Слова на букву nest-open (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву nest-open (459)

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on the lam
{adj.} or {adv. phr.}, {slang} Running away, especially from the law; in flight. * /The bank robber was on the lam for ten months before the police caught him./ - ...
on the watch
{adj. phr.} Alert; watchful. * /The customs inspector was on the watch for diamond smugglers./ * /Mary was on the watch for bargains at the auction./ Compare: EYE OUT, ...
on a dime
{adv. phr.}, {informal} In a very small space. * /Bob can turn that car on a dime./ * /Tom says his new sports car will stop on a dime./
on a limb
See: OUT ON A LIMB.
on a pedestal
{adv. phr.} Lovingly honored and cared for. * /Mrs. Raymond's children served her breakfast in bed on Mother's Day and later took her out to dinner. She felt on a ...
on a scratched horse
See: PUT ONE'S MONEY ON A SCRATCHED HORSE.
on a shoestring
{adv. phr.} With little money to spend; on a very low budget. * /The couple was seeing Europe on a shoestring./
on a volcano
See: SIT ON A VOLCANO.
on account
{adv. phr.} As part payment of a debt; to lessen the amount owed. * /John paid $10 down and $5 on account each month for his bicycle./
on account of
{prep.} As a result of; because of. * /The picnic was held in the gym on account of the rain./ Compare: ON ONE'S ACCOUNT, OF ONE'S OWN ACCORD.
on air
See: WALK ON AIR.
on all four
See: HIT ON ALL FOUR.
on all fours
{adv. phr.} 1. On all four legs; on hands and knees. * /Fido sat up to "beg" but dropped down on all fours to eat the dog biscuit Sam gave him./ * /Billy's father got down ...
on an average
or[on the average] {adv. phr.} In most cases; usually. * /On an average Dan's mother has to ask him three times before he helps with the dishes./ * /On the average, ...
on an even keel
{adv. phr,}, {informal} In a well-ordered way or condition; orderly. * /When the football rally seemed almost ready to become a riot, the principal stepped to the platform ...
on and off
See: OFF AND ON.
on approval
{adv. phr.} With the understanding that the thing may be refused. * /Mr. Grey bought his camera on approval./ * /The company offered to send a package of stamps on approval./ ...
on behalf of
See: IN BEHALF OP.
on board(1)
{prep.} On (a ship). * /Joan was not on board the ship when it sailed./
on board(2)
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} On a ship. * /The captain was not on board when the S.S. Flandre sailed./ * /A ship was leaving the harbor, and we saw the people on board waving./
on borrowed time
See: LIVE ON BORROWED TIME.
on call
{adj. phr.} 1. Having to be paid on demand. * /Jim didn't have the money ready even though he knew the bill was on call./ 2. Ready and available. * /This is Dr. Kent's day to ...
on cloud nine
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Too happy to think of anything else; very happy. * /Ada has been on cloud nine since the magazine printed the story she wrote./ * /We were on ...
on condition that
{conj.} Providing that; if. * /I will lend you the money on condition that you pay it back in one month./ * /She agreed to act in the play on condition that she ...
on deck
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. On a floor of a ship open to the outdoors. * /The passengers were playing shufflehoard on deck./ * /The sailors kept busy cleaning and painting on ...
on deposit
{adv. phr.} In a bank. * /I have almost $500 on deposit in my account./ * /The children save their pennies and each month place them on deposit./
on die money
{adv. phr.} Exactly right; exactly accurate. * /Algernon won the lottery; the numbers he picked were right on the money./ Compare: ON THE NOSE.
on duty
{adj. phr.} Doing one's job; supervising. * /Two soldiers are on duty guarding the gates./ * /There is always one teacher on duty during study hour./ Contrast: OFF ...
on earth
See: IN THE WORLD.
on easy street
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Having enough money to live very comfortably; rather rich. * /After years of hard work, the Grants found themselves on easy street./ * /Jim's ...
on edge
{adj. phr.} Excited or nervous; impatient. * /The magician kept the children on edge all through his show./ * /We were all on edge as we listened to the TV for ...
on end
{adj. phr.} Seemingly endless. - Used with plural nouns of time. * /Judy spent hours on end writing and rewriting her essay./ * /During July and August there was no rain for ...
on faith
{adv. phr.} Without question or proof. * /He said he was twenty-one years old and the employment agency took him on faith./ * /He looked so honest that we accepted his story ...
on file
{adv. phr.} Placed in a written or electronic file; on record. * /We are sorry we cannot hire you right now but we will keep your application on file./
on fire
See: SET THE WORLD ON FIRE.
on foot
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. By walking. * /Sally's bicycle broke and she had to return home on foot./ 2. Being planned. * /The reporter said that a civil rights ...
on guard
{adj. phr.} Watchful; watching. * /The police warned people to he on guard for pickpockets during the Christmas rush./ * /Two men are on guard at the door./ Contrast: ...
on hand
{adv. phr.} 1a. Nearby; within reach. * /Always have your dictionary on hand when you study./ 1b. Here. * /Soon school will end and vacation will be on hand./ 2. Present. * ...
on high cotton
See: ON TOP OF THE WORLD also SITTING ON HIGH COTTON.
on hold
{adv. phr.} 1. Left waiting while making a telephone call. * /"Sorry sir," the secretary said, "I'll have to put you on hold for a minute."/ 2. Waiting; temporarily ...
on ice
{adv.} or {adj. phr.}, {slang} 1. The same as won; sure to be won. * /The score was 20-10 in the last inning, and our team had the game on ice./ 2. Away for safekeeping or ...
on in years
See: ALONG IN YEARS.
on pain of
also[under pain of] {prep.}, {formal} At the risk of; under penalty of. * /The workers went on strike on pain of losing their jobs./ * /The rebels had to swear under pain ...
on paper
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Judging by appearances only and not by past performance; in theory; theoretically. * /On paper, the American colonies should have lost the ...
on pins and needles
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Worried; nervous. * /Jane's mother was on pins and needles because Jane was very late getting home from school./ * /Many famous actors are on ...
on purpose
{adv. phr.} For a reason; because you want to; not accidentally. * /Jane did not forget her coat; she left it in the locker on purpose./ * /The clown fell down on ...
on record
{adj. phr.} 1. An official or recorded statement or fact; said for everyone to know. * /We do not know when the famous writer was born, but the date of his death is on ...
on sale
{adj. phr.} Selling for a special low price. * /Tomato soup that is usually sold for sixty cents a can is now on sale for fifty cents./ * /John and Mary couldn't sell ...
on schedule(1)
{adv. phr.} As planned or expected; at the right time. * /The school bus arrived at school on schedule./ * /The four seasons arrive on schedule each year./ Compare: ON ...
on schedule(2)
{adj. phr.} Punctual; as planned. * /The new airline claims to have more on schedule arrivals than the competition./
on season
See: HIGH SEASON. Contrast: OFF SEASON.
on second thought
See: SECOND THOUGHT.
on sight
See: AT SIGHT.
on table
See: WAIT AT TABLE or WAIT ON TABLE.
on the air
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} Broadcasting or being broadcast on radio or TV. * /His show is on the air at six o'clock./ * /The ball game is on the air now./
on the alert
{adj. phr.} Alert; watchful; careful. * /Campers must be on the alert for poison ivy and poison oak./ * /Drivers must be on the alert for traffic signals./ Compare: ON ...
on the average
See: ON AN AVERAGE.
on the back
See: PAT ON THE BACK.
on the ball
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Paying attention and doing things well. - Used after "is" or "get". * /Ben is really on the ball in school./ * /The coach told Jim he must get on the ...
on the bandwagon
{adj. phr.}, {informal} In or into the newest popular group or activity; in or into something you join just because many others are joining it. - Often used after " climb", ...
on the barrelhead
See: CASH ON THE BARRELHEAD.
on the beam
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. (Of an airplane) In the radio beam that marks the path to follow between airports; flying in the right direction. * /A radio signal tells the ...
on the bench
1. Sitting in a law court as a judge. * /Judge Wyzanski is on the bench this morning./ 2. Sitting among the substitute players. * /The coach had to keep his ...
on the blink
{adj. phr.} Faulty; malfunctioning; inoperative. * /I need to call a competent repairman because my computer is on the blink again./
on the block
{adj. phr.} To be sold; for sale. * /The vacant house was on the block./ * /Young cattle are grown and sent to market to be placed on the block./
on the brain
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Filling your thoughts; too much thought about; almost always in mind. * /Mary Ann has boys on the brain./ * /Joe's hobby is ham radio and he has radio ...
on the brink of
{adv. phr.} Facing a new event that's about to happen. * /"I am on the brink of a new discovery," our physics professor proudly announced./
on the button
{adv., adj.}, {slang} At the right place; at the heart of the matter. * /John's remark was right on the button./ Compare: ON THE DOT.
on the cards
See: IN THE CARDS.
on the carpet
See: CALL ON THE CARPET.
on the cheap
{adv. phr.} Inexpensively; on a tight budget. * /She buys most of her clothes on the cheap in secondhand stores./
on the chin
See: TAKE IT ON THE CHIN.
on the cuff
{adj.} or {adv. phr.}, {informal} Agreeing to pay later; to be paid for later; on credit. * /Peter lost the money that Mother gave him to buy meat, and the store would ...
on the dole
{adv. phr.} Drawing unemployment benefits. * /When Jim lost his job he got on the dole and is still on it./
on the dot
also[on the button] {adv. phr.}, {informal} Exactly on time; not early and not late. * /Susan arrived at the party at 2:00 P.M. on the dot./ * /Ben's plane arrived on the ...
on the double!
{adv. phr.} Hurry up! * /"Let's go! On the double!" the pilot cried, as he started up the engine of the small plane./
on the eve of
{prep.} Just before (an event). * /On the eve of the election, the president proposed a plan to cut taxes./
on the face of it
{adv. phr.} Apparently; as it seems. * /On the face of it, Joe's claim that he can swim five miles is true./ * /His statement that he is a millionaire is, on the face of ...
on the fence
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} Not able, or not wanting to choose; in doubt; undecided. - Often used with "sit". * /Jack sat on the fence for a week last spring before he finally ...
on the fly(1)
{adv. phr.} 1. While in the air; in flight. * /The bird caught a bug on the fly./ * /Joe was called out because the catcher caught the ball on the fly./ 2. ...
on the fly(2)
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Busy; going somewhere in a hurry; going about doing things. * /Getting the house ready for the visitors kept Mother on the fly all day./ * /The ...
on the go
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Active and busy. * /Successful businessmen are on the go most of the time./ * /Healthy, happy people are usually on the go./ Compare: ON THE MOVE.
on the hog
See: LIVE HIGH OFF THE HOG or EAT HIGH ON THE HOG.
on the hour
{adv. phr.} Each time the hour has zero minutes and zero seconds. * /The uptown bus goes past the school on the hour./ * /The woman must take her pill on the hour./
on the house
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Paid for by the owner. * /At the opening of the new hotel, the champagne was on the house./ * /Oscar was the first customer at the diner, so his ...
on the increase
See: ON THE WAX. Contrast: ON THE DECREASE, ON THE WANE.
on the job
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Working hard; not wasting time. * /Joe was on the job all of the time that he was at work./ * /The school paper came out on time because the ...
on the knees of the gods
See: IN THE LAP OF THE GODS.
on the level
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Honest and fair; telling the whole truth. * /Our teacher respects the students who are on the level with her./ * /Joyce wondered if the fortune-teller ...
on the line
See: LAY ON THE LINE or PUT ON THE LINE.
on the lips
See: HANG ON THE WORDS OF or HANG ON THE LIPS OF.
on the lookout
{adj. phr.} Watching closely. * /The little boy was on the lookout for his father./ * /Forest rangers are always on the lookout for forest fires./ * /The doctor is on ...
on the loose
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Free to go; not shut in or stopped by anything. * /The zookeeper forgot to close the gate to the monkey cage and the monkeys were on the loose./ * ...
on the make
{adj.}, {slang} 1. Promiscuous or aggressive in one's sexual advances. * /I can't stand Murray; he's always on the make./ 2. Pushing to get ahead in one's career; doing ...
on the map
See: PUT ON THE MAP.
on the market
{adj. phr.} For sale. * /In the summer many fresh vegetables are on the market./ * /The Goodwins put their house on the market in January, but they did not sell it till ...
on the mend
{adj. phr.} Healing; becoming better. * /John's broken leg is on the mend./ * /Mary's relationship with Joan is on the mend./
on the move
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} 1. Moving around from place to place; in motion. * /It was a very cold day, and the teacher watching the playground kept on the move to stay warm./ * ...
on the nose
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Just right; exactly. * /Stanley hit the ball on the nose./ * /The airplane pilot found the small landing field on the nose./
on the other foot
See: SHOE ON THE OTHER FOOT.
on the other hand
{adv. phr.} Looking at the other side; from another point of view. - Used to introduce an opposite or different fact or idea. * /Jim wanted to go to the movies; his ...
on the outs
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Not friendly; having a quarrel. * /Mary and Sue were on the outs./ * /Being on the outs with a classmate is very upsetting./ Syn.: AT ODDS.
on the point of
{prep.} Ready to begin; very near to. - Usually used with a verbal noun. * /The coach was on the point of giving up the game when our team scored two points./ * /The ...
on the Q.T.
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Secretly; without anyone's knowing. * /George and Paul formed a club on the Q.T./ * /The teachers got the principal a present strictly on the Q.T./ ...
on the road
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Traveling; moving from one place to another. * /When we go on vacation, we take a lunch to eat while on the road./ * /Mr. Smith is on the road ...
on the rocks
{adj. phr.} 1. {informal} Wrecked or ruined. * /Mr. Jones' business and marriage were both on the rocks./ 2. With ice only. * /At the restaurant, Sally ordered orange ...
on the ropes
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Against the ropes of a boxing ring and almost not able to stand up. * /The fighter was on the ropes and could hardly lift his gloves./ 2. Almost ...
on the run
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. In a hurry; hurrying. * /Jane called "Help!" and Tom came on the run./ * /Modern mothers are usually on the run./ 2. Going away from a fight; in ...
on the safe side
{adv. phr.} Provided for against a possible emergency; well prepared. * /"Please double-check these proofs, Mr. Brown," the printer said, "just to be on the safe ...
on the shelf
{adv.} or {adj. phr.}, {informal} Laid aside; not useful anymore. * /When a girl grows up, she puts childish habits on the shelf./ * /Mr. Myron's company put him on ...
on the side
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. In addition to a main thing, amount or quantity; extra. * /He ordered a hamburger with onions and French fries on the side./ * /His job at ...
on the sly
{adv. phr.} So that other people won't know; secretly. * /The boys smoked on the sly./ * /Mary's mother did not approve of lipstick, but Mary used it on the sly./
on the spot
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. or[upon the spot] At that exact time and at the same time or place; without waiting or leaving. * /The news of important events is often broadcast on ...
on the spur of the moment
{adv. phr.} On a sudden wish or decision; suddenly; without thought or preparation. * /John had not planned to take the trip; he just left on the spur of the ...
on the stage
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} In or into the work of being an actor or actress. * /John's brother is on the stage./ * /Mary went on the stage./
on the strength of
{prep.} With faith or trust in; depending upon; with the support of. * /On the strength of Jim's promise to guide us, we decided to climb the mountain./ * ...
on the string
or[on a string] {adv. phr.}, {informal} Under your influence or control; obedient to every wish. * /The baby had his mother on a string./ * /She was pretty and popular, ...
on the take
{adv. phr.} Bribable; corrupt. * /Officer O'Keefe was put on three months' probation because it was alleged that he was on the take./
on the tip of one's tongue
{adv. phr.} About to say something, such as a name, a telephone number, etc., but unable to remember it for the moment. * /"His name is on the tip of my tongue," ...
on the town
{adv.} or {adj. phr.}, {informal} In or into a town to celebrate; having a good time or enjoying the amusements in a town. * /When the sailors got off their ship they went out ...
on the track of
or[on the trail of] Hunting or looking for; trying to find; following. * /The hunter is on the track of a deer./ * /The lawyer is on the trail of new proof in the case./ ...
on the trail of
See: ON THE TRACK OF.
on the trigger
See: QUICK ON THE TRIGGER.
on the up and up
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Honest; trustworthy; sincere. * /We felt that he was honest and could be trusted. This information is on the up and up./ Compare: ON THE LEVEL.
on the vine
See: DIE ON THE VINE or WITHER ON THE VINE.
on the wagon
{adv. phr.} Participating in an alcohol addiction program; not touching any alcoholic beverage. * /Jim's doctor and his family finally managed to convince him that he was ...
on the wane and on the wax
{adv. phr.} Decreasing and increasing. - Said of the moon. * /The moon is regularly on the wane and on the wax at regular intervals lasting half a month./
on the warpath
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Very angry. * /When Mother saw the mess in the kitchen she went on the warpath./ * /Betty has been on the warpath ever since she found out she ...
on the way
or[on one's way] {adv.} or {adj. phr.} Coming; going toward a place or goal; started. * /Help was on the way./ * /The train left and Bill was on his way to New York./ * /He is ...
on the whole
{adv. phr.} 1. In the most important things; in most ways. * /On the whole, Billy did very well in school this year./ * /Everybody agreed that on the whole it was a good ...
on the wing
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. In the air; while flying. * /The duck flew away, but John shot it on the wing./ 2. {informal} In constant motion; always very busy. * /Susan was ...
on the words
See: HANG ON THE WORDS OF.
on the wrong foot
See: GET OFF ON THE WRONG FOOT.
on the wrong side of the bed
See: GET UP ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE BED.
on the wrong track
{adv. phr.} Lost; pursuing the wrong lead. * /Professor MacAlister confessed that his chemical experiments were on the wrong track./ Contrast: BARK UP THE WRONG TREE.
on time
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. At the time arranged; not late; promptly. * /The train left on time./ * /Mary is always on time for an appointment./ Contrast: AHEAD OF TIME, ...
on top
{adv.} or {adj. phr.}, {informal} In the lead; with success; with victory. * /The horse that everyone had expected would be on top actually came in third./ * /Although ...
on top of
{prep}. 1. On the top of; standing or lying on; on. * /When the player on the other team dropped the ball, Bill fell on top of it./ * /That high hill has a tower on top of ...
on top of the world
or[sitting on top of the world] also (Southern)[sitting on high cotton] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Feeling pleased and happy; feeling successful. * /John was on top of the ...
on trial
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. For testing or trying out for a time before making a decision. * /I was lucky that I had bought the machine on trial because I didn't like it and was ...
on words
See: PLAY ON WORDS.
on your life
See: NOT ON YOUR LIFE.
on-again, off-again
See: OFF-AGAIN, ON-AGAIN.
once
See: AT ONCE, EVERY NOW AND THEN or EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE.
once and for all
{adv. phr.} 1. One time and never again; without any doubt; surely; certainly; definitely. * /Let me say, for once and for all, you may not go to the party Saturday./ * ...
once bitten, twice shy
See: BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE.
once for all
See: ONCE AND FOR ALL.
once in a blue moon
{adv. phr.} Very rarely; very seldom; almost never. * /Coin collecting is interesting, hut you find a valuable coin only once in a blue moon./ * /Once in a blue moon ...
once in a while
{adv. phr.} Not often; not regularly; sometimes; occasionally. * /We go for a picnic in the park once in a while./ * /Once in a while the puppy would run away, but usually ...
once upon a time
{adv. phr.} Sometime before now, long ago. * /Once upon a time she was thought to be the most talented actress in the country./ - Often used at the beginning of fairy ...
once-over
{n.}, {slang} 1. A quick look; a swift examination of someone or something. - Usually used with "give" or "get". * /The new boy got the once-over from the rest of the class ...
one
See: AT ONE, FOR ONE, GO IN ONE EAR AND OUT THE OTHER, HANG ONE ON, HOLE IN ONE, KILL TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE, NUMBER ONE, SIX OF ONE AND HALF-A-DOZEN OF THE OTHER, ...
one for the books
{n, phr.}, {informal} Very unusual; a remarkable something. * /The newspaper reporter fumed in a story that was one for the books./ * /Their trip through the Rocky ...
one and the same
{adj. phr.} The same; identical. * /Erle Stanley Gardner and A.A. Fair are one and the same person./ * /The spider lily and the Peruvian Daffodil are one and the same./
one damn thing after another
or[ODTAA] (pronounced owed-tay) {n. phr.} If there is one problem, there will be more. * /First I lost my wallet, then a kid broke the window, and, lastly, my car refused ...
one eye on
{informal} Watching or minding (a person or thing) while doing something else; part of your attention on. - Used after "have", "keep", or "with". * /Jane had one eye ...
one foot in the grave
{n. phr.} Near to death. * /The dog is fourteen years old, blind, and feeble. He has one foot in the grave./ * /Grandfather has never been sick a day in his life, ...
one man's meat is another man's poison
What is good for one person is not necessarily good for another. - A proverb, * /Even though Jeff likes to swim in ice cold water, his brother Tun hates it. This is ...
one of these days
or[some of these days] {adv. phr.} Someday; sometime soon. * /One of these days Herbert will be famous./ * /I'm going to do that sewing some of these days./
one on the city
{n.}, {slang} A glass of water (which is provided free of charge, as a free gift from the city). * /What will you have? - Oh, just give me one on the city./
one up
{adj. phr.} Having an advantage; being one step ahead, * /John graduated from high school; he is one up on Bob, who dropped out./ * /The Platters are one up on their ...
one's money's worth
{n. phr.} A fair return on one's money spent or invested. * /I wouldn't say that the trip was a great bargain, but I feel that we got our money's worth./
one's own row
See: HOE ONE'S OWN ROW.
one-armed bandit
{n.}, {slang} A slot machine, like those used in Las Vegas and other gambling places. * /Joe was playing the one-armed bandit all day - and he lost everything he had./
one-horse
{adj. phr.} Insignificant; modest; provincial. * /Arnold's business is a one-horse operation; he never had a single employee./
one-night stand
{n. phr.} 1. A single performance given by a traveling company while on a tour. * /After they went bankrupt in the big cities, the traveling jazz quartet played one-night ...
one-two
{n.} 1. A succession of two punches, the first a short left, followed by a hard right punch, usually in the jaw. * /Ali gave Frazir the one-two./ 2. Any quick or decisive ...
one-upmanship
{v.}, {informal} Always keeping ahead of others; trying to keep an advantage. * /No matter what I do, I find that Jim has already done it better. He's an expert at ...
onion
See: KNOW ONE'S WAY AROUND(2).
only
See: HAVE EYES ONLY FOR, IF ONLY.
open
See: EYES OPEN, THROW OPEN.
open and aboveboard
{adj. phr.} Honest. * /Jacob felt that the firm he was doing business with wasn't entirely open and aboveboard./
open and shut
See: CUT AND DRIED.
open arms
See: RECEIVE WITH OPEN ARMS.
open fire
{v. phr.} To begin shooting. * /The big warship turned its guns toward the enemy ship and opened fire./ * /When the policeman called to the robber to stop, he turned and ...
open heart
{n.} 1. No hiding of your feelings; frankness; freedom. * /She spoke with an open heart of her warm feelings for her pupils./ * /She told her troubles with an open ...
open its doors
{v. phr.} 1. To allow someone or something to enter or join; become open. * /That college was started for women only, but a few years ago it opened its doors to ...
open letter
{n. phr.} A public message in the form of a letter addressed to a particular person or to a group. * /There was an open letter to the president of the United States ...
open market
{n. phr.} Goods or securities available for purchase by all. * /The stocks of certain companies are on the open market./
open marriage
{n. phr.} An arrangement by mutual agreement between husband and wife whereby they are both allowed to have extramarital affairs. * /Chances are the open ...
open one's eyes
or[open up one's eyes] {v. phr.} To make a person see or understand the truth; make a person realize; tell a person what is really happening or what really exists. * ...
open one's heart
{v. phr.} 1. To talk about your feelings honestly; confide in someone. * /After going around worrying, Mary opened her heart to her mother./ * /John felt much ...
open onto
{v. phr.} To have a view of. * /Our apartment in Chicago has a set of windows that open onto Lake Michigan./
open Pandora's box
See: PANDORA'S BOX.
open question
{n. phr.} A debatable issue. * /Whether assisted suicide is legal and moral or not is still an open question, recent publicity on the matter notwithstanding./
open secret
{n.} Something that is supposed to be a secret but that everyone knows. * /It is an open secret that Mary and John are engaged./ * /Who will be appointed as the next ...
open sesame
{n. phr.}, {literary} Immediate means of entrance, or unobstructed access to something. * /Tom mistakenly believed that his wealth would be an open sesame to the world of ...
open shop
{n. phr.} A factory or firm that employs both union and non-union labor. * /The firm refuses to adopt an open shop policy./ Contrast: CLOSED SHOP.
open the door
{v. phr.} To allow more action or discussion; give a chance. * /Learning to read and write opens the door to a better job and better living conditions./ * /Raising the tax ...
open the floodgates
{v. phr.} To let loose an outburst of human activity or emotion. * /It would open the floodgates of anger and discontent if the university raised tuition too soon./
open up
{v.} 1. To show for the first time; make clear; reveal. * /The story of Helen Keller's life opened up a whole new world to Mary./ * /Einstein's theories opened up a ...
open up one's eyes
See: OPEN ONE'S EYES.
open-door policy
{n. phr.} A policy that states that newcomers are welcome to join the company, firm, or country in question. * /During the nineteenth century the United States had ...
open-minded
{adj.} Having no dogmatic or biased views on matters of theory, religion, politics, etc. * /Fred is easy to talk to about anything; he is a highly intelligent and ...

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