in the application of Western techniques to traditional painting styles. After World ...
Ko Hung
▪ Chinese philosopher Pinyin  Ge Hong,  also called  (Wade–Giles romanization) Pao-p'u-tzu  born AD 283, ?, Tan-yang, China died AD 343, , Tan-yang       perhaps ...
Ko Un
▪ 2008   born Aug. 1, 1933, Kunsan, North Cholla province, Japanese-occupied Korea [now South Korea] By 2007 Korean poet Ko Un, the author of more than 150 works, including ...
ko-
Stem of demonstrative pronoun meaning “this.” Oldest form *k̑o-, becoming *ko- in centum languages. Derivatives include he1, et cetera, and behind. I. Variant form ...
kō-
To sharpen, whet. Oldest form *k̑eə₃-, colored to *k̑oə₃-, contracted to *k̑ō- (becoming *kō- in centum languages). 1. Suffixed extended form *koəi-no-. hone1, from ...
koa
/koh"euh/, n. 1. a Hawaiian acacia, Acacia koa, of the legume family, characterized by spreading branches and gray bark. 2. the hard, red or golden-brown wood of this tree, used ...
koala
/koh ah"leuh/, n. a sluggish, tailless, gray, furry, arboreal marsupial, Phascolarctos cinereus, of Australia. [1800-10; erroneous sp. for earlier koola(h) (now obs.) < Dharuk ...
Kōami Family
▪ Japanese artists flourished 19th century       Japanese lacquerware artists who were eminent for 19 generations in the Muromachi, Azuchi-Momoyama, and Tokugawa ...
koan
/koh"ahn/, n., pl. koans, koan. Zen. a nonsensical or paradoxical question to a student for which an answer is demanded, the stress of meditation on the question often being ...
kob
/kob, kohb/, n. an African antelope, Kobus kob, related to the puku and the lechwe. [1765-75; said to be < Wolof koba] * * * ▪ mammal       small, stocky African ...
kob-
To suit, fit, succeed. hap, happen, happy; hapless, mishap, from Old Norse happ, chance, good luck, from Germanic *hap-.   [Pokorny kob- 610.] * * *
Kobarid
Serbo-Croatian. /kaw"bah rddeed'/; Eng. /koh"beuh reed'/, n. a village in W Slovenia, formerly in Italy: defeat of the Italians by the Germans and Austrians 1917. Italian, ...
Kobayashi Hideo
▪ Japanese author born April 11, 1902, Tokyo, Japan died March 1, 1983, Tokyo       one of the most influential critics in the Japanese cultural ...
Kobayashi Kiyochika
▪ Japanese printmaker born Sept. 10, 1847, Asakusa, Edo [now Tokyo], Japan died Nov. 28, 1915, Kyōto       Japanese printmaker who adopted the effects of Western ...
Kobayashi Kokei
▪ Japanese painter original name  Kobayashi Shigeru   born Feb. 11, 1883, Niigata prefecture, Japan died April 3, 1957, Tokyo       artist who greatly contributed to ...
Kobayashi Makoto
▪ Japanese scientist born April 7, 1944, Nagoya, Japan       Japanese scientist who was a corecipient, with Yoichiro Nambu (Nambu, Yoichiro) and Maskawa Toshihide, of ...
Kobayashi Masaki
▪ Japanese director born Feb. 4, 1916, Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan died Oct. 4, 1996, Tokyo       Japanese motion-picture director whose 9 1/2-hour trilogy, Ningen no joken ...
Kobayashi Takiji
▪ Japanese author born Oct. 13, 1903, Shimo Kawazoe, Japan died Feb. 20, 1933, Tokyo       outstanding writer of the proletarian literary movement in pre-World War II ...
Kobayashi, Koji
▪ 1997       Japanese visionary industrialist who guided the NEC Corp. as president (1964-76) and then chairman (until 1988) toward computers and other high-tech ...
Kobayashi, Masaki
▪ 1997       Japanese film director (b. Feb. 14, 1916, Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan—d. Oct. 4, 1996, Tokyo, Japan), created exquisitely stylized motion pictures known for ...
kobdas
Drum used for inducing trances and for divination by Sami shamans. It consisted of a wooden frame over which a reindeer hide was stretched; the hide was covered with designs ...
Kobe
/koh"bee/; Japn. /kaw"bee"/, n. a seaport on S Honshu, in S Japan. 1,367,392. * * * City (pop., 2000 prelim.: 1,493,595), west-central Honshu, Japan. It is situated on Ōsaka ...
Kobe beef
meat from the Japanese cattle (Kobe cattle), which are specially raised to produce a beef that is highly prized for its extreme tenderness. * * *
Kōbe earthquake of 1995
▪ Japanese history also called   Great Hanshin earthquake , Japanese in full  Hanshin-Awaji Daishinsai (“Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster”)   (Jan. 17, 1995) ...
Kōbe Steel, Ltd.
▪ Japanese manufacturer       major Japanese manufacturer of iron and steel, nonferrous metal products, and machinery. Headquarters are in Kōbe with offices in Tokyo ...
Köbenhavn
/kue'beuhn hown"/, n. Danish name of Copenhagen. * * *
Kobia, Samuel
▪ 2005       It did not take long after the Rev. Samuel Kobia became general secretary of the World Council of Churches (WCC) in January 2004 for the Kenyan Methodist ...
Koblenz
/koh"blents/, n. Coblenz. * * * or Coblenz ancient Confluentes City (pop., 2002 est.: 107,730), western Germany. Situated at the junction of the Rhine and Moselle rivers, it ...
kobo
/koh"boh/, n., pl. kobo, kobos. a bronze coin and monetary unit of Nigeria, the 100th part of a naira. * * *
kobold
/koh"bold, -bohld/, n. (in German folklore) 1. a spirit or goblin, often mischievous, that haunts houses. 2. a spirit that haunts mines or other underground places. [1625-35; < ...
Kobuk Valley National Park
National park, northwestern Alaska, U.S. Located north of the Arctic Circle, it was made a national monument in 1978 and a national park in 1980. Occupying an area of 1,750,421 ...
Kobus
▪ mammalian genus  genus of antelopes, family Bovidae (order Artiodactyla), containing about six species—the waterbucks (waterbuck) and lechwes (lechwe), the kob, and the ...
Koc, Vehbi
▪ 1997       Turkish businessman and philanthropist who built his business into the country's largest conglomerate—comprising over 80 companies and employing over ...
Kocaeli
/koh'jah ay"lee, keuh juy"lee/, n. Izmit. * * * ▪ province, Turkey       il (province), of northwestern Turkey, bounded on the north by the Black Sea and on the west ...
Koch
/koch/ for 1; /kawkh/ for 2, n. 1. Edward I., born 1924, U.S. politician: mayor of New York City since 1977. 2. Robert /rddoh"berddt/, 1843-1910, German bacteriologist and ...
Koch Bihar
▪ India also spelled  Kuch Bihar  or  Cooch Behar        town, West Bengal state, northeastern India. The town lies just east of the Torsa River. It is an ...
Koch, (Heinrich Hermann) Robert
born Dec. 11, 1843, Clausthal, Hannover died May 27, 1910, Baden-Baden, Ger. German physician. As the first to isolate the anthrax bacillus, observe its life cycle, and develop ...
Koch, C.J.
▪ Australian author in full  Christopher John Koch  born July 16, 1932, Hobart, Tas., Austl.       Australian novelist whose sensually detailed works often explore ...
Koch, Ed(ward Irving)
born Dec. 12, 1924, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. politician. After serving in the army during World War II, he graduated from New York University Law School. He was elected to the ...
Koch, Frederick Henry
▪ American theatrical manager and educator born Sept. 12, 1877, Covington, Ky., U.S. died Aug. 16, 1944, Miami Beach       founder of the Carolina Playmakers at the ...
Koch, Ilsa
▪ German war criminal byname  Witch of Buchenwald  German  Hexe von Buchenwald  born 1906?, Dresden, Germany died September 1/2, 1967, Aichach, West ...
Koch, Kenneth
▪ American author born February 27, 1925, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. died July 6, 2002, New York, New York       American teacher and author noted especially for his witty, ...
Koch, Kenneth Jay
▪ 2003       American poet, writer, and teacher (b. Feb. 27, 1925, Cincinnati, Ohio—d. July 6, 2002, New York, N.Y.), was known for verse that combined modernism with ...
Koch, Marita
▪ German athlete married name  Marita Koch Meier  born Feb. 18, 1957, Wismar, E.Ger.       East German athlete who collected a remarkable 16 individual and team world ...
Koch, Martin
▪ Swedish author born Dec. 23, 1882, Stockholm died June 22, 1940, Hedemora, Swed.       Swedish novelist who was first among the “proletarian authors” to make a ...
Koch, Niels Fabian Helge von
▪ Swedish mathematician born January 25, 1870, Stockholm, Sweden died March 11, 1924, Stockholm  Swedish mathematician famous for his discovery of the von Koch snowflake ...
Koch, Robert
▪ German bacteriologist Introduction in full  Robert Heinrich Hermann Koch  born Dec. 11, 1843, Clausthal, Hannover [now Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Ger.] died May 27, 1910, ...
Koch, Rudolf
▪ German artist born Nov. 20, 1876, Nürnberg, Ger. died April 9, 1934, Offenbach       German calligrapher (calligraphy), type designer, and teacher, a major influence ...
Koch,Robert
Koch (kôk, kôKH), Robert. 1843-1910. German bacteriologist who discovered the cholera bacillus and the bacterial cause of anthrax. He won a 1905 Nobel Prize for developing ...
Kochanowski, Jan
▪ Polish poet born 1530, Sycyna, Poland died August 22, 1584, Lublin  humanist poet who dominated the culture of Renaissance Poland.       Born into the country ...
Kocharian, Robert
▪ president of Armenia in full  Robert Sedraki Kocharian  born Aug. 31, 1954, Stepanakert [now Xankändi], Azer.       Armenian politician who served as president of ...
Köchel listing
/kerr"sheuhl/; Ger. /kue"kheuhl/ the chronological number of a composition of Mozart as assigned in the catalog of the composer's works compiled in the 19th century by the ...
Köchel, Ludwig (Alois Ferdinand) von
born Jan. 14, 1800, Stein, near Krems, Austria died June 3, 1877, Vienna Austrian scholar and musicologist. After gaining a law degree, he tutored children of wealthy families ...
Köchel, Ludwig, Ritter von
▪ Austrian musician in full  Ludwig Alois Ferdinand, Ritter von Köchel (knight of)  born Jan. 14, 1800, Stein, near Krems, Austria died June 3, 1877, ...
Kocher
/koh"keuhr/; Ger. /koh"kheuhrdd/, n. Emil Theodor /ay"meel tay"oh dohrdd'/, 1841-1917, Swiss physiologist, pathologist, and surgeon: Nobel prize 1909. * * *
Kocher, Emil Theodor
born Aug. 25, 1841, Bern, Switz. died July 27, 1917, Bern Swiss surgeon. He was the first surgeon to remove the thyroid gland to treat goitre (1876). He later found that total ...
Kochi
/koh"chee/; Japn. /kaw"chee/, n. a seaport on central Shikoku, in SW Japan. 300,830. * * * ▪ India formerly  Cochin        city and major port on the Arabian Sea, ...
Kochno, Boris
▪ French writer born Jan. 3, 1904, Moscow, Russia died Dec. 8, 1990, Paris, France       Russian-born writer and ballet librettist who collaborated with ballet ...
Kochowski, Wespazjan
▪ Polish poet and historian born 1633, Gaj, Poland died June 6, 1700, Kraków       Polish poet and historian whose works helped spark Polish ...
Kock, Paul de
▪ French author in full  Charles-Paul de Kock  born May 21, 1793, Passy, Fr. died April 27, 1871, Paris       prolific French author whose novels about Parisian life ...
Kōda Rohan
▪ Japanese author pseudonym of  Kōda Shigeyuki   born Aug. 20, 1867, Edo, Japan died July 30, 1947, Ichikawa, Chiba Prefecture       Japanese novelist and essayist ...
Kodachrome
/koh"deuh krohm'/ 1. Trademark. a brand of positive color transparency. n. 2. (l.c.) a positive color transparency. * * *
Kodaikanal
▪ India  town, southwestern Tamil Nadu (Tamil Nādu) state, southeastern India. It is situated at an elevation of 7,300 feet (2,225 metres) in the Palni Hills. Created in ...
Kodaira
▪ Japan       city, Tokyo to (metropolis), Honshu, Japan, in the Musashino Plateau, on the Shinjuku Line (railway). The surrounding area was developed as an ...
Kodaira Kunihiko
▪ Japanese mathematician born March 16, 1915, Tokyo, Japan died July 26, 1997, Kōfu       Japanese mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1954 for his work ...
Kodaira, Kunihiko
▪ 1998       Japanese mathematician who made important contributions to harmonic analysis, algebraic geometry, complex analytic manifolds, and other areas of ...
Kodak
/koh"dak/, Trademark. a brand of portable camera introduced by George Eastman in 1888, using a roll of film and intended for taking snapshots. * * *
Kodak{™}
a US company which is the world’s largest producer of cameras, film and other photographic equipment. It was started in 1892 by George Eastman, who created the name Kodak ...
Kodály
/koh duy", -dah"ee/; Hung. /koh"dah yeu/, n. Zoltán /zawl"tahn/, 1882-1967, Hungarian composer. * * *
Kodály, Zoltán
Ko·dál·y (kō'dīʹ, kôʹdä-yə), Zoltán. 1882-1967. Hungarian composer whose works include the opera Háry János (1926) and the orchestral work Missa Brevis (1945). * * ...
Kodama Gentarō
▪ Japanese statesman born March 16, 1852, Tokuyama, Japan died July 23, 1906, Tokyo  Japanese army general and statesman of the Meiji period.       Kodama, born into ...
Kodel
/koh del"/, Trademark. a brand of polyester fiber, used chiefly in blended cotton and polyester fabrics and as a fiberfill. * * *
Kodiak
/koh"dee ak'/, n. 1. an island in the N Pacific, near the base of the Alaska Peninsula. 100 mi. (160 km) long. 2. See Kodiak bear. * * * ▪ Alaska, United ...
Kodiak bear
a large, brown bear, Ursus (arctos) middendorffi, inhabiting coastal areas of Alaska and British Columbia, that grows to a length of 9 ft. (2.7 m). Also called ...
Kodiak Island
Island (pop., 2000: 13,913), Alaska, U.S. Lying in the Gulf of Alaska, it is 100 mi (160 km) long and 10–60 mi (16–96 km) wide and has an area of 3,588 sq mi (9,293 sq ...
Kodiakbear
Ko·di·ak bear (kōʹdē-ăk') n. A brown bear inhabiting islands and coastal areas of Alaska and sometimes considered a separate species (Ursus middendorffi).   [After Kodiak ...
KodiakIsland
Kodiak Island An island of southern Alaska in the Gulf of Alaska east of the Alaska Peninsula. Discovered in 1763, the island was the site of the first permanent Russian ...
Kodok
/koh"dok/, n. modern name of Fashoda. * * *
Koechlin, Charles
▪ French composer born Nov. 27, 1867, Paris, Fr. died Dec. 31, 1950, Le Rayol Canadel-sur-Mer, Var  composer and teacher who had a strong impact on his own and younger ...
koel
/koh"euhl/, n. any of several cuckoos of the genus Eudynamys, of India, the Malay Archipelago, and Australia. [1820-30; < Hindi < Skt kokila] * * *
Koenig, Marie-Pierre
▪ French military officer in full  Marie-Pierre-Joseph-François Koenig  born October 10, 1898, Caen, France died September 2, 1970, Neuilly-sur-Seine       French ...


© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.091 c;