Слова на букву keep-long (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву keep-long (459)

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leave well enough alone
See: LET WELL ENOUGH ALONE.
leave without a leg to stand on
See: LEG TO STAND ON.
leave word with
{v. phr.} To leave a message. * /Hank left word with his secretary where he could be reached by phone while he was away from his office./
leave-taking
See: TAKE ONE'S LEAVE.
left
See: OUT IN LEFT FIELD, RIGHT AND LEFT.
left field
{n.} 1. The part of a baseball out-field to the batter's left. * /Right-handed batters usually hit to left field./ Compare: CENTER FIELD, RIGHT FIELD. 2. See: ...
left-handed
{adj.}, {informal} 1. Using the left hand habitually. 2. Crooked; phoney; homosexual. * /Morris is such a left-handed guy./ 3. Clumsy; untoward; awkward. * /Grab that hammer ...
left-handed compliment
An ambiguous compliment which is interpretable as an offense. * /I didn't know you could look so pretty! Is that a wig you're wearing?/
left-wing
{adj.} That which is or belongs to a group of people in politics that favors radical change in the direction of socialism or communism. * /The left-wing faction called for an ...
leg
See: ON ONE'S LAST LEGS, PULL ONE'S LEG, SHAKE A LEG, TAIL BETWEEN ONE'S LEGS.
leg man
{n.}, {informal} 1. An errand boy; one who performs messenger services, or the like. * /Joe hired a leg man for the office./ 2. {slang}, {semi-vulgar}, ...
leg to stand on
{n. phr.} A firm foundation of facts; facts to support your claim. - Usually used in the negative. * /Jerry's answering speech left his opponent without a leg to ...
leg work
{n.}, {informal} The physical end of a project, such as the typing of research reports; the physical investigating of a criminal affair; the carrying of books to and from ...
leg-pulling
See: PULL ONE'S LEG.
legal age
or[lawful age] The age at which a person is allowed to do a certain thing or is held responsible for an action. * /In most states the legal age for voting is 27./ * /He could ...
Legree
See: SIMON LEGREE.
leisure
See: AT LEISURE or AT ONE'S LEISURE.
lend a hand
or[give a hand] also[bear a hand] {v. phr.} To give help; make yourself useful; help. * /The stage manager asked some of the boys to lend a hand with the scenery./ * /Dick saw ...
lend an ear to
See: GIVE AN EAR TO.
lend color to
See: GIVE COLOR TO.
lend itself to
{v. phr.} To give a chance for or be useful for; to be possible or right for. * /Bob was sick and did not go to Jane's party, but his absence lent itself to ...
lend oneself to
{v. phr.} To give help or approval to; encourage; assist. * /Alice wouldn't lend herself to the plot to hide the teacher's chalk./
length
See: AT LENGTH, GO TO ANY LENGTH, KEEP AT A DISTANCE or KEEP AT ARM'S LENGTH.
less
See: MORE OR LESS, MUCH LESS.
less than
{adv.} Not; little. * /We were busy and less than delighted to have company that day./ * /The boys were less than happy about having a party./ Contrast: MORE THAN.
less than no time
{n. phr.}, {informal} Very quickly. * /We can be ready to go in less than no time./ * /It took Sally less than no time to get dinner ready./
lesson
See: TEACH A LESSON.
let
See: LIVE AND LET LIVE.
let one's hair down
or[let down one's hair] {v. phr.}, {informal} Act freely and naturally; be informal; relax. * /Kings and queens can seldom let their hair down./ * /After the dance, ...
let alone
{conj. phr.} 1. Even less; certainly not. - Used after a negative clause. * /I can't add two and two, let alone do fractions./ * /Jim can't drive a car, let alone ...
let be
{v.} To pay no attention to; disregard; forget. * /Let her be; she has a headache./ Compare: LET ALONE.
let bygones be bygones
{v. phr.} To let the past be forgotten. * /After a long, angry quarrel the two boys agreed to let bygones be bygones and made friends again./ * /We should let bygones be ...
let down
{v. phr.} 1. To allow to descend; lower. * /Harry let the chain saw down on a rope and then climbed down himself./ 2. To relax; stop trying so hard; take it easy. * ...
let down easy
{v. phr.} To refuse or say no to (someone) in a pleasant manner; to tell bad news about a refusal or disappointment in a kindly way. * /The teacher had to tell George that ...
let down one's hair
See: LET ONE'S HAIR DOWN.
let drop
{v. phr.} 1. To cease to talk about; set aside; forget. * /This is such an unpleasant subject that I suggest we let it drop for a few days./ 2. To disclose; hint. * /He ...
let fall
See: LET DROP.
let George do it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To expect someone else to do the work or take the responsibility. * /Many people expect to let George do it when they are on a committee./ Compare: ...
let go
{v.} 1a. To stop holding something; loosen your hold; release. * /The boy grabbed Jack's coat and would not let go./ - Often used with "of". * /When the child let go of ...
let go hang
See: GO HANG.
let go of
{v. phr.} To release one's grasp. * /As soon as Sally let go of the leash, her dog ran away./
let go of one's mother's apron strings
See: TIED TO ONE'S MOTHER'S APRON STRINGS.
let grass grow under one's feet
{v. phr.} To be idle; be lazy; waste time. - Used in negative, conditional, and interrogative sentences. * /The new boy joined the football team, made the honor ...
let it all hang out
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} Not to disguise anything; to let the truth be known. * /Sue can't deceive anyone; she just lets it all hang out./
let it lay
{v. phr.}, {used imperatively}, {slang} Forget it; leave it alone; do not be concerned or involved. * /Don't get involved with Max again - just let it lay./
let it rip
{v. phr.}, {used imperatively}, {slang} Don't be concerned; pay no attention to what happens. * /Why get involved? Forget about it and let it rip./ 2. (Imperatively) ...
let know
{v. phr.} To inform. * /Please let us know the time of your arrival./
let loose
{v.} 1a. or[set loose] or[turn loose] To set free; loosen or give up your hold on. * /The farmer opened the gate and let the bull loose in the pasture./ * /They turned ...
let me see
or[let us see] {informal} 1. Let us find out by trying or performing an action. * /Let me see if you can jump over the fence./ 2. Give me time to think or remember. * /I ...
let off
{v.} 1. To discharge (a gun); explode; fire. * /Willie accidentally let off his father's shotgun and made a hole in the wall./ Syn.: GO OFF, LET LOOSE(2). 2. To ...
let off steam
or[blow off steam] {v. phr.} 1. To let or make steam escape; send out steam. * /The janitor let off some steam because the pressure was too high./ 2. {informal} ...
let off the hook
See: LET OFF(3).
let on
{v.}, {informal} 1. To tell or admit what you know. - Usually used in the negative. * /Frank lost a quarter but he didn't let on to his mother./ 2. To try to make people ...
let one have it
{v. phr.} 1a. {slang} To hit hard. * /He drew back his fist and let the man have it./ * /Give him a kick in the pants; let him have it!/ Syn.: GIVE IT TO. 1b. {slang} ...
let one in on
{v. phr.} To reveal a secret to; permit someone to share in. * /If I let you in on something big we're planning, will you promise not to mention it to anyone?/
let one's left hand know what one's right hand is doing
{v. phr.} 1. To make a show of your kindness or help to others. - Used in the negative. * /The Bible tells us not to let the left hand know what the right hand is doing when ...
let oneself go
See: LET GO(6).
let out
{v.} 1a. To allow to go out or escape. * /The guard let the prisoners out of jail to work in the garden./ * /Mother won't let us out when it rains./ Compare: LET LOOSE. 1b. ...
let pass
{v. phr.} To disregard; overlook. * /Herb may have overheard what was said about him, but he decided to let it pass./
let ride
{v. phr.}, {informal} To allow to go on without change; accept (a situation or action) for the present. * /The committee could not decide what to do about Bob's idea, so they ...
let sleeping dogs lie
Do not make (someone) angry and cause trouble or danger; do not make trouble if you do not have to. - A proverb. * /Don't tell Father that you broke the window. Let ...
let slip
{v. phr.} To unintentionally reveal. * /Ellen let it slip that she had been a witness to the accident./
let the cat out of the bag
{v. phr.}, {informal} To tell about something that is supposed to be a secret. * /We wanted to surprise Mary with a birthday gift, but Allen let the cat out of the ...
let the chips fall where they may
{v. phr.} To pay no attention to the displeasure caused others by your actions. * /The senator decided to vote against the bill and let the chips fall where they ...
let the grass grow under one's feet
{v. phr.}, {informal} To waste time; be slow or idle. * /Grandpa spends so much time sitting and thinking that Grandma accuses him of letting the grass grow under his ...
let up
{v.}, {informal} 1. To become less, weaker, or quiet; become slower or stop. * /It's raining as hard as ever. It's not letting up at all./ * /It snowed for three days ...
let well enough alone
or[leave well enough alone] {v. phr.} To be satisfied with what is good enough; not try to improve something because often that might cause more trouble. * /John wanted ...
let's don't
also[don't let's] {substandard} Let's not; let us not; I suggest that we don't. * /"'Let's go out and play," said Fred. "Let's don't until the rain stops," said Mary./ * ...
let's have it
See: LET HAVE IT.
letdown
{n.} A disappointment; a heartbreak. * /It was a major letdown for John when Mary refused to marry him./
letter
See: CHAIN LETTER, NIGHT LETTER, TO THE LETTER.
letter-perfect
{adj. phr.} Memorized perfectly; perfect to the last letter. * /The actor was letter-perfect in his role./
level
See: ON THE LEVEL.
level best
{adj. phr.} One's utmost; one's very best. * /Eric refused to stay in school although his parents did their level best to make him finish./
level off
or[level out] {v.} 1. To make flat or level. * /The steamroller leveled out the gravel roadbed and then the concrete was poured./ 2. To move on an even level. * /The ...
level with
{v. phr.} To tell someone the truth; not engage in lies and subterfuge. * /"You can level with me," his father said. "Did you break that window?"/
levelheaded
{adj. phr.} Having good common sense; practical; reasonable. * /What our office needs is a good, level-headed manager./
liberty
See: TAKE LIBERTIES.
lick and a promise
{n. phr.}, {informal} A careless, hasty job; an unsatisfactory piece of work. * /You didn't wash your hands. You just gave them a lick and a promise./ * /The boys didn't ...
lick into shape
{v. phr.} To make perfect; drill; train. * /The sergeant licked the new volunteer army into shape in three months./
lick one's boots
{v. phr.} To flatter or act like a slave; do anything to please another. * /She wanted her boyfriend to lick her boots all the time./ * /A wise king would not want ...
lick one's chops
{v. phr.}, {informal} To think about something pleasant; enjoy the thought of something. * /John is licking his chops about the steak dinner tonight./ * /Tom is licking his ...
lick the --- out of
See: BEAT THE --- OUT OF.
lickety-split
also[lickety-cut] {adv.}, {informal} At full speed; with a rush. * /As soon as school was out the boys ran lickety-split to the swimming pool./
lid
See: FLIP ONE'S LID, THE LID.
lie
See: GIVE THE LIE TO, LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE, MAKE ONE'S BED AND LIE IN IT.
lie around
{v. phr.} To be unused; inert. * /This old typewriter has been lying around ever since Grandpa died./
lie down on the job
{v. phr.}, {informal} To purposely fail to do your job; neglect a task; loaf. * /Bill isn't trying to learn his lessons. He is lying down on the job./ * /If you lie down ...
lie in state
{v. phr.} Of a dead person: To lie in a place of honor, usually in an open coffin, and be seen by the public before burial. * /When the president died, thousands of ...
lie in wait
{v. phr.} To watch from hiding in order to attack or surprise someone; to ambush. * /The driver of the stage-coach knew that the thieves were lying in wait somewhere ...
lie low
or {nonstandard}[lay low] {v.}, {informal} 1. To stay quietly out of sight; try not to attract attention; hide. * /After holding up the bank, the robbers lay low for a ...
lie through one's teeth
{v. phr.} To lie uninhibitedly and unashamedly. * /Everyone in the courtroom could sense that the accused was lying through his teeth./
lie to
{v.} Of a ship: To stay in one place facing against the wind; stop. * /Our ship will lie to outside the harbor until daylight./ Compare: LAY TO(2).
lief
See: AS SOON also AS LIEF, HAD AS SOON also HAD AS LIEF.
lieu
See: INSTEAD OF also IN LIEU OF.
life
See: BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH, BIG AS LIFE, CAT HAS NINE LIVES, CHARMED LIFE, COME ALIVE OT COME TO LIFE, FACTS OF LIFE, FOR DEAR LIFE, FOR THE LIFE OF ONE, LEAD ...
life of Riley
{n. phr.}, {informal} A soft easy life; pleasant or rich way of living. * /He's living the life of Riley. He doesn't have to work anymore./ Compare: BED OF ROSES, IN ...
life of the party
{n. phr.} A person who makes things enjoyable or interesting for a group of people. * /Bill is the life of the party at school. He is always making us laugh./
lift a finger
or[lift a hand] also[raise a hand] {v. phr.} 1. To do something; do your share; to help. - Usually used in the negative. * /We all worked hard except Joe. He ...
light
See: BRING TO LIGHT, COME TO LIGHT, DASH LIGHT, HIDE ONE'S LIGHT UNDER A BUSHEL, IN THE LIGHT OF, MAKE LIGHT OF, MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK, OUT LIKE A LIGHT, SEE THE ...
light housekeeping
{n.}, {slang} An arrangement in which an unmarried couple live together. * /Are Joe and Sue married? - Oh, no, - it's just a case of light housekeeping./ See: SHACK UP ...
like
See: EAT LIKE A BIRD, FEEL LIKE, LOOK LIKE THE CAT THAT ATE THE CANARY, NOTHING LIKE, THE LIKES OF or THE LIKE.
like a bird
See: EAT LIKE A BIRD.
like a book
See: READ ONE LIKE A BOOK.
like a fish out of water
See: FISH OUT OF WATER.
like a glove
See: FIT LIKE A GLOVE.
like a hole in the head
{adv. phr.} Not at all; scarcely; grudgingly; in an unwelcome manner. * /Joan needs her mother-in-law to stay with her for a week like a hole in the head./
like a horse
See: EAT LIKE A HORSE.
like a light
See: OUT LIKE A LIGHT.
like a million
See: FEEL LIKE A MILLION.
like a million dollars
See: LOOK LIKE A MILLION DOLLARS.
like a steel trap
See: MIND LIKE A STEEL TRAP.
like anything
{adv. phr.} To an extreme degree. * /He swore like anything when he found out that he hadn't been promoted./
like clockwork
See: GO LIKE CLOCKWORK or GO OFF LIKE CLOCKWORK.
like crazy
See: LIKE MAD.
like father, like son
A son is usually like his father in the way he acts. - A proverb. * /Frank's father has been on the city council; he is now the mayor, and is running for governor. Frank is ...
like hell
{adv.}, {slang}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} 1. With great vigor. * /As soon as they saw the cops, they ran like hell./ 2. {interj.} Not so; untrue; indicates the speaker's ...
like it is
See: TELL IT LIKE IT IS.
like looking for a needle in a haystack
See: NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK.
like mad
or[like crazy] {adv.}, {slang}, {informal} With great enthusiasm and vigor; very fast. * /We had to drive like mad (like crazy) to get there on time./ See: LIKE HELL(1). ...
like two peas in a pod
{adj. phr.} Closely similar; almost exactly alike. * /The twin sisters Eve and Agnes are like two peas in a pod./
like water
{adv. phr.} As something easily poured out or wasted; freely. - Usually used in the phrase "spend money like water". * /Sailors on shore leave often spend money like ...
like water off a duck's back
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Without changing your feelings or opinion; without effect. * /Advice and correction roll off him like water off a duck's back./ * /Many ...
lily
See: GILD THE LILY also PAINT THE LILY.
limb
See: OUT ON A LIMB.
line
See: BLOW ONE'S LINES or FLUFF ONE'S LINES, CHOW LINE, DOWN THE LINE, DRAW A LINE or DRAW THE LINE, DROP A LINE, END OF THE ROAD or END OF THE LINE, FOUL LINE, GOAL ...
line drive
{n.} A batted baseball that is usually hit hard and travels in the air not far above the ground. * /The batter hit a line drive to left field for a single./
line of fire
{n. phr.} The path that something fired or thrown takes. * /When the bandit and the police began to shoot, John was almost in their line of fire./ Compare: CROSS FIRE. ...
line of least resistance
or[path of least resistance] {n. phr.} The easiest way; the way that takes least effort. * /In becoming a doctor like his father John had really just followed the line of ...
line of scrimmage
{n. phr.} An imaginary line on a football field parallel to the goal lines where each play except the kickoff begins. * /The play was stopped at the line of scrimmage./
line one's pockets
also[line one's purse] {v. phr.}, {informal} To get a lot of money unfairly; get rich by being dishonest. * /The policeman lined his pockets by taking bribes./ * /The ...
line up
{v. phr.} 1. To take places in a line or formation; stand side by side or one behind another; form a line or pattern. * /The boys lined up and took turns diving off the ...
linen
See: AIR ONE'S DIRTY LINEN IN PUBLIC or WASH ONE'S DIRTY LINEN IN PUBLIC.
lineup
{n.} 1. An alignment of objects in a straight line. * /A lineup of Venus and the moon can be a very beautiful sight in the night sky./ 2. An arrangement of suspects ...
lining
See: EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING.
link
See: MISSING LINK.
lion's share
{n. phr.} A disproportionate share; the largest part. * /The manager always gets the lion's share of the company's profits./
lip
See: BUTTON ONE'S LIP or ZIP ONE'S LIP, HANG ON THE WORDS OF or HANG ON THE LIPS OF, KEEP A STIFF UPPER LIP, SLIP OF THE TONGUE also SLIP OF THE LIP.
lip service
{n.} Support shown by words only and not by actions; a show of loyalty that is not proven in action. - Usually used with " pay". * /Bv holding elections, communism ...
liquid assets
{n. phr.} Those belongings that can be easily converted into cash. * /Herb asked for a loan and the bank manager told him to bring in proof of all his liquid assets./ ...
liquor up
{v. phr.}, {slang} To drink an excessive amount of liquor before engaging in some activity as if comparing oneself to a car that needs to be filled before a journey. * ...
list
See: SUCKER LIST, WAITING LIST.
listen in
{v.} 1. To listen to a radio broadcast. * /We found them listening in to the president's speech./ 2. To listen to the talk of others, often to talk that is not intended ...
listen to reason
{v. phr.} To listen to and think about advice that you are given. * /Joe was stubborn and would not listen to reason./ * /It will save you a lot of trouble if you will ...
lit up like a Christmas tree
{adj. phr.}, {informal} To be drunk. * /On New Year's Eve Ned was lit up like a Christmas tree./ Compare: THREE SHEETS TO THE WIND.
litterbug
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A person who leaves garbage in a public place, such as a park or beach or a street; one who litters. * /Don't be a litterbug; keep the city ...
little
See: A LITTLE, A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE IS A DANGEROUS THING, GREAT OAKS FROM LITTLE ACORNS GROW, LITTLE FROG IN A BIG POND, MAKE LITTLE OF, NOT A LITTLE, QUITE A ...
little does one think
{v. phr.} To not realize; not expect; be hardly aware of. * /Little did Ed think that very soon he would be the father of twin daughters./
little folk
or[little people] See: WEE FOLK.
little frog in a big pond
or[small frog in a big pond] {n. phr.} An unimportant person in a large group or organization. * /In a large company, even a fairly successful man is likely to feel like a ...
little pitchers have big ears
Little children often overhear things they are not supposed to hear, or things adults do not expect they would notice. - A proverb. * /Be especially careful not to swear ...
little theater
{n.} A theater, usually with nonprofessional actors and actresses, which presents plays more for personal pleasure and practice than for profit. * /Little theater groups ...
live
See: PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN GLASS HOUSES SHOULD NOT THROW STONES.
live and learn
You learn more new things the longer you live; you learn by experience. - A proverb. * /"Live and learn," said Mother. "I never knew that the Indians once had a camp where ...
live and let live
To live in the way you prefer and let others live as they wish without being bothered by you. * /Father scolds Mother because she wears her hair in curlers and Mother ...
live down
{v.} To remove (blame, distrust or unfriendly laughter) by good conduct; cause (a mistake or fault) to be forgiven or forgotten by not repeating it. * /John's business ...
live from hand to mouth
{v. phr.} To live on little money and spend it as fast as it comes in; live without saving for the future; have just enough. * /Mr. Johnson got very little pay, and ...
live high off the hog
or[eat high on the hog] See: EAT (LIVE) HIGH ON THE HOG or EAT (LIVE) HIGH OFF THE HOG.
live in
or[room in] {v.}, {informal} To live in the school you attend or the place where you work. * /Jack decided to live in during his freshman year at college./ * /Many women ...
live in a fool's paradise
{v. phr.} To deceive oneself; tell oneself unreal stories. * /His information is based on a lot of misunderstanding - the poor guy is living in a fool's paradise./
live in an ivory tower
{v. phr.} To be blind to real life; live an unrealistically sheltered existence. * /Professor Nebelmacher has no idea of the cost of living; he lives in an ivory tower./ ...
live in the fast lane
{v. phr.}, {informal} To live a full and very active life pursuing wealth and success. * /They have been living in the fast lane ever since they arrived in New York City./ ...
live it up
{v. phr.}, {informal} To pursue pleasure; enjoy games or night life very much; have fun at places of entertainment. * /Joe had had a hard winter in lonesome places; now he ...
live off someone
{v. phr.} To be supported by someone. * /Although Eric is already 40 years old, he has no job and continues to live off his elderly parents./
live off the fat of the land
See: FAT OF THE LAND.
live on borrowed time
{v. phr.} To live or last longer than was expected. * /Ever since his operation, Harvey felt he was living on borrowed time./ * /Mr. Brown was living on borrowed time ...
live out
{v.} 1. To finish (a period of time); spend. * /Smith lived out the year in the North as he had agreed, but then moved to the South again./ * /After retiring, John and his ...
live out of a suitcase
{v. phr.} To have no permanent residence or a permanent place to hang one's clothes. * /When Jennifer accepted her new job, she had no idea that she would have to live ...
live up to
{v.} To act according to; come up to; agree with; follow. * /So far as he could, John had always tried to live up to the example he saw in Lincoln./ * /Bob was a man ...
live wire
{n. phr.} 1. An electrically charged wire, usually uninsulated. * /The electrician was severely burned by the live wire./ 2. An alert or energetic person. * /To sell the ...
living daylights
See: BEAT THE --- OUT OF, KNOCK THE --- OUT OF.
living end
{adj.}, {slang} Great; fantastic; the ultimate. * /That show we saw last night was the living end./
load
See: GET A LOAD OF.
load the bases
or[fill the bases] {v. phr.} To get men on all three bases in baseball. * /The Mets loaded the bases with two singles and a base on balls./ * /Don hit a home run with the ...
loaded for bear
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Ready for action; prepared and eager. * /Frank liked the new merchandise and as he set out on his rounds as a salesman, he felt really loaded for bear./ ...
loaf
See: HALF A LOAF IS BETTER THAN NONE or HALF A LOAF IS BETTER THAN NO BREAD.
loan shark
{n. phr.} A money lender who charges excessive interest. * /Why go to a loan shark when you can borrow from the bank at the legal rate?/
local yokel
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's hand radio jargon} City police officer, as opposed to state police or highway patrol. * /There's a local yokel westbound on the move./ ...
lock
See: SCALP LOCK.
lock the barn door after the horse is stolen
To be careful or try to make something safe when it is too late. - A proverb. * /After Mary failed the examination, she said she would study hard after that. She wanted to ...
lock up
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be assured of success. * /How did your math test go? - I locked it up, I think./
lock, stock, and barrel
{n. phr.} Everything; completely. * /The robbers emptied the whole house - lock, stock, and barrel./ Compare: HOOK, LINE, AND SINKER.
lodge a complaint
{v. phr.} To make a complaint; complain. * /If our neighbors don't stop this constant noise, I will have to lodge a complaint with the management./
loggerhead
See: AT LOGGERHEADS.
loin
See: GIRD UP ONE'S LOINS.
lone wolf
{n.} A man who likes to work or live alone. * /The man who paints a picture or establishes a business is often a lone wolf; so is the criminal outlaw./ * /Jones is a good ...
long
See: AT LAST or AT LONG LAST, BEFORE LONG, COME A LONG WAY, IN THE LONG RUN, NO LONGER, SO LONG, THE LONG AND THE SHORT.
long and short of it
{n. phr.} The essence; the whole story in a nutshell. * /The long and short of it is that he is lazy and doesn't really want to find a job./
long ball
{n.} A baseball hit far enough to be a home run. * /The White Sox need a player who can hit the long ball./
long face
{n.} A sad look; disappointed look. * /He told the story with a long face./ - Often used in the phrase " pull a long face". * /Don't pull a long face when I tell ...
long haul
or[long pull] {n.}, {informal} 1. A long distance or trip. * /It is a long haul to drive across the country./ Contrast SHORT HAUL. 2. A long length of time during ...
long pull
See: LONG HAUL. [long shot] {n.} 1. A bet or other risk taken though not likely to succeed. * /The horse was a long shot, but it came in and paid well./ * /Jones was a ...
long-winded
{adj.} Tedious; overlong; given to too much talking. * /Everyone was bored by the old man's long-winded stories./
longhair(1)
1. {n.}, {slang} A male hippie. * /Who's that longhair? - It's Joe./ 2. An intellectual who prefers classical music to jazz or acid rock. * /Catwallender is a regular ...

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