Слова на букву long-nest (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву long-nest (459)

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matter of opinion
{n. phr.} Something that may or may not be true; something that people do not all agree on. * /Whether or not he was a good general is a matter of opinion./ Compare: ...
matter-of-fact
{adj.} 1. Simply telling or showing the truth; not explaining or telling more. * /The newspaper gave a matter-of-fact account of the murder trial./ 2. Showing little feeling ...
may
See: BE THAT AS IT MAY, COME WHAT MAY, LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY.
me
See: DEAR ME, PICK-ME-UP, SO HELP ME.
mean business
{v. phr.}, {informal} To decide strongly to do what you plan to do; really mean it; be serious. * /The boss said he would fire us if we didn't work harder and he means ...
mean well
{v. phr.} To have good intentions. * /Fred generally means well, but he has a tendency to be tactless./
means
See: BY ALL MEANS, BY MEANS OF, BY NO MEANS, WAYS AND MEANS.
means to an end
{n. phr.} An action leading to some end or purpose. * /Money for him was just a means to an end; actually he wanted power./
measure
See: BEYOND MEASURE, FOR GOOD MEASURE, MADE-TO-MEASURE, TAKE ONE'S MEASURE or TAKE THE MEASURE OF.
measure off
{v. phr.} To mark by measuring. * /She measured off three yards with which to make the new dress./
measure up
{v.} To be equal; be of fully high quality; come up. * /John didn't measure up to the best catchers but he was a good one./ * /Lois' school work didn't measure up to her ...
meatball
{n.}, {slang} A dull, boring, slow-witted, or uninteresting person. * /You'll never get an interesting story out of that meatball - stop inviting him./
medicine
See: TAKE ONE'S MEDICINE.
medium
See: STRIKE A HAPPY MEDIUM.
meet
See: MAKE ENDS MEET.
meet halfway
See: GO HALFWAY.
meet one's death
{v. phr.} To die. * /Algernon met his death in a car accident./
meet one's eye
{v. phr.} To be in plain view or come into plain view; appear clearly or obviously. * /When John rounded the bend, a clear blue lake met his eye./ * /On a first ...
meet one's match
{v. phr.} To encounter someone as good as oneself. * /The champion finally met his match and lost the game./
meet one's Waterloo
{v. phr.} To be defeated; lose an important contest. * /After seven straight victories the team met its Waterloo./ * /John fought instead of running, and the bully met his ...
meet up with
{v. phr.} To meet by accident; come upon without planning or expecting to. * /When he ran around the tree, Bob suddenly meet up with a large bear./ * /The family would ...
meet with
{v.} 1. To meet (someone), usually by accident. * /In the woods he met with two strangers./ Syn.: COME UPON. 2. To meet together, usually by plan; join; have a ...
meeting
See: BEST BIB AND TUCKER or SUNDAY-GO-TO-MEETING CLOTHES.
melt
See: BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT IN ONE'S MOUTH, MELT IN ONE'S MOUTH.
melt in one's mouth
{v. phr.} 1. To be so tender as to seem to need no chewing. * /The chicken was so tender that it melted in your mouth./ 2. To taste very good; be delicious. * /Mother's ...
melting pot
{n. phr.} A country where different nationalities mingle and mix with the result that, in the second generation, most people speak the main language of the country ...
memory
See: IN MEMORY OF.
mend
See: ON THE MEND.
mend one's fences
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something to make people like or follow you again; strengthen your friendships or influence. * /The senator went home from Washington to ...
mend one's ways
{v. phr.} To reform; change one's behavior from negative to positive. * /He had better mend his ways or he'll wind up in jail./
mental telepathy
{n. phr.} The passing of one person's thoughts to another without any discoverable talking or carrying of signals between them. * /Mrs. Smith knew the moment her ...
mention
See: NOT TO MENTION.
meow
See: CAT'S MEOW.
mercy
See: AT THE MERCY OF.
mercy killing
{n. phr.} The act of killing a terminally ill patient or animal in order to avoid further suffering. * /Mercy killing of humans is illegal in most countries, yet ...
merrier
See: MORE THE MERRIER.
merry
See: LEAD A MERRY CHASE, MAKE MERRY.
mess around
{v. phr.} 1. To engage in idle or purposeless activity. * /Come on, you guys, - start doing some work, don't just mess around all day!/ 2. {vulgar} To be promiscuous; ...
mess up
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To cause trouble; to spoil something. * /What did you have to mess up my accounts for?/ 2. To cause someone emotional trauma. * /Sue will ...
message
See: GET THE MESSAGE.
method in (to) one's madness
{n. phr.} A plan or organization of ideas hard to perceive at first, but that becomes noticeable after longer and closer examination. * /We thought he was crazy to ...
mickey mouse(1)
{adj.}, {slang} Inferior; second rate; chicken; easy; gimmicky. * /Watch out for Perkins; he's full of mickey mouse ideas./
mickey mouse(2)
{n.} ({derogatory}) A stupid person; a policeman; a white man (as used by blacks).
midair
See: UP IN THE AIR(2) also IN MIDAIR.
middle
See: CHANGE HORSES IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREAM, IN THE MIDDLE.
middle ground
{n.} A place halfway between the two sides of an argument; a compromise. * /John wanted to go running. Bill said it was too hot. Tom took the middle ground and suggested ...
middle of the road
{n. phr.} A way of thinking which does not favor one idea or thing too much; being halfway between two different ideas. * /The teacher did not support the boys or the ...
middle-of-the-road
{adj.} Favoring action halfway between two opposite movements or ideas; with ideas halfway between two opposite sides; seeing good on both sides. * /The men ...
middleman
{n.} A person or small business standing in an intermediary position between two parties. * /A retail merchant is the middleman between the factory and the consumer./ ...
midfield stripe
{n.} The line across the center of a football field; the 50-yard line. * /The visitors were able to cross the midfield stripe once during the whole game./
midnight oil
See: BURN THE MIDNIGHT OIL.
midstream
See: CHANGE HORSES IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREAM or CHANGE HORSES IN MIDSTREAM.
might
See: WITH MIGHT AND MAIN.
mighty
See: HIGH-AND-MIGHTY.
mile
See: GIVE ONE AN INCH AND HE WILL TAKE A MILE, JAW DROP or JAW DROP A MILE, MISS BY A MILE, MISS IS AS GOOD AS A MILE.
mile markers
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Small signs along interstate highways usually bearing a number. * /The Smokey is located at 131 mile marker./
miles away
{adj. phr.} Inattentive; not concentrating. * /When Betty said, "We have theater tickets for tonight," Ken didn't react as his mind was miles away./
milk
See: CRY OVER SPILLED MILK.
mill
See: RUN-OF-THE-MILL, THROUGH THE MILL.
mill around
{v. phr.} To move impatiently in no particular direction. * /The crowd milled around, waiting for the arrival of the president./
million
See: FEEL LIKE A MILLION, LOOK LIKE A MILLION DOLLARS.
millstone around one's neck
{n. phr.} An intolerable burden. * /Max said that his old car was a millstone around his neck./ Compare: MONKEY ON ONE'S BACK.
mince words
{v. phr.} To choose words carefully for the sake of politeness or deception. * /I like people who speak frankly and truthfully without mincing words./
mind
See: CROSS ONE'S MIND or PASS THROUGH ONE'S MIND, GIVE A PIECE OF ONE'S MIND, HALF A MIND, IN MIND, IN ONE'S MIND'S EYE, MAKE UP ONE'S MIND, NEVER MIND, ON ONE'S ...
mind you
{v. phr.}, {informal} I want you to notice and understand. * /Mind you, I am not blaming him./
mind like a steel trap
{n. phr.} A very quick and understanding mind, which is quick to catch an idea. * /Henry is not fond of sports, but he has a mind like a steel trap./ * /A successful ...
mind one's own business
{v. phr.} To not interfere in the affairs of others. * /He finally got tired of her criticism and told her to mind her own business./
mind one's p's and q's
{v. phr.} To be very careful what you do or say; not make mistakes. * /When the principal of the school visited the class the students all minded their p's and q's./ * /If you ...
mind-reader
See: READ ONE'S MIND.
mine
See: BACK TO THE SALT MINES, RUN OF THE MILL or RUN OF THE MINE.
mine of information
{n. phr.} A person, a book, etc., that is a valuable source of information. * /A dictionary can be a mine of information./ * /He is a mine of information on the stock ...
minority leader
{n. phr.} The leader of the political party that has fewer votes in a legislative house. * /The minority leader of the Senate supported the bill./ * /The minority leader in ...
mint money
See: COIN MONEY.
minutes of the meeting
{n. phr.} The notes taken by the recording secretary; of an official body or an association recording of what was said and transacted during the given session. * /"Shall we ...
misfire
{v.} To fail to appeal; fall flat. * /The standup comic's jokes misfired with the audience./ Compare: GO OVER LIKE A LEAD BALLOON.
miss
See: HEART SKIP A BEAT or HEART MISS A BEAT.
miss a trick
{v. phr.} To fail to see, hear, or notice something of even the slightest importance. * /He never misses a trick when it comes to the stock market./
miss by a mile
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To shoot at something and be far from hitting it; not hit near. * /Jack's first shot missed the target by a mile./ 2. To be very wrong; be far from ...
miss is as good as a mile
It is the same if one fails or misses something by much or by little. - A proverb. * /We thought Tom had a home run but the ball went foul by inches. A miss is as good ...
miss out
{v.}, {informal} To fail; lose or not take a good chance; miss something good. * /Jim's mother told him he missed out on a chance to go fishing with his father because ...
miss the boat
also[miss the bus] {v. phr.}, {informal} To fail through slowness; to put something off until too late; do the wrong thing and lose the chance. * /Mr. Brown missed the ...
miss the point
{v. phr.} To be unable to comprehend the essence of what was meant. * /The student didn't get a passing grade on the exam because, although he wrote three pages, he ...
missing link
n. 1. Something needed to complete a group; a missing part of a chain of things. * /A 1936 penny was the missing link in John's collection of pennies./ * /The ...
Missouri
See: FROM MISSOURI.
mistake
See: BY MISTAKE.
misty-eyed
or[dewey-eyed] {adj. phr.} 1. Having eyes damp with tears; emotional. * /The teacher was misty-eyed when the school gave her a retirement gift./ 2. Of the kind who cries ...
mix up
{v.} To confuse; make a mistake about. * /Jimmy doesn't know colors yet; he mixes up purple with blue./ * /Even the twins' mother mixes them up./ Compare: MIXED UP.
mixed bag
{n. phr.} A varied set of people, ideas, objects, or circumstances, including both the good and the bad. * /This report is a mixed bag of opinions./ * /There was a mixed ...
mixed blessing
{n.} Something good that has bad features. * /John's new bicycle was a mixed blessing. The other boys were always asking John to ride it./
mixed up
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Confused in mind; puzzled. * /Bob was all mixed up after the accident./ Compare: BALL UP(1). 2. Disordered; disarranged; not neat. * /The papers ...
molehill
See: MAKE A MOUNTAIN OUT OF A MOLEHILL.
moment
See: ON THE SPUR OF THE MOMENT.
Monday
See: BLUE MONDAY.
money
See: COIN MONEY or MINT MONEY, EASY MONEY, FOOL AND HIS MONEY ARE SOON PARTED, FOR LOVE OR MONEY, IN THE CHIPS or IN THE MONEY, MADE OF MONEY, MARRY MONEY, PUT ...
money burns a hole in one's pocket
See: BURN A HOLE IN ONE'S POCKET.
money is no object
{informal sentence} The price of something is irrelevant. * /Please show me your most beautiful mink coat; money is no object./
money to burn
{n. phr.}, {informal} Very much money, more than is needed. * /Dick's uncle died and left him money to burn./ * /When Joe is twenty-one he will have money to burn./ * /Jean ...
monkey
See: GREASE MONKEY, MAKE A FOOL OF or MAKE A MONKEY OF.
monkey around
See: FUCK AROUND, HORSE AROUND, MESS AROUND.
monkey business
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Any unethical, illegitimate, or objectionable activity that is furtive or deceitful, e.g., undercover sexual advances, cheating, misuse of ...
monkey on one's back
{n. phr.}, {informal} An unsolved or nagging problem. * /"My math course is a real monkey on my back," Jack complained./ Compare: ALBATROSS AROUND ONE'S NECK, ...
monkey wrench
See: THROW A MONKEY WRENCH.
monster
See: GREEN-EYED MONSTER.
month in, month out
See: DAY IN AND DAY OUT.
month of Sundays
{n. phr.}, informal A very long time. - Used for emphasis after "for" or "in" and usually with a negative verb. * /I have not had devil's food cake in a month of Sundays./ * ...
moon
See: ASK FOR THE MOON or CRY FOR THE MOON, DARK OF THE MOON, FULL OF THE MOON, ONCE IN A BLUE MOON, PROMISE THE MOON.
moonshine
{n.} Illegally distilled alcoholic beverage made at home, mostly on a farm. * /Grandpa is at it again in the barn, making moonshine out of plums./
mop the floor with
or[mop up the floor with] or[wipe the floor with] or[wipe up the floor with] {v. phr.}, {slang} To defeat very clearly or quickly; to beat badly. * /The bully threatened ...
mop up
{v. phr.} To disperse or liquidate isolated groups or detachments of opposing forces. * /Our forces won the basic battle but there still remain pockets of resistance they ...
mop up the floor with
See: MOP THE FLOOR WITH.
more
See: BITE OFF MORE THAN ONE CAN CHEW.
more often than not
{adv. phr.} More than half the time; fifty-one or more times out of a hundred; not quite usually, but fairly regularly. * /Nancy comes over on Saturday more ...
more or less
{adv. phr.} 1. Somewhat; rather; mostly; fairly. * /Earl made some mistakes on the test, but his answers were more or less right./ * /Ed is more or less intelligent./ * ...
more than
{adv.} Over what you might expect; very. * /They were more than glad to help./ * /He was more than upset by the accident./ Contrast: LESS THAN.
more than one can chew
See: BITE OFF MORE THAN ONE CAN CHEW.
more than one could shake a stick at
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Very many; a great many; more than you can count. * /There were more people at the game than you could shake a stick at./ * /I had more ...
more the merrier
{n. phr.} The more people who join in the fun, the better it will be. - Used in welcoming more people to join others in some pleasant activity. * /Come with us on the boat ...
morning after
{n.}, {slang} The effects of drinking liquor or staying up late as felt the next morning; a hangover. * /One of the troubles of drinking too much liquor is the morning ...
Moses
See: HOLY CATS or HOLY MOSES.
moss
See: ROLLING STONE GATHERS NO MOSS.
most
See: AT MOST, MAKE THE MOST OF.
mother
See: TIED TO ONE'S MOTHER'S APRON STRINGS.
motion
See: GO THROUGH THE MOTIONS.
mountain
See: MAKE A MOUNTAIN OUT OF A MOLEHILL.
mouse
See: PLAY CAT AND MOUSE WITH.
mouth
See: BORN WITH A SILVER SPOON IN ONE'S MOUTH, BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT IN ONE'S MOUTH, BY WORD OF MOUTH, DOWN IN THE DUMPS or DOWN IN THE MOUTH, FOAM AT THE MOUTH, ...
mouth-watering
{adj.} Smelling or looking very good to eat. * /It was a mouth-watering meal./
mouthful
See: SAY A MOUTHFUL.
move
See: GET A MOVE ON, ON THE MOVE.
move in on
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {colloquial} To take over something that belongs to another. * /He moved in on my girlfriend and now we're not talking to each other./
move a muscle
{v. phr.} To move even a very little. - Used in negative sentences and questions and with "if". * /The deer stood without moving a muscle until the hunter was gone./ * ...
move heaven and earth
{v. phr.} To try every way; do everything you can. * /Joe moved heaven and earth to be sent to Washington./ Compare: LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED.
movement
See: LABOR MOVEMENT.
moving spirit
{n. phr.} The main figure behind a business or an activity; the one who inspires the others. * /Mr. Smith is the moving spirit behind our expansion plans./
much
See: AS MUCH AS, FOR AS MUCH AS, MAKE MUCH OF, SO MUCH, SO MUCH FOR, THINK A GREAT DEAL OF or THINK MUCH OF.
much as
See: AS MUCH AS(1).
much less
{conj.} And also not; and even less able or likely to. - Used after a negative clause. * /I never even spoke to the man, much less insulted him./ * /John couldn't even pick up ...
mud
See: NAME IS MUD, STICK-IN-THE-MUD.
mud in your eye
{n. phr.}, {informal} A cheering exclamation when people drink, much like "cheers!" * /Each time John raised his glass he said, "Well, here's mud in your eye!"/
mug shot
{n. phr.} A police photograph showing the arrested person's full face and profile. * /"Go over these mug shots," Sergeant O'Malley said, "and tell me if you find the ...
Muhammad
See: IF THE HILL WON'T COME TO MUHAMMAD, THEN MUHAMMAD MUST COME TO THE HILL.
mull over
{v. phr.} To consider; think over. * /He mulled over the offer for some time, but finally rejected it./
mum is the word
You must keep the secret; keep silent; don't tell anyone. - Often used as an interjection. * /We are planning a surprise party for John and mum is the word./ * /"Mum is the ...
murder
See: SCREAM BLOODY MURDER.
muscle
See: MOVE A MUSCLE.
muscle in on
{v. phr.} To intrude; penetrate; force oneself into another's business or territory. * /The eastern Mafia muscled in on the western Mafia's turf and a shooting war was ...
muscle-bound
{adj.} Having your muscles large, hard, and tight from too much exercising; having muscles so developed that you can hardly move. * /Bob was big and strong, but he was ...
music
See: FACE THE MUSIC.
music to one's ears
{n. phr.} Something one likes to hear. * /When the manager phoned to say I got the job, it was music to my ears./
musical chairs
{n. phr.} (Originally the name of a children's game.) The transfer of a number of officers in an organization into different jobs, especially each other's jobs. * /The ...
mustard
See: CUT THE MUSTARD.
muster
See: PASS MUSTER.
my God
or[my goodness] {interj.} Used to express surprise, shock, or dismay. * /My God! What happened to the car?/
my lips are sealed
{informal sentence} A promise that one will not give away a secret. * /"You can tell me what happened, " Helen said. "My lips are sealed."/
nail
See: HARD AS NAILS, HIT THE NAIL ON THE HEAD, TOOTH AND NAIL.
nail down
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make certain; make sure; settle. * /Joe had a hard time selling his car, but he finally nailed the sale down when he got his friend Sam to give ...
nail one's colors to the mast
{literary} To let everyone know what you think is right and refuse to change. * /During the election campaign the candidate nailed his colors to the mast on the ...
name
See: CALL NAMES, HANDLE TO ONE'S NAME, IN NAME, TAKE ONE'S NAME IN VAIN, TO ONE'S NAME.
name calling
See: CALL NAMES.
name day
{n.} The day of the saint for whom a person is named. * /Lawrence's name day is August 10, the feast of St. Lawrence./
name is mud
{informal} (You) are in trouble; a person is blamed or no longer liked. - Used in the possessive. * /If you tell your mother I spilled ink on her rug my name will be ...
name of the game
{n.}, {informal} The crux of the matter; that which actually occurs under the disguise of something else. * /Getting medium income families to support the rest of society ...
named after
{adj. phr.} Given the same name as someone. * /Archibald was named after his father./
namedropper
{n. phr.} A person who is always mentioning well-known names. * /Since her move to Hollywood she has become a regular namedropper./
narrow down
{v. phr.} To limit within very strict margins. * /Of the numerous applicants, the list has been narrowed down to just a few./
narrow escape
{n. phr.} An escape by a very small margin; a near miss. * /If the truck that hit his car had been coming faster, it would have killed him; it was certainly a narrow ...
narrow-minded
{adj. phr.} Limited in outlook; resistant to new ideas; bigoted. * /He is generally very open about everything, but when it comes to politics, he is terribly ...
nary a
{informal} Not a single; not one; never a. * /One afternoon a large dark cloud came in the sky. John thought it would rain so he took his raincoat - but nary a ...
nasty-nice
{adj.} Unkind in a polite way; disagreeable while pretending to be gracious. * /The bus driver has a nasty-nice way of showing his dislike./
natural
See: BIG AS LIFE or BIG AS LIFE AND TWICE AS NATURAL.
natural-born
{adj.} 1. Being a (citizen) because you were born in the country. * /Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt came to the United States from Germany and are naturalized citizens but their ...
nature
See: SECOND NATURE.
naught
See: GO FOR NOTHING also GO FOR NAUGHT.
near
See: FAR AND NEAR.
near at hand
See: AT HAND.
necessity
See: MAKE A VIRTUE OF NECESSITY, OF NECESSITY.
neck
See: BREATHE DOWN ONE'S NECK, BREAK ONE'S NECK, CATCH IT IN THE NECK or GET IT IN THE NECK, PAIN IN THE NECK, SAVE ONE'S NECK, STICK ONE'S NECK OUT.
neck and neck
{adj. or adv.}, {informal} Equal or nearly equal in a race or contest; abreast; tied. * /At the end of the race the two horses were neck and neck./ * /For months John and ...
neck of the woods
{n. phr.}, {informal} Part of the country; place; neighborhood; vicinity. * /We visited Illinois and Iowa last summer; in that neck of the woods the corn really grows ...
necktie party
{n.}, {slang} A hanging by a mob; lynching. * /Cattle thieves were stealing the rancher's cattle, but the cowboys caught them and had a necktie party./ Compare: STRING ...
ned
See: RAISE THE DEVIL.
needle
See: ON PINS AND NEEDLES.
needle in a haystack
{n. phr.}, {informal} Something that will be very hard to find. * /"I lost my class ring somewhere in the front yard," said June. Jim answered, " Too bad. That will be like ...
neither fish nor fowl
also[neither fish, flesh, nor fowl] Something or someone that does not belong to a definite group or known class; a strange person or thing; someone or something odd or ...
neither here nor there
{adj. phr.} Not important to the thing being discussed; off the subject; not mattering. * /Perhaps you did stay up late finishing your homework. That's neither here nor ...
neither hide nor hair
See: HIDE OR HAIR.
neither rhyme nor reason
{n. phr.} No emotional or intellectual substance. * /As far as I am concerned, his proposal makes no sense; it has neither rhyme nor reason./
Nellie
See: NICE NELLY or NICE NELLIE, NERVOUS NELLIE.
Nelly
See: NICE NELLY or NICE NELLIE, NERVOUS NELLIE.
nerve
See: GET ON ONE'S NERVES, GET UP THE NERVE.
Nervous Nellie
{n.}, {informal} A timid person who lacks determination and courage. * /I say we will never win if we don't stop being Nervous Nellies!/
nervous breakdown
{n.} A mild or severe attack of mental illness; a collapse of a person's ability to make decisions and solve problems because of overwork, great mental strain, or the like. * ...
nervous prostration
{n.} An illness of the mind that makes you feel very tired, worried, and bored, and that often causes headaches, upset stomach, and other sickness. * /Aunt Jane said that ...
nest
See: FEATHER ONE'S NEST, STIR UP A HORNET'S NEST.

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