Слова на букву --- -be m (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву --- -be m (459)

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at close range
{adv. phr.} Close by; in proximity. * /The police officer fired at the fleeing murder suspect at close range./
at cross purposes
{adv. phr.} With opposing meanings or aims; with opposing effect or result; with aims which hinder or get in each other's way. * /Tom's parents acted at cross purposes in ...
at death's door
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} Very near death; dying. * /He seemed to be at death's door from his illness./
at ease
or[at one's ease] {adj.} or {adv. phr.} 1. In comfort; without pain or bother. * /You can't feel at ease with a toothache./ 2. or[at one's ease] Comfortable in one's ...
at every turn
{adv. phr.} Every time; all the time; continually without exception. * /Because of his drinking, the man was refused a job at every turn./
at face value
{prep. phr.} What one can actually hear, read, or see; literally. * /John is so honest that you can take his words at face value./ * /This store's advertisements are ...
at fault
{adj. phr.} Responsible for an error or failure; to blame. * /The driver who didn't stop at the red light was at fault in the accident./ * /When the engine would not ...
at first
{adv. phr.} In the beginning; at the start. * /The driver didn't see the danger at first./ * /At first the job looked good to Bob, but later it became tiresome./ * ...
at first blush
{adv. phr.} When first seen; without careful study. * /At first blush the offer looked good, but when we studied it, we found things we could not accept./
at first glance
or[at first sight] {adv.} or {adj. phr.} After a first quick look. * /At first sight, his guess was that the whole trouble between the two men resulted from personalities ...
at great length
{prep. phr.} 1. In great detail. * /Jim told us the story of his life at great length./ 2. For a long time. * /The boring speaker rambled on at great length./
at half mast
{prep. phr.} Halfway up or down; referring primarily to flagposts, but may be used jokingly. * /When a president of the United States dies, all flags are flown at half ...
at hand
also[at close hand] or[near at hand] {adv. phr.} 1. Easy to reach; nearby. * /When he writes, he always keeps a dictionary at hand./ 2. {formal} Coming soon; almost here. ...
at heart
{adv. phr.} 1. In spite of appearances; at bottom; in reality. * /His manners are rough but he is a kind man at heart./ 2. As a serious interest or concern; as an ...
at home
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. In the place where you live or come from. * * /I went to his house, but he was not at home./ * /Americans abroad are protected by the government ...
at issue
{adj. phr.} 1. In dispute; to be settled by debate, by vote, by battle, or by some other contest. * /His good name was at issue in the trial./ * /The independence of ...
at it
{adj. phr.} Busily doing something; active. * /His rule for success was to keep always at it./ * /The couple who owned the little cleaning shop were at it early and late./ * ...
at large
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Not kept within walls, fences, or boundaries; free. * /The killer remained at large for weeks./ Compare: AT LIBERTY. * /Cattle and sheep roamed ...
at last
also[at long last] {adv. phr.} After a long time; finally. * /The war had been long and hard, but now there was peace at last./ * /The boy saved his money until at last he ...
at least
{adv. phr.} 1. or[at the least] At the smallest guess; no fewer than; no less than. * /You should brush your teeth at least twice a day./ * /At least three students are ...
at leisure
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} 1. Not at work; not busy; with free time; at rest. * /Come and visit us some evening when you're at leisure./ 2. or[at one's leisure] When and how ...
at length
{adv. phr.} 1. In detail; fully. * /You must study the subject at length to understand it./ * /The teacher explained the new lesson at length to the students./ 2. In the ...
at liberty
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Free to go somewhere or do something; not shut in or stopped. * /The police promised to set the man at liberty if he told the names of the other ...
at loggerheads
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} In a quarrel; in a fight; opposing each other. * /The two senators had long been at loggerheads on foreign aid./ * /Because of their barking dog, the ...
at long last
See: AT LAST.
at loose ends
{adj. phr.} Without a regular job or settled habits; uncertain what to do next; having nothing to do for a while; undecided; unsettled; restless. * /Feeling at loose ...
at most
or[at the most] {adv. phr.} By the largest or most generous guess; at the upper limit; by the maximum account; not more than; at best; at worst. * /It was a minor ...
at odds
{adj. phr.} In conflict or disagreement; opposed. * /The boy and girl were married a week after they met and soon found themselves at odds about religion./ Compare: AT ...
at once
{adv. phr.} 1. Without delay; right now or right then; immediately. * /Put a burning match next to a piece of paper and it will begin burning at once./ * /Mother called ...
at one
{adj. phr.} 1. In union or harmony; in agreement or sympathy. Not usually used informally. * /He felt at one with all the poets who have sung of love./ 2. Of the same ...
at one fell swoop
See: IN ONE FELL SWOOP.
at one stroke
See: AT A BLOW or AT ONE STROKE.
at one time
{adv. phr.} 1. In the same moment; together. * /Let's start the dance again all at one time./ * /Mr. Reed's bills came all at one time and he could not pay them./ Syn.: ...
at one's beck and call
or[at the beck and call of] {adj. phr.} Ready and willing to do whatever someone asks; ready to serve at a moment's notice. * /A good parent isn't necessarily always ...
at one's best
{prep. phr.} In best form; displaying one's best qualities. * /Tim is at his best when he has had a long swim before a ballgame./ * /Jane rested before the important ...
at one's door
or[at one's doorstep] {adv. phr.} 1. Very close; very near where you live or work. * /Johnny is very lucky because there's a swimming pool right at his doorstep./ * ...
at one's ease
See: AT EASE(2).
at one's elbow
{adv. phr.} Close beside you; nearby. * /The President rode in an open car with his wife at his elbow./ * /Mary practiced for several years to become a champion ...
at one's feet
{adv. phr.} Under your influence or power. * /She had a dozen men at her feet./ * /Her voice kept audiences at her feet for years./ Compare: THROW ONESELF AT SOMEONE'S ...
at one's fingertips
{adv. phr.} 1. Within easy reach; quickly touched; nearby. * /Seated in the cockpit, the pilot of a plane has many controls at his fingertips./ 2. Readily usable as ...
at one's heels
{adv. phr.} Close behind; as a constant follower or companion. * /The boy got tired of having his little brother at his heels all day./ * /John ran by the finish line with ...
at one's leisure
See: AT LEISURE(2).
at one's service
{adv. phr.} 1. Ready to serve or help you; prepared to obey your wish or command; subject to your orders. * /He placed himself completely at the President's service./ * ...
at one's wit's end
or[at wits end] {adj. phr.} Having no ideas as to how to meet a difficulty or solve a problem; feeling puzzled after having used up all of your ideas or resources; not ...
at one's word
See: TAKE AT ONE'S WORD.
at pains
{adj. phr.} Making a special effort. * /At pains to make a good impression, she was prompt for her appointment./
at present
{adv. phr.} At this time; now. * /It took a long time to get started, but at present the road is half finished./ * /At present the house is empty, but next week a ...
at random
{adv. phr.} With no order, plan, or purpose; in a mixed-up, or thoughtless way. * /He opened the letters at random./ * /His clothes were scattered about the room at ...
at sea(1)
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. On an ocean voyage; on a journey by ship. * /They had first met at sea./ 2. Out on the ocean; away from land. * /By the second day the ship ...
at sea(2)
{adj. phr.} Not knowing what to do; bewildered; confused; lost. * /The job was new to him, and for a few days he was at sea./ * /When his friends talked about ...
at sight
or[on sight] {adv. phr.} 1. The first time the person or thing is seen; as soon as the person or thing is seen. * /First graders learn to read many words on sight./ * ...
at sixes and sevens
{adj. phr.} Not in order; in confusion; in a mess. * /He apologized because his wife was away and the house was at sixes and sevens./ * /Our teacher had just moved to a new ...
at stake
{adj. phr.} Depending, like a bet, on the outcome of something uncertain; in a position to be lost or gained. * /The team played hard because the championship of the ...
at straws
See: GRASP AT STRAWS.
at swords' points
{adj. phr.} Ready to start fighting; very much opposed to each; other hostile; quarreling. * /The dog's barking kept the Browns at swords' points with their neighbors for ...
at table
See: AT THE TABLE; WAIT AT TABLE.
at that
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. As it is; at that point; without more talk or waiting. * /Ted was not quite satisfied with his haircut but let it go at that./ 2. In ...
at the best
See: AT BEST.
at the bit
See: CHAMP AT THE BIT.
at the drop of a hat
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. Without waiting; immediately; promptly. * /If you need a babysitter quickly, call Mary, because she can come at the drop of a hat./ Compare: ON THE ...
at the eleventh hour
{prep. phr.} At the last possible time. * /Aunt Mathilda got married at the eleventh hour; after all, she was already 49 years old./
at the end of one's rope
See: END OF ONE'S ROPE.
at the kill
See: IN AT THE KILL.
at the least
See: AT LEAST.
at the mercy of
or[at one's mercy] {adj. phr.} In the power of; subject to the will and wishes of; without defense against. * /The champion had the other boxer at his mercy./ * /The ...
at the most
See: AT MOST.
at the outset
{adv. phr.} At the start; at the beginning. * /"You'll live in the cheaper barracks at the outset; later you can move into the better cabins," the camp director said ...
at the outside
{adv. phr.} Maximally; at the utmost. * /This old house can cost no more than $40,000 at the outside./
at the point of
{prep.} Very near to; almost at or in. * /When Mary broke her favorite bracelet, she was at the point of tears./ * /The boy hurt in the accident lay at the point of ...
at the ready
{adj. phr.} Ready for use. * /The sailor stood at the bow, harpoon at the ready, as the boat neared the whale./
at the same time
{adv. phr.} 1. In the same moment; together. * /The two runners reached the finish line at the same time./ Syn.: AT ONCE, AT ONE TIME. 2. In spite of that fact; ...
at the seams
See: BURST AT THE SEAMS.
at the table
or[at table] {adv. phr.} At a meal; at the dinner table. * /The telephone call came while they were all at table./
at the tip of one's tongue
or[on the tip of one's tongue] {adv. phr.} {informal} 1. Almost spoken; at the point of being said. * /It was at the tip of my tongue to tell him, when the phone rang./ * ...
at the top of one's voice
or[at the top of one's lungs] {adv. phr.} As loud as you can; with the greatest possible sound; very loudly. * /He was singing at the top of his voice./ * /He shouted ...
at this rate
or[at that rate] {adv. phr.} At a speed like this or that; with progress like this or that. * /John's father said that if John kept going at that rate he would never ...
at times
{adv. phr.} Not often; not regularly; not every day; not every week; occasionally; sometimes. * /At times Tom's mother lets him hold the baby./ * /You can certainly be ...
at will
{adv. phr.} As you like; as you please or choose freely. * /Little Bobby is allowed to wander at will in the neighborhood./ * /With an air conditioner you can enjoy ...
at wits end
See: AT ONE'S WIT'S END.
at work
{adj, phr.} Busy at a job; doing work. * /The teacher was soon hard at work correcting that day's test./ * /Jim is at work on his car./
at worst
or[at the worst] {adv. phr.} 1. Under the worst conditions; as the worst possibility. * /When Don was caught cheating in the examination he thought that at worst he ...
aught
See: FOR AUGHT at FOR ALL(2), FOR ALL ONE KNOWS.
Aunt Tom
{n.}, {slang}, {originally from Black English} A successful professional or business woman who, due to her success in a masculine profession, doesn't care about the ...
avail
See: TO NO AVAIL or OF NO AVAIL.
average
See: ON AN AVERAGE or ON THE AVERAGE, LAW OF AVERAGES.
awe
See: STAND IN AWE OF.
awkward age
{n.} Adolescence; awkwardness during adolescence. * /Sue used to be an " ugly duckling" when she was at the awkward age, but today she is a glamorous fashion model./
AWOL
See: ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.
ax to grind
{n. phr.}, {informal} Something to gain for yourself: a selfish reason. * /In praising movies for classroom use he has an ax to grind; he sells motion picture equipment./ * ...
B.Y.O.
(Abbreviation) {informal} Bring Your Own. Said of a kind of party where the host or hostess does not provide the drinks or food but people ring their own.
B.Y.O.B.
(Abbreviation) {informal} Bring Your Own Bottle. Frequently written on invitations for the kind of party where people bring their own liquor.
babe in the woods
{n. phr.} A person who is inexperienced or innocent in certain things. * /He is a good driver, but as a mechanic he is just a babe in the woods./ Compare: OVER ONE'S ...
baby
See: WAR BABY.
baby boom
{n.} A sudden increase in the birth rate. * /The universities were filled to capacity due to the baby boom that followed World War II./
baby kisser
{n.}, {slang} A person campaigning for votes in his quest for elected political office; such persons often kiss little children in public. * /Nixon was a baby kisser when ...
back
See: BACK OF or IN BACK OF, BEHIND ONE'S BACK, BRUSH BACK, COME BACK, CUT BACK, DOUBLE BACK, DRAW BACK, DROP BACK. EYES IN THE BACK OF ONE'S HEAD, FADE BACK, ...
back and forth
{adv.} Backwards and forwards. * /The chair is rocking hack and forth./ * /The tiger is pacing hack and forth in his cage./ Compare: TO AND FRO.
back away
{v.} To act to avoid or lessen one's involvement in something; draw or turn back; retreat. * The townspeople backed away from the building plan when they found out how ...
back door
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Rear of vehicle. * /I am watching your back door./
back down
or[back off] {v.}, {informal} To give up a claim; not follow up a threat. * /Bill said he could beat Ted, but when Ted put up his fists Bill backed down./ * /Harry ...
back in circulation
{adv. phr.} 1. Socially active once again (said about people); back on the dating circuit after a divorce or a romantic breakup. * /Now that Sully is divorced from Jim she ...
back number
{n.} Something out of fashion, or out of date. * /Among today's young people a waltz like "The Blue Danube" is a hack number./
back of
or[in back of] {prep.} 1. In or at the rear of; to the back of; behind. * /The garage is hack of the house./ * /Our car was in hack of theirs at the traffic light./ 2. ...
back out
{v. phr.} 1. To move backwards out of a place or enclosure. * /Bob slowly backed his car out of the garage./ 2. To withdraw from an activity one has promised to ...
back seat
See: TAKE A BACK SEAT.
back street
{n.} A street not near the main streets or from which it is hard to get to a main street. * /We got lost in the back streets going through the city and it took us a half ...
back talk
{n.} A sassy, impudent reply. * /Such back talk will get you nowhere, young man!/ See: TALK BACK.
back the wrong horse
{v. phr.} To support a loser. * /In voting for George Bush, voters in 1992 were backing the wrong horse./
back to the salt mines
{informal} Back to the job; back to work; back to work that is as hard or as unpleasant as working in a salt mine would be. - An overworked phrase, used humorously. * ...
back to the wall
or[back against the wall] {adv. phr.} In a trap, with no way to escape; in bad trouble. * /The soldiers had their backs to the wall./ * /He was in debt and could not get ...
back up
{v.} 1. To move backwards. * /The train was backing up./ 2. To help or be ready to help; stay behind to help; agree with and speak in support of. * /Jim has joined the Boy ...
back-to-back
{adv.} 1. Immediately following. * /The health clinic had back-to-back appointments for the new students during the first week of school./ 2. Very close to, as if ...
backfire
{v.} To misfire; to have a reverse effect from what was intended. * /Mimi's gossip about the Head of the Department backfired wizen people began to mistrust her./
backhanded compliment
{n. phr.} A remark that sounds like a compliment but is said sarcastically. * /"Not had for a girl" the coach said, offering a backhanded compliment./
backseat driver
{n.}, {informal} A bossy person in a car who always tells the driver what to do. * /The man who drove the car became angry with the back seat driver./
backward
See: BEND OVER BACKWARD or LEAN OVER BACKWARD; FALL OVER BACKWARDS or FALL OVER ONESELF.
backward and forward
or[backwards and forwards] {adv. phr.} To the full extent; in all details; thoroughly; completely. * /He understood automobile engines backwards and forwards./ * ...
bacon
See: BRING HOME THE BACON.
bad
See: GO FROM BAD TO WORSE, IN A BAD WAY, IN BAD, IN ONE'S BAD GRACES, LEAVE A BAD TASTE IN ONE'S MOUTH, NOT BAD or NOT SO BAD or NOT HALF BAD, ON ONE'S BAD SIDE, TOO ...
bad actor
{n.}, {informal} A person or animal that is always fighting, quarreling, or doing bad things. * /The boy was a bad actor and nobody liked him./
bad blood
{n.}, {informal} Anger or misgivings due to bad relations in the past between individuals or groups. * /There's a lot of bad blood between Max and Jack; I bet they'll ...
bad egg
{n.}, {slang} A ne'er-do-well; good-for nothing; a habitual offender. * /The judge sent the bad egg to prison at last./ Contrast: GOOD EGG.
bad mouth (someone)
{v.}, {slang} To say uncomplimentary or libelous things about someone; deliberately to damage another's reputation. * /It's not nice to had mouth people./
bad news
{n.}, {slang} An event, thing, or person which is disagreeable or an unpleasant surprise. * /What's the new professor like? - He's all bad news to me./
bad paper
{n.}, {slang} 1. A check for which there are no funds in the bank. 2. Counterfeit paper money. * /Why are you so mad? - I was paid with some bad paper./
bad shit
{n.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} An unpleasant event or situation, such as a long lasting and unsettled quarrel or recurring acts of vengeance preventing two people or two ...
bad trip
{n.}, {slang}, {also used colloquially} A disturbing or frightening experience, such as terrifying hallucinations, while under the influence of drugs; hence, by colloquial ...
bag
See: GRAB BAG, IN THE BAG, LEAVE HOLDING THE BAG, LET THE CAT OUT OF THE BAG.
bag and baggage
{adv.}, {informal} With all your clothes and other personal belongings, especially movable possessions; completely. * /If they don't pay their hotel bill they will be put ...
baggage
See: BAG AND BAGGAGE.
bail
See: JUMP BAIL or SKIP BAIL.
bail out(1)
{v.} 1. To secure release from prison until trial by leaving or promising money or property for a while. * /When college students got into trouble with the police, the ...
bail out(2)
{v.} To jump from an airplane and drop with a parachute. * /When the second engine failed, the pilot told everyone to bail out./
bail out(3)
{v.} To dip water from a filling or leaking boat; throw water out of a boat to prevent its sinking. * /Both men were kept busy bailing out the rowboat after it began ...
bait
See: FISH OR CUT BAIT.
bake
See: HALF-BAKED.
baker's dozen
{n.}, {informal} Thirteen. * /"How many of the jelly doughnuts, Sir? " the salesclerk asked. "Oh, make it a baker's dozen."/
balance
See: HANG IN THE BALANCE, OFF BALANCE.
ball
See: BASE ON BALLS, CARRY THE BALL, FLY BALL, FOUL BALL, GET THE BALL ROLLING, SET THE BALL ROLLING, START THE BALL ROLLING, GOPHER BALL, GROUND BALL, HAVE A HALL, HAVE ...
ball game
{n.}, {slang}, also {informal} The entire matter at hand; the whole situation; the entire contest. * /You said we can get a second mortgage for the house?! Wow! That's a ...
ball of fire
{n.}, {informal} A person with great energy and ability; a person who can do something very well. * /He did poorly in school but as a salesman he is a ball of fire./ * ...
ball up
{v.}, {slang} To make a mess of; confuse. * /Don't ball me up./ * /Hal balled up the business with his errors./ - Often used in the passive. * /He was so balled up that he ...
balloon
See: TRIAL BALLOON, LEAD BALLOON.
ballot stuffing
See: STUFF THE BALLOT BOX.
baloney
{n.}, {informal} Nonsense, unbelievable, trite, or trivial. * /John brags that he's won the $10 million lottery, and I think it's just a lot of baloney./ * /"Will you ...
banana oil
{n.}, {slang} Flattery that is an obvious exaggeration; statements that are obviously made with an ulterior motive. * /Cut out the banana oil; flattery will get ...
band
See: BEAT THE BAND.
band together
{v. phr.} To join a group to exert united force. * /The inhabitants of the ecologically threatened area banded together to stop the company from building new smokestacks./
bandbox
See: LOOK AS IF ONE HAS COME OUT OF A BANDBOX.
bandwagon
See: JUMP ON THE BANDWAGON.
bandy about
{v. phr.} To spread rumors or whisper secrets. * /The news of Jim and Mary's divorce was bandied about until everyone at the office had heard it./
bang up
{adj.}, {informal} Very successful; very good; splendid; excellent. * /The football coach has done a bang-up job this season./ * /John did a bang-up job painting the house./ ...
bank
See: PIGGY BANK.
bank on
{v.}, {informal} To depend on; put one's trust in; rely on. * /He knew he could bank on public indignation to change things, if he could once prove the dirty work./ * ...
bar
See: BEHIND BARS, PARALLEL BARS.
bar the door
See: CLOSE THE DOOR.
bargain
See: DRIVE A BARGAIN, IN THE BARGAIN or INTO THE BARGAIN.
bargain for
or[bargain on] {v.} To be ready for; expect. * /When John started a fight with the smaller boy he got more than he bargained for./ * /The final cost of building the house ...
barge in
{v. phr.}, {informal} To appear uninvited at someone's house or apartment, or to interrupt a conversation. * /I'm sorry for barging in like that, Sir, but my car died on me ...
bark up the wrong tree
{v. phr.}, {informal} To choose the wrong person to deal with or the wrong course of action; mistake an aim. * /If he thinks he can fool me, he is barking up the wrong ...
bark worse than one's bite
{informal} Sound or speech more frightening or worse than your actions. * /The small dog barks savagely, but his bark is worse than his bite./ * /The boss ...
barn
See: LOCK THE BARN DOOR AFTER THE HORSE IS STOLEN.
barrel
See: OVER A BARREL also OVER THE BARREL, SCRAPE THE BOTTOM OF THE BARREL.
barrelhead
See: CASH ON THE BARREL-HEAD.
base
See: FIRST BASE, GET TO FIRST BASE or REACH FIRST BASE, LOAD THE BASES or FILL THE BASES, OFF BASE, SECOND BASE, STOLEN BASE, THIRD BASE.
base on balls
{n.} First base given to a baseball batter who is pitched four balls outside of the strike zone. * /He was a good judge of pitchers and often received bases on balls./ ...
basket
See: PUT ALL ONE'S EGGS IN ONE BASKET.
basket case
{n.}, {slang}, {also informal} 1. A person who has had both arms and both legs cut off as a result of war or other misfortune. 2. A helpless person who is unable ...
bat
See: AT BAT, GO TO BAT FOR, RIGHT AWAY or RIGHT OFF also RIGHT OFF THE BAT.
bat an eye
or[bat an eyelash] {v. phr.}, {informal} To show surprise, fear, or interest; show your feelings. - Used in negative sentences. * /When I told him the price of the car ...
bat the breeze
See: SHOOT THE BREEZE.
bath
See: SPONGE BATH, THROW THE BABY OUT WITH THE BATH.
batting average
{n. phr.} Degree of accomplishment (originally used as a baseball term). * /Dr. Grace has a great batting average with her heart transplant operations./
battle
See: HALF THE BATTLE.
battle of nerves
{n. phr.} A contest of wills during which the parties do not fight physically but try to wear each other out. * /It has been a regular battle of nerves to get the new ...
bawl out
{v.}, {informal} To reprove in a loud or rough voice; rebuke sharply; scold. * /The teacher bawled us out for not handing in our homework./ Compare: HAUL OVER THE COALS, ...
bay
See: AT BAY, BRING TO BAY.
be
See: LET BE, TO-BE.
be a fly on the wall
{v. phr.} To eavesdrop on a secret conversation. * /How I wish I could be a fly on the wall to hear what my fiance's parents are saying about me!/
be a good hand at
{v. phr.} To be talented, gifted, or skilled in some activity. * /Florian is a good hand at both gardening and building./
be a poor hand at
{v. phr.} To be inept, untalented, or clumsy in some activity. * /Archibald is a poor hand at tennis so no one wants to play with him./ Contrast: BE A GOOD HAND AT.
be an item
{v. phr.} To be a couple; belong to one another. * /No one is surprised to see them together anymore; if is generally recognized that they are an item./
be at pains
{v. phr.} To be extremely desirous to do something; to take the trouble to do something. * /The captain was at pains to see that everybody got safely into the lifeboats./
be even-Steven
{v. phr.} To be in a position of owing no favors or debt to someone. * /Yesterday you paid for my lunch, so today I paid for yours; now we're even-Steven./
be game
{v. phr.} To be cooperative, willing, sporting. * /When I asked Charlie to climb Mount McKinley with us, he said he was game if we were./
be hard on
{v. phr.} To be strict or critical with another; be severe. * /"Don't be so hard on Jimmy," Tom said. "He is bound to rebel as he gets older."/
be in a stew
{v. phr.} To be worried, harassed, upset. * /Al has been in a stew ever since he got word that his sister was going to marry his worst enemy./
be in labor
{v. phr.} To be in parturition; experience the contractions of childbirth. * /Vane had been in labor for eight hours before her twin daughters were finally born./
be in someone else's shoes
{v. phr.} To be in someone else's situation. * /Fred has had so much trouble recently that we ought to be grateful we're not in his shoes./
be into something
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have taken something up partly as a nobby, partly as a serious interest of sorts (basically resulting from the new consciousness and ...
be it so
See: SO BE IT.
be itching to
{v. phr.} To have a very strong desire to do something. * /Jack is itching to travel abroad./
be my guest
{v. phr.} Feel free to use what I have; help yourself. * /When Suzie asked if she could borrow John's bicycle, John said, "Be my guest."/

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