Слова на букву pull-scen (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву pull-scen (459)

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pull a long face
See: LONG FACE.
pull date
{n.}, {informal} The date stamped on baked goods, dairy products, or other perishable foods indicating the last day on which they may be sold before they must be removed ...
pull down
{v.}, {informal} 1. To catch (a ball) after a hard run. * /The outfielder pulled down a long drive to center field./ 2. To earn. * /Mr. Blake pulls down $500 a week./ * ...
pull down about one's ears
or[pull down around one's ears] See: ABOUT ONE'S EARS.
pull in
See: HAUL IN.
pull off
{v.}, {informal} To succeed in (something thought difficult or impossible); do. * /Ben Hogan pulled off the impossible by winning three golf tournaments in one year./ * ...
pull one's teeth
{v. phr.} To take power away from; make powerless. * /The general pulled the teeth of the rebel army by blocking its ammunition supply line./ * /The student ...
pull one's chestnuts out of the fire
To do someone else a great favor which they don't really deserve, doing oneself a disfavor in the process. * /Small countries often have to pull the chestnuts out of the ...
pull one's leg
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get someone to accept a ridiculous story as true; fool someone with a humorous account of something; trick. * /For a moment, I actually ...
pull one's punches
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Not to hit as hard as you can. * /Jimmy pulled his punches and let Paul win the boxing match./ 2. To hide unpleasant facts or make them seem good. ...
pull one's weight
{v. phr.} To do your full share of work; do your part. * /In a small shop, it is important that each man pull his weight./ * /When Mother was sick in the hospital, ...
pull oneself together
{v. phr.} To become calm after being excited or disturbed; recover self-command; control yourself. * /It had been a disturbing moment, but he was able to pull ...
pull oneself up by the bootstraps
or[pull oneself up by one's own bootstraps] {adv. phr.} To succeed without help; succeed by your own efforts. * /He had to pull himself up by the bootstraps./
pull out
{v. phr.} 1. To withdraw; leave unceremoniously. * /The defeated army hastily pulled out of the occupied territories./ 2. To leave (said about trains). * /The train pulled ...
pull out of a hat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get as if by magic; invent; imagine. * /When the introduction to a dictionary tells you how many hours went into its making, these figures were not ...
pull over
{v.} To drive to the side of the road and stop. * /The policeman told the speeder to pull over./ * /Everyone pulled over to let the ambulance pass./
pull rank
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} To assert one's superior position or authority on a person of lower rank as in exacting a privilege or a favor. * /How come you always get ...
pull strings
or[pull wires] {v. phr.}, {informal} To secretly use influence and power, especially with people in charge or in important jobs to do or get something; make use of ...
pull the plug on
{v. phr.}, {slang} To expose (someone's) secret activities. * /The citizens' committee pulled the plug on the mayor, and he lost his election./
pull the rug out from under
{v. phr.}, {informal} To withdraw support unexpectedly from; to spoil the plans of. * /Bill thought he would be elected, but his friends pulled the rug out from under ...
pull the wool over one's eyes
{v. phr.}, {informal} To fool someone into thinking well of you; deceive. * /The businessman had pulled the wool over his partner's eyes about their financial ...
pull through
{v.} 1. To help through; bring safely through a difficulty or sudden trouble; save. * /A generous loan showed the bank's faith in Father and pulled him through the ...
pull together
{v.} To join your efforts with those of others; work on a task together; cooperate. * /Many men must pull together if a large business is to succeed./ * /Tim was a ...
pull up
{v.} 1. To check the forward motion of; halt; stop. * /He pulled up his horse at the gate./ 2. To tell (someone) to stop doing something; say (someone) is doing wrong ...
pull up one's socks
{v. phr.} To try to do better, either in terms of one's behavior or at a task one is performing. * /I'll have to pull up my socks if I am going to finish my work ...
pull up short
{v. phr.} To suddenly stop. * /He pulled up short in his red car at the corner when he saw a pregnant lady crossing./ * /When Mark saw that he was hurting Jill's feelings, ...
pull up stakes
{v. phr.}, {informal} To leave the place where you have been living. * /We are going to pull up stakes and move to California./ * /The Jones family pulled up stakes ...
pull wires
See: PULL STRINGS.
pullout
{n.} An evacuation. * /The pullout of the American military proceeded on schedule./
punch
See: BEAT TO THE PUNCH, PACK A PUNCH, PULL ONE'S PUNCHES, TAKE A PUNCH AT.
punch-drunk
{adj.} 1. Dazed or become dulled in the mind from being hit in the head. * /He was a punch-drunk boxer who made his living shining shoes./ 2. In a foggy state of ...
puppy love
also[calf love] {n.}, {informal} The first love of very young people. * /When John and Mary began going around together in junior high school, their parents said it was ...
pure and simple
{adj.} Simply stated; basic. - Follows the noun it modifies and is used for emphasis. * /The problem, pure and simple, is finding a baby-sitter./ * /The question, pure ...
purpose
See: AT CROSS PURPOSES, ON PURPOSE, TO ALL INTENTS AND PURPOSES.
purse
See: LINE ONE'S POCKETS also LINE ONE'S PURSE.
purse strings
{n.} Care or control of money. * /Dad holds the purse strings in our family./ * /The treasurer refused to let go of the club's purse strings./
push around
{v.}, {informal} To be bossy with; bully. * /Don't try to push me around!/ * /Paul is always pushing the smaller children around./
push off
or[shove off] {v.} 1. To push a boat away from the shore. * /Before Tom could reach the boat, Jake had shoved off./ 2. {slang} To start; leave. * /We were ready to push ...
push on
{v. phr.} To press forward; proceed forward laboriously. * /The exhausted mountain climbers pushed on, despite the rough weather, as the peak was already in sight./ ...
push one's luck
See: PRESS ONE'S LUCK.
push over
{v. phr.} To upset; overthrow. * /She is standing on her feet very solidly; a little criticism from you certainly won't push her over./ * /The wind in Chicago can be so ...
push the panic button
{v. phr.}, {slang} To become very much frightened; nervous or excited, especially at a time of danger or worry. * /John thought he saw a ghost and pushed the panic ...
push up daisies
{v. phr.}, {slang} To be dead and buried. * /I'll be around when you're pushing up daisies./ * /Don't play with guns or you may push up the daisies./
push-up
{n.} An exercise to build strong arms and shoulders, in which you lie on your stomach and push your body up on your hands and toes. * /At the age of seventy, Grandpa still ...
pushover
{n.} 1. Something easy to accomplish or overcome. * /For Howard steering a boat is a pushover as he was raised on a tropical island./ 2. A person easily seduced. * /It is ...
put
See: HARD PUT or HARD PUT TO IT, STAY PUT.
put out
{v.} 1. To make a flame or light stop burning; extinguish; turn off. * /Please put the light out when you leave the room./ * /The firemen put out the blaze./ ...
put to it
{adj. phr.} Hard pressed; having trouble; in difficulty; puzzled. * /When he lost his job, he was rather put to it for a while to provide for his family./ * /The boy ...
put (it) in black and white
See: BLACK AND WHITE.
put (it) in writing
See: BLACK AND WHITE.
put a bee in one's bonnet
See: BEE IN ONE'S BONNET.
put a bug in one's ear
or[put a flea in one's ear] See: BUG IN ONE'S EAR.
put a new face on
{v. phr.} To alter the aspect of something; change. * /Mr. Merry man's announcement of his candidacy for governor puts an entirely new face on the political scene in our ...
put about
{v. phr.} - Nautical usage. To turn in the opposite direction; turn around. * /When we saw the storm clouds thickening in the sky, we put about quickly and raced ashore./
put across
{v.} 1. To explain clearly; make yourself understood; communicate. * /He knew how to put his ideas across./ Compare: GET ACROSS. 2. {informal} To get (something) done ...
put all one's eggs in one basket
{v. phr.} To place all your efforts, interests, or hopes in a single person or thing. * /Going steady in high school is putting all your eggs in one basket too ...
put an end to
or[put a stop to] {v. phr.} 1. To make (something) end; stop; end. * /The farmer built an electric fence around his field to put an end to trespassing./ * /The principal said ...
put aside
{v. phr.} 1. To save; put something aside for a special purpose. * /Peter puts $100 aside every week./ 2. To let go of; put away. * /The teacher to the students, "Put your ...
put away
{v.} 1. To put in the right place or out of sight. * /She put away the towels./ 2. To lay aside; stop thinking about. * /He put his worries away for the weekend./ 3. ...
put back the clock
or[turn back the clock] {v. phr.} To go back in time; relive the past. * /If I could put back the clock I'd give more thought to preparing for a career./ * /Richard wishes ...
put by
{v.} To save for the future; lay aside. * /He had put by a good sum during a working lifetime./
put down
{v. phr.} 1. To stop by force, crush. * /In 24 hours the general had entirely put down the rebellion./ 2. To put a stop to; check. * /She had patiently put down unkind ...
put forth
{v. phr.} To produce; issue; send out. * /In the spring the apple trees put forth beautiful white blossoms./ * /The chairman of the board put forth an innovative proposal ...
put ideas into one's head
{v. phr.} To persuade someone to do something negative; put one up to something. * /Billy would never have poured glue into his father's shoes if the neighbor's son hadn't ...
put in
{v.} 1. To add to what has been said; say (something) in addition to what others say. * /While the boys were discussing the car accident, Ben put in that the road was icy./ ...
put in a word for
{v. phr.} To speak in favor of someone; recommend someone. * /"Don't worry about your job application," Sam said to Tim. "I'll put in a word for you with ...
put in an appearance
also[make an appearance] {v. phr.} To be present, esp. for a short time; visit; appear. * /He put in an appearance at work, but he was too ill to stay./ * /The ...
put in mind of
{v. phr.}, {nonstandard} To remind of; suggest to; call up the memory of. * /She puts me in mind of my sister./ * /That puts me in mind of a story./
put in one's place
{v. phr.}, {informal} To criticize someone for impolite boldness; remind someone of low rank or position; reduce someone's unsuitable pride; deflate. * /The assistant was ...
put in one's way
See: PUT IN THE WAY OF.
put in the way of
or[put in one's way] {v. phr.} To set before (someone); give to (someone); show the way to; help toward. * /After Joe graduated, the coach put him in the way of a good ...
put it on thick
See: LAY IT ON.
put off
{v.} 1. {informal} To cause confusion in; embarrass; displease. * /I was rather put off by the shamelessness of his proposal./ * /The man's slovenliness put me off./ ...
put on
{v. phr.} 1. To dress in. * /The boy took off his clothes and put on his pajamas./ * /Mother put a coat on the baby./ 2a. To pretend; assume; show. * /Mary isn't really ...
put on airs
{v. phr.} To show conceit; act in a superior or condescending manner. * /The fact that her parents own a villa in Capri is no reason for Amanda to keep putting on ...
put on an act
{v. phr.} 1. To perform a play. * /The seventh grade put on a lovely act for Christmas for the parents./ 2. To pretend. * /"If you always put on an act," her ...
put on ice
See: ON ICE(2).
put on one's thinking cap
{v. phr.} To think hard and long about some problem or question. * /Miss Stone told her pupils to put on their thinking caps before answering the question./
put on paper
See: BLACK AND WHITE.
put on the dog
{v. phr.} To behave ostentatiously in terms of dress and manner. * /"Stop putting on the dog with me," Sue cried at Roy. "I knew the real you from way hack!"/
put on the line
See: LAY ON THE LINE.
put on the map
{v. phr.} To make (a place) well known. * /The first successful climb of Mount Matterhorn put Zermatt, Switzerland, on the map./ * /Shakespeare put his hometown of ...
put one in one's place
See: CUT DOWN TO SIZE.
put one in the picture
{v. phr.} To inform someone of all the facts about a given situation. * /Once you're back from your overseas trip, we'll put you in the picture about recent developments at ...
put one on a pedestal
{v. phr.} To exaggeratedly worship or admire a person. * /Daniel puts Elaine on a pedestal and caters to her every whim./
put one on one's feet
See: ON ONE'S FEET(2).
put one out of the way
See: OUT OF THE WAY(3).
put one through one's paces
{v. phr.} To train and discipline someone; test one's abilities. * /The new recruits were certainly put through their paces by the drill sergeant./
put one wise
{v. phr.} To bring one up-to-date; inform someone; explain. * /Our old friend David put us wise as to where the best used cars could be found in Chicago./
put one's back to it
{v. phr.} To make a real effort; to try. * /You can finish the job by noon if you put your back to it./ * /I'm sure you can make the football team if you put your back to ...
put one's best foot forward
{v. phr.}, {informal} To try to make a good impression; try to make a good appearance; do one's best. * /During courtship, it is natural to put your best foot ...
put one's cards on the table
See: LAY ONE'S CARDS ON THE TABLE.
put one's finger on
also[lay one's finger on] {v. phr.} To find exactly. * /The engineers couldn't put their fingers on the reason for the rocket's failure to orbit./ * /We called in an ...
put one's foot down
{v. phr.}, {informal} To take a decided stand; be stubborn in decision. * /John didn't want to practice his piano lesson, but his teacher put his foot down./ * /When ...
put one's foot in it
or[put one's foot in one's mouth] {v. phr.}, {informal} To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another's feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. * /He ...
put one's hand on
See: LAY ONE'S HANDS ON(3).
put one's hand to
or[set one's hand to] or[turn one's hand to] {v. phr.} To start working at; try to do. * /Hal does a good job at everything mat he turns his hand to./ * /After Mr. ...
put one's hand to the plow
or[set one's hand to the plow] {v. phr.} To start doing something of importance; give yourself to a big job. * /We felt that he had put his hand to the plow, and we ...
put one's head in the sand
See: HIDE ONE'S HEAD IN THE SAND.
put one's heart on one's sleeve
See: HEART ON ONE'S SLEEVE.
put one's house in order
or[set one's house in order] {v. phr.} To arrange your affairs in good order. * /Grandfather knew he would not live long and set his house in order./ * /When Mr. Black ...
put one's money on a scratched horse
{v. phr.}, {informal} To bet on a certain failure; to gamble without a chance of winning. * /You bet on the New York Mets to win the World Series? Why put your money on a ...
put one's nose out of joint
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make you jealous; leave you out of favor. * /When Jane accepted Tom's invitation it put Jack's nose out of joint./ 2. To ruin your ...
put one's shoulder to the wheel
{v. phr.} To make a great effort yourself or with others; try hard; cooperate. * /The effort to get a new high school succeeded because everyone put his shoulder to the ...
put oneself in another's place
or[put oneself in another's shoes] {v. phr.} To understand another person's feeling imaginatively; try to know his feelings and reasons with understanding; enter into his ...
put out of action
See: OUT OF ACTION.
put out of the way
{v. phr.} To kill. * /When people spoke against the dictator, he had them put out of the way./ * /The old dog was very sick, and Father had the animal doctor put him ...
put over
{v.} 1. To wait to a later time; postpone. * /They put over the meeting to the following Tuesday./ Syn.: PUT OFF. 2. {informal} To make a success of; complete. * /He ...
put someone on
{v.} To play a joke on someone by saying or doing things that are only pretense; kid. * /When the voice on the phone told Mrs. Jones she had won a $10,000 prize, she ...
put that in your pipe and smoke it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To understand something told you; accept something as fact or reality; not try to change it. - Usually used as a command, normally only in ...
put the bite on
{v. phr.}, {slang} To ask (for money, favors, etc.) * /John put the bite on his friend for several tickets to the dance./ * /Willie Mays put the bite on the Giants for a ...
put the cart before the horse
See: CART BEFORE THE HORSE.
put their heads together
or[lay their heads together] {v. phr.}, {informal} To plan or consider things together; discuss something as a group; talk it over. * /They put their heads together and decided ...
put through
{v. phr.} 1. To carry out; arrange. * /If Jim can put through one more financial transaction like this one, we will be rich./ 2. To connect (said of telephone calls). ...
put through one's paces
{v. phr.}, {informal} To test the different abilities and skills of a person or a thing; call for a show of what one can do. * /He put his new car through its paces./ * ...
put to bed
{v. phr.} 1. To put to rest for the night. * /Father put the three children to bed./ * /The boy seemed ill, so the nurse put him to bed./ 2. {informal} To complete ...
put to rights
or[set to rights] {v. phr.}, {informal} To put in good order; clean up. * /It took the company a long time to put the office to rights after the fire./ * /It took Mrs. ...
put to sea
{v. phr.} To start a voyage. * /The captain said the ship would put to sea at six in the morning./ * /In the days of sailing ships, putting to sea depended on the ...
put to shame
{v. phr.} 1. To disgrace. * /The cleanliness of European cities puts our cities to shame./ * /That filthy dump puts our town to shame./ 2. To do much better than ...
put to sleep
{v. phr.} 1. To cause to fall asleep. * /Mother used to put us to sleep by telling us a good-night story and giving us a kiss./ 2. To kill with an injection (said of ...
put to the sword
{v. phr.}, {literary} To kill (people) in war, especially with a sword. * /The Romans put their enemies to the sword./ * /In some wars captives have been put to the ...
put to use
{v. phr.} To use. * /During the early part of the Korean war the cooks and office workers of the U.S. Army were put to use in battle./ * /Henry decided to put his ...
put two and two together
{v. phr.} To make decisions based on available proofs; reason from the known facts; conclude; decide. * /He had put two and two together and decided where they had ...
put up
{v.} 1a. To make and pack (especially a lunch or medicine); get ready; prepare. * /Every morning Mother puts up lunches for the three children./ * /The druggist put up ...
put up a (brave
or[good) front] {v. phr.} To act courageously, even though one is actually afraid. * /When Joe was taken in for his open heart surgery, he put up a brave front, although ...
put up a (brave, good, etc.) flght
{v. phr.} To resist. * /He put up a good fight but he was bound to lose in the end to the older, more experienced chess player./
put up or shut up
{v. phr.} {informal} 1. To bet your money on what you say or stop saying it. - Often used as a command; often considered rude. * /The man from out of town kept saying ...
put up to
{v. phr.}, {informal} To talk to and make do; persuade to; get to do. * /Older boys put us up to painting the statue red./ Compare: EGG ON.
put up with
{v.} To accept patiently; bear. * /We had to put up with Jim's poor table manners because he refused to change./ * /The mother told her children, "I refuse to put up with ...
put upon
{v.} To use (someone) unfairly; expect too much from. - Used in the passive or in the past participle. * /Martha was put upon by the bigger girls./ * /Arthur was a much ...
put wise
{v.}, {slang} To tell (someone) facts that will give him an advantage over others or make him alert to opportunity or danger. * /The new boy did not know that Jim was playing a ...
put words into one's mouth
{v. phr.} To say without proof that another person has certain feelings or opinions; claim a stand or an idea is another's without asking; speak for another without ...
put-on
{n.} An act of teasing; the playing of a practical joke on someone. * /Eric didn't realize that it was a put-on when his friends phoned him that he won the lottery./
put-up
{adj.} Artificially arranged; plotted; phony; illegal. * /The FBI was sure that the bank robbers worked together with an insider and that the whole affair was a ...
putdown
{n.} An insult, * /It was a nasty putdown when John called his sister a fat cow./
q
See: MIND ONE'S P'S AND Q'S.
Q.T.
See: ON THE Q.T.
qualms
See: HAVE (NO) QUALMS ABOUT.
quantity
See: UNKNOWN QUANTITY.
quarterback sneak
{n.} A football play in which the quarterback takes the ball from the center and dives straight ahead in an attempt to gain a very short distance. * /Johnson took the ...
queen
See: HOMECOMING QUEEN.
queer fish
{n.} A strange or unusual person who does odd things. * /Uncle Algernon dresses in heavy furs in the summer and short-sleeved shirts in the winter. No wonder ...
queer oneself
{v. phr.} To act in such a manner as to offend others and thus one's own chances or position. * /Phil has queered himself with many girls by his erratic behavior./
quest
See: IN SEARCH OF also IN QUEST OF.
question
See: BEG THE QUESTION, BESIDE THE POINT or BESIDE THE QUESTION, BEYOND QUESTION also WITHOUT QUESTION, CALL IN QUESTION, IN QUESTION, INTO QUESTION, OUT OF THE QUESTION, ...
quick buck
See: FAST BUCK.
quick on the draw
See: QUICK ON THE TRIGGER.
quick on the trigger
or[trigger happy] {adj. phr.} Ready to shoot without warning; fast with a gun. * /He's a dangerous criminal quick on the trigger./ 2. {informal} Fast at answering ...
quick on the uptake
{adj. phr.} Smart; intelligent. * /Eleanor is very witty and quick on the uptake./
quick study
{n. phr.} One who acquires new skills and habits in record time. * /Sue is new at her job but people have confidence in her because she is a quick study./
quit
See: CALL IT QUITS.
quite a bit
See: QUITE A LITTLE.
quite a few
or[quite a number] also {formal}[not a few] {n.} or {adj. phr.} Rather a large number; more than a few. * /Quite a few went to the game./ * /The basket had quite a few ...
quite a little
or {informal}[quite a bit] also {formal}[not a little] {n.} or {adj. phr.} Rather a large amount; rather much; more than a little. * /We are not finished; quite a little is ...
quite a number
See: QUITE A FEW.
quite the thing
{n. phr.} The socially proper thing to do. * /In polite society it is quite the thing to send a written thank you note to one's host or hostess after a dinner party./
rabbit
See: JACK-RABBIT START.
race
See: DRAG RACE, RAT RACE.
race against time
{v. phr.} To be in a great hurry to finish a given project by a specified deadline. * /The workers were racing against time to finish the campus modernization project./
race to stand still
{v. phr.} To be so far behind in one's work that one must exert an effort similar to that needed to win a race in order simply not to fall even further behind. * ...
rack and ruin
{n. phr.} Complete decay; condition of decline. * /The entire house had been so neglected that it had gone to rack and ruin./
rack one's brain
{v. phr.} To try your best to think; make a great mental effort; especially: to try to remember something you have known. * /Bob racked his brain trying to remember where ...
radio ham
{n. phr.} Someone whose hobby is the operating of shortwave radio. * /The code letters C.Q. are used by radio hams to invite other radio hams to join in the ...
red
See: IN THE RED, PAINT THE TOWN RED, SEE RED.
red carpet
See: ROLL OUT THE RED CARPET.
red cent
{n. phr.} The one-cent coin; a copper coin; very little money. * /Poor Oscar is so broke he doesn't have a red cent to his name./
red eye
{adj. phr.} Bloodshot eyes that are strained from too much reading. * /Poor Tim has a red eye; he must have been studying too late again./
red herring
{n. phr.} A false scent laid down in order to deceive; a phony or misleading story designed to cause confusion. * /That story about the president having an affair ...
red tape
{n. phr.} Unnecessary bureaucratic routine; needless but official delays. * /If you want to get anything accomplished in a hurry, you have to find someone in power who can ...
red-handed
{adj.} In the very act; while committing a crime or evil action. * /The criminal was caught red-handed while holding up the neighborhood bank at gunpoint./
red-letter day
{n. phr.} A holiday; memorable day (usually printed in red on calendars). * /The Fourth of July is a red-letter day./ * /It was a red-letter day for Felix, when he won ...
red-light district
{n. phr.} A district of brothels or where prostitutes hang out. * /Most unwisely, the young sailor decided to spend his leave on shore by haunting the red-light ...
redcap
{n.} A porter at an airport or at a railroad station. * /Mr. Smith works as a redcap at Chicago's O'Hare Airport./
reel off
See: RATTLE OFF.
reference
See: IN REFERENCE TO or WITH REFERENCE TO.
refine on
or[refine upon] {v.} 1. To make better; improve. * /Mary was asked to refine on her first outline to make it clearer and more exact./ 2. To be better than; surpass. ...
regain one's feet
{v. phr.} To get back up again after falling down. * /Tom fell while he skied down the hill but he regained his feet quickly./ Compare: TO ONE'S FEET.
regard
See: IN REFERENCE TO or IN REGARD TO or WITH REGARD TO.
regular guy
or[regular fellow] {n.}, {informal} A friendly person who is easy to get along with; a good sport. * /You'll like Tom. He's a regular guy./ Syn.: GOOD EGG.
rein
See: FREE REIN, GIVE REIN TO or GIVE FREE REIN TO.
relation
See: IN RELATION TO or WITH RELATION TO.
relative to
1. On the subject of; about. * /Relative to school athletics, the principal said the students should not allow athletics to interfere with homework./ 2. In comparison with; in ...
repeat oneself
{v. phr.} To say the same thing over again, often in the same words; repeat ideas because you forget what you said or because you want to stress their importance. * ...
resign oneself
{v. phr.} To stop arguing; accept something which cannot be changed. * /When Jane's father explained that he could not afford to buy her a new bicycle, she finally resigned ...
resistance
See: LINE OF LEAST RESISTANCE.
rest
See: LAY TO REST, PARADE REST.
rest assured
{v. phr.} To be convinced; persuaded; certain and unworried. * /"Please rest assured," he said seriously, "that I will keep all of my promises."/
rest home
See: CONVALESCENT HOME.
rest on one's laurels
{v. phr.} To be satisfied with the success you have already won; stop trying to win new honors. * /Getting an A in chemistry almost caused Mike to rest on his laurels./
rest on one's oars
{v. phr.} To stop trying; stop working for a while; rest. * /The man who wants to become a millionaire can never rest on his oars./ * /A high school student who wants to ...
rest room
{n.} A room or series of rooms in a public building which has things for personal comfort and grooming, such as toilets, washbowls, mirrors, and often chairs or couches. ...
retreat
See: BEAT A RETREAT.
return
See: IN RETURN.
return the compliment
{v. phr.} To say or do the same to someone that he has said or done to you; pay someone back. * /Mary said, "I love your new hairdo" and Suzy returned the compliment ...
rev up
{v. phr.}, {informal}, {slang} 1. To press down sharply several times on the accelerator of an idling car in order to get maximum acceleration. * /The race driver ...
reverse
See: DOUBLE REVERSE, IN REVERSE.
rhyme or reason
{n. phr.} A good plan or reason; a reasonable purpose or explanation. - Used in negative, interrogative, or conditional sentences. * /Don could see no rhyme or ...
rib
See: STICK TO ONE'S RIBS or STICK TO THE RIBS.
rich
See: STRIKE IT RICH.
rid of
Free of; away from; without the care or trouble. * /The puppy is finally rid of worms./ * /If I could be rid of the children for the day, I would go./ * /I wish you'd get ...
ride
See: ALONG FOR THE RIDE, LET RIDE, RUN WITH HARE AND HUNT (RIDE) WITH THE HOUNDS, TAKE FOR A RIDE, THUMB A RIDE.
ride roughshod over
{v. phr.} To do as you wish without considering the wishes of (another person); treat with scorn or lack of courtesy; show no sympathy for. * /The city officials ...
ride herd on
{v. phr.} 1. To patrol on horseback around a herd of animals to see that none of them wanders away. * /Two cowboys rode herd on the cattle being driven to market./ 2. ...
ride on one's coattails
{v. phr.} To succeed in a certain endeavor by attaching oneself to the greater weight of another person or corporate body. * /"We will never get our Ph.D. program ...
ride out
{v.} To survive safely; endure. * /The captain ordered all sails lowered so the ship could ride out the storm./ * /Jack decided to ride out his troubles by saying that ...
ride the brake
or[ride the clutch] {v. phr.}, {informal} To keep your foot on the pedal. * /Riding the brake is a bad habit for a driver to form./
ride the gravy train
{v. phr.} To live a life of plenty and luxury. * /Those who have a wealthy executive or heir to a fortune for a spouse can ride the gravy train without doing any ...
ride up
or[crawl up] {v.} To slip gradually upward on the body. * /Shorts that ride up can be very uncomfortable./
riding high
{adj.} Attracting attention; enjoying great popularity. * /After scoring the winning touchdown, John is riding high with his classmates./
riding for a fall
{adj. phr.} Behaving in an overconfident way that is likely to lead to trouble; being too sure of yourself; doing something dangerous. * /The student who does not ...
rig out
{v. phr.} To overdecorate; doll up; dress up. * /Ann arrived all rigged out in her newest Parisian summer outfit./
right
See: ALL RIGHT, ALL RIGHT FOR YOU, DEAD TO RIGHTS, GIVE ONE'S RIGHT ARM, HEART IN THE RIGHT PLACE, IN THE RIGHT, PLAY ONE'S CARDS RIGHT, PUT TO RIGHTS or SET TO ...
right along
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1a. On your way satisfactorily or without trouble. * /They fixed the engine and the train ran right along./ 1b. On your way without delay. ...
right and left
{adv. phr.} In or from every direction; all around; on all sides. * /The knight rode into battle striking at the enemy right and left with his broadsword./ * /When ...
right away
or {informal}[right off] also {informal}[right off the bat] {adv. phr.} Immediately; as the next thing in order; without delay. * /Phil's mother told him to do his homework ...
right down
or[up one's alley] {adv. phr.} In accordance with one's specialty or predilection. * /This kind of preclassical music is right up Bill's alley; after all, he wrote his ...
right field
{n.} The part of a baseball outfield to the batter's right. * /Left-handed batters usually hit to right field./ Compare: CENTER FIELD, LEFT FIELD. -[right fielder] {n.} ...
right on
{adj.}, {interj.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Exclamation of animated approval "Yes," "That's correct," "You're telling the truth," "we believe you," etc. * /Orator: And we shall ...
right out
or[straight out] {adv.} Plainly; in a way that hides nothing; without waiting or keeping back anything. * /When Mother asked who broke the window, Jimmie told her ...
right side of the tracks
See: THE TRACKS.
right-hand man
{v. phr.} A valued and indispensable assistant. * /The chancellor of the university never goes anywhere without the vice chancellor, his right-hand man, whose judgment he ...
right-wing
{adj.} Being or belonging to a political group which opposes any important change in the way the country is run. * /Some countries with right-wing governments have ...
Riley
See: LIFE OF RILEY.
ring
See: GIVE A RING, RUN CIRCLES AROUND or RUN RINGS AROUND, THREE-RING CIRCUS, THROW ONE'S HAT IN THE RING.
ring a bell
{v. phr.} To make you remember something; sound familiar. * /Not even the cat's meowing seemed to ring a bell with Judy. She still forgot to feed him./ * /When Ann ...
ring in
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To bring in (someone or something) from the outside dishonestly or without telling; often: hire and introduce under a false name. * /Bob ...
ring out
{v.} To ring a special clock that records the time you leave work. * /Charles can't leave early in his new job; he has to ring out./
ring the changes
{v. phr.} To say or do the same thing in different ways; repeat the same idea in many ways. * /David wanted a new bicycle and he kept ringing the changes on it all ...
ring true
{v. phr.} To have a tone of genuineness; sound convincing. * /I believed his sob story about how he lost his fortune, because somehow it all rang true./
ring up
{v.} 1. To add and record on a cash register. * /The supermarket clerk rang up Mrs. Smith's purchases and told her she owed $33./ * /Business was bad Tuesday; we didn't ...
ringleader
{n. phr.} The chief of an unsavory group; a higher-up. * /The FBI finally caught up with the ringleader of the dope smugglers from South America./
riot
See: READ THE RIOT ACT, RUN RIOT.
rip into
or[tear into] {v.}, {informal} 1. To start a fight with; attack. * /The puppy is tearing into the big dog./ Syn.: PITCH INTO. 2. To quarrel with; scold. * /Mrs. ...
rip off
{v.}, {slang} (Stress on "off") Steal. * /The hippies ripped off the grocery store./
rip-off
{n.}, {slang} (Stress on "rip") An act of stealing or burglary. * /Those food prices are so high, it's almost a rip-off./
ripe
See: TIME IS RIPE.
rise
See: GET A RISE OUT OF, GIVE RISE TO.
rise from the ashes
{v. phr.} To rise from ruin; start anew. * /A year after flunking out of medical school, Don rose from the ashes and passed his qualifying exams for the M.D. with honors./
rise in the world
See: COME UP IN THE WORLD.
rise to
{v.} To succeed in doing what is expected by trying especially hard in or on; show that you are able to do or say what is needed or proper in or on. * /Jane was surprised ...
rise up
{v. phr.} To stage a rebellion; revolt. * /The people finally rose up and communism came to an end in Eastern Europe./
risk
See: CALCULATED RISK, RUN A RISK.
road
See: ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME, BURN UP THE ROAD, END OF THE ROAD, GET THE SHOW ON THE ROAD, HIT THE ROAD, HUG THE ROAD, MIDDLE OF THE ROAD, ON THE ROAD.
road gang
{n.} A group of men who work at road construction. * /Football players often work with road gangs during summer vacations./
road hog
{n.}, {informal} A car driver who takes more than his share of the road. * /A road hog forced John's car into the ditch./
road show
{n.} A theatrical play that is performed for a few days in one town and then moves to other towns. * /Many actors get their start in road shows./ * /The road show is ...
road sign
{n.} A sign on which there is information about a road or places; a sign with directions to drivers. * /The road sign read, "25 MPH LIMIT" but Jack drove along at fifty ...
road test
{n.} 1. A test to see if you can drive a car. * /Jim took the road test and got his driver's license last week./ 2. A test to see if a car works all right on the road. ...
roast
See: WEINER ROAST or HOT DOG ROAST.
roasting ear
{n.} An ear of corn young and tender enough to be cooked and eaten; also corn cooked on the cob. * /The scouts buried the roasting ears in the coals of their campfire./ * ...
rob Peter to pay Paul
{v. phr.} To change one duty or need for another; take from one person or thing to pay another. * /Bill owed Sam a dollar, so he borrowed another from Joe to pay Sam ...
rob the cradle
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have dates with or marry a person much younger than yourself. * /When the old woman married a young man, everyone said she was robbing the ...
rob the till
or[have one's hand in the till] {v. phr.}, {informal} To steal money in your trust or for which you are responsible. * /The supermarket manager suspected that ...
robbery
See: HIGHWAY ROBBERY.
robin
See: ROUND ROBIN.
rock
See: HAVE ROCKS IN ONE'S HEAD, ON THE ROCKS.
rock and roll
See: ROCK 'N' ROLL.
rock hound
{n.}, {slang} A person who studies and collects rocks for a hobby. * /Many young rock hounds grow up to be geologists./ * /Tony is an eager rock hound, and we have ...
rock the boat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make trouble and risk losing or upsetting something; cause a disturbance that may spoil a plan. * /The other boys said that Henry was ...
rock'n'roll
or[rock and roll] {n.} A style of popular music with heavily accented rhythm. * /Rock'n'roll appeals mostly to youngsters nine to sixteen years old./ * /Rock and roll became ...
rock-bottom
{n.} The lowest possible point. * /The nation's morale hit rock bottom in the hours following the president's assassination./ - Often used like an adjective, ...
rocker
See: OFF ONE'S ROCKER.
rod
See: HOT ROD.

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