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Слова на букву pull-scen (459)

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roll
See: GET THE BALL ROLLING, KEEP THE BALL ROLLING, ROCK 'N' ROLL OT ROCK AND ROLL.
roll around
{v.}, {informal} To return at a regular or usual time; come back. * /When winter rolls around, out come the skis and skates./
roll out the red carpet
{v. phr.} 1. To welcome an important guest by putting a red carpet down for him to walk on. * /They rolled out the red carpet for the Queen when she arrived in ...
roll up one's sleeves
To get ready for a hard job; prepare to work hard or seriously. * /When Paul took his science examination, he saw how little he knew about science. He rolled up his ...
rolling stone gathers no moss
A person who changes jobs or where he lives often will not be able to save money or things of his own. - A proverb. * /Uncle Willie was a rolling stone that gathered no moss. ...
Roman collar
{n.} The high, plain, white collar worn by priests and clergymen. * /The man with the Roman collar is the new Episcopalian preacher./ * /Many Protestant ...
Rome
See: ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME.
Rome wasn't built in a day
Great things are not accomplished overnight; great deeds take a long time. - A proverb. * /A takes a long time to write a successful novel, but don't worry; Rome ...
roof
See: HIT THE CEILING or HIT THE ROOF, RAISE THE ROOF.
rooftop
See: SHOUT PROM THE HOUSE- TOPS or SHOUT FROM THE ROOFTOPS.
room
See: CONTROL ROOM, POWDER ROOM, UTILITY ROOM.
room and board
{n. phr.} A room for rent with meals included. * /A room alone in that country costs only $10 a day, but room and board together run $22 a day./
room clerk
or[desk clerk] {n.} A person who is responsible for assigning rooms and providing service to guests in hotels, motels, inns, etc. * /At first-class hotels, room clerks are ...
room service
{n.} Service provided to hotel guests in their rooms. Also: The hotel workers who give this service. * /We called for room service when we wanted ice./ * /Room service ...
room to
See: LIVE IN.
room with
{v. phr.} 1. To live in a furnished room with someone as a roommate without having an affair. * /I roomed with him in college for four years./ 2. To live together ...
roost
See: CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST, RULE THE ROOST.
root
See: TAKE ROOT.
root for
{v. phr.} To cheer for; applaud; support. * /During the Olympics one usually roots for the team of one's own country./
root-bound
{adj.} 1. Having a limited amount of space for root growth. * /After seven or eight years day lilies become root-bound and will not bloom well unless they are divided./ 2. ...
rope
See: END OF ONE'S ROPE, GIVE ONE ENOUGH ROPE AND HE WILL HANG HIMSELF, ON THE ROPES, THE ROPES.
rope Into
{v.}, {informal} 1. To trick into; persuade dishonestly. * /Jerry let the big boys rope him into stealing some apples./ 2. To get (someone) to join in; persuade to ...
rope in
{v.}, {informal} 1. To use a trick to make (someone) do something; deceive; fool. * /The company ropes in high school students to sell magazine subscriptions by telling them ...
rope off
{v. phr.} To divide into sections by use of a rope. * /The police roped off the section of the street where the president was expected to jog./
rose
See: BED OF ROSES, LOOK AT THE WORLD THROUGH ROSE-COLORED GLASSES.
rose-colored glasses
See: LOOK AT THE WORLD THROUGH ROSE-COLORED GLASSES.
rotten egg
{n.}, {informal} A person whose character or way of acting is not good. * /His friends have all learned he is a rotten egg./ Often used by children in fun, as of ...
rotten to the core
{adj. phr.} 1. Thoroughly decayed or spoiled. * /This apple is inedible; it is brown and soft and rotten to the core./ 2. In total moral collapse. * /The Communist ...
rough
See: DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH.
rough diamond
See: DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH.
rough it
{v. phr.} To live like primitive people; live with little of the comfort and equipment of civilization. * /Scouts like to rough it in the woods on weekend hikes./
rough sledding
See: HARD SLEDDING.
rough up
{v.} To attack or hurt physically; treat roughly; beat. * /Three boys were sent home for a week because they roughed up a player on the visiting team./ * /While Pete was ...
rough-and-ready
{adj.} 1. Not finished in detail; not perfected; rough but ready for use now. * /We asked Mr. Brown how long it would take to drive to Chicago and his rough-and-ready answer ...
rough-and-tumble
1. {n.} Very rough, hard fighting or arguing that does not follow any rules. * /There was a rough-and-tumble on the street last night between some soldiers and sailors./ * ...
rough-shod
See: RIDE ROUGH-SHOD OVER.
roughhouse
{n.} Riotous play or commotion. * /? told the boys they can play in the attic if there is no roughhouse./
roughly speaking
{adv. phr.} Approximately; in general terms. * /Roughly speaking, about 250 people attended the annual convention of the Dictionary Society of America./
roughneck
{n.} A low, coarse fellow. * /The only boys in the neighborhood are a bunch of roughnecks, and Mrs. Smith is unhappy about the fact that her son is rapidly becoming ...
roulette
See: RUSSIAN ROULETTE.
round
See: BRING AROUND or BRING ROUND, COME ROUND, GO THE ROUNDS, MAKE ROUNDS, SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE, YEAR-ROUND.
round off
{v.} 1. To make round or curved. * /John decided to round off the corners of the table he was making so that no one would be hurt by bumping them./ 2. To change to the ...
round out
{v. phr.} To complete; make whole. * /He needs only one or two more rare compact discs to round out his collection of Vivaldi./
round robin
{n. phr.} 1. Something written, especially a request or protest that is signed by a group of people. - Often used like an adjective. * /The people in our neighborhood are ...
round the clock
See: AROUND THE CLOCK.
round trip
{n.} A return trip; passage to a place and back. * /The ticket agent explained that a ticket for a round trip to Hawaii at certain times of the year may cost less ...
round up
{v.} 1. To bring together (cattle or horses). * /Cowboys round up their cattle in the springtime to brand the new calves./ 2. {informal} To collect; gather. * /Dave rounded ...
round-eyed
or[wide-eyed] also[large-eyed] {adj.} Very much surprised; astonished; awed. * /The people were round-eyed when they learned what the computer could do./ * /The children ...
rounds
See: GO THE ROUNDS.
roundup
{n.} A muster; an inspection; a gathering together. * /The farmer and his son decided to hold a major roundup of all their cattle to see that none had been stolen by the ...
row
See: HARD ROW TO HOE or TOUGH ROW TO HOE, HOE ONE'S OWN ROW, SKID ROW.
royal road
{n. phr.} A quick means of accomplishment; an easy path. * /There is no royal road to learning in order to obtain a university degree./
rub down
{v. phr.} 1. To dry the body of (an animal or person) by rubbing. * /Stablemen rub down a horse after a race./ 2. To rub and press with the fingers on the body of (a ...
rub elbows
also[rub shoulders] {v. phr.} To be in the same place (with others); meet and mix. * /City people and country people, old and young, rub elbows at the horse show./ * /On a ...
rub it in
{v. phr.}, {slang} To remind a person again and again of an error or short-coming; tease; nag. * /Jerry was already unhappy because he fumbled the ball, but his teammates kept ...
rub off
{v.} 1. To remove or be removed by rubbing; erase. * /The teacher rubs the problem off the chalkboard./ * /After Ann shook hands with the president, she would not shake hands ...
rub out
{v.}, {slang} To destroy completely; kill; eliminate. * /The gangsters rubbed out four policemen before they were caught./ * /The gangsters told the storekeeper that if he ...
rub salt into one's wounds
{v. phr.}, {informal} To deliberately add pain when one feels shame, regret, or defeat. * /Must you rub salt into my wounds by telling me how much fun I missed by not going ...
rub shoulders
See: RUB ELBOWS.
rub the wrong way
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make (someone) a little angry; do something not liked by (someone); annoy; bother. * /John's bragging rubbed the other boys the wrong way./ * ...
rub up against
{v. phr.} To come into contact with. * /In that business one naturally has to rub up against all kinds of people./
rub up to
{v. phr.} To do nice things for one; flatter a person; gain attention or rewards. * /Mona has the ability to rub up to the right kinds of people, so it's no wonder she is ...
rub-a-dub
{n.} The sound made by beating a drum. * /We heard a great rub-a-dub as the parade marched into view./
rubber check
{n.}, {informal} A check written without enough money in the bank to make it good. * /Bill got into trouble when he paid his bills with rubber checks./ * /By the time ...
rubdown
{n.} A massage. * /The chiropractor gave his patient a powerful rubdown./
ruffle feathers
or[ruffle one's feathers] {v. phr.} Insult or disturb slightly; offend. * /The author ruffled some feathers by his portrait of his hometown./
rug
See: PULL THE RUG OUT FROM UNDER, SWEEP UNDER THE RUG.
rule
See: EXCEPTION PROVES THE RULE, GROUND RULE.
rule of thumb
{n. phr.} A simple and practical method that has proven successful or useful in the past. * /It is a very good rule of thumb to look up all unfamiliar words in a good ...
rule out
{v.} 1. To say that (something) must not be done; not allow; also: decide against. * /The principal ruled out dances on school nights./ * /The play was ruled out by the ...
rule the roost
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be leader or boss; be in charge. * /Jim is very bossy; he always wants to rule the roost./ * /Who rules the roost in the Smith's house?/ ...
run
See: BLOOD RUNS COLD, END RUN, CUT AND RUN, FIRST-RUN, HOME RUN, IN THE LONG RUN, IN THE RUNNING, ON THE RUN, OUT OF THE RUNNING, SECOND-RUN.
run a risk
or[take a risk] {v. phr.} To be open to danger or loss; put yourself in danger; be unprotected. * /A baseball umpire wears a mask and chest protector so he won't run ...
run a temperature
{v. phr.} To have a body temperature that is above normal; have a fever. * /Jimmy didn't look ill, although he was running a temperature./ * /We took the baby to the ...
run a tight ship
{v. phr.} To run an organization with a firm hand, with strict rules and regulations. * /Our dean of the college runs a very tight ship; he tolerates no mistakes./
run across
See: COME ACROSS(1).
run after
or[chase after] {v.} 1. To try to find; look for; hunt. * /The Dramatic Club has to run all over town after things for setting the stage when it puts on a play./ 2. ...
run along
{v.} To go away; leave. * /Joan said she had errands to do and must run along./
run around
or[chase around] {v.}, {informal} To go to different places for company and pleasure; be friends. * /Tim hasn't been to a dance all year; with school work and his job, he ...
run around in circles
{v. phr.} To waste time in repetitious movements; be confused. * /There was such a crowd in the lobby that I ran around in circles trying to find my group./
run away
or[run off] {v.} To leave and not plan to come back; go without permission; escape. * /Many times Tommy said he would run away from home, but he never did./ * /The guards in ...
run away with
{v.} 1a. To take quickly and secretly, especially without permission; steal. * /A thief ran away with Grandma's silver teapot./ Syn.: MAKE OFF. 1b. To go away with; elope. ...
run circles around
also[run rings around] {v. phr.} To show that you can do a task much better than; do better than (someone) very easily. * /In spelling, Ruth could run circles around ...
run down
{v.} (stress on "down") 1. To crash against and knock down or sink. * /Jack rode his bicycle too fast and almost ran down his little brother./ * /It was so foggy that the ...
run dry
{v. phr.} To dry up; lose the water content. * /After many years of use, our well ran dry./
run errands
{v. phr.} To carry messages or perform similar minor tasks. * /Peter runs errands for our entire neighborhood to make some extra money./
run for it
or[make a run for it] {v. phr.} To dash for safety; make a speedy escape. * /The bridge the soldiers were on started to fall down and they had to run for it./ * /The ...
run for one's money
{n. phr.} 1. A good fight; a hard struggle. - Usually used with "give" or "get". * /Our team didn't win the game, but they gave the other team a run for their money./ 2. ...
run in
{v. phr.} 1. {informal} To take to jail; arrest. * /The policeman ran the man in for peddling without a license./ 2. To make a brief visit. * /The neighbor boy ran in for ...
run in the blood
or[run in the family] {v. phr.} To be a common family characteristic; be learned or inherited from your family. * /A great interest in gardening runs in his family./ * /Red ...
run into
{v.} 1. To mix with; join with. * /If the paint brush is too wet, the red paint will run into the white on the house./ * /This small brook runs into a big river in the ...
run into a brick wall
or[run into a stone wall] See: STONE WALL.
run into the ground
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To do or use (something) more than is wanted or needed. * /It's all right to borrow my hammer once in a while, but don't run it into the ...
run its course
{v. phr.} To fulfill a normal development; terminate a normal period. * /Your flu will run its course; in a few days you'll be back on your feet./
run of luck
{n. phr.} A period of good luck. * /I had a run of luck last Saturday when I went fishing and caught seven big trout within one hour./
run off
{v. phr.} 1. To produce with a printing press or duplicating machine. * /The print shop ran off a thousand copies of the newspaper./ 2. To drive away. * /The boys ...
run off at the mouth
{v. phr.} To talk too much; be unable to stop talking. * /"Shut up, John," our father cried. "You are always running off at the mouth."/
run out
{v.} 1a. To come to an end; be used up. * /Jerry almost got across the brook on the slippery stones but his luck ran out and he slipped and fell./ * /We'd better do our ...
run out on
{v. phr.} To leave someone in the lurch; abandon another. * /When Ted ran out on Delores, she got so angry that she sued him for divorce./
run over
{v.} 1. To be too full and flow over the edge; spill over. * /Billy forgot he had left the water on, and the tub ran over./ 2. To try or go over (something) quickly; ...
run ragged
{v. phr.} To tire out; make nervous by too much worry or work. * /Trying to keep up with too many clubs, sports, and activities in addition to his homework ran Tom ...
run rings around
See: RUN CIRCLES AROUND.
run riot
{v. phr.} 1. To act freely or wildly; not control yourself. * /The monkey got out of his cage and ran riot in the pet shop./ * /John let his imagination run riot, ...
run scared
{v. phr.} To expect defeat, as in a political campaign. * /The one-vote defeat caused him to run scared in every race thereafter./
run short
{v. phr.} 1. To not have enough. * /Bob asked Jack to lend him five dollars because he was running short./ * /We are running short of sugar./ Compare: RUN OUT. 2. To be not ...
run that by me again!
{v. phr.}, {informal command} Repeat what you just said, as I couldn't understand you. * /"Run that by me again," he cried. "This telephone connection is very bad."/
run the gauntlet
also[gantlet] {v. phr.} 1. To be made to run between two lines of people facing each other and be hit by them with clubs or other weapons. * /Joe had to run the gauntlet ...
run through
{v.} 1. To make a hole through, especially with a sword; pierce. * /The pirate was a good swordsman, but the hero finally ran him through./ 2. To spend recklessly; ...
run to
{v. phr.} To approximate; reach. * /It has been estimated that the casualties will run to over 300,000 killed by cholera and starvation in the crowded refugee camps./
run to seed
See: GO TO SEED.
run true to form
{v. phr.} To follow a usual way; act as expected; agree with how a person usually acts. * /The little boy's actions ran true to form. He bothered his mother until ...
run up
{v. phr.} 1. To add to the amount of; increase. * /Karl ran up a big bill at the bookstore./ 2. To put together or make hastily; sew quickly together. * /Jill ran up a ...
run up against
See: UP AGAINST.
run wild
{v. phr.} To be or go out of control. * /The students ran wild during spring vacation./ * /The new supervisor lets the children run wild./ * /The violets are running ...
run with the hare and hunt (ride) with the hounds
{v. phr.} To appear to support both parties in a conflict; to conduct things in ambiguous ways. * /Critics accused the king of running with the hare and hunting with ...
run-down
{adj.} (stress on "run") In poor health or condition; weak or needing much work. * /Grandma caught a cold because she was very run-down from loss of sleep./ * /The ...
run-in
{n.} 1. A traffic accident. * /My car was wrecked when I had a run-in with a small truck./ 2. A violent quarrel. * /John had a nasty run-in with his boss and was fired./
run-of-the-mill
or[run-of-the-mine] {adj.} Of a common kind; ordinary; usual. * /Frank is a very good bowler, but Joe is just run-of-the-mill./ * /It was just a run-of-the-mine ...
run-off
{n.} A second election held to determine the winner when the results of the first one were inconclusive. * /The senatorial race was so close that the candidates will have to ...
runner-up
{n.} The person who finishes second in a race or contest; the one next after the winner. * /Tom won the race and Jack was runner-up./ * /Joan was runner-up in ...
running commentary
{n. phr.} A continual series of remarks. * /My chiropractor gives me a running commentary on the health care debate while he is giving me a rubdown./
running start
{n. phr.} Good progress at the beginning. * /The team was off to a running start, having won the first two games./ * /Contributions of $5000 before the drive began gave ...
rush
See: BUM'S RUSH.
Russian roulette
{n.} A game of chance in which one bullet is placed in a revolver, the cartridge cylinder is spun, and the player aims the gun at his own head and pulls the trigger. * ...
rust away
{v. phr.} To disappear gradually through the process of rust or corrosion. * /If you refuse to paint those metal bars on the window, they will soon rust away./
rustproof
{adj.} Free from rusting or corrosion; permeated with anti-rust chemical agents. * /My new watch is rustproof and waterproof and I can wear it while swimming or taking a ...
saber rattling
or[sword rattling] {n.} A show of military strength usually to frighten; a threat of military force. * /The dictator marched his troops and tanks along the border ...
sack
See: GET THE SACK at GET THE BOUNCE(2), GIVE THE SACK at GIVE THE BOUNCE(2), HIT THE HAY or HIT THE SACK, LEAVE HOLDING THE BAG or LEAVE HOLDING THE SACK.
sacred cow
{n.} A person or thing that is never criticized, laughed at, or insulted even if it deserves such treatment. * /Motherhood is a sacred cow to most politicians./ * ...
sacrifice fly
{n.} A baseball hit high in the air that helps a runner score after it is caught. * /Mantle drove in two runs with a single and a sacrifice fly./
saddle
See: IN THE SADDLE.
saddle shoe
{n.} A white shoe with a black or brown piece of leather shaped like a saddle across the top of the shoe. * /Mary wore bobby socks and saddle shoes./
saddled with
{adj. phr.} Burdened with; handicapped. * /The business was so saddled with debt that the new owner had a hard time making a go of it for a couple of years./
safe
See: PLAY SAFE.
safe and sound
{adj. phr.} Not harmed; not hurt; safe and not damaged. * /The package arrived safe and sound./ * /The children returned from their trip safe and sound./ Compare: ...
safety blitz
{n.} A defensive play in football in which the defensive safety man makes a quick run to tackle the offensive quarterback. * /Bob's safety blitz kept Tom from ...
safety glass
{n.} Two panes of glass with a sheet of plastic between them so that the glass will not break into pieces. * /Safety glass is used in cars because it does not break ...
safety in numbers
{n. phr.} Protection against trouble by being in a group. * /Peter said, "Stay in a group; there is safety in numbers."/
safety island
or[safety zone] {n.} A raised area in a highway or road to be used only by people walking. * /John was half-way across the street when the light changed. He stayed on ...
sail
See: SET SAIL, RAKE THE WIND OUT OF ONE'S SAILS.
sail (right) through
{v. phr.} To conclude easily and rapidly; finish something. * /The bright young man sailed through the bar exam in record time./
sail close to the wind
{v. phr.} To be on the borderline between legality and illegality. * /The wealthy tycoon sailed close to the wind during Prohibition./
sail into
{v.}, {informal} 1. To attack with great strength; begin hitting hard. * /George grabbed a stick and sailed into the dog./ Compare: LAY INTO, PITCH INTO. 2. To ...
sail under false colors
{v. phr.} 1. To sail a ship, often pirate, under the flag of another country. * /The pirate ship flew the American flag until it got near, then raised the black ...
sailor collar
{n.} A large square collar like those worn by sailors. * /Little Timmy's suit has a sailor collar./ * /Mary's blouse has a sailor collar./
sake
See: FOR ONE'S SAKE.
salad days
{n. phr.}, {informal} The period of one's youth; a period of inexperience. * /He was silly and immature during his salad days in high school./
sale
See: NO DEAL or NO SALE, ON SALE, WHITE SALE.
sales check
or[sales slip] {n.} A paper which the clerk gives the person who bought something; a paper that shows what you bought in a store and how much you paid for it. * /Mrs. Smith ...
sales talk
{n.} A speech made to point out all the good reasons why the sale would help someone who might buy the product. * /Mrs. Goldsmith gave the man a good sales talk about the ...
Salisbury steak
{n.} A broiled or fried hamburger patty sometimes containing eggs, milk, bread crumbs, and seasoning. * /James ordered a Salisbury steak for lunch./
salt
See: BACK TO THE SALT MINES, TAKE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT also TAKE WITH A PINCH OF SALT, WORTH ONE'S SALT.
salt away
{v.}, {informal} To save (money) for the future. * /Every week Joe salts away half of his pay./
salt of the earth
{n. phr.}, {informal} One who helps to make society good and wholesome; a basically good or valuable person. * /Everyone here considers Syd and Susan the salt of the ...
salt pork
{n.} Very fat pork that has been packed in salt or dipped in brine for curing. * /Mother cooked beans with salt pork for supper./
same
See: AT THE SAME TIME, ALL THE SAME, or JUST THE SAME, IN THE SAME BREATH, LIGHTNING NEVER STRIKES TWICE IN THE SAME PLACE, ONE AND THE SAME.
same here
{informal} And it is the same with me; and the same for me. - Used only in speech. * /Mary ordered an ice cream soda, and Jill said, " Same here."/ * /Tom said he was too ...
sand
See: HIDE ONE'S HEAD IN THE SAND.
sand lot
{n.} A field, vacant lot, or other open place used as a sports playing field, usually by younger teams or by amateurs who can't afford to use anything better. * ...
sand trap
{n.} A low place on a golf course that is filled with sand to stop the ball. * /The golfer lost four strokes trying to get the ball out of the sand trap./
sand-lot
{adj.} Of the kind seen on sand lots; not professional. * /The professional football team was so confused by their opponents' fast play that they acted like a bunch of ...
sandwich board
{n.} Two advertising signs worn by a man, one on his chest and the other on his back. * /The man walking along Main Street wore a sandwich board saying "Eat at Joe's."/ ...
sauce
See: HIT THE SAUCE.
save face
{v. phr.} To save your good reputation, popularity, or dignity when something has happened or may happen to hurt you; hide something that may cause you shame. * /The ...
save for a rainy day
See: RAINY DAY.
save one's breath
{v. phr.}, {informal} To keep silent because talking will not help; not talk because it will do no good. * /Save your breath; the boss will never give you the day off./ ...
save one's neck
or[save one's skin] {v. phr.}, {slang} To save from danger or trouble. * /The fighter planes saved our skins while the army was landing from the ships./ * /Betty saved ...
save the day
{v. phr.} To bring about victory or success, especially when defeat is likely. * /The forest fire was nearly out of control when suddenly it rained heavily and saved ...
save up
{v. phr.} To put away for future use; keep as savings; save. * /John was saving up for a new bicycle./ * /Mary saved up pieces of cloth to make a quilt./
saving grace
{n. phr.} A single good attribute; a redeeming quality. * /Felicity is not very attractive but her intelligence and wit are her saving grace./
savings account
{n.} An account in a bank, where people put money to save it, and the bank uses the money and pays interest every year. * /If you leave your money in your savings account ...
savings bond
{n.} A government certificate given for money and saved for a number of years so that the government will pay back the money with interest. * /Mary bought a $25 savings ...
saw wood
also {Southern}[saw gourds] {v. phr.}, {slang} To breathe loudly through the nose while sleeping; snore. * /John was sawing wood./ * /In Alabama a boy who snores saws ...
sawed-off
{adj.}, {informal} Shorter than usual; small of its kind. * /The riot police carried sawed-off shotguns./ * /Jimmy was a sawed-off, skinny runt./
say
See: DARE SAY, GO WITHOUT SAYING, I'LL SAY, NEVER SAY DIE, NOT TO MENTION or TO SAY NOTHING OF, STRANGE TO SAY, THAT IS or THAT IS TO SAY, YOU DON'T SAY, YOU SAID IT ...
say a mouthful
1. {v. phr.}, {slang} To say something of great importance or meaning; say more by a sentence than the words usually mean. - Usually in past tense. * /Tom said a mouthful ...
say one's peace
or[speak one's piece] {v. phr.} To say openly what you think; say, especially in public, what you usually say or are expected to say. * /John told the boss that he thought ...
say the word
{v. phr.}, {informal} To say or show that you want something or agree to something; show a wish, willingness, or readiness; give a sign; say yes; say so. * /Just say ...
say uncle
also[cry uncle] {v. phr.}, {informal} To say that you surrender; admit that you have lost; admit a defeat; give up. * /Bob fought for five minutes, but he had to say ...
say-so
{n.} Approval; permission; word. * /Father got angry because I took his new car out without his say-so./
says who
or[says you] {v. phr.}, {slang} I don't believe or accept that. - An expression of rebuff often used to make fun of someone or oppose him. * /"I am the strongest boy ...
scale
See: TO SCALE.
scale down
{v.} To make smaller or less; decrease. * /John scaled down each boy's share of food after a bear robbed the camp./ * /Tom built a scaled down model of the plane./ Compare: ...
scandal sheet
{n.} A newspaper that prints much shocking news and scandal. * /Bob wanted to find out who won the election, but he could find only a scandal sheet./ * /The scandal sheet ...
scarcely any
See: HARDLY ANY.
scarcely ever
See: HARDLY EVER.
scare away
or[off] {v. phr.} To cause to flee; frighten away. * /Jake is a confirmed bachelor; the best way to scare him off is to start talking about marriage./
scare out of one's wits
or[scare stiff] or[scare the daylights out of] {v. phr.}, {informal} To frighten very much. * /The owl's hooting scared him out of his wits./ * /The child was scared stiff ...
scare to death
See: TO DEATH.
scare up
or[scrape up] {v.}, {informal} To find, collect, or get together with some effort when needed. * /The boy scared up enough money to go to college./ * /"Will you stay for ...
scaredy-cat
or[scared-cat] See: FRAIDY-CAT.
scene
See: BEHIND THE SCENES.
scent
See: THROW OFF THE SCENT.

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