Слова на букву open-pull (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву open-pull (459)

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openhanded
{adj.} Generous; liberal. * /Although not wealthy himself, Bob was always very openhanded with those who needed help./
opinion
See: MATTER OP OPINION.
opposite number
{n. phr.} A person occupying the same position as someone in a different group, organization, or country. * /The opposite number of the President of the United States ...
opposite sex
{n. phr.} The sex different from the one being discussed or mentioned. * /Fred came out and said he was gay, having never had any interest in the opposite sex./
optional origin
{n.} Stipulation in international commodities contract whereby the seller may ship from either his foreign or his domestic resources. * /Be sure to enter that in the ...
or other
{adv.} - Used to emphasize indefinite words or phrases beginning with "some" (as "someone", "something", "somewhere", "somehow", "sometime"). * /Somehow or other, Linda ...
or so
{adv.} About; or a little more. * /Mr. Brown will be back in a day or so./ * /The book cost $5 or so./ * /There will be twenty or so people at the party./ Compare: MORE ...
orbit
See: GO INTO ORBIT.
order
See: APPLE-PIE-ORDER, CALL TO ORDER, IN ORDER, IN ORDER TO, IN SHORT ORDER, JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED, MADE TO ORDER, OUT OF ORDER, PUT ONE'S HOUSE IN ORDER or SET ...
order about
or[around] {v. phr.} To dictate arrogantly to someone; domineer. * /Dan orders his younger colleagues around in a most unpleasant way./
ordinary
See: OUT OF THE ORDINARY.
other
See: EACH OTHER, EVERY OTHER, GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE or GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE HILL, GO IN ONE EAR AND OUT ...
other fish to fry
{n. phr.}, {informal} Other things to do; other plans. * /They wanted John to be the secretary, but he had other fish to fry./ * /Mary was invited to the party but she refused ...
other side of the tracks
See: WRONG SIDE OF THE TRACKS.
out of one's element
{adv. phr.} Outside of your natural surroundings; where you do not belong or fit in. * /Wild animals are out of their element in cages./ * /Chris is out of his ...
out of one's shell
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Out of one's bashfulness or silence; into friendly conversation. - Usually used after "come". * /John wouldn't come out of his shell and talk ...
out of the ordinary
{adj. phr.} Outside or beyond common experience; unusual; wonderful; extraordinary. * /The parade will be something out of the ordinary because a real king will be ...
out of the question
{adj. phr.} Not worth considering; unthinkable; impossible. * /It sometimes snows as late as June in the mountains, but the summer campers thought that snow was out of ...
out of work
{adv. phr.} Having no income-producing job; unemployed. * /When too many people are out of work, it is a sign that the economy is in a recession./
out and about
See: UP AND ABOUT.
out at the elbows
{adj. phr.} Poorly or shabbily dressed. * /Roy walks around out at the elbows, but it's not because he is penniless, but more in imitation of a certain style./
out back
{adv. phr.} In one's backyard. * /On the Fourth of July they were out back making preparations for their holiday barbecue./
out cold
{adv.} or {adj.}, {informal} Unconscious; in a faint. * /The ball hit Dick in the head and knocked him out cold for ten minutes./ * /They tried to lift Mary when she ...
out for
{prep.} Joining, or planning to join; taking part in; competing for a place in. * /John is out for the basketball team./ * /Mary is going out for the school newspaper./ ...
out from under
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Free from something that worries you; seeing the end; finished. - Usually used with "be" or "get". * /Mary had so much to do in the new house she ...
out in force
{adv. phr.} Present in very large numbers; en masse. * /On the Fourth of July the police cars are out in force in the Chicago area./
out in left field
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Far from the right answer; wrong; astray. * /Johnny tried to answer the teacher's question but he was way out in left field./ * /Susan ...
out in the cold
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Alone; not included. * /All the other children were chosen for parts in the play, but Johnny was left out in the cold./ * /Everybody made plans for ...
out in the open
See: COME OUT IN THE OPEN.
out like a light
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Fast asleep; to sleep very quickly. * /Tom got so much fresh air and exercise that he went out like a light as soon as he lay down./ * /As ...
out loud
{adv. phr.} In an ordinary speaking voice and not whispering or talking quietly; so everybody can hear; aloud. * /The teacher read the final grades out loud./ * ...
out of
{prep.} 1a. From the inside to the outside of. * /John took the apple out of the bag./ * /Get out of the car!/ * /The teacher has gone out of town./ 1b. In a place away ...
out of (one's) reach
{adv. phr.} Unreachable; unattainable; unobtainable. * /Sam wanted to be a United States senator but he came to realize that such a dream was out of his reach./
out of a bandbox
See: LOOK AS IF ONE HAS COME OUT OF A BANDBOX.
out of a clear sky
or[out of a clear blue sky] See: OUT OF THE BLUE.
out of account
See: LEAVE OUT OF ACCOUNT.
out of action
{adv. phr.} Useless; crippled; damaged so as to be quiescent. * /American bombers put Nazi heavy industry out of action during World War II./ * /When I broke my leg I was ...
out of all proportion
{adv. phr.} Disproportionate; lopsided. * /The news coverage of the sensational celebrity double murder has grown out of all proportion, obscuring the international news./
out of bounds
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Outside of the boundary lines in a game; not on or inside the playing field. * /Bill thought he had scored a touchdown, but he had stepped out of ...
out of breath
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} Not breathing easily or regularly; gasping; panting. * /The fat man was out of breath after climbing the stairs./ * /The mile run left Bill out ...
out of character
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Not in agreement with a person's character or personality; not in the way that a person usually behaves or is expected to behave; not usual; ...
out of circulation
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Not out in the company of friends, other people, and groups; not active; not joining in what others are doing. * /John has a job after school and ...
out of commission
{adj. phr.} 1. Retired from active military service; no longer on active duty. * /When the war was over, many warships were placed out of commission./ Contrast: IN ...
out of condition
See: OUT OF SHAPE or OUT OF CONDITION.
out of date
{adj. phr.} Old fashioned; superseded; no longer valid; too old to be used. * /Father's suit is out of date; he needs a new one./ * /The news magazines in the doctor's ...
out of fashion
{adj. phr.} Having passed from vogue; out of the current mode. * /The miniskirt is now out of fashion in most quarters, but it may very well come back some day./
out of gas
{adv. phr.} 1. Out of fuel (said of automobiles). * /Be sure you don't run out of gas when you go on a long distance trip by car./ 2. Rundown; depleted of energy; in ...
out of gear
See: THROW OUT OF GEAR.
out of hand
{adv. phr.} 1. Out of control. * /Bobby's birthday party got out of hand and the children were naughty./ * /Small puppies often get out of hand./ 2. Suddenly, quickly ...
out of hot water
See: HOT WATER.
out of keeping
{adj. phr.} Not going well together; not agreeing; not proper. * /Loud talk was out of keeping in the library./ * /It was out of keeping for the kind man to kick the ...
out of kilter
{adj. phr.}, {informal} 1. Not balanced right; not in a straight line or lined up right. * /The scale must be out of kilter because when I weighed myself on it, it said ...
out of line with
{prep.} Not in agreement with. * /The price of the bicycle was out of line with what Bill could afford./
out of line(1)
{adv. phr.} Not in a straight line; away from a true line. * /The two edges were out of line and there was a space between them./ * /The sergeant ordered the soldier ...
out of line(2)
{adj. phr.} Not obeying or agreeing with what is right or usual; doing or being what people do not expect or accept; outside ordinary or proper limits; not usual, right, ...
out of luck
{adj. phr.} Being unlucky; having bad luck; having something bad happen to you. * /Mr. Jones missed his train and was out of luck in getting to the ball game on time./ * ...
out of mind
See: OUT OF SIGHT, out OF MIND.
out of nowhere
{adv. phr.} Without having been seen before; suddenly and unexpectedly. * /Mr. Jones was driving too fast on the express highway when a police patrol car appeared out ...
out of one's blood
{adv. phr.} Separate from one's feelings, interests, or desires. * /When Tom moved to the city, he couldn't get the country out of his blood./ * /Mary is having a hard ...
out of one's hair
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Rid of as a nuisance; relieved of as an annoyance. * /Harry got the boys out of his hair so he could study./ Compare: OUT OF ONE'S WAY. Contrast: IN ...
out of one's hand
See: EAT OUT OF ONE'S HAND.
out of one's head
or[out of one's mind] or[out of one's senses] also[off one's head] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Acting in a crazy way; especially, wildly crazy. * /The patient was feverish and out ...
out of one's mind
See: OUT OF ONE'S HEAD.
out of one's mouth
See: TAKE THE BREAD OUT OF ONE'S MOUTH, TAKE THE WORDS OUT OF ONE'S MOUTH.
out of one's pocket
{adv. phr.} Having sustained a financial loss; poorer by a said amount. * /The show was so bad that, besides having a lousy time, I was also $35 out of my pocket./
out of one's sails
See: TAKE THE WIND OUT OF ONE'S SAILS.
out of one's senses
See: OUT OF ONE'S HEAD.
out of one's skin
See: JUMP OU T OF ONE'S SKIN.
out of one's way
See: OUT OF THE WAY(3).
out of one's wits
See: SCARE OUT OF ONE'S WITS.
out of order
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. In the wrong order; not coming after one another in the right way. * /Peter wrote the words of the sentence out of order./ * /Don't get out of ...
out of place(1)
{adv. phr.} Not in the right or usual place or position. * /Harry fell and knocked one of his teeth out of place./ * /The teacher lined up the class and told them not ...
out of place(2)
{adj. phr.} In the wrong place or at the wrong time; not suitable; improper. * /Joan was the only girl who wore a formal at the party, and she felt out of place./ * ...
out of practice
{adj. phr.} Not in proper condition; unable to do something well because of lack of practice. * /The basketball team got out of practice during the Christmas holidays./ ...
out of print
{adj. phr.} No longer obtainable from the publisher because the printed copies have been sold out; no longer printed. * /The book is out of print. An edition of one ...
out of school
See: TELL TALES OUT OF SCHOOL.
out of season
{adv. phr.} 1. Not at the right or lawful time for hunting or catching. * /The boys were caught fishing out of season./ 2. Not at the usual time for growing and selling. * ...
out of shape
or[out of condition] {adj. phr.} 1. Not in good condition; not able to perform well. * /Father was out of shape when he took a long hike with the boys, and he was stiff ...
out of sight
{adv. phr.} 1. Not within one's field of vision. * /The sailboat disappeared out of sight over the horizon./ 2. Extremely expensive. * /The builder's estimate was so high that ...
out of sight, out of mind
If one doesn't see something for an extended period of time, one tends to forget about it. - A proverb. * /After Caroline moved out of town, Ray soon found other women to ...
out of sorts
{adj. phr.} In an angry or unhappy mood; in a bad temper; grouchy. * /Mary was out of sorts and wouldn't say good morning./ * /Bob was out of sorts because he didn't ...
out of step
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Not in step; not matching strides or keeping pace with another or others. * /George always marches out of step with the music./ 2. Out of ...
out of stock
{adj. phr.} Having none for sale or use; no longer in supply; sold out. * /When Father tried to get tires for an old car, the man in the store said that size was out of ...
out of the blue
or[out of a clear sky] or[out of a clear blue sky] {adv. phr.}, {informal} Without any warning; by surprise; unexpectedly. * /At the last minute Johnny came out of ...
out of the corner of one's eye
{adv. phr.} Without looking at a person or thing directly or openly; secretly; without being noticed. * /The cat looked at the mouse out of the corner of his eye./ * ...
out of the frying pan into the fire
Out of one trouble into worse trouble; from something bad to something worse. - A proverb. * /The movie cowboy was out of the frying pan into the fire. After he escaped from ...
out of the hole
{adv.} or {adj. phr.}, {informal} 1a. With a score better than zero in a game; especially a card game, to a score above zero. * /It took us a long time to get out of ...
out of the picture
{adv. phr.} No longer a possibility or in the running; rejected. * /Mark assured Carol that his ex-wife was completely out of the picture./
out of the rain
See: KNOW ENOUGH TO COME IN OUT OF THE RAIN.
out of the red
{adv. phr.} Having reached solvency; no longer in debt. * /Under the new management, our company finally got out of the red./ Contrast: IN THE HOLE, IN THE RED. Compare: ...
out of the running
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} Having no chance to win; not among the real contenders; not among those to be considered. * /John had been out of the running since his first date with ...
out of the swim
{adj. phr.} Not doing what others are doing; not active in business or social affairs. * /Mary had to stay home and take care of Mother while she was sick, and soon ...
out of the way
{adv. phr.} 1. Not where people usually go; difficult to reach. * /When little Tommy comes to visit her, Aunt Sally puts her lamps and vases out of the way./ - ...
out of the woods
See: CROW BEFORE ONE IS OUT OF THE WOODS.
out of thin air
{adv. phr.} Out of nothing or from nowhere. * /The teacher scolded Dick because his story was made out of thin air./ * /On the way home from town, Tom saw a house standing ...
out of this world
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Wonderfully good or satisfying; terrific; super. * /The dress in the store window was out of this world!/ * /Mother was on TV last night. Isn't that ...
out of touch
{adj. phr.} Not writing or talking with each other; not getting news anymore. * /Fred had got out of touch with people in his hometown./ * /On his island Robinson Crusoe was ...
out of town
{adv. phr.} Having left one's usual residence or place of work on a longer trip. * /"Mr. Smith is out of town until Monday," the secretary said. " May I take a ...
out of tune
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Out of proper musical pitch; too low or high in sound. * /The band sounded terrible, because the instruments were out of tune./ 2. Not in agreement; ...
out of turn
{adv. phr.} 1. Not in regular order; at the wrong time. * /John played out of turn./ * /By taking a day off out of turn, Bob got the schedule mixed up./ 2. Too hastily ...
out of wedlock
See: BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK.
out of whack
{adj. phr.}, {slang }1. Needing repair; not working right. * /Ben was glad the lawn mower got out of whack, because he didn't have to mow the lawn./ Syn.: OUT OF ...
out on a limb
{adv. phr.} With your beliefs and opinions openly stated; in a dangerous position that can't be changed. * /The president went out on a limb and supported a ...
out on bail
{adv. phr.} Released from prison because a security deposit known as " bail" has been put up by an individual or a bail bond broker. * /The murder suspect was out on a ...
out on parole
{adv. phr.} Released from prison but still under the supervision of the police. * /Although Henry is out on parole he must watch his step very carefully. If he commits ...
out on the town
{adv. phr.} Going from one bar or restaurant to the next in order to celebrate an event. * /They all went out on the town to celebrate his promotion to vice president./
out to lunch
{adj.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Gone for the midday meal. 2. Inattentive; daydreaming; inefficient; stupid. * /Neil Bender is just out to lunch today./
out-and-out
{adj.} Extreme; complete; thorough. * /The candidate was an out-and-out conservative./ * /It was out-and-out robbery to charge twice the usual price for eggs just because ...
out-of-pocket expenses
{n. phr.} Expenses one has to pay for oneself, not the company that sends one on a given assignment, such as tips for waiters, cab drivers, etc. * /Luckily, my ...
outback
{n.} 1. The remote and uncultivated wilderness areas of Australia or New Zealand, with very few inhabitants. * /Mike and Barbara roughed it in the Australian outback for ...
outer space
{n.} What is outside of the earth's air. * /An astronaut cannot live without oxygen when he goes into outer space./
outside of
{prep.} 1. Not in; outside. * /I would not want to meet a lion outside of a zoo./ Contrast: INSIDE OF. 2. Except for; not including. * /Outside of Johnny, all the boys on ...
over a barrel
also[over the barrel] {adv. phr.}, {informal} In the power of your enemies; not able to do anything about what happens to you; in a helpless condition; trapped. * /Bill ...
over age
{adj. phr.} Too old; not young enough; above the legal age. * /Grandfather wanted to fight in World War II, but he could not because he was over age./ Contrast: UNDER AGE.
over and done with
{adj. phr.} Finished; completed; forgotten. * /Norm and Meg's affair has been over and done with for a long time./
over one's dead body
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Not having the ability to stop something undesirable from taking place. * /"You will get married at age sixteen over my dead body!" Jane's father ...
over one's head
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Not understandable; beyond your ability to understand; too hard or strange for you to understand. * /Mary laughed just to be polite, but the ...
over spilled milk
See: CRY OVER SPILLED MILK.
over the coals
See: HAUL OVER THE COALS or RAKE OVER THE COALS.
over the hill
{adj.}, {informal} Past one's prime; unable to function as one used to; senile. * /Poor Mr. Jones is sure not like he used to be; well, he's over the hill./
over the hump
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Past the most difficult part; past the crisis; out of danger. * /Mary was failing math, but she is over the hump now./ * /John was very sick after ...
over the long haul
See: IN THE LONG RUN. Contrast: OVER THE SHORT HAUL.
over the short haul
See: IN THE SHORT RUN. Contrast: OVER THE LONG HAUL.
over the top
{adv. phr.} 1. Out of the trenches and against the enemy. * /The plan was to spend the night in the trenches and go over the top at dawn./ * /Johnny found that he was braver ...
over the traces
See: KICK OVER THE TRACES.
over with(1)
{prep.} At the end of; finished with; through with. * /They were over with the meeting by ten o'clock./ * /By Saturday Mary will be over with the measles./
over with(2)
{adj.}, {informal} At an end; finished. * /John knew his mother would scold him for losing the money, and he wanted to get it over with./ * /After the hard test, Jerry said, ...
overall
{adj.} All inclusive; comprehensive. * /What our department needs is an overall revamping of our undergraduate curriculum./
overboard
See: GO OFF THE DEEP END or GO OVERBOARD.
overhead
{n.} Expenses incurred in the upkeep of one's plant and premises, employees' salaries, etc., which are not due to the cost of individual items or products. * /"Our overhead is ...
overnight
{adj.} 1. From one evening until the next morning. * /We could drive from Chicago to Detroit in one day, but it would be more comfortable if we stayed overnight in a ...
own
See: COME INTO ONE'S OWN, DOSE OF ONE'S OWN MEDICINE, HOLD ONE'S OWN, IN A WORLD OF ONE'S OWN, KEEP ONE'S OWN COUNSEL, OF ONE'S OWN ACCORD or OF ONE'S OWN FREE WILL, ON ...
own up
{v.}, {informal} To take the blame; admit your guilt; confess. * /When Mr. Jones asked who broke the window, Johnny owned up./ * /Mary owned up to having borrowed ...
oyster
See: WORLD IS ONE'S OYSTER.
part
See: DISCRETION IS THE BETTER PART OF VALOR, FOOL AND HIS MONEY ARE SOON PARTED, FOR MY PART, FOR ONE'S PART also ON ONE'S PART, FOR THE MOST PART, IN PART, MAN OF PARTS, ...
part and parcel
{n. phr.} A necessary or important part; something necessary to a larger thing. - Usually followed by "of". * /Freedom of speech is part and parcel of the liberty of a ...
part company
{v. phr.} 1. To part with someone; leave each other; separate. * /The boys parted company as they came from the park./ * /George parted company with the others at his ...
part of the furniture
{n. phr.} In a job or position for so long that one is taken entirely for granted, like a part of the physical surroundings. * /He has been working in the same office for ...
part with
{v.} 1. To separate from; leave. * /He parted with us at the end of the trip./ Compare: PART COMPANY. 2. To let go. * /They were sorry to part with the old house./ * /He ...
partake of
{v.}, {formal} 1. To take some of; receive a share of; eat. * /He partook of ordinary country fare as he traveled./ 2. To have the same qualities as; show the ...
partial to
{v. phr.} Having a weakness for; favorable toward. * /He seems to be partial to blondes while his brother is partial to redheads./
particular
See: IN PARTICULAR.
parting of the ways
{n. phr.} 1. The point where a road or path divides; a fork. * /They stood undecided at a parting of the ways, where a forest path forked./ 2. A time or place where a ...
party
See: HEN PARTY, LIFE OF THE PARTY, NECK-TIE PARTY, THROW A PARTY.
party line
{n. phr.} Ideas, policies, and goals set forth by the leadership of a group or organization. * /Dan seldom has an original idea but he keeps faithfully repeating his ...
party to
{adj. phr.} Concerned with; participating in. * /The prosecution has been trying to show that the defendant was party to a fraud./
pass
See: BRING TO PASS, COME TO PASS, FORWARD PASS, JUMP PASS, SCREEN PASS.
pass around
{v. phr.} To circulate from one to another; distribute something among a group of people. * /Why doesn't he pass around the appetizers to the guests?/
pass away
{v.} 1. To slip by; go by; pass. * /We had so much fun that the weekend passed away before we realized it./ * /Forty years had passed away since they had met./ 2. To ...
pass by
See: PASS OVER.
pass by the board
See: GO BY THE BOARD.
pass for
{v. phr.} To be taken for; be considered as. * /Charles speaks Arabic so fluently that he could easily pass for an Arab./
pass muster
{v. phr.}, {informal} To pass a test or check-up; be good enough. * /After a practice period, Sam found that he was able to pass muster as a lathe operator./ * /His work ...
pass off
{v.} 1. To sell or give (something) by false claims; offer (something fake) as genuine. * /The dishonest builder passed off a poorly built house by pretending it was well ...
pass on
{v.} 1. To give an opinion about; judge; settle. * /The college passed on his application and found him acceptable./ * /The committee recommended three people for the job ...
pass out
{v.}, {informal} 1. To lose consciousness; faint. * /She went back to work while she was still sick, and finally she just passed out./ Compare: GIVE OUT(3). 2. or ...
pass over
or[pass by] {v.} To give no attention to; not notice; ignore, * /I can pass over the disorderliness of the troops, but their disobedience is serious./ * /In choosing men to ...
pass the buck
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make another person decide something or accept a responsibility or give orders instead of doing it yourself; shift or escape responsibility or blame; ...
pass the hat
{v. phr.} To solicit money; take up collections for a cause. * /The businessmen's club frequently passes the hat for contributions toward scholarships./
pass the time of day
{v. phr.} To exchange greetings; stop for a chat. * /They met at the corner and paused to pass the time of day./
pass through one's mind
See: CROSS ONE'S MIND.
pass up
{v.} To let (something) go by; refuse. * /Mary passed up the dessert because she was on a diet./ * /John was offered a good job in California, but he passed it up because he ...
pass upon
{v. phr.} To express an opinion about; judge. * /George said he wanted his wife to pass up the new house before he decided to buy it./
pass with flying colors
See: WITH FLYING COLORS.
passed ball
{n.} A pitched baseball missed by the catcher when he should have been able to catch it. * /The batter singled and went to second on a passed ball./
passing
See: IN PASSING.
past master
{n. phr.} An expert. * /Alan wins so often because he is a past master at chess./
past one's peak
{adj. phr.} No longer as strong, efficient, or able as one once was, usually because of advanced age and decreased ability. * /He used to be a terrific athlete but we're ...
pat
See: PIT-A-PAT, STAND PAT.
pat on the back(1)
{v. phr.} 1. To clap lightly on the back in support, encouragement, or praise. * /The coach patted the player on the back and said a few encouraging words./ 2. To make your ...
pat on the back(2)
{n. phr.} 1. An encouraging tap of the hand on someone's back; a show of sympathy or support. * /I gave her a pat on the back and told her she had done fine work./ 2. A word ...
pat-a-cake
{n.} A clapping game that keeps time to a nursery rhyme. * /Mother played pat-a-cake with the baby./
patch up
{v.} 1. To mend a hole or break; repair; fix. * /He patched up a couple of old tires./ * /The lovers patched up their quarrel./ 2. To put together in a hurried ...
patrol
See: SHORE PATROL.
Paul
See: ROB PETER TO PAY PAUL.
pause
See: GIVE PAUSE.
pave the way
{v. phr.} To make preparation; make easy. * /Aviation paved the way for space travel./ * /A good education paves the way to success./
pavement
See: POUND THE PAVEMENT.
pay
See: DEVIL TO PAY.
pay one's respect to
{v. phr.} To discharge one's social obligations by visiting someone or by calling them on the phone. * /The newly arrived people paid their respects to their ...
pay a call
{v. phr.} To visit someone. * /"Come and pay us a call some time, when you're in town," Sue said to Henry./
pay as one goes
{v. phr.} To pay cash; to pay at once; to avoid charging anything bought; to avoid debt entirely by paying cash. - Usually used with "you". * /It is best to pay as ...
pay attention
{v. phr.} To listen to someone; hear and understand someone alertly. * /"Pay attention, children!" the teacher cried, "Here is your homework for next week!"/
pay court to
{v. phr.} To woo; to shower with attention. * /He had been paying court to her for three long years before he worked up the courage to ask her to marry him./
pay dirt
{n.}, {slang} 1. The dirt in which much gold is found. * /The man searched for gold many years before he found pay dirt./ 2. {informal} A valuable discovery. - Often used ...
pay down
{v. phr.} 1. To give as a deposit on some purchase, the rest of which is to be paid in periodic installments. * /"How much can you pay down on the house, sir?" the realtor ...
pay for
{v.} To have trouble because of (something you did wrong or did not do); be punished or suffer because of. * /When Bob could not get a good job, he realized he had to pay ...
pay in advance
See: IN ADVANCE.
pay lip service to
See: LIP SERVICE.
pay off
{v. phr.} 1. To pay the wages of. * /The men were paid off just before quitting time, the last day before the holiday./ 2. To pay and discharge from a job. * /When the ...
pay one a left-handed compliment
See: LEFT-HANDED COMPLIMENT.
pay one back in his own coin
{v. phr.} To retaliate. * /Jim refused to help Bob when he needed it most, so Bob decided to pay him back in his own coin and told him to go and look for help elsewhere./
pay one's way
{v. phr.} 1. To pay in cash or labor for your expenses. * /He paid his way by acting as a guide./ 2. To be profitable; earn as much as you cost someone; be ...
pay out
See: PAY OFF.
pay the piper
or[pay the fiddler] {v. phr.} To suffer the results of being foolish; pay or suffer because of your foolish acts or wasting money. * /Bob had spent all his money and ...
pay through the nose
{v. phr.}, {informal} To pay at a very high rate; pay too much. * /He had wanted experience, but this job seemed like paying through the nose for it./ * /There was a ...
pay up
{v.} To pay in full; pay the amount of; pay what is owed. * /The monthly installments on the car were paid up./ * /He pays his dues up promptly./ * /He gets behind when he ...
payoff
{n.} Culmination point; climax. * /After many months of patient labor on your book, the payoff comes when you see the first printed copy./
peace
See: HOLD ONE'S PEACE.
pearl
See: CAST PEARLS BEFORE SWINE or CAST ONE'S PEARLS BEFORE SWINE.
pebble
See: NOT THE ONLY PEBBLE ON THE BEACH.
peck
See: HUNT AND PECK.
pecking order
{n.} The way people are ranked in relation to each other (for honor, privilege, or power); status classification; hierarchy. * /After the president was in office ...
pedestal
See: ON A PEDESTAL.
peel
See: KEEP ONE'S EYES PEELED.
peel off
{v.} To dive away from a group of airplanes in a flight formation; bring one plane down from a group. * /As the group neared the home base, pilot after pilot peeled off for ...
peeping Tom
{n.} A man or boy who likes sly peeping. * /He was picked up by the police as a peeping Tom./
peg
See: SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE, TAKE DOWN A PEG.
peg away
{v.} To work methodically, industriously, or steadily * /Thomson pegged away for years at a shoe repair business./ * /Jones kept pegging away, and finally recognition came./ ...
pen
See: POISON-PEN, SLIP OF THE PEN.
pen pal
{n.} A friend who is known to someone through an exchange of letters. * /John's pen pal writes him letters about school in Alaska./
penalty box
{n.} A place where penalized hockey players are required to go to wait until the penalty is over. * /Two players got into a fight and were sent to the penalty box for ...
penny for one's thoughts
Please tell me what you are thinking about; what's your daydream. * /"A penny for your thoughts!" he exclaimed./
penny pincher
,[penny pinching] See: PINCH PENNIES.
penny wise and pound foolish
Wise or careful in small things but not careful enough in important things. - A proverb. * /Mr. Smith's fence is rotting and falling down because he wouldn't spend money ...
people who live in glass houses should not throw stones
Do not complain about other people if you are as bad as they are. - A proverb. * /Mary says that Betty is jealous, but Mary is more jealous herself. People who live in ...
pep talk
{n.}, {informal} A speech that makes people feel good so they will try harder and not give up. * /The football coach gave the team a pep talk./ * /Mary was worried about her ...
period of grace
See: GRACE PERIOD.
perish the thought
{v. phr.} Let us not even think of it; may it never come true. - Used as an exclamation. * /If John fails the college entrance exam - perish the thought - he will go ...
perk up
{v.} To get or give back pep, vigor, health, or spirit; become or make more lively; liven up. * /He perked up quickly after his illness./ * /The rain perked up the flowers ...
person
See: IN PERSON.
pet name
{n. phr.} A special or abbreviated name indicating affection. * /He never calls his wife her real name, "Elizabeth," but only such pet names as "honey," "honey ...
petard
See: HOIST WITH ONE'S OWN PETARD.
Peter
See: ROB PETER TO PAY PAUL.
peter out
{v.}, {informal} To fail or die down gradually; grow less; become exhausted. * /After the factory closed, the town pretty well petered out./ * /The mine once had a rich ...
photo finish
{n. phr.} A close finish in a race of people or animals, where the camera must decide the actual result, sometimes by millimeters. * /The black horse was declared the ...
pick
See: BONE TO PICK or CROW TO PICK.
pick holes in
{v. phr.} To criticize or find fault with something, such as a speech, a statement, a theory, etc. * /It is easier to pick holes in someone else's argument than to ...
pick a bone
See: BONE TO PICK.
pick a fight
See: PICK A QUARREL.
pick a hole in
or[pick holes in] {v. phr.}, {informal} To find a mistake in or things wrong with; criticize; blame. * /The witness said he had been walking in the moonlight last Sunday, ...
pick a pocket
{v. phr.} To steal by removing from the pocket of another. * /While in the train, somebody picked his pocket and took the last dollar he had./
pick a quarrel
{v. phr.} To seek the opportunity for a fight or a quarrel. * /When Charlie has too much to drink, he has a tendency to pick a quarrel with whomever happens to be around./ See: ...
pick a/the lock
{v. phr.} To burglarize; open illegally; open a lock without the regular key. * /The robber got into the house by picking the lock./
pick and choose
{v.} To select with much care; choose in a fussy way; take a long time before choosing. * /He was never one to pick and choose./ * /Some people pick and choose to get ...
pick apart
or[pick to pieces] {v. phr.} To criticize harshly; find things wrong with; find fault with. * /After the dance, the girls picked Susan apart./ * /They picked the play to ...
pick at
{v.} 1. To reach or grasp for repeatedly. * /The baby kept picking at the coverlet./ 2. To eat without appetite; choose a small piece every little while to eat. * /He ...
pick off
{v.} 1. To pull off; remove with the fingers. * /He picked off the burs that had stuck to his overcoat./ 2. To shoot, one at a time; knock down one by one. * /The sniper ...
pick on
{v.} 1. {informal} To make a habit of annoying or bothering (someone); do or say bad things to (someone). * /Other boys picked on him until he decided to fight them./ ...
pick one's teeth
{v. phr.} To clean one's teeth with a toothpick. * /It is considered poor manners to pick one's teeth in public./
pick one's way
{v. phr.} To go ahead carefully in difficult or unfamiliar places; advance with care. * /After nightfall we drove slowly along, picking our way until we found the ...
pick out
{v.} 1. To choose. * /It took Mary a long time to pick out a dress at the store./ 2. To see among others; recognize; tell from others. * /We could pick out different ...
pick over
{v.} To select the best of; look at and take what is good from; choose from. * /She picked the apples over and threw out the bad ones./ * /We hurried to the big sale, ...
pick the brains of
{v. phr.} To get ideas or information about a particular subject by asking an expert. * /If you have time, I'd like to pick your brains about home computers./
pick to pieces
See: PICK APART, PICK HOLES IN.
pick up
{v.} 1. To take up; lift. * /During the morning Mrs. Carter picked up sticks in the yard./ 2. {informal} To pay for someone else. * /After lunch, in the restaurant, ...
pick up the tab
{v. phr.} To pay the bill in a restaurant; be the one who underwrites financially what others are doing. * /"I am always the one who picks up the tab," Charlie complained ...
pick-me-up
{n. phr.} Something you take when you feel tired or weak. * /John stopped at a drugstore for a pick-me-up after working three hours overtime./ * /Mary always carried a ...
pickpocket
{n.} A thief; a petty criminal who steals things and money out of people's pockets on a bus, train, etc. * /In some big cities many poor children become pickpockets out of ...
pickup
{n.}, (stress on " pick") 1. A rugged, small truck. * /When he got into the lumber business, Max traded in his comfortable two-door sedan for a pickup./ 2. Scheduled ...
Pidgin English
{n. phr.} A jargon that consists of some mispronounced English words and some foreign words used by Orientals in talking with Westerners. * /You can conduct a lot of ...
pie
See: EAT HUMBLE PIE, FINGER IN THE PIE, PIE IN THE SKY, SWEETIE PIE.
pie in the sky
{n. phr.}, {informal} An unrealistic wish or hope. * /Our trip to Hawaii is still only a pie in the sky./ Compare: PIPE DREAM.
piece
See: BY THE PIECE, CONVERSATION PIECE, GIVE A PIECE OF ONE'S MIND, GO TO PIECES, OF A PIECE, PIECE OF CAKE, SAY ONE'S PIECE or SPEAK ONE'S PIECE, TO PIECES.
piece of cake
{adj.}, {slang} Easy. * /The final exam was a piece of cake./
piece out
{v.} 1. To put together from many different pieces; put together from odd parts; patch. * /They pieced out a meal from leftovers./ * /He pieced out the machine with ...
piecework
{n.} Work paid for in accordance with the quantity produced. * /Al prefers working on a piecework basis to being on a regular salary because he feels he makes more that ...
pig in a poke
{n. phr.} An unseen bargain; something accepted or bought without looking at it carefully. * /Buying land by mail is buying a pig in a poke: sometimes the land turns ...
pig out
{v. phr.} 1. To eat a tremendous amount of food. * /"I always pig out on my birthday," she confessed./ 2. To peruse; have great fun with; indulge in for a longer period ...
pigeonhole
{v.} 1. To set aside; defer consideration of. * /The plan was pigeonholed until the next committee meeting./ 2. To typecast; give a stereotypical characterization ...
piggy bank
{n.} A small bank, sometimes in the shape of a pig, for saving coins. * /John's father gave him a piggy bank./
piggy-back
{adj.} or {adv.} Sitting or being carried on the shoulders. * /Little John loved to go for a piggy-back ride on his father's shoulders./ * /When Mary sprained her ...
pigheaded
{adj.} Stubborn; unwilling to compromise. * /"Stop being so pigheaded!" she cried. "I, too, can be right sometimes!"/
pile up
{v. phr.} 1. To grow into a big heap. * /He didn't go into his office for three days and his work kept piling up./ 2. To run aground. * /Boats often pile up on the rocks in ...
pile-up
{n.} 1. A heap; a deposit of one object on top of another. * /There is a huge pile-up of junked cars in this vacant lot./ 2. A large number of objects in the same ...

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