Слова на букву keep-long (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву keep-long (459)

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keep track
{v. phr.} To know about changes; stay informed or up-to-date; keep a count or record. * /What day of the week is it? I can't keep track./ - Usually used with "of". * /Mr. ...
keep under one's hat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To keep secret; not tell. * /Mr. Jones knew who had won the contest, but he kept it under his hat until it was announced publicly./ - Often used as a ...
keep up
{v.} 1a. To go on; not stop; continue. * /The rain kept up for two days and the roads were flooded./ Compare: KEEP ON. 1b. To go on with (something); continue steadily; ...
keep up appearances
{v. phr.} To maintain an outward show of prosperity in spite of financial problems. * /Mr. Smith's widow had a hard time keeping up appearances after her husband's ...
keep up one's end
See: HOLD ONE'S END UP.
keep up with
See: KEEP STEP WITH, KEEP ABREAST OF.
keep up with the Joneses
{v. phr.} To follow the latest fashion; try to be equal with your neighbors. * /Mrs. Smith kept buying every new thing that was advertised, finally Mr. Smith told her to ...
keep watch
{v. phr.} To be vigilant; be alert; guard. * /The police have asked the neighborhood to keep watch against an escaped convict./
keep your fingers crossed
See: CROSS ONE'S FINGERS.
keeper
See: FINDERS KEEPERS.
keeping
See: IN KEEPING, OUT OF KEEPING.
keeps
See: FOR KEEPS.
kettle
See: KETTLE OF FISH, POT CALLS THE KETTLE BLACK.
kettle of fish
{v. phr.}, {informal} Something to be considered; how things are; a happening; business. * /I thought he needed money, but it was another kettle of fish - his car had ...
key
See: LOW KEY, OFF-KEY.
keyed up
{adj.}, {informal} Excited; nervous; anxious to do something. * /Mary was all keyed up about the exam./ * /Mother would not let Tom read a ghost story at bedtime; she ...
kick about
See: KICK AROUND(3).
kick against the pricks
{v. phr.}, {literary} To fight against rules or authority in a way that just hurts yourself. * /Johnny kicked against the pricks in his foster home until he learned that he ...
kick around
{v.}, {informal} 1. To act roughly or badly to; treat badly; bully. * /John likes to kick around the little boys./ * /Mr. Jones is always kicking his dog around./ Syn.: PUSH ...
kick back
{v.}, {slang}, {informal} To pay money illegally for favorable contract arrangements. * /I will do it if you kick back a few hundred for my firm./
kick down
{v. phr.}, {slang} To shift an automobile, jeep, or truck into lower gear by hand-shifting. * /Joe kicked the jeep down from third to second, and we slowed down./
kick in
See: CHIP IN.
kick in the pants
or[kick in the teeth] {n. phr.}, {informal} Unexpected scorn or insult when praise was expected; rejection. * /Mary worked hard to clean up John's room, but all she ...
kick it
{v. phr.}, {slang} To end a bad or unwanted habit such as drinking, smoking, or drug addiction. * /Farnsworth finally kicked it; he's in good shape./
kick off
{v. phr.} 1. To make the kick that begins a football game. * /John kicked off and the football game started./ 2. {informal} To begin; launch; start. * /The candidate kicked ...
kick oneself
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be sorry or ashamed; regret. * /When John missed the train, he kicked himself for not having left earlier./ * /Mary could have kicked ...
kick out
or[boot out] {v.}, {informal} To make (someone) go or leave; get rid of; dismiss. * /The boys made so much noise at the movie that the manager kicked them out./ * /The ...
kick over
{v.} 1. Of a motor: To begin to work. * /He had not used his car for two months and when he tried to start it, the motor would not kick over./ 2. {slang} To pay; ...
kick over the traces
also[jump the traces] {v. phr.} To break the rules; behave badly. * /When their teacher was absent and they had a substitute, the children kicked over the traces./ Compare: ...
kick the bucket
{v. phr.}, {slang} To die. * /Old Mr. Jones kicked the bucket just two days before his ninety-fourth birthday./ Compare: KICK OFF(3).
kick up
{v.}, {informal} To show signs of not working right. * /John had had too much to eat and his stomach started to kick up./ * /After working well for a year the air ...
kick up a fuss
or[kick up a row] or[raise a row] also[kick up a dust] {v. phr.}, {informal} To make trouble; make a disturbance. * /When the teacher gave the class five more hours of ...
kick up one's heels
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have a merry time; celebrate. * /When exams were over the students went to town to kick up their heels./ * /Mary was usually very quiet but at the ...
kickback
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} Money paid illegally for favorable treatment. * /He was arrested for making kickback payments./
kickoff
{n.} The start of something, like a new venture, a business, a sports event, or a concert season. * /Beethoven's Ninth will be the kickoff for this summer season at ...
kid
See: HANDLE WITH GLOVES or HANDLE WITH KID GLOVES, HANDLE WITHOUT GLOVES or HANDLE WITHOUT KID GLOVES.
kiddie car
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} A school bus. * /Watch out for that kiddie car coming up behind you!/
kill
See: CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT, IN AT THE KILL.
kill off
{v.} To kill or end completely; destroy. * /The factory dumped poisonous wastes into the river and killed off the fish./ * /The president suggested a new law to Congress ...
kill the goose that laid the golden egg
To spoil something that is good or something that you have, by being greedy. - A proverb. * /Mrs. Jones gives you an apple from her tree whenever you go by her house, ...
kill time
{v. phr.} To cause the time to pass more rapidly; waste time. * /The plane trip to Hong Kong was long and tiring, but we managed to kill time by watching several ...
kill two birds with one stone
{v. phr.} To succeed in doing two things by only one action; get two results from one effort. * /Mother stopped at the supermarket to buy bread and then went to get Jane ...
kilter
See: OUT OF KILTER.
kind
See: IN A WAY also IN A KIND OF WAY, IN KIND.
kind of
or[sort of] {adv. phr.}, {informal} Almost but not quite; rather. * /A guinea pig looks kind of like a rabbit, but it has short ears./ * /Bob was kind of tired when he ...
kindled spirits
{n. phr.} People who resemble each other in numerous ways, including their ways of thinking and feeling. * /They are kindred spirits; they both like to go on long ...
kindly
See: TAKE KINDLY TO.
king's ransom
{n. phr.} 1. An excessively large sum of money extorted by kidnappers to let someone go free. * /The Smith family had to pay a kings ransom for the freedom of their ...
kiss someone
or[something goodbye] {v. phr.} To lose or give up someone or something forever. * /"If you won't marry Jane," Peter said to Tom, "you might as well kiss her goodbye."/ * ...
kite
See: GO FLY A KITE.
kitten
See: HAVE KITTENS.
knee
See: BRING TO ONE'S KNEES, IN THE LAP OF THE GODS also ON THE KNEES OF THE GODS, ON ONE'S KNEES, UP TO THE CHIN IN or UP TO THE KNEE IN.
knee-deep
or[neck-deep] {adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Very much; deeply; having a big part in. * /Johnny was knee-deep in trouble./ 2. Very busy; working hard at. * /We were neck-deep in ...
knee-high to a grasshopper
also[knee-high to a duck] {adj. phr.}, {informal} As tall as a very small child; very young. * /Charles started reading when he was knee-high to a grasshopper./ * ...
kneeling bus
{n.}, {informal} A bus equipped with a hydraulic device to enable it to drop almost to curb level for greater ease of boarding and leaving vehicle, as a convenience ...
knell
See: DEATH KNELL.
knit
See: CLOSE-KNIT.
knitting
See: STICK TO ONE'S KNITTING or TEND TO ONE'S KNITTING.
knock
See: SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS.
knock about
or[knock around] {v.} To travel without a plan; go where you please. * /After he graduated from college, Joe knocked about for a year seeing the country before he went ...
knock back on one's heels
See: SET BACK ON ONE'S HEELS.
knock cold
{v. phr.}, {informal} To render unconscious. * /The blow on the chin knocked Harry cold./
knock down
{v. phr.} To reduce; lower. * /The realtors said that if we decided to buy the house, they would knock the price down by 10%./
knock for a loop
or[throw for a loop] {v. phr.}, {slang} To surprise very much. * /When I heard they were moving, I was really knocked for a loop./ * /The news of their marriage threw ...
knock it off
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To stop talking about something considered not appropriate or nonsensical by the listener. - Used frequently as an imperative. * /Come ...
knock off
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To burglarize someone. * /They knocked off the Manning residence./ 2. To murder someone. * /The gangsters knocked off Herman./
knock off one's feet
{v. phr.} To surprise (someone) so much that he does not know what to do. * /Her husband's death knocked Mrs. Jones off her feet./ * /When Charlie was given the prize, it ...
knock on wood
{v. phr.} To knock on something made of wood to keep from having bad luck. - Many people believe that you will have bad luck if you talk about good luck or brag ...
knock one's block off
{v. phr.}, {slang} To hit someone very hard; beat someone up. * /Stay out of my yard or I'll knock your block off./ * /Jim will knock your block off if he catches you ...
knock oneself out
{v. phr.}, {informal} To work very hard; make a great effort. * /Mrs. Ross knocked herself out planning her daughter's wedding./ * /Tom knocked himself out to give his guests a ...
knock out
{v. phr.} To make helpless, unworkable, or unusable. * /The champion knocked out the challenger in the third round./ * /The soldier knocked out two enemy tanks with his ...
knock over
{v. phr.} To overturn; upset. * /I accidentally knocked over the Chinese lamp that fell on size floor and broke./
knock the living daylights out of
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To render (someone) unconscious (said in exaggeration). * /The news almost knocked the living daylights out of me./
knock the stuffing out of
See: KNOCK THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS OUT OF.
knocked out
{adj.}, {slang} Intoxicated; drugged; out of one's mind. * /Jim sounds so incoherent, he must be knocked out./
knockout
{n.}, {slang} 1. Strikingly beautiful woman. * /Sue is a regular knockout./ 2. A straight punch in boxing that causes one's opponent to fall and lose consciousness. * /The ...
knot
See: TIE IN KNOTS, TIE THE KNOT.
knotty problem
{n. phr.} A very complicated and difficult problem to solve. * /Doing one's income tax properly can present a knotty problem./
know something inside out
{v. phr.} To be extremely well conversant with something; be an expert in; have thorough knowledge of. * /Tom knows the stock market inside out./
know a thing or two about
{v. phr.} To be experienced in; have a fairly considerable knowledge of. * /Tom has dealt with many foreign traders; he knows a thing or two about stocks and bonds./
know enough to come in out of the rain
{v. phr.} To have good sense; know how to take care of yourself. - Usually used in the negative. * /Bob does so many foolish things that his mother says he doesn't ...
know if one is coming or going
or[know whether one is coming or going] {v. phr.} To feel able to think clearly; know what to do. - Usually used in the negative or with limiters. * /On Monday, the car ...
know in one's bones
See: FEEL IN ONE'S BONES.
know one in high places
{v. phr.} To be connected with people in power. * /Ted's grandfather was the mayor of Chicago so he knows people in high places./
know one is alive
{v. phr.} Not to notice a person. - Used with negative or limiting words and in questions. * /She was a good-looking girl but she didn't know I was alive./ Compare: GIVE A ...
know one's own mind
{v. phr.} To no( hesitate or vacillate; be definite in one's ideas or plans. * /It is impossible to do business with Fred, because he doesn't know his own mind./
know one's place
{v. phr.} To be deferential to one's elders or superiors. * /Ken is a talented teaching assistant, but he has a tendency to tell the head of the department how to ...
know one's way around
or[know one's way about] {v. phr.} 1. To understand how things happen in the world; he experienced in the ways of the world. * /The sailor had been in the wildest ports ...
know the ropes
See: THE ROPES.
know the score
See: THE SCORE.
know what's what
See: KNOW SOMETHING INSIDE OUT.
know which side one's bread is buttered on
{v. phr.} To know who can help you and try to please him; know what is for your own gain. * /Dick was always polite to the boss; he knew which side his bread was buttered ...
know which way to turn
See: NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO TURN.
know-how
{n.}, {slang} Expertise; ability to devise and construct. * /The United States had the know-how to beat the Soviet Union to the moon in 1969./
know-it-all
{n.} A person who acts as if he knows all about everything; someone who thinks no one can tell him anything new. * /After George was elected as class president, ...
knowledge
See: A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE IS A DANGEROUS THING, TO THE BEST OF YOUR KNOWLEDGE.
knuckle
See: BUCKLE DOWN or KNUCKLE DOWN, RAP ONE'S KNUCKLES.
knuckle down
See: BUCKLE DOWN.
knuckle under
{v. phr.} To do something because you are forced to do it. * /Bobby refused to knuckle under to the bully./ Compare: GIVE IN.
labor movement
{n.} Groups which form, strengthen, and increase membership in labor unions. * /His father was connected with the labor movement in the 1920's./
labor of love
{n. phr.} Something done for personal pleasure and not pay or profit. * /Building the model railroad was a labor of love for the retired engineer./
labor the point
See: BELABOR THE POINT.
labor under
{v. phr.} To be the victim of; suffer from. * /Ken is obviously laboring under the delusion that Jennifer will marry him out of love./
lace into
or[tie into] {v.}, {informal} To attack physically or with words; begin to hit or criticize. * /The boxer laced into his opponent./ * /The critics laced into the new movie./ ...
ladies' room
{n. phr.} A public toilet and restroom for women. * /Can you please tell me where the ladies' room is?/
lady friend
{n.} 1. A woman friend. * /His aunt stays with a lady friend in Florida during the winter./ 2. A woman who is the lover of a man. - Used by people trying to appear more polite, ...
lady of the house
{n. phr.} Female owner, or wife of the owner, of the house; the hostess. * /"Dinner is served," the lady of the house announced to her guests./
lady's man
{n.} A man or boy who likes to be with women or girls very much and is popular with them. * /Charlie is quite a lady's man now./
lady-killer
{n.}, {informal} 1. Any man who has strong sex appeal toward women. * /Joe is a regular lady-killer./ 2. A man who relentlessly pursues amorous conquests, is successful ...
laid out
{adj.} Arranged. * /Her house is very conveniently laid out./
laid up
{adj.} Sick; confined to bed. * /I was laid up for a couple of weeks with an ear infection./
lake
See: GO JUMP IN THE LAKE.
lam
See: ON THE LAM.
lamb
See: GOD TEMPERS THE WIND TO THE SHORN LAMB, IN TWO SHAKES OF A LAMB'S TAIL.
lame duck
{n.}, {informal} An elected public official who has been either defeated in a new election or whose term cannot be renewed, but who has a short period of time ...
land
See: FAT OF THE LAND, LAY OF THE LAND also HOW THE LAND LIES.
land all over
See: JUMP ON.
land of nod
{n. phr.} Sleep. * /The little girl went off to the land of nod./
land on
See: JUMP ON.
land on one's feet
also[land on both feet] {v. phr.}, {informal} To get yourself out of trouble without damage or injury and sometimes with a gain; be successful no matter what happens. * /No ...
land-office business
{n.}, {informal} A great rush of business. * /It was a hot day, and the drive-ins were doing a land-office business in ice cream and cold drinks./
landing ship
{n.} A ship built to land troops and army equipment on a beach for an invasion. * /The landing ship came near the beach, doors in the bow opened, and marines ran out./ ...
landslide
{n.} An overwhelming victory during a political election. * /Ronald Reagan won the election of 1980 in a landslide./
lane
See: LOVERS' LANE.
lap
See: IN THE LAP OF LUXURY, IN THE LAP OF THE GODS.
lap up
{v.} 1. To eat or drink with the tip of the tongue. * /The kitten laps up its milk./ 2. {informal} To take in eagerly. * /She flatters him all the time and he just laps ...
lardhead
{n.}, {slang} A stupid or slow-witted person. * /You'll never convince Donald; he's a lardhead./
large
See: AT LARGE, BY AND LARGE.
large as life
See: BIG AS LIFE.
large order
{n. phr.} Difficult job; a difficult task to fulfill. * /It is a large order to educate three children in college at the same time./ Compare: TALL ORDER.
large-eyed
See: ROUND-EYED.
lash
See: TONGUE LASHING.
lash out
{v.} 1. To kick. * /The horse lashed out at the man behind him./ 2. To try suddenly to hit. * /The woman lashed out at the crowd with her umbrella./ 3. To attack with ...
last
See: AT LAST, EVERY LAST MAN, EVERY SINGLE or EVERY LAST, FIRST AND LAST, HE LAUGHS BEST WHO LAUGHS LAST, HAVE THE LAST LAUGH, ON ONE'S LAST LEGS, TILL THE LAST GUN IS ...
last but not least
{adv. phr.} In the last place but not the least important. * /Billy will bring sandwiches, Alice will bring cake, Susan will bring cookies, John will bring potato ...
last ditch
{n.} The last place that can be defended; the last resort. * /They will fight reform to the last ditch./
last lap
{n. phr.} The final stage. * /Although the trip had been very interesting, we were glad that we were on the last lap of our tiring journey./ See: LAST LEG.
last laugh
See: HAVE THE LAST LAUGH.
last leg
{n. phr.} 1. Final stages of physical weakness before dying. * /The poor old man was on his last leg in the nursing home./ 2. The final stage of a journey. * /The ...
last out
{v.} 1. To be enough until the end of. * /There is enough food in the house to last out the snowstorm./ * /Our candies won't last out the night./ 2. To continue to the ...
last stand
{n. phr.} See: LAST DITCH.
last straw
or[straw that breaks the camel's back] {n. phr.} A small trouble which follows other troubles and makes one lose patience and be unable to bear them. * /Bill had a bad day in ...
last word
{n.} 1. The last remark in an argument. * /I never win an argument with her. She always has the last word./ 2. The final say in deciding something. * /The superintendent has ...
last-ditch
{adj.} Made or done as a last chance to keep from losing or tailing. * /He threw away his cigarettes in a last-ditch effort to stop smoking./ Compare: BACK TO THE ...
last-ditch effort
See: LAST DITCH.
latch on
or[hitch onto] {v.}, {informal} 1. To get hold of; grasp or grab; catch. * /He looked for something to latch onto and keep from falling./ * /The football player ...
latch string
{n.} 1. A string that opens an old-fashioned door by lifting a small bar. * /The early settlers kept the latch string outside the door when they were working around ...
late
See: BETTER LATE THAN NEVER, OF LATE.
lather
See: IN A LATHER.
laugh
See: HE LAUGHS BEST WHO LAUGHS LAST, HAVE THE LAST LAUGH.
laugh all the way to the bank
{v. phr.} To have made a substantial amount of money either by lucky investment or by some fraudulent deal and rejoice over one's gains. * /If you had done what I ...
laugh in one's beard
See: LAUGH UP ONE'S SLEEVE.
laugh in one's sleeve
See: LAUGH UP ONE'S SLEEVE.
laugh off
{v.} To dismiss with a laugh as not important or not serious; not take seriously. * /He had a bad fall while ice skating but he laughed it off./ * /You can't laugh off a ...
laugh on the wrong side of one's mouth
or[laugh on the other side of one's mouth] or[laugh out of the other side of one's mouth] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be made sorry; to feel annoyance or ...
laugh one out of
{v. phr.} To cause another to forget his/her worries and sorrows by joking. * /Jack was worried about getting airsick, but his son and daughter laughed him out of it./ ...
laugh one's head off
{v. phr.}, {informal} To laugh very hard; be unable to stop laughing. * /Paul's stories are so wildly funny that I laugh my head off whenever he starts telling one of them./
laugh up one's sleeve
or[laugh in one's sleeve] or[laugh in one's beard] To be amused but not show it; hide your laughter. * /He was laughing up his sleeve when Joe answered the phone because he ...
laughing matter
{n.} A funny happening; a silly situation. - Usually used with "no". * /John's failing the test is no laughing matter!/ * /We were amused when our neighbor's cat had ...
launch window
{n.}, {Space English}, {informal} 1. A period of time when the line-up of planets, Sun, and Moon are such as to make favorable conditions for a specific space launch. * ...
laurel
See: LOOK TO ONE'S LAURELS, REST ON ONE'S LAURELS.
lavender
See: LAY OUT(7).
law
See: LAY DOWN THE LAW, PARLIAMENTARY LAW, TAKE THE LAW INTO ONE'S OWN HANDS.
law of averages
{n. phr.} The idea that you can't win all the time or lose all the time. * /The Celtics have won 10 games in a row but the law of averages will catch up with them ...
law unto oneself
{n. phr.}, {literary} A person who does only what he wishes; a person who ignores or breaks the law when he doesn't like it. * /Everybody in Germany feared Hitler because he ...
law-abiding
{adj.} Obeying or following the law. * /Michael had been a law-abiding citizen all his life./
lawful age
See: LEGAL AGE.
lay
See: KILL THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGG.
lay into
or[light into] {v.}, {informal} 1. To attack physically; go at vigorously. * /The two fighters laid into each other as soon as the bell rang./ * /John loves Italian ...
lay a finger on
{v. phr.} To touch or bother, even a little. - Used in negative, interrogative, and conditional sentences. * /Don't you dare lay a finger on the vase!/ * /Suppose Billy ...
lay about one
{v. phr.} To hit out in all directions. - Used with a reflexive object: "her", "him", or "them". * /The bandits surrounded the sheriff, but he laid about him so hard, with his ...
lay an egg
{v. phr.}, {slang} To fail to win the interest or favor of an audience. * /His joke laid an egg./ * /Sometimes he is a successful speaker, but sometimes he lays an ...
lay aside
{v. phr.} 1. To put off until another time; interrupt an activity. * /The president laid aside politics to turn to foreign affairs./ 2. To save. * /They tried to lay aside ...
lay at one's door
{v. phr.}, {literary} To blame (something) on a person. * /The failure of the plan was laid at his door./ Compare: LAY TO(1).
lay away
{v.} 1. To save. * /She laid a little of her pay away each week./ 2. To bury (a person). - Used to avoid the word "bury", which some people think is unpleasant. * /He ...
lay bare
{v. phr.} To expose; reveal; divulge. * /During his testimony the witness laid bare the whole story of his involvement with the accused./
lay by
{v.} To save, especially a little at a time. * /The students laid a little money by every week till they had enough for a trip to Florida./ * /The farmer laid by some ...
lay down
{v.} 1. To let (something) be taken; give up or surrender (something). * /The general told the troops to lay down their arms./ * /He was willing to lay down his ...
lay down one's arms
{v. phr.} To cease fighting; surrender. * /The Civil War ended when the Confederate army finally laid down its arms./
lay down one's cards
See: LAY ONE'S CARDS ON THE TABLE.
lay down one's life
{v. phr.} To sacrifice one's life for a cause or person; suffer martyrdom. * /The early Christians often laid down their lives for their faith./
lay down the law
{v. phr.} 1. To give strict orders. * /The teacher lays down the law about homework every afternoon./ 2. To speak severely or seriously about a wrongdoing; scold. * ...
lay eyes on
or[set eyes on] {v. phr.} To see. * /She knew he was different as soon as she laid eyes on him./ * /I didn't know the man; in fact, I had never set eyes on him./
lay for
{v.}, {informal} To hide and wait for in order to catch or attack; to lie in wait for. * /The bandits laid for him along the road./ * /I knew he had the marks for the ...
lay hands on
{v. phr.} 1. To get hold of; find; catch. * /The treasure hunters can keep any treasure they can lay hands on./ * /If the police can lay hands on him, they will put him ...
lay hold of
{v. phr.} 1. To take hold of; grasp; grab. * /He laid hold of the rope and pulled the boat ashore./ 2. To get possession of. * /He sold every washing machine he could lay ...
lay in
{v.} To store up a supply of; to get and keep for future use. * /Mrs. Mason heard that the price of sugar might go up, so she laid in a hundred pounds of it./ * ...
lay it on
or[lay it on thick] also[put it on thick] or[spread it on thick] or[lay it on with a trowel] {v. phr.}, {informal} To persuade someone by using very much flattery; flatter. * ...
lay it on the line
See: LAY ON THE LINE(2).
lay low
{v.} 1. To knock down; to force into a lying position; to put out of action. * /Many trees were laid low by the storm./ * /Jane was laid low by the flu./ 2. To kill. * ...
lay of the land
also[how the land lies] {n. phr.} 1. The natural features of a piece of land, such as hills and valleys. * /The style of house the contractor builds depends partly on the ...
lay off
{v. phr.} 1. To mark out the boundaries or limits. * /He laid off a baseball diamond on the vacant lot./ Compare: LAY OUT(5). 2. To put out of work. * /The company lost the ...
lay on
{v.} 1. To spread on or over a surface; apply. * /He told us that we should lay on a second coat of paint for better protection against the weather./ 2. To beat; to ...
lay on the line
or[put on the line] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To pay or offer to pay. * /The sponsors had to lay nearly a million dollars on the line to keep the show on TV./ * /The ...
lay one's cards on the table
or[lay down one's cards] or[put one's cards on the table] {v. phr.}, {informal} To let someone know your position and interest openly; deal honestly; act without trickery ...
lay one's finger on
See: PUT ONE'S FINGER ON.
lay one's hands on
or[get one's hands on] {v. phr.} 1. To seize in order to punish or treat roughly. * /If I ever lay my hands on that boy he'll be sorry./ Compare: LAY A FINGER ON. 2. To get ...
lay oneself open to
{v. phr.} To make oneself vulnerable to; expose oneself. * /If you don't perform your job properly, you will lay yourself open to criticism./
lay oneself out
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make an extra hard effort; try very hard. * /Larry wanted to win a medal for his school, so he really laid himself out in the race./
lay out
{v. phr.} 1. To prepare (a dead body) for burial. * /The corpse was laid out by the undertaker./ 2. {slang} To knock down flat; to hit unconscious. * /A stiff right to the ...
lay over
{v.} 1. To put off until later; delay; postpone. * /We voted to lay the question over to our next meeting for decision./ 2. To arrive in one place and wait some time ...
lay rubber
or[lay a patch] {v. phr.}, {slang} To take off in a car or a motorcycle so fast that the tires (made of rubber) leave a mark on the pavement. * /Look at those crazy ...
lay the blame at one's door
{v. phr.} To say that another person or group is responsible for one's own failure. * /The angry coach laid the blame at the door of the players when our college lost ...
lay the fault at one's door
See: LAY THE BLAME AT ONE'S DOOR.
lay their heads together
See: PUT THEIR HEADS TOGETHER.
lay to
{v.} 1. To give the blame or credit to; to name as cause. * /He was unpopular and when he made money, it was laid to his dishonesty, but when he lost money, it was ...
lay to heart
See: TAKE TO HEART.
lay to rest
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To put a dead person into a grave or tomb; bury. * /President Kennedy was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery./ 2. To get rid of; ...
lay up
{v.} 1. To collect a supply of; save for future, use; store. * /Bees lay up honey for the winter./ 2. To keep in the house or in bed because of sickness or injury; ...
lay waste
{v. phr.}, {literary} To cause wide and great damage to; destroy and leave in ruins; wreck. * /Enemy soldiers laid waste the land./
lay-away plan
{n.} A plan for buying something that you can't pay cash for; a plan in which you pay some money down and pay a little more when you can, and the store holds the article ...
layoff
{n.} A systematic or periodical dismissal of employees from a factory or a firm. * /Due to the poor economy, the car manufacturer announced a major layoff starting ...
layout
{n.} General situation; arrangement; plan. * /The layout of their apartment overlooking Lake Michigan was strikingly unusual./ Compare: LAID OUT.
layover
{n.} A stopover, usually at an airport or in a hotel due to interrupted air travel. * /There were several layovers at O'Hare last month due to bad weather./
lead
See: ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME, BLIND LEADING THE BLIND.
lead a dog's life
{v. phr.}, {informal} To live a hard life, work hard, and be treated unkindly. * /A new college student of long ago led a dog's life./
lead a merry chase
{v. phr.} To delay or escape capture by (someone) skillfully; make (a pursuer) work hard. * /The deer led the hunter a merry chase./ * /Valerie is leading her ...
lead by the nose
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have full control of; make or persuade (someone) to do anything whatever. * /Many people are easily influenced and a smart politician can lead them ...
lead off
{v.} To begin; start; open. * /Richardson led off the inning with a double./ * /We always let Henry lead off./ * /Mr. Jones led off with the jack of diamonds./ * /When the ...
lead on
{v. phr.} To encourage you to believe something untrue or mistaken. * /Tom led us on to believe that he was a world traveler, but we found out that he had never been outside ...
lead one a merry dance
{v. phr.} To cause someone unusual discomfort or expense; tire someone by causing one to overdo. * /With her personal extravagances and constant social activities that cost ...
lead the way
{v. phr.} To go before and show how to go somewhere; guide. * /The boys need someone to lead the way on their hike./ * /The men hired an Indian to lead the way to the Pueblo ...
lead to
{v. phr.} To result in. * /Such a heavy arms race can only lead to war./
lead-footed
See: HEAVY-FOOTED.
leader
See: MAJORITY LEADER, MINORITY LEADER.
leading light
{n. phr.} A prominent person in a community, company, or group. * /Alan is the leading light of our discussion group on music./
leaf
See: TURN OVER A NEW LEAF.
leaf through
{v. phr.} To scan or glance through a book or other reading matter. * /I only had time to leaf through the program before the concert started./
league
See: IN LEAGUE WITH, IVY LEAGUE.
leaguer
See: TEXAS LEAGUER.
leak out
{v. phr.} To become known; escape. * /The famous beauty queen tried to keep her marriage a secret, but news of it soon leaked out./
leak to
{v. phr.} To purposely let a secret be known, as if conveying it in the strictest confidence. * /The movie star's secret divorce was leaked to the tabloids by her ...
lean on
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To pressure (someone) by blackmailing, threats, physical violence, or the withholding of some favor in order to make the person comply with a ...
lean over backward
See: BEND OVER BACKWARD.
lean-to
{n.} 1. A shed for tools, such as spades, hoes, etc., attached to the wall of a house, * /Joe looked for the garden hose in the lean-to./ 2. A small cabin in the country. ...
leap
See: BY LEAPS AND BOUNDS.
leap year
{n.} Every fourth year during which the month of February contains 29 rather than 28 days. * /During a leap year one must wait a day longer for one's February pay ...
learn
See: LIVE AND LEARN.
learn by heart
See: BY HEART.
learn by rote
{v. phr.} To blindly memorize what was taught without thinking about it. * /If you learn a subject by rote, it will be difficult to say anything original about it./
learn one's way around
See: KNOW ONE'S WAY AROUND.
learn the hard way
See: HARD WAY.
learn the ropes
See: THE ROPES.
least
See: AT LEAST, IN THE LEAST, LAST BUT NOT LEAST, LINE OF LEAST RESISTANCE.
leatherneck
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A member of the United States Marine Corps. * /I didn't know your son Joe became a leatherneck./
leave
See: SHORE LEAVE, TAKE IT OR LEAVE IT, TAKE LEAVE OF, TAKE ONE'S LEAVE.
leave a bad taste in one's mouth
{v. phr.} To feel a bad impression; make you feel disgusted. * /Seeing a man beat his horse leaves a bad taste in your mouth./ * /His rudeness to the teacher left a ...
leave alone
See: LET ALONE.
leave at the altar
{v. phr.} 1. To decide not to marry someone in the last minute; jilt. * /Ed left poor Susan at the altar./ 2. To overlook and skip for promotion; not fulfill deserved ...
leave behind
{v. phr.} 1. Abandon. * /Refugees on the run must sometimes leave old and sick people behind./ 2. To forget; go away without. * /We had reached our car when we noticed ...
leave flat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To quit or leave suddenly without warning when wanted or needed; desert; forsake; abandon. * /Sam found that being a member of the ...
leave hanging
or[leave hanging in the air] {v. phr.} To leave undecided or unsettled. * /Because the committee could not decide on a time and place, the matter of the spring dance was ...
leave high and dry
See: HIGH AND DRY.
leave holding the bag
or[leave holding the sack] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To cause (someone) not to have something needed; leave without anything, * /In the rush for seats, Joe was left ...
leave in the lurch
{v. phr.} To desert or leave alone in trouble; refuse to help or support. * /The town bully caught Eddie, and Tom left him in the lurch./ * /Bill quit his job, leaving ...
leave it at that
{v. phr.} To avoid further and more acrimonious disagreement; not argue or discuss any further. * /Our opinion on health care is obviously different, so let's just leave ...
leave no stone unturned
{v. phr.} To try in every way; miss no chance; do everything possible. - Usually used in the negative. * /The police will leave no stone unturned in their search for ...
leave off
{v.} To come or put to an end; stop. * /There is a high fence where the school yard leaves off and the woods begin./ * /Don told the boys to leave off teasing his little ...
leave one's mark
{v. phr.} To leave an impression upon; influence someone. * /Tolstoy never won the Nobel Prize, but he left his mark on world literature./ See: MAKE ONE'S MARK.
leave open
{v. phr.} To remain temporarily unsettled; subject to further discussion. * /Brad said that the question of health insurance would be left open until some future date./
leave out
{v. phr.} To skip; omit. * /The printer accidentally left out two paragraphs from Alan's novel./
leave out in the cold
See: OUT IN THE COLD.
leave out of account
{v. phr.} To fail to consider; forget about. * /The picnic planners left out of account that it might rain./ Contrast: TAKE INTO ACCOUNT.
leave the matter open
See: LEAVE OPEN.

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