Слова на букву open-pull (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву open-pull (459)

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pill
See: BITTER PILL.
pillar of society
{n. phr.} A leading figure who contributes to the support and the well-being of his/her society; a person of irreproachable character. * /Mrs. Brown, the director of ...
pillar to post
See: FROM PILLAR TO POST.
pimple
See: GOOSE BUMPS or GOOSE PIMPLES.
pin
See: ON PINS AND NEEDLES.
pin curl
{n.} A curl made with a hair clip or bobby pin. * /Mary washed her hair and put it up in pin curls./ * /All the girls had their hair in pin curls to get ready for the ...
pin down
{v.} 1a. To keep (someone) from moving; make stay in a place or position; trap. * /Mr. Jones' leg was pinned down under the car after the accident./ * /The soldier was pinned ...
pin money
{n. phr.} Extra money used for incidentals. * /She has a regular full-time job but she earns extra pin money by doing a lot of baby-sitting./
pin one's ears back
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To beat; defeat. * /After winning three games in a row, the Reds had their ears pinned back by the Blues./ 2. To scold. * /Mrs. Smith pinned Mary's ...
pin one's faith on
{v. phr.} To depend upon; trust. * /We pinned our faith on our home basketball team to win the state finals, and they did!/
pin one's heart on one's sleeve
See: WEAR ONE'S HEART ON ONE'S SLEEVE.
pinch
See: TAKE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT also TAKE WITH A PINCH OF SALT, WHERE THE SHOE PINCHES.
pinch and scrape
{v. phr.} To save as much money as possible by spending as little as possible. * /They are trying to buy their first house so they are pinching and scraping every penny they ...
pinch pennies
{v. phr.}, {informal} Not spend a penny more than necessary; be very saving or thrifty. * /When Tom and Mary were saving money to buy a house, they had to pinch pennies./ ...
pinch-hit
{v.} 1. To substitute for another player at bat in a baseball game. * /Smith was sent in to pinch-hit for Jones./ 2. {informal} To act for a while, or in an ...
pine away
{v. phr.} To waste away with grief. * /After George was sent abroad, his wife pined away for him so much that she became ill./
pink
See: IN THE PINK, TICKLE PINK.
pink around the gills
See: GREEN AROUND THE GILLS.
pint-size
{adj.}, {informal} Very small. * /The new pint-size, portable TV sets have a very clear picture./ * /It was funny to hear a pint-size voice coming out of a great big man./ ...
pinup girl
{v. phr.} An attractive girl whose picture is pinned or tacked to the wall by an admirer. * /Some Hollywood actresses are understandably very popular pinup girls among male ...
pip-squeak
{n.}, {informal} A small, unimportant person. * /If the club is really democratic, then every little pip-squeak has the right to say what he thinks./ * /When the smallest ...
pipe
See: PUT THAT IN YOUR PIPE AND SMOKE IT.
pipe down
{v.} 1. To call (sailors) away from work with a whistle. * /He piped the men down after boat drill./ 2. {slang} To stop talking; shut up; be quiet. * /"Oh, pipe ...
pipe dream
{n.}, {informal} An unrealizable, financially unsound, wishful way of thinking; an unrealistic plan. * /Joe went through the motions of pretending that he wanted to buy that ...
pipe up
{v.}, {informal} To speak up; to be heard. * /Mary is so shy, everyone was surprised when she piped up with a complaint at the club meeting./ * /Everyone was afraid to talk ...
piper
See: PAY THE PIPER.
piss off
{v.}, {slang}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To bother; annoy; irritate. * /You really piss me off when you talk like that./ - [pissed off] {adj.} * /Why act so pissed off just ...
pit against
{v.} To match against; oppose to; put in opposition to; place in competition or rivalry with. * /The game pits two of the best pro football teams in the East against each ...
pit-a-pat
{adv.} With a series of quick pats. * /When John asked Mary to marry him, her heart went pit-a-pat./ * /The little boy ran pit-a-pat down the hall./
pitch
See: WILD PITCH.
pitch a curve
or[a curve ball] {v. phr.} To catch someone unawares; confront someone with an unexpected event or act. * /My professor pitched me a curve ball when he ...
pitch dark
{adj.} Totally, completely dark. * /A starless and moonless night in the country can be pitch dark./
pitch in
{v.}, {informal} 1. To begin something with much energy; start work eagerly. * /Pitch in and we will finish the job as soon as possible./ 2. To give help or money for ...
pitch into
{v.}, {informal} 1. To attack with blows or words. * /He pitched into me with his fists./ * /He pitched into the idea of raising taxes./ Syn.: LAY INTO(1),(2), RIP INTO. 2. ...
pitch out
{v.} 1. To deliberately throw a pitch outside of the home plate in baseball so that the batter cannot hit the ball and the catcher can make a quick throw. * /The catcher ...
pitch woo
{v. phr.}, {slang} To kiss and hug; make love. * /Mary and John pitched woo in the movies./ * /While Bob drove, Betty and Jim sat in the back pitching woo./
pitcher
See: LITTLE PITCHERS HAVE BIG EARS, RELIEF PITCHER, STARTING PITCHER.
pitchfork
See: RAIN CATS AND DOGS or RAIN PITCHFORKS.
pity
See: TAKE PITY ON or TAKE PITY UPON.
place
See: HEART IN THE RIGHT PLACE, HIGH PLACE, IN PLACE, INSTEAD OF or IN PLACE OF, IN THE FIRST PLACE, JUMPING-OFF PLACE, LIGHTNING NEVER STRIKES TWICE IN THE SAME ...
plague on both your houses
or[plague o' both your houses] Bad luck to both of you! - Used to show disgust at those who wont stop quarreling. * /The bus drivers went on strike because the bus ...
plain
or[smooth sailing] {n. phr.} An uncomplicated, unhampered, or easy course. * /For a graduate of such a famous university as he was, that assignment was plain sailing./
plain Jane
{n. phr.} A common or simple looking young woman or girl. * /When we were in school, Ann was a plain Jane, but she blossomed out and even won the title of Miss ...
plain white wrapper
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Unmarked police car. * /There's a plain white wrapper at your rear door!/ See: BROWN PAPER BAG.
plan
See: LAY AWAY PLAN.
plan on
{v.} 1. To have the plan of; have in mind. - Used with a verbal noun. * /I plan on going to the movies after I finish my homework./ * /Mary was planning on seeing John at ...
plank
See: WALK THE PLANK.
plate
See: HOME PLATE.
platonic love
{n. phr.} Great affection toward another person without sex. * /They are platonic lovers; they do everything together except make love./
platter
See: HAND SOMETHING TO ONE ON A SILVER PLATTER.
play
See: ALL WORK AND NO PLAY MAKES JACK A DULL BOY, DOUBLE PLAY, FAIR PLAY, FORCE PLAY, GAME AT WHICH TWO CAN PLAY, MAKE A PLAY FOR, TURN ABOUT IS FAIR PLAY.
play a part in
{v. phr.} To be instrumental in; have a role in; be concerned with. * /Some First Ladies play a greater part in political life than others./
play a waiting game
{v. phr.} To withhold action until one's chances for success improve. * /Ray would like to be vice president of the company so he is playing a waiting game in the hope ...
play along (with)
{v.} Cooperate; make no trouble. * /The honest jockey refused to play along with the bookmaker's illegal plan./
play around
See: FOOL AROUND.
play around with
See: TOY WITH.
play ball
{v. phr.} 1. To begin play in a ball game. * /When the umpire calls "Play ball," the game begins./ 2. {informal} To join in an effort with others; cooperate. * /To get along ...
play by ear
{v. phr.} 1. To play a musical instrument by remembering the tune, not by reading music. * /Mary does not know how to read music. She plays the piano by ear./ * /Joe ...
play cat and mouse with
{v. phr.} To tease or fool (someone) by pretending to let him go free and then catching him again. * /Joe's uncle had fun playing cat and mouse with him./ * /The ...
play down
{v.} To give less emphasis to; make (something) seem less important; divert attention from; draw notice away from. * /The newspaper stories played down the actor's ...
play fair
{v. phr.} To do what is right to others; act in a fair and truthful way. * /The boys like the principal because he always plays fair./ * /Mary would not date any other ...
play fast and loose
{v. phr.} To do as you please without caring what will happen to other people; act so carelessly or unfairly that people cannot depend on you; be very unreliable. * /He played ...
play footsie
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Touch the feet of a member of the opposite sex under the table as an act of flirtation. * /Have you at least played footsie with her?/ 2. ...
play for keeps
{v. phr.} To take an action of finality and irreversibility. * /"Are you serious about me?" she asked. "Yes," he replied. "I want to marry you. I play for keeps."/
play hard to get
{v. phr.} To act as if one weren't interested; be fickle; be coy. * /"Professor Brown is playing very hard to get," our dean said, "but I know he will accept our offer and ...
play havoc with
or[raise havoc with] {v. phr.} To cause destruction; ruin; injure badly. * /The storm played havoc with the apple orchard./ * /When Ralph was arrested for stealing the ...
play hooky
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stay out of school to play. * /Carl is failing in school because he has played hooky so many times during the year./
play into one's hands
{v. phr.} To be or do something that another person can use against you; help an opponent against yourself. * /In the basketball game, Jerry's foul played into the ...
play off
{v.} 1. To match opposing persons, forces, or interests so that they balance each other. * /The girl played off her admirers against each other./ * /Britain tried to play ...
play on
or[play upon] {v.} 1. To cause an effect on; influence. * /A heavy diet of television drama played on his feelings./ 2. To work upon for a planned effect; excite to a ...
play one false
{v. phr.}, {literary} To act disloyally toward (a person); betray; cheat; deceive. * /Good faith was not in him: he played anyone false who trusted him./ * /His hopes ...
play one for
{v.}, {informal} To treat (someone) as; act toward (someone) as; handle (someone) as; handle as. * /He played the man for a sucker./
play one's cards right
or[play one's cards well] {v. phr.}, {informal} To use abilities and opportunities so as to be successful; act cleverly; make the best use of your place or skills. ...
play ostrich
{v. phr.} To refuse to face painful facts or unpleasant truths. * /She plays ostrich when it comes to her husband's drinking problem./
play politics
{v. phr.} To make secret agreements for your own gain; handle different groups for your own advantage. * /In order to get elected, he had to play politics with both ...
play possum
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To pretend to be asleep. * /Johnny seemed to be fully asleep, but his mother knew that he was playing possum./ 2. To stay quiet for ...
play safe
or[play it safe] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be very careful; accept small gains or none to avoid loss; avoid danger for the sake of safety. * /He got tired as the game ...
play second fiddle
{v. phr.}, {informal} To act a smaller part; follow another's lead; be less noticed. * /His wife had the stronger mind and he played second fiddle to her./ * /During ...
play the devil with
or[play hob with] {v. phr.}, {informal} To cause confusion in; upset. * /Uncle Bob's unexpected visit played the devil with our own plans to travel./ * /Mother's illness ...
play the field
{v. phr.}, {informal} To date many different people; not always have dates with the same person. * /Al had a steady girlfriend, but John was playing the field./ * /Jim ...
play the game
{v. phr.}, {informal} To obey the rules; do right; act fairly. * /"That's not playing the game," we told him when he wanted to desert his wife./ * /"Oh, let's play the ...
play the market
{v. phr.} To try to make money on the stock market by buying and selling stocks, * /John lost all his savings playing the market./ * /Sometimes Mr. Smith makes a ...
play to the gallery
{v. phr.} To try to get the approval of the audience. * /Whenever John recites in class he seems to be playing to the gallery./ * /The lawyer for the defense was more ...
play tricks on
{v. phr.} To make another the victim of some trick or joke. * /Al got angry when his classmates played a trick on him by hiding his clothes while he was swimming./
play up
{v.} To call attention to; talk more about; emphasize. * /The coach played up the possibilities, and kept our minds off our weaknesses./ * /The director played up the woman's ...
play up to
{v. phr.}. {slang} 1. To try to gain the favor of, especially for selfish reasons; act to win the approval of; try to please. * /He played up to the boss./ 2. To use ...
play upon
See: PLAY ON.
play with fire
{v. phr.} To put oneself in danger; to take risks. * /Leaving your door unlocked in New York City is playing with fire./ * /The doctor told Mr. Smith that he must watch his ...
played out
{adj. phr.} Tired out; worn out; finished; exhausted. * /It had been a hard day, and by night he was played out./ * /For a while, at least, it seemed the interest in ...
please
See: AS YOU PLEASE.
plough
or[plow through] {v. phr.} Pass through laboriously. * /Saw had to plough through hundreds of pages of American history to get ready for his test./
plow
See: PUT ONE'S HAND TO THE PLOW.
plow into
{v.} 1. To attack vigorously. * /He plowed into his work and finished it in a few hours./ 2. To crash into with force. * /A truck plowed into my car and smashed the ...
pluck up
{v.} 1. To have (courage) by your own effort; make yourself have (courage). * /In spite of failure, he plucked up heart to continue./ * /He plucked up courage when he ...
pluck up one's courage
See: SCREW UP ONE'S COURAGE.
plug away
See: PEG AWAY.
plug in
{v. phr.} To connect (an electrical appliance) to a power wire by putting its plug into a receptacle or hole. * /The integrated circuit has multiplied the number of small ...
plug into
{v.} To connect (an electrical appliance) to a power wire by inserting its plug into a receptacle or hole. * /He thought he had left the lamp plugged into the wall, and so ...
plume oneself
{v. phr.}, {literary} To be proud of yourself; boast. * /He plumed himself on having the belle of the ball as his date./ * /He plumed himself on his successful ...
plunk down
{v.}, {informal} 1. To drop down; fall. * /After walking a mile we plunked down on a bench to rest./ 2. To drop something noisily or firmly. * /He plunked the ...
pocket
See: BURN A HOLE IN ONE'S POCKET, LINE ONE'S POCKETS.
pocket money
See: SPENDING MONEY.
pocket one's pride
See: SWALLOW ONE'S PRIDE.
point
See: AT SWORDS' POINTS, AT THE POINT OF, BESIDE THE POINT, BOILING POINT, CASE IN POINT, COME TO THE POINT, EXTRA POINT, MAKE A POINT, ON THE POINT OF, SORE SPOT or ...
point of view
{n.} Attitude; opinion. * /From the American point of view, Fidel Castro is a bad neighbor to have./
point out
{v.} 1. To show by pointing with the finger; point to; make clear the location of. * /The guide pointed out the principal sights of the city./ 2. To bring to ...
point up
{v.} To show clearly; emphasize. * /The increase in crime points up the need for greater police protection./ * /Johnny's report card points up his talent for math./
point-blank
{adv.} Straightforwardly; bluntly; directly. * /Sue refused point-blank to discuss marriage with Sam./
poison-pen
{adj.} Containing threats or false accusations; written in spite or to get revenge, and usually unsigned. * /Mrs. Smith received a poison-pen letter telling her that ...
poke
See: PIG IN A POKE, TAKE A PUNCH AT or TAKE A POKE AT.
poke around
or[poke about] {v.} 1. To search about; look into and under things. * /The detective poked around in the missing man's office./ 2. To move slowly or aimlessly; do ...
poke fun at
See: MAKE FUN OF.
poles apart
{adj.} Completely different. * /The two brothers were poles apart in personality./ * / It was hard for the members to make any decisions because their ideas were poles ...
polish off
{v.}, {informal} 1. To defeat easily. * /The Dodgers polished off the Yankees in four straight games in the 1963 World Series./ 2. To finish completely; finish doing ...
polish the apple
{v. phr.}, {slang} To try to make someone like you; to try to win favor by flattery. * /Mary polished the apple at work because she wanted a day off./ * /Susan is the ...
politics
See: PLAY POLITICS.
pond
See: LITTLE FROG IN A BIG POND.
pool
See: CAR POOL.
pooped out
{adj.}, {slang} Worn out; exhausted. * /Everyone was pooped out after the hike./ * /The heat made them feel pooped out./
poor as a church mouse
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Penniless; broke; extremely poor. * /The newly arrived boat people were poor as church mice./
poor-mouth
{v.} To be constantly complaining about one's poverty; keep saying how one cannot afford the better things in life. * /Uncle Jack indulges in an awful lot of poor-mouthing, ...
pop
See: EYES POP OUT.
pop fly
{n.} A baseball batted high into the air but not very far from the plate. * /The batter hit a pop fly to the shortstop./
pop in
{v. phr.} To suddenly appear without announcement. * /"Just pop into my office any time you're on campus," Professor Brown said./
pop one's cork
See: BLOW A FUSE, FLY OFF THE HANDLE, LOSE ONE'S MARBLES, LOSE ONE'S TEMPER.
pop the question
{v. phr.}, {slang} To ask someone to marry you. * /After the dance he popped the question./ * /A man is often too bashful to pop the question./
popup
{v.} 1. or[bob up] To appear suddenly or unexpectedly; show up; come out. * /Just when the coach thought he had everything under control, a new problem bobbed up./ * ...
pork
See: SALT PORK.
port of call
{n. phr.} 1. Any of the ports that a ship visits after the start of a voyage and before the end; a port where passengers or cargo may be taken on or put off; an ...
port of entry
{n. phr.} 1. A port where things brought into the country to sell may pass through customs. * /Other ports of entry have been taking business from New York./ 2. A port ...
position
See: SCORING POSITION.
possessed of
{adj. phr.}, {formal} In possession of; having; owning. * /He was possessed of great wealth./ * /He was possessed of great self-confidence./
possum
See: PLAY POSSUM.
post
See: PROM PILLAR TO POST.
pot
See: GO TO POT.
pot call the kettle black
{informal} The person who is criticizing someone else is as guilty as the person he accuses; the charge is as true of the person who makes it as of the one he makes it ...
potato
See: HOT POTATO.
potboiler
{n.} A book, play, or film written for the primary purpose of earning money for the author. * /"Reading a cheap potboiler helps me go to sleep," the professor wryly ...
potluck
See: TAKE POTLUCK.
potluck supper
See: COVERED-DISH SUPPER.
potshot
{n.} A direct shot at an easy, stationary target from behind a protected position or camouflage; criticism. * /Modern journalists like to take potshots at the ...
pound
See: PENNY WISE AND POUND FOOLISH.
pound of flesh
{n. phr.}, {literary} The maximum payment authorized by law. * /He had hoped that Peter would be lenient regarding the interest they had agreed on, but Peter ...
pound away at
{v. phr.} 1. To attack; criticize. * /In his campaign speeches the candidate kept pounding away at the administration's foreign policy./ 2. To work ...
pound out
{v. phr.} 1. To play a piece of music very loudly on a percussion instrument. * /The boy was pounding out the tune "Mary had a little lamb" on the marimba./ 2. To flatten ...
pound the pavement
{v. phr.}, {informal} To walk up and down the streets; tramp about. * /John pounded the pavement looking for a job./ * /Mary and Bill pounded the pavement to find an ...
pour
See: IT NEVER RAINS BUT IT POURS.
pour cold water on
See: THROW COLD WATER ON.
pour it on thick
See: LAY IT ON THICK.
pour money down the drain
{v. phr.} To spend one's money unwisely; to waste one's funds. * /"Stop supporting Harry's drug habit," Ralph said. "You're just pouring money down the drain."./
pour oil on troubled waters
{v. phr.} To quiet a quarrel; say something to lessen anger and bring peace. * /The troops were nearing a bitter quarrel until the leader poured oil on the troubled ...
pour out
{v.} 1. To tell everything about; talk all about. * /Mary poured out her troubles to her pal./ 2. To come out in great quantity; stream out. * /The people poured out ...
powder
See: TAKE A POWDER.
powder room
{n.} The ladies' rest room. * /When they got to the restaurant, Mary went to the powder room to wash up./
power behind the throne
{n. phr.} The person with the real power backing up the more visible partner (usually said about the wives of public figures). * /It is rumored that the First Lady it the ...
practice
See: IN PRACTICE also INTO PRACTICE, MAKE A PRACTICE OF, OUT OF PRACTICE.
presence of mind
{n. phr.} Effective and quick decision-making ability in times of crisis. * /When Jimmy fell into the river, his father had the presence of mind to dive in after him and ...
present
See: AT PRESENT.
press box
{n.} The place or room high in a sports stadium that is for newspaper men and radio and television announcers. * /In baseball the official scorer sits in the press box./
press conference
{n. phr.} A meeting with news reporters. * /The reporters questioned the president about foreign affairs at the press conference./ * /The press conference with the senator ...
press one's luck
or[push one's luck] {v. phr.} To depend too much on luck; expect to continue to be lucky. * /When John won his first two bets at the race track, he pressed his luck ...
press the flesh
{v.}, {slang} To shake hands with total strangers by the hundreds, keeping an artificial smile all the way, in order to raise one's popularity during political ...
pressure group
{n. phr.} An organization whose goal it is to create changes by lobbying for the benefit of its own members. * /Certain unscrupulous pressure groups stop at nothing ...
pretty
See: SITTING PRETTY.
pretty kettle of fish
See: KETTLE OF FISH.
pretty penny
{n. phr.} A large amount of money. * /Their new house is so big and modern that we're sure it must have cost them a pretty penny./
prevail upon
or[prevail on] {v.} To bring to an act or belief; cause a change in; persuade. * /He prevailed upon the musician to entertain instead of the absent speaker./ * /He ...
prey on
or[prey upon] {v.} 1. To habitually kill and eat; catch for food. * /Cats prey on mice./ 2. To capture or take in spoils of war or robbery. * /Pirates preyed on American ...
prey on one's mind
{v. phr.} To afflict; worry. * /He couldn't sleep because his many debts were preying on his mind./
price on one's head
{n. phr.} Reward offered to anyone who catches a thief or a murderer. * /The hotel manager learned that the quiet man taken from his room by the police was a murderer ...
prick
See: KICK AGAINST THE PRICKS.
prick up one's ears
{v. phr.}, {informal} To come to interested attention; begin to listen closely; try to hear. * /The woman pricked up her ears when she heard them talking about her./
pride
See: SWALLOW ONE'S PRIDE.
pride must take a pinch
One must endure the minor pains and hardships one encounters while being made pretty. - A proverb. * /"Mother," Sue cried, "stop pulling my hair!" "Just a ...
pride oneself on
{v. phr.} To be proud ot, take satisfaction in; be much pleased by. * /She prided herself on her beauty./ * /He prided himself on his strength and toughness./ Compare: PLUME ...
print
See: FINE PRINT, IN PRINT, OUT OF PRINT.
private
See: IN PRIVATE.
private eye
{n.}, {colloquial} A private investigator; a detective. * /Buddy Ebsen played a private eye on "Bamaby Jones."/
progress
See: IN PROGRESS.
promise
See: AS GOOD AS ONE'S WORD, LICK AND A PROMISE.
promise the moon
{v. phr.} To promise something impossible. * /A politician who promises the moon during a campaign loses the voters' respect./ * /I can't promise you the moon, but I'll do ...
proof of the pudding is in the eating
Only through actual experience can the value of something be tested. - A proverb. * /He was intrigued by the ads about the new high mileage sports cars. " Drive one, ...
prune
See: FULL OF BEANS or FULL OF PRUNES.
psych out
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To find out the real motives of (someone). * /Sue sure has got Joe psyched out./ 2. To go berserk; to lose one's nerve. * /Joe says ...
psyched up
{adj.}, {informal} Mentally alert; ready to do something. * /The students were all psyched up for their final exams./
Public
See: JOHN Q. PUBLIC.
public enemy
{n. phr.} A famous criminal. * /Al Capone of Chicago used to be Public Enemy Number One during prohibition./
public speaker
{n.} A person who speaks to the public. * /A public speaker must appeal to all kinds of people./
public-address system
{n.} A set of devices for making a speaker's voice louder so that he can be heard by more people. * /The public-address system broke down during the senator's speech./ ...
puffed up
{adj.} Elated; proud; conceited. * /Just because Bob inherited some money from his father is no reason for him to act so puffed up./
pull
See: LONG HAUL or LONG PULL.
pull in one's horns
or[draw in one's horns] {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To reduce your boasts; calm down from a quarrel; back down on a promise. * /He said he could beat any man ...
pull something on one
{v. phr.} To perpetrate something prejudicial; deceive. * /Larry pulled a very dirty trick on Ann when, after going with her for three years, he suddenly married ...
pull a fast one
{v. phr.} To gain the advantage over one's opponent unfairly; deceive; trick. * /When Smith was told by his boss that he might be fired, he called the company ...

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