Слова на букву long-nest (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву long-nest (459)

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longhair(2)
{adj.}, {slang} Pertaining to classical art forms, primarily in dancing and music. * /Cut out that longhair Mozart Symphony and put on a decent pop record!/
look
See: DIRTY LOOK.
look a gift horse in the mouth
To complain if a gift is not perfect. - A proverb. Usually used with a negative. * /John gave Joe a baseball but Joe complained that the ball was old. His father told him ...
look after
also[see after] {v.} To watch over; attend to. * /John's mother told him to look after his younger brother./ * /When he went to Europe, Mr. Jenkins left his son to see ...
look alive
{v.} Act lively; be quick; wake up and work; be busy; hurry. - Often used as a command. * /"Look alive there," the boss called./
look as if butter wouldn't melt in one's mouth
See: BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT IN ONE'S MOUTH.
look as if one has come out of a bandbox
{v. phr.}, {informal} To look very clean and fresh; look as if you had just had a bath and put on all-new clothing. * /In spite of the long, hot train ride, Jody ...
look at
{v.} To have a way of thinking or feeling toward; think about something in a certain way. * /Is he a hero or a villain? That depends on how you look at it./ * /Depending on ...
look at the world through rose-colored glasses
or[see with rose-colored glasses] {v. phr.} To see everything as good and pleasant; not see anything hard or bad. * /When Jean graduated from high school, she ...
look back
{v.} To review the past; think of what has happened. * /As John looked back, his life seemed good to him./ * /Murphy looked back on his early struggles as having made him ...
look bleak
{v.} To indicate misfortune; appear threatening or ruinous. * /As prices dropped lower and lower, things looked bleak for Henry's company./ * /Many witnesses gave testimony ...
look daggers
{v. phr.} To show anger with a look; express hate or enmity by a look or stare; look fiercely. * /The other driver looked daggers at Morris for turning in before him./ * /Mary ...
look down on
also[look down upon] {v.} To think of (a person or thing) as less good or important; feel that (someone) is not as good as you are, or that (something) is not worth having or ...
look down one's nose at
{v. phr.}, {informal} To think of as worthless; feel scorn for. * /The banker's wife has beautiful china cups, and she looked down her nose at the plastic cups that Mrs. ...
look for
{v.} 1. To think likely; expect. * /We look for John to arrive any day now./ * /The frost killed many oranges, and housewives can look for an increase in their price./ * /Bob ...
look for a needle in a haystack
See: NEEDLE IN A HAY STACK.
look forward to
{v.} 1. To expect. * /At breakfast, John looked forward to a difficult day./ 2. To expect with hope or pleasure. * /Frank was looking forward to that evening's date./
look high and low for
{v. phr.} To look everywhere; search all over. * /Everyone has been looking high and low for the lost key but no one could find it./
look in on
{v.} To go to see; make a short visit with; make a call on. * /On his way downtown, Jim looked in on his aunt./ * /The doctor looked in on Mary each day when he went ...
look in the eye
or[look in the face] {v. phr.} To meet with a steady look; to face bravely or without shame. * /Mary looked the gangster in the eye, and he turned away without ...
look into
{v.} To find out the facts about; examine; study; inspect. * /The mayor felt he should look into the decrease of income from parking meters./ * /Mr. Jones said he ...
look like a million dollars
{v. phr.}, {informal} To look well and prosperous; appear healthy and happy and lucky; look pretty and attractive. * /John came back from Florida driving a fine new ...
look like the cat that ate the canary
or[look like the cat that swallowed the canary] {v. phr.} To seem very self-satisfied; look as if you had just had a great success. * /Peter bet on the poorest horse in the ...
look on
or[look upon] {v.} 1. To regard; consider; think of. * /The stuff had always been looked on as a worthless factory waste./ * /Until the day Bob made the touchdown, the other ...
look oneself
{v. phr.} To appear self-possessed and well; look or seem in full possession of your abilities and in good health; to appear all right or normal. * /Mary had had a long ...
look out
or[watch out] {v.} 1. To take care; be careful; be on guard. - Usually used as a command or warning. * /"Look out!" John called, as the car came toward me./ * /"Look out ...
look out for
{v. phr.} To watch out for; be on the alert. * /There were signs along the highway warning drivers to look out for deer crossing./
look over
{v.} To look at and try to learn something about; look at every part or piece of or at every one of; examine; inspect; study. * /I looked hurriedly over the apples in the ...
look sharp
{v.} To be alert; be very attentive; keep a close watch. * /It pays to look sharp in traffic./ * /The guide told us to look sharp because there were rattlesnakes ...
look small
See: FEEL SMALL.
look to
{v.} 1. To attend to; get ready for; take care of. * /Plans had been prepared that looked to every possibility./ * /The president assigned a man to look to our needs./ 2. ...
look to one's laurels
To make sure that your reputation is not spoiled; protect your good name; keep your record from being beaten by others. * /Tom won the broad jump, but he had to look to ...
look up
{v.} 1. {informal} To improve in future chances; promise more success. * /The first year was tough, but business looked up after that./ 2. To search for; hunt for ...
look up to
{v.} To think of (someone) as a good example to copy; honor; respect. * /Mr. Smith had taught for many years, and all the students looked up to him./ * /Young children look ...
look upon
See: LOOK ON(1).
look-in
{n.}, {informal} A chance or hope. - Usually used with a negative. * /It wasn't much of a look-in, but it was the only chance they let him have./ * /Charlie didn't realize ...
lookout
See: ON THE LOOKOUT.
loop
See: KNOCK FOR A LOOP or THROW FOR A LOOP.
loose
See: AT LOOSE ENDS, CAST OFF or CAST LOOSE, CUT LOOSE, FAST AND LOOSE, HAVE A SCREW LOOSE, LET LOOSE or SET LOOSE or TURN LOOSE, ON THE LOOSE.
loose ends
{n.} 1. Parts or things that should be finished or put together. * /Mary's composition had many loose ends./ * /When George came home after a long trip, he started picking up ...
lord it over
{v. phr.} To act as the superior and master of; dominate; be bossy over; control. * /John learned early to lord it over other children./ * /The office manager lorded it ...
Lord knows
See: GOD KNOWS.
lose
See: HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU LOSE.
lose track
{v. phr.} To forget about something; not stay informed; fail to keep a count or record. * /What's the score now? I've lost track./ - Usually used with "of". * ...
lose face
{v.} To be embarrassed or shamed by an error or failure; lose dignity, influence or reputation; lose self-respect or the confidence of others. * /Many Japanese ...
lose ground
1. To go backward; retreat. * /The soldiers began to lose ground when their leader was killed./ Compare: GIVE GROUND. 2. To become weaker; get worse; not improve. * /The ...
lose heart
{v. phr.} To feel discouraged because of failure; to lose hope of success. * /The team had won no games and it lost heart./ Contrast: TAKE HEART.
lose one's balance
Contrast: KEEP ONE'S BALANCE.
lose one's grip
{v. phr.} To fail in control or command; lose your strength, force, or ability to lead. * /Mr. Jones began to lose his grip: he no longer wanted the hard jobs, and he ...
lose one's head (over)
{v. phr.} 1. To panic. * /"Let's not lose our heads," the captain cried. "We have good lifeboats on this vessel."/ 2. To become deeply infatuated with someone. * /Don't ...
lose one's heart
{v. phr.} To fall in love; begin to love. * /She lost her heart to the soldier with the broad shoulders and the deep voice./ * /Bill lost his heart to the puppy the ...
lose one's marbles
{v. phr.} To go mad; become crazed. * /Stan must have lost his marbles; he is hopelessly pursuing a happily married woman./
lose one's shirt
{v. phr.}, {slang} To lose all or most of your money. * /Uncle Joe spent his life savings to buy a store, but it failed, and he lost his shirt./ * /Mr. Matthews lost ...
lose one's temper
{v. phr.} To lose control over one's anger; to get angry. * /He lost his temper when he broke the key in the lock./ Compare: BLOW A FUSE, FLY OFF THE HANDLE. ...
lose one's tongue
{v. phr.}, informal To be so embarrassed or surprised that you cannot talk. * /The man would always lose his tongue when he was introduced to new people./ Compare: CAT ...
lose oneself
{v. phr.} 1. To go wrong; miss your way; become unable to find the right direction. * /Fred lost himself in the confusion of downtown Boston streets./ 2. To conceal ...
lose out
{v.} To fail to win; miss first place in a contest; lose to a rival. * /John lost out in the rivalry for Mary's hand in marriage./ * /Fred didn't want to lose out to ...
lose sight of
{v. phr.} 1. Not to be able to see any longer. * /I lost sight of Mary in the crowd./ * /I watched the plane go higher and higher until I lost sight of it./ Contrast: CATCH ...
lose touch
{v. phr.}, {informal} To fail to keep in contact or communication. - Usually used with "with". * /After she moved to another town, she lost touch with her childhood ...
loser
See: FINDERS KEEPERS or FINDERS KEEPERS LOSERS WEEPERS.
loss
See: AT A LOSS, THROW FOR A LOSS.
lost
See: GET LOST, NO LOVE LOST.
lost cause
{n. phr.} A movement that has failed and has no chance to be revived. * /Communism in Eastern Europe has become a lost cause./
lost upon
adj. Wasted. * /Tim's generosity is completely lost upon Sue; he can't expect any gratitude from her./
lot
See: A LOT, CAST ONE'S LOT WITH, SAND LOT, THINK A GREAT DEAL OF or THINK A LOT OF, THROW IN ONE'S LOT WITH or CAST IN ONE'S LOT WITH.
loud
See: ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS, FOR CRYING OUT LOUD, OUT LOUD, THINK ALOUD or THINK OUT LOUD.
loud mouth
or[big mouth] {n.}, {slang} A noisy, boastful, or foolish talker. * /Fritz is a loud mouth who cannot be trusted with secrets./ * /When he has had a few drinks, Joe ...
loud-mouthed
or[big-mouthed] {adj.}, {slang} Talking noisily, boastfully, or foolishly. * /Fred was a loud-mouthed fellow, whose talk no one listened to./ * /If I were you, I would not ...
lounge lizard
{n. phr.} A well-dressed male fortune hunter who sits around in bars and other public places, and attends many social events to try to pick up wealthy women through smart ...
louse up
{v.}, {slang} To throw into confusion; make a mess of; spoil; ruin. * /When the man who was considering John's house heard that the basement was wet, that was enough to ...
love
See: FOR LOVE OR MONEY, IN LOVE, LABOR OF LOVE, MAKE LOVE, NO LOVE LOST, PUPPY LOVE also CALF LOVE.
love affair
{n.} A friendship between lovers; a romance or courtship. * /The love affair of Bob and Jane went on for months./ * /Harry had many love affairs, but he never ...
love game
{n.} A game of tennis which is won without the opponent scoring. * /Britain took a love game on Songster's service./
love-in
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A festival or occasion to celebrate life, human sensuality, the beauty of nature, human sexuality, and universal love; affairs so ...
lovers' lane
{n.} A hidden road or walk where lovers walk or park in the evening. * /A parked car in a lonely lovers' lane often is a chance for holdup men./
low
See: LAY LOW, LIE LOW.
low season
Contrast: HIGH SEASON.
low-key
{adj.} Relaxed and easygoing. * /Surprisingly, dinner with the governor was a low-key affair./
lowbrow
{n.} A person of limited culture; a nonintellectual. * /Some people claim that only lowbrows read the comics./ Contrast: HIGH BROW.
lowdown
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} The inside facts of a matter; the total truth. * /Nixon never gave the American people the lowdown on Watergate./
lower the boom
{v. phr.}, {informal} To punish strictly; check or stop fully. * /The mayor lowered the boom on outside jobs for city firemen./ * /Father lowered the boom on the girls ...
luck
See: DOWN ON ONE'S LUCK, LUCK OUT, PRESS ONE'S LUCK or PUSH ONE'S LUCK, IN LUCK, OUT OF LUCK.
luck out
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Suddenly to get lucky when in fact the odds are against one's succeeding. * /I was sure I was going to miss the train as I was three ...
lucky
See: THANK ONE'S LUCKY STARS.
lucky star
{n.} A certain star or planet which, by itself or with others, is seriously or jokingly thought to bring a person good luck and success in life. * /John was born under a ...
lump in one's throat
{n. phr.} A feeling (as of grief or pride) so strong that you almost sob. * /John's mother had a lump in her throat at his college graduation./ * /All during her ...
lump sum
{n.} The complete amount; a total agreed upon and to be paid at one time. * /The case was settled out of court with the plaintiff receiving a lump sum of half a ...
lunar module (L.M.)
or[Lem] {n.}, {Space English} That portion of the rocket assemblage on a flight to the Moon in which the astronauts descend to the Moon's surface. * /Building the ...
lung
See: AT THE TOP OF ONE'S VOICE or AT THE TOP OP ONE'S LUNGS.
lurch
See: LEAVE IN THE LURCH.
lust for
{v. phr.} To physically yearn for; hanker after; want something very strongly. * /Ed has been lusting after Meg for a very long time./
luxury
See: IN THE LAP OF LUXURY.
M.C.
or[emcee] {v.} To act as master of ceremonies at a show. * /The famous actor emceed the entire television show./
mackerel
See: HOLY CATS or HOLY MACKEREL.
mad about
{adj. phr.} 1. Angry about. * /What is Harriet so mad about?/ 2. Enthusiastic about. * /Dan is mad about pop music./
mad as a hatter
or[mad as a March hare] {adj. phr.} Not able to think right; crazy. * /Anyone who thinks the moon is made of green cheese is mad as a hatter./
mad as a hornet
or[mad as hops] or[mad as a wet hen] {adj. phr.}, {informal} In a fighting mood; very angry. * /When my father sees the dent in his fender, he'll be mad as a hornet./ * ...
mad as a March hare
See: MAD AS A HATTER.
mad as hops
See: MAD AS A HORNET.
made of money
{adj. phr.} Very rich; wealthy. * /Mr. Jones buys his children everything they want. He must be made of money./ Compare: MONEY TO BURN.
made to order
{adj. phr.} 1. Made specially in the way the buyer wants instead of all the same in large amounts; made especially for the buyer. * /Mr. Black's clothes were all made to ...
made up out of whole cloth
See: OUT OF WHOLE CLOTH.
made-to-measure
or[tailor-made] {adj.} Made to fit a special set of measurements or needs. * /John has a new made-to-measure suit./ * /The club is tailor-made for Jane./ Syn.: MADE TO ...
magic carpet
{n.} 1. A rug said to be able to transport a person through the air to any place he wishes. * /The caliph of Baghdad flew on his magic carpet to Arabia./ 2. Any form of ...
maiden speech
{n. phr.} One's first public speech, usually before some legislative body. * /It was the new congressman's maiden speech and everyone was listening very keenly./
maiden voyage
{n. phr.} The first voyage of a boat. * /The Titanic sank on her maiden voyage to America from England./
mail order
{n. phr.} A purchase made by mail. * /If you don't have a chance to go to a store, you can sometimes make a purchase by mail order./
main
See: IN THE MAIN, WITH MIGHT AND MAIN.
main drag
{n.}, {colloquial} 1. The most important street or thoroughfare in a town. * /Lincoln Avenue is the main drag of our town./ 2. The street where the dope pushers and ...
main squeeze
{n.}, {slang} 1. The top ranking person in an organization or in a neighborhood; an important person, such as one's boss. * /Mr. Bronchard is the main squeeze in this ...
majority leader
{n.} The leader of the political party with the most votes in a legislative house. * /The majority leader of the House of Representatives tried to get the members of his ...
make
See: ALL WORK AND NO PLAY MAKES JACK A DULL BOY, HAVE IT MADE, MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK, ON THE MAKE.
make something of
{v. phr.} 1. To make (something) seem important. * /When girls see another girl with a boy, they often try to make something of it./ 2. To start a fight over; use as an ...
make a long story short
{v. phr.} To summarize a lengthy narrative. * /"So, to make a long story short," he said, "I made a killing on the stock market."/ Compare: IN A NUTSHELL.
make a beeline for
{v. phr.} To go in a straight line toward. * /The runner made a beeline for first base./ * /When the bell rang Ted made a beeline for the door of the classroom./
make a big deal about
{v. phr.}, {informal} To exaggerate an insignificant event. * /Jeff said, "I'm sorry I banged into you in the dark. Don't make a big deal out of it."/
make a clean breast of
{v. phr.} To admit (your guilt); tell all about (your wrong doing); confess everything. * /The police caught the hit-and-run driver and he made a clean breast of his ...
make a clean sweep of
{v. phr.} 1. Achieve a complete victory. * /In 7980 the Reagan Republicans made a clean sweep of the western states./ 2. To eliminate thoroughly and completely. * ...
make a clown of
See: MAKE A FOOL OF.
make a day of it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something all day. * /When they go to the beach they take a picnic lunch and make a day of it./ Compare: MAKE A NIGHT OF.
make a dent in
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make less by a very small amount; reduce slightly. - Usually used in the negative or with such qualifying words as "hardly" or "barely". * /John ...
make a difference
or[make the difference] {v. phr.} To change the nature of something or a situation; be important; matter. * /John's good score on the test made the difference ...
make a face
{v. phr.}, {informal} To twist your face; make an ugly expression on your face (as by sticking out your tongue). * /The boy made a face at his teacher when she turned her ...
make a fast buck
See: FAST BUCK.
make a federal case out of
See: MAKE A BIG DEAL ABOUT, MAKE A MOUNTAIN OUT OF A MOLEHILL.
make a fool of
or (informal)[make a monkey of] {v. phr.} To make (someone) look foolish. * /The boy made a fool of himself./ * /Mary's classmates made a fool of her by telling her the ...
make a fuss over
{v. phr.} 1. To quarrel about something or someone. * /I want you kids to stop fussing about who gets the drumstick./ 2. To he excessively concerned about someone or ...
make a go of
{v. phr.} To turn into a success. * /He is both energetic and highly skilled at trading; he is sure to make a go of any business that holds his interest./
make a hit
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be successful; be well-liked; get along well. * /Mary's new red dress made a hit at the party./ * /Alice was so happy that her boyfriend made a ...
make a killing
{v. phr.} To earn or suddenly win a very large sum of money. * /Herb bought a lot of soybean stock when the price was low and sold it when the price went up. Small wonder ...
make a living
{v. phr.} To earn one's livelihood. * /If you're good at your job, you can make a better living than if you don't know what you're doing./ * /It is easier to make a living ...
make a match
{v. phr.} To bring a man and woman together for the purpose of an engagement or marriage. * /Sheila's aunt is anxious to make a match between her and an attractive, wealthy ...
make a mess of
See: SCREW UP.
make a monkey of
See: MAKE A FOOL OF.
make a motion
{v. phr.} To propose in some committee meeting or legislative group that a certain action be taken. * /The secretary made a motion that the minutes of the last meeting ...
make a mountain out of a molehill
To think a small problem is a big one; try to make something unimportant seem important. * /You're not hurt badly, Johnny. Stop trying to make a mountain out of a ...
make a move
{v. phr.} 1. To budge; change places. * /"If you make a move," the masked gangster said, "I'll start shooting."/ 2. To go home after dinner or a party. * /"I guess it's time ...
make a name for oneself
{v. phr.} To become recognized in a field of endeavor; become a celebrity. * /Joe has worked so hard at soybean trading that he made quite a name for himself as a trader./ * ...
make a night of it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To spend the whole night at an activity. * /The dog found the door unlatched and made a night of it./ * /The boys and girls at the dance made a ...
make a nuisance of oneself
{v. phr.} To constantly bother others. * /The screaming kids made a nuisance of themselves around the swimming pool./
make a pass at
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} Make advances toward a member of the opposite sex (usually man to a woman) with the goal of seducing the person. * /We've been dating for ...
make a pig of oneself
{v. phr.}, {informal} To overindulge; eat too much. * /Mary said, "This dessert is so delicious that I am going to make a pig of myself and have some more."/
make a play for
{v. phr.}, {slang} To try to get the interest or liking of; flirt with; attract. * /Bob made a play for the pretty new girl./ * /John made a play for the other boys' ...
make a point
{v. phr.} To try hard; make a special effort. - Used with "of" and a verbal noun. * /He made a point of remembering to get his glasses fixed./ * /He made a point of thanking ...
make a practice of
{v. phr.} To make a habit of; do regularly. * /Make a practice of being on time for work./
make a quick buck
See: FAST BUCK.
make a racket
{v. phr.} To cause a lot of noisy disturbance. * /I wish the kids playing in the street wouldn't make such a racket while I'm trying to take a nap./
make a scene
{v. phr.} To act hysterically; attract unfavorable attention. * /I didn't want Kate to make a scene in front of all of those people, so I gave her the money she wanted./
make a splash
{v. phr.} To cause a sensation. * /The brilliant young pianist, barely 14 years old, made quite a splash on the concert circuit./
make a stab at
{v. phr.} To try doing something at random without sufficient preparation. * /The singer was not familiar with the aria but she decided to make a stab at it anyhow./ ...
make a stand
{v. phr.} 1. To take a firm position on an issue. * /He keeps talking about politics hut he never makes a stand for what he believes in./ 2. To take up a defensive ...
make a stir
See: MAKE A SCENE.
make a touch
{v. phr.} To borrow money; try to borrow money. * /He is known to make a touch whenever he is hard up for cash./
make a virtue of necessity
{v. phr.} Make the best of things as they are; do cheerfully what you do. * /After Mr. Wilson lost all his money, he made a virtue of necessity and found a new and ...
make after
{v. phr.} To chase something; run after something. * /The mouse escaped from the kitchen corner and the cat made after it./
make allowance
{v. phr.} To judge results by the circumstances. - Often used in plural. * /When a small boy is helping you, you must make allowances for his age./
make an appearance
See: PUT IN AN APPEARANCE.
make an end of
{v. phr.} To make (something) end; put a stop to; stop. * /To make an end of rumors that the house was haunted, a reporter spent the night there./
make an example of
{v. phr.} To punish (someone) publicly to show what happens when someone does wrong. * /The teacher made an example of the boy who copied from another student during a ...
make an exhibition of oneself
{v. phr.} To behave foolishly or embarrassingly in public. * /Stop drinking so much and making an exhibition of yourself./
make away with
{v.}, {informal} Take; carry away; cause to disappear. * /The lumberjack made away with a great stack of pancakes./ * /Two masked men held up the clerk and ...
make believe
{v.} To act as if something is true while one knows it is not; pretend. * /Let's make believe we have a million dollars./ * /Danny made believe he didn't hear his mother ...
make book
{v. phr.} To serve as a bookmaker taking bets on the horse races. * /The police were out to prosecute anybody who made book illegally./
make both ends meet
See: MAKE ENDS MEET.
make bricks without straw
{v. phr.} To make something without the wherewithal; do something the hard way; do a job under hard conditions. * /John could not go to a library, and writing the ...
make conversation
{v. phr.} To talk with someone just so that there will be talk. * /John made conversation with the stranger so that he would not feel left out./ * /Mary didn't really ...
make do
{v. phr.} To use a poor substitute when one does not have the right thing. * /John did not have a hammer, and he had to make do with a heavy rock./ * /This motel isn't what ...
make ends meet
{v. phr.} To have enough money to pay one's bills; earn what it costs to live. * /Both husband and wife had to work to make ends meet./
make eyes at
{v. phr.}, {informal} To look at a girl or boy in a way that tries to attract him to you; flirt. * /The other girls disliked her way of making eyes at their boyfriends ...
make faces at
{v. phr.} To grimace; scowl. * /"Stop making faces at each other, you children," my aunt said, "and start eating."/
make for
{v.} To go toward; start in the direction of. * /The children took their ice skates and made for the frozen pond./ * /The bee got his load of pollen and made for the ...
make free with
{v.} 1. To take or use (things) without asking. * /Bob makes free with his roommate's clothes./ * /A student should not make free with his teacher's first name./ 2. To act ...
make friends
{v. phr.} To become friends; form a friendship. * /Mrs. Jones invited Bobby to her home to play with Don. She hoped that they would make friends with each other./ * /You can ...
make fun of
or[poke fun at] {v. phr.}, {informal} To joke about; laugh at; tease; mock. * /Men like to make fun of the trimmings on women's hats./ * /James poked fun at the new pupil ...
make good
{v. phr.} 1. To do what one promised to do; make something come true. * /Mr. Smith borrowed some money. He promised to pay it back on payday. He made good his promise./ ...
make good time
{v. phr.} To make unimpeded progress on a journey; arrive at one's destination sooner than estimated. * /There was not much traffic on the expressway so we made good time on ...
make haste
{v. phr.} To move fast; hurry. - Rarely used in speaking. * /The dog wriggled into one end of the hollow log, and the rabbit made haste to get out the other end./ * ...
make haste with
See: HURRY ON WITH.
make hay while the sun shines
{v. phr.} To do something at the right time; not wait too long. * /Dick had a free hour so he made hay while the sun shone and got his lesson for the next day./ ...
make head or tail of
{v. phr.}, {informal} To see the why of; finding a meaning in; understand. - Used in negative, conditional, and interrogative sentences. * /She could not make head or tail ...
make headway
{v. phr.} To move forward; make progress. * /The university is making headway with its campus reorganization project./
make it hot
{v. phr.}, {informal} To bring punishment; cause trouble. * /Dick threatened to make it hot for anyone who tied knots in his pajama legs again./
make it snappy
{v. phr.}, {informal} To move quickly; be fast; hurry. - Usually used as a command. * /"Make it snappy," Mother said, "or we'll be late for the movie."/ * /The man ...
make it with
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To be accepted by a group. * /Joe finally made it with the in crowd in Hollywood./ 2. {vulgar} To have sex with (someone). * /I wonder if ...
make light of
{v. phr.} To treat an important matter as if it were trivial. * /One ought to know which problems to make light of and which ones to handle seriously./ Compare: LAUGH ...
make little of
{v. phr.} To make (something) seem unimportant; belittle. * /Mary made little of Jane's new bicycle because she was jealous./ * /Tom made little of his saving the ...
make love
{v. phr.} 1. To be warm, loving, and tender toward someone of the opposite sex; try to get him or her to love you too. * /There was moonlight on the roses and he made ...
make merry
{v. phr.}, {literary} To have fun, laugh, and be happy, * /In Aesop's fable the grasshopper made merry while the ant worked and saved up food./ * /In the Bible ...
make mincemeat (out) of
{v. phr.} To destroy completely. * /The defense attorney made mincemeat of the prosecution's argument./
make much of
{v. phr.} To make something seem of more worth or importance than it really is; praise. * /Visitors made much of the new collie./ * /The boy made much of the hard things of ...
make neither head nor tail of
{v. phr.} To be unable to figure something out. * /This puzzle is so complicated that I can make neither head nor tail of it./ Compare: HEADS OR TAILS.
make no bones
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To have no doubts; not to worry about right or wrong; not to be against. - Used with "about". * /Bill makes no bones about telling a lie to escape ...
make of
{v. phr.} To interpret; understand. * /What do you make of his sudden decision to go to Africa?/
make off
{v.} To go away; run away; leave. * /When the deer saw the hunter it made off at once./ * /A thief stopped John on a dark street and made off with his wallet./ Compare: ...
make one out to be
{v. phr.} To accuse someone of being something. * /Don't make me out to be such a grouch; I am really quite happy-go-lucky./
make one feel at home
{v. phr.} To be hospitable; welcome; make someone feel at ease. * /They are very popular hosts because they always manage to make their guests feel at home./
make one tick
{v. phr.} To cause to operate; to motivate. * /He is so secretive that we are unable to figure out what makes him tick./
make one's bed and lie in it
To be responsible for what you have done and so to have to accept the bad results. * /Billy smoked one of his father's cigars and now he is sick. He made his bed, now let ...
make one's blood boil
or[make the blood boil] {v. phr.}, {informal} To make someone very angry. * /When someone calls me a liar it makes my blood boil./ * /It made Mary's blood boil to ...
make one's blood run cold
See: BLOOD RUNS COLD.
make one's ears burn
See: EARS BURN.
make one's hair stand on end
See: HAIR STAND ON END.
make one's head spin
{v. phr.} To be bewildered; be confused. * /It makes my head spin to think about the amount of work I still have to do./
make one's mark
{v. phr.} To become known to many people; do well the work you started to do; make a reputation. * /Shakespeare made his mark as a playwright./
make one's mouth water
{v. phr.} 1. To look or smell very good; make you want very much to eat or drink something you see or smell. * /The pies in the store window made Dan's mouth water./ * /The ...
make one's pile
{v. phr.} To make one's fortune. * /The rich man made his pile in the stock market./
make one's way
{v. phr.} 1. To go forward with difficulty; find a path for yourself. * /They made their way through the crowd./ 2. To do many hard things to earn a living; make a life work ...
make oneself at home
{v. phr.} To feel comfortable; act as if you were in your own home. * /If you get to my house before I do, help yourself to a drink and make yourself at home./ * /John was ...
make oneself scarce
{v. phr.}, {slang} To leave quickly; go away. * /The boys made themselves scarce when they saw the principal coming to stop their noise./ * /A wise mouse makes himself scarce ...
make or break
{v. phr.} To bring complete success or failure, victory or defeat. * /Playing the role of Hamlet will make or break the young actor./
make out
{v.} 1. To write the facts asked for (as in an application blank or a report form); fill out. * /The teacher made out the report cards and gave them to the students to ...
make over
{v.} 1. To change by law something from one owner to another owner; change the name on the title (lawful paper) from one owner to another. * /Mr. Brown made over the ...
make passes at
See: MAKE A PASS AT.
make rounds
{v. phr.} To travel the same route, making several stops along the way. * /The milkman makes his rounds every morning./ * /The doctor makes the rounds of the hospital ...
make sense
{v. phr.} 1. To be something you can understand or explain; not be difficult or strange. * /The explanation in the school book made no sense because the words were hard./ ...
make short work of
{v. phr.} To finish rapidly. * /The cat made short work of the baby rabbit./ * /Tim was anxious to get to the movies so he made short work of his homework./
make sit up
{v. phr.} To shock to attention; surprise; create keen interest. * /Her sudden appearance at the party and her amazingly low-cut dress made us all sit up./
make sport of
See: MAKE FUN OF.
make sure
{v. phr.} To see about something yourself; look at to be sure. * /Father makes sure that all the lights are off before he goes to bed./ * /Mary thought she had time to ...
make the best of
{v. phr.} To do something you do not like to do and not complain; accept with good humor. * /The girl did not like to wash dishes but she made the best of it./ Compare: MAKE ...
make the blood boil
See: MAKE ONE'S BLOOD BOIL.
make the feathers fly
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To enjoy working; be strong and work hard. * /When Mrs. Hale did her spring cleaning she made the feathers fly./ 2. See: MAKE THE FUR FLY.
make the fur fly
or[make the feathers fly] {v. phr.}, {informal} Say or write mean things about someone or to jump on and fight hard. * /A man fooled Mr. Black and got his money. Mr. Black will ...
make the grade
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make good; succeed. * /It was clear that Mr. Baker had made the grade in the insurance business./ * /It takes hard study to make the ...
make the most of
{v. phr.} To do the most you can with; get the most from; use to the greatest advantage. * /She planned the weekend in town to make the most of it./ * /George studied hard. ...
make the scene
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be present; to arrive at a certain place or event. * /I am too tired to make the scene; let's go home./
make things hum
See: KEEP THINGS HUMMING.
make time
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To be successful in arriving at a designated place in short or good time. * /We're supposed to be there at 6 P.M., and it's only 5:30 - we're making good ...
make tongues wag
See: TONGUES TO WAG.
make tracks
{v. phr.}, {informal} To go fast; get a speedy start; hurry. * /Man, it's time we made tracks!/ * /The boys made tracks for home when it began to get dark./ Compare: GET ...
make up
{v.} (stress on "up") 1. To make by putting things or parts together. * /A car is made up of many different parts./ 2. To invent; think and say something that is new or ...
manger
See: DOG IN THE MANGER.
manner
See: ALL MANNER OF, TO THE MANNER BORN.
many
See: GOOD MANY or GREAT MANY, IN SO MANY WORDS, SO MANY.
many a
{adj.} Many (persons or things) - Used with a singular noun. * /Many a boy learns to swim before he can read./ * /I have spent many a day in his home./
many hands make light work
If many people work together, even a hard job becomes easier. - A proverb. * /Come on boys, many hands make light work. If we work together, we can finish painting the ...
many is me
There are a great number of (persons or things); many are the (persons or things). - Used at the beginning of a sentence with a singular noun. * /Many is the man I have ...
many moons ago
{adv. phr.} A long, long time ago. * /Many moons ago, when I was young, I was able to dance all night./
map
See: PUT ON THE MAP.
map out
{v. phr.} To arrange; lay out; plan. * /The candidate will meet with his campaign manager tomorrow to map out his campaign strategy./
marble
See: HAVE ALL ONE'S BUTTONS or HAVE ALL ONE'S MARBLES.
March
See: MAD AS A HATTER or MAD AS A MARCH HARE.
mare's nest
{n. phr.} Something that doesn't exist; a discovery that proves to be worthless. * /He claims that he has discovered a gasoline substitute but we suspect it will turn out ...
marine
See: TELL IT TO THE MARINES.
mark
See: MAKE ONE'S MARK, TOE THE LINE or TOE THE MARK, UP TO THE MARK at UP TO PAR(2), WALK THE CHALK or WALK THE CHALK LINE or WALK THE CHALK MARK, WIDE OF THE ...
mark down
{v. phr.} 1. To lower the price. * /The department store marked down their prices on women's sandals./ 2. To give a poor grade to a student. * /Peter was marked down for ...
mark off
{v. phr.} Mark with lines; lay out in sections. * /The field will be marked off in accordance with the special track events that will take place tomorrow./
mark one's words
{v. phr.} To pay close attention to what one says; an emphatic expression indicating prophecy. * /"It will certainly rain tomorrow," he said. " Mark my words."/
mark time
{v. phr.} 1. To move the feet up and down as in marching, but not going forward. * /The officer made the soldiers mark time as a punishment./ 2. To be idle; waiting ...
markdown
{n.} A reduction in price. * /Joan asked, "Do you like my new sandals? They were markdowns at Marshall Field's."/
marked man
{n. phr.} A man whose behavior has made him the object of suspicion; a man whose life may be in danger. * /When Dave dared to criticize the dictator openly, he became a marked ...
market
See: FLEA MARKET, IN THE MARKET FOR, ON THE MARKET, PLAY THE MARKET.
marry money
{v. phr.} To marry a rich person. * /Ellen married money when she became Hal's wife./
masking tape
{n.} A paper tape that is stuck around the edges of a surface being painted to keep the paint off the surface next to it. * /The painters put masking tape around the window ...
masse
See: EN MASSE.
mast
See: NAIL ONE'S COLORS TO THE MAST.
master copy
{n.} 1. A perfect text to which all copies are made to conform; a corrected version used as a standard by printers. * /The master copy must be right, because if it isn't, the ...
master key
{n. phr.} A key that opens a set of different locks. * /The building janitor has a master key to all of the apartments in this building./
master of ceremonies
or[M.C.] or[emcee] {n.} The person in charge of introducing the various participants in a show or entertainment. * /Bob Hope was the M.C. of many memorable ...
mastermind
{v.} To create; direct; invent the central plan for several individuals to follow. * /Lenin masterminded the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia./
mat
See: WELCOME MAT IS OUT.
matter
See: FOR THAT MATTER, LAUGHING MATTER, NO MATTER, THE MATTER.
matter of record
{n. phr.} A fact or event that is kept officially as a legal record. * /If you are convicted of speeding it becomes a matter of record./ * /A birth certificate or ...
matter of course
{n. phr.} Something always done; the usual way; habit; rule. * /A was a matter of course for John to dress carefully when he was meeting his wife./ * /Bank officers ask ...
matter of fact
{n. phr.} Something that is really true; something that can be proved. * /The town records showed that it was a matter of fact that the two boys were brothers./ * /It is a ...

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