Слова на букву sche-so b (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву sche-so b (459)

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schedule
See: ON SCHEDULE.
scheme
See: COLOR SCHEME.
school
See: TELL TALES OUT OF SCHOOL.
school of hard knocks
{n. phr.} Life outside of school or college; life out in the world; the ordinary experience of learning from work and troubles. * /He never went to high school; ...
score
See: SETTLE A SCORE also WIPE OUT AN OLD SCORE, THE SCORE.
scot-free
{adj. phr.} Without punishment; completely free. * /In spite of his obvious guilt, the jury acquitted him and he got off scot-free./
scotch broth
{n.} A thick barley soup with vegetables and mutton or beef. * /Mother cooked a hearty scotch broth for dinner./
Scott
See: GREAT GODFREY or GREAT SCOTT.
scout
See: GOOD EGG or GOOD SCOUT.
scout around
{v. phr.} To search for; look around. * /When we first came to town, we had to scout around for a suitable apartment./
scrape
See: BOW AND SCRAPE.
scrape the bottom of the barrel
{v. phr.}, {informal} To use or take whatever is left after the most or the best has been taken; accept the leftovers. * /At first they took out quarters, but they had ...
scrape together
{v. phr.} To quickly assemble, usually from scanty ingredients. * /We were so hungry we had to scrape together some lunch from all kinds of frozen leftovers./
scrape up
See: SCARE UP.
scratch
See: FROM SCRATCH, PUT ONE'S MONEY ON A SCRATCHED HORSE, UP TO PAR or UP TO SCRATCH.
scratch around for
{v. phr.} To search randomly for something. * /If you scratch around for a more reliable used car, maybe you'll feel more confident on the road./
scratch one's back
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something kind and helpful for someone or to flatter him in the hope that he will do something for you. Usually used in the expression "You ...
scratch the surface
{v. phr.} To learn or understand very little about something. - Usually used with a limiting adverb (as " only", "hardly"). * /We thought we understood Africa but when we ...
scream bloody murder
{v. phr.}, {informal} To yell or protest as strongly as one can. * /When the thief grabbed her purse, the woman screamed bloody murder./ * /When the city doubled property ...
screen test
{n.} A short movie made to see if an actor or actress is good enough or the right one to play a part. * /Ellen acted well on the stage, but she failed her screen test./
screw
See: HAVE A SCREW LOOSE, PUT ON THE SCREWS.
screw around
{v. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To hang around idly without accomplishing anything, to loaf about, to beat or hack around. * /You guys are no longer welcome here; all you ...
screw up
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {semi-vulgar}, {best avoided} 1. To make a mess of, to make an error which causes confusion. * /The treasurer screwed up the accounts of the Society ...
screw up one's courage
or[pluck up one's courage] {v. phr.} To force yourself to be brave. * /The small boy screwed up his courage and went upstairs in the dark./ * /When his father came home ...
screw-up
{n.} A mistake; an error; a confusing mess. * /"What a screw-up!" the manager cried, when he realized that the bills were sent to the wrong customers./
screws
See: TIGHTEN THE SCREWS.
scrimmage
See: LINE OF SCRIMMAGE.
scrounge around
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To search for an object aimlessly without having one clearly in mind. * /I don't know what's the matter with him, he is just scrounging around all ...
sea
See: AT SEA, BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA, HIGH SEAS, NOT THE ONLY FISH IN THE SEA, PUT TO SEA.
sea legs
{n. phr.} 1. Adjustment to being in a boat that is rocking on the sea. * /This is my first transatlantic trip so give me a day to get my sea legs before you make me ...
seam
See: BURST AT THE SEAMS.
search
See: IN SEARCH OF.
search me
{informal} I don't know; how should I know? - May be considered rude. * /When I asked her what time it was, she said, " Search me, I have no watch."/
search one's heart
or[search one's soul] {v. phr.}, {formal} To study your reasons and acts; try to discover if you have been fair and honest. * /The teacher searched his heart trying to decide ...
search out
{v.} To search for and discover; find or learn by hunting. * /The police were trying to search out the real murderer./
search with a fine-tooth comb
See: FINE-TOOTH COMB.
season
See: HIGH SEASON, IN SEASON, LOW SEASON, OUT OF SEASON.
seat
See: BACK SEAT DRIVER, FLY BY THE SEAT OF ONE'S PANTS, HOT SEAT, JUDGMENT SEAT, TAKE A BACK SEAT.
seat belt
{n.} A strong strap used to protect a person in a moving car or other vehicle by holding him in his seat. * /When the plane began to land, Billy and his mother ...
second
See: PLAY SECOND PIDDLE, SPLIT SECOND.
second best
{n.} Something that is lower than or not quite as good as the best. * /Tom liked the deluxe model bicycle; but he could afford only a second best./ * /Joan chose the ...
second childhood
{n. phr.} Senility; dotage. * /"Grandpa is in his second childhood; we must make allowances for him at the dinner table," my mother said, as Grandpa dropped food all over ...
second class
{n.} 1. The second best or highest group; the class next after the first. * /Joe was good enough in arithmetic to be put in the second class but was not good enough for ...
second cousin
{n.} A child of your father's or mother's first cousin. * /Mary and Jane are second cousins./
second nature
{n.} Something done without any special effort, as if by natural instinct. * /Cutting tall trees has become second nature to the experienced lumberjack./
second sight
{n. phr.} Intuition; prescience; clairvoyance. * /Some police departments employ psychics to find missing persons or objects as they are said to have second sight./
second thought
{n.} A change of ideas or opinions resulting from more thought or study. * /Your second thoughts are very often wiser than your first ideas./ * /We decided to climb the ...
second to none
{adj. phr.} Excellent; first rate; peerless. * /Our new State University campus is second to none. There is no need to pay all that high tuition at a private college./ ...
second wind
also[second breath] {n.} 1. The easier breathing that follows difficult breathing when one makes a severe physical effort, as in running or swimming./ * /After the first ...
second-best
{adj.} Next to best; second in rank. * /Mary wore her second-best dress./ * /Bob was the second-best player on the team./ * /"I am the second-best student in this school ...
second-class(1)
{adj.} 1. Belonging in the class that is next to the highest or next best. * /He was only a second-class math student./ * /His parents traveled as second-class passengers on ...
second-class(2)
{adv.} By second class. * /We went second-class on the train to New York./ * /I mailed the newspaper second-class./
second-guess
{v. phr.} 1. To criticize another's decision with advantage of hindsight. * /The losing team's coach is always second-guessed./ 2. To guess what someone else ...
second-rate
{adj.} Of mediocre or inferior quality. * /The movie received a bad review; it was second-rate at best./
second-run
{adj.} Of a movie: Shown in many movie theaters before, and allowed to be shown later in other movie theaters. * /Tickets to second-run movies cost much less./
secondhand
{adj.} Used; not new; preowned. * /Sometimes a secondhand car is just as reliable as a brand new one./
secret
See: IN SECRET, OPEN SECRET.
section gang
or[section crew] {n.} A group of railroad workers who watch and repair a number of miles of track. * /The section crew was called out to fix the broken bridge./
section hand
{n.} A worker who repairs railway track; one of the men in a section gang. * /The section hands moved off the track while the train went by./
security blanket
{n.}, {slang}, {colloquial} An idea, person, or object that one holds on to for psychological reassurance or comfort as infants usually hang on to the edge of a pillow, ...
see
See: CAN'T SEE THE WOODS FOR THE TREES, LET ME SEE or LET'S SEE.
see a lot of
{v. phr.} To go out regularly with someone; have an affair with someone. * /They have been seeing a lot of each other lately./
see about
{v.} 1. To find out about; attend to. * /If you are too busy, I'll see about the train tickets./ 2. {informal} To consider; study. * /I cannot take time now but I'll see ...
see after
See: LOOK AFTER.
see better days
{v. phr.} 1. To enjoy a better or happier life. * /Mr. Smith is poor now, but he will see better days./ 2. To become old, damaged, or useless. Used in the perfect tense. * ...
see beyond one's nose
or[see beyond the end of one's nose] {v. phr.} To make wise judgments about questions of importance to yourself and others; act with farseeing understanding. Used in ...
see daylight
{v. phr.}, {informal} To know that an end or success is near. * /We thought we would never finish building the house, but now we can see daylight./ * /Sarah thought it ...
see eye to eye
{v. phr.} To agree fully; hold exactly the same opinion. * /Though we did not usually agree, we saw eye to eye in the matter of reducing taxes./ * /Jim did not see eye ...
see fit
or[think fit] {v. phr.} To decide that an action is necessary, wise, or advisable; choose. * /Jim asked "Dad, what time should I come home after the dance?" His father ...
see how the land lies
{v. phr.}, {informal} To reconnoiter; investigate. * /Before going there in person to ask for a job, you had better see how the land lies and who does what./ Compare: ...
see into
{v.} To know or understand the real nature or meaning of. * /Suddenly the teacher saw into Linda's strange actions./
see off
{v.} To go to say or wave goodbye to. * /His brother went to the train with him to see him off./ * /When Marsha flew to Paris, Flo saw her off at the airport./
see one home
{v. phr.} To walk a person home. * /"Let me see you home, dear," Nick said to Jenny at the end of the party./
see one's way clear
{v. phr.} To know no reason for not doing something; feel that you are free. * /John finally saw his way clear to help his friends./ * /Mary had to do her homework ...
see out
{v.} 1. To go with to an outer door. * /A polite man sees his company out after a party./ 2. To stay with and finish; not quit. * /Pete's assignment was hard but he saw it ...
see reason
{v. phr.} To think or act sensibly, especially after realizing what the facts are on a certain matter and accepting advice about it. * /He finally saw reason and reshaped his ...
see red
{v. phr.}, {informal} To become very angry. * /Whenever anyone teased John about his weight, he saw red. /
see service
{v. phr.} 1. To be used over a considerable period of time. * /This old camera of mine has already seen six years of service./ 2. To serve in a military sense. * ...
see stars
{v. phr.}, {informal} To imagine you are seeing stars as a result of being hit on the head. * /When Ted was hit on the head by the ball, he saw stars./ * /The boxer's head ...
see the last of
{v. phr.} To say good-bye to someone or something; get rid of something. * /We were glad to see the last of the winter./
see the beat
See: HEAR THE BEAT.
see the color of one's money
{v. phr.}, {informal} To know that you have money to spend. * /The realtor would not show us a house until he saw the color of our money./ * /Before I show you the ...
see the light
{v. phr.}, {informal} To understand or agree, often suddenly; accept another's explanation or decision. * /I did not approve of his action, but he explained his reason and ...
see the light at the end of the tunnel
{v. phr.}, {informal} To anticipate the happy resolution of a prolonged period of problems. * /We've been paying on our house mortgage for many years, but at long last we ...
see the light of day
{v. phr.} To be born or begun. * /The children visited the old house where their great-grandfather first saw the light of day./ * /The party was a failure, and Mathilda ...
see the sights
See: SIGHTSEE.
see things
{v. phr.}, {informal} To imagine sights which are not real; think you see what is not there. * /I had not seen him for twenty years and when we met on the street I ...
see through
{v.} 1. To understand the real meaning of or reason for; realize the falseness of. * /Mother saw through Johnny's excuses not to go to bed on Christmas Eve. She knew he ...
see to
also[look to] {v.} To attend to; take care of; do whatever needs to be done about. * /While Donna bought the theatre tickets, I saw to the parking of the car./ ...
see to it
{v. phr.} To take care; take the responsibility; make sure. - Usually used with a noun clause. * /We saw to it that the child was fed and bathed./
see with rose-colored glasses
See: LOOK AT THE WORLD THROUGH ROSE-COLORED GLASSES.
seed
See: GO TO SEED or RUN TO SEED.
seed money
{n. phr.} A small grant or donation for others to be able to start a new venture. * /All you need is some seed money and you can set up your own desk-top publishing firm./
seeing is believing
Seeing something is good proof. * /Bill told Joe he had passed his test, but Joe said, "Seeing is believing."/
seize on
{v.} To make use of (a happening or idea.) * /Bob seized on the rain as an excuse for missing school./
seize the opportunity
{v. phr.} To exploit a chance. * /His wealthy uncle offered to send him to Harvard and he wisely seized the opportunity./
self-conscious
{adj.} Embarrassed; shy. * /Edith has a freckled face and sometimes she is very self-conscious about it./
self-made
{adj.} Having achieved wealth, fame, and success on one's own without outside help. * /John D. Rockefeller is one of the most famous self-made men in America./
self-possessed
{adj.} Confident; sure of one self. * /Before he made his first million, he used to be shy, but afterwards he became very self-possessed./
self-seeking
{adj.} Given to egotism and self-aggrandizement. * /Al is the most self-seeking person I've ever met, he is not fun to be around./
sell down the river
{v. phr.} To give harmful information about someone or something to one's enemies; betray. * /The traitor sold his country down the river to the enemy army./ * /The criminal ...
sell off
{v. phr.} To liquidate one's holdings of certain set items. * /The retired professor had to sell off his rare butterfly collection to meet his health expenses./
sell one a bill of goods
{v. phr.} To persuade another to acquire something useless; defraud. * /We were sure sold a bill of goods when Alfred persuaded us to buy his custom-built car for which ...
sell one on
{v. phr.} To persuade someone to do something. * /We were able to sell our wealthy uncle on the idea of having a joint family vacation in Hawaii./
sell out
{v.} 1a. To sell all of a certain thing which a store has in stock. * /In the store's January white sale the sheets and pillowcases were sold out in two days./ 1b. ...
sell short
{v.} To think (a person or thing) less good or valuable than is true; underestimate. * /Don't sell the team short; the players are better than you think./ * /Some ...
sell snow to the Eskimos
{v. phr.} To sell something to people who already have a large quantity of the same or similar goods. * /My Alaskan friend said, "One of the hottest businesses in ...
sellout
{n.} 1. A betrayal or act of treason. * /The spy's behavior during the Cold War was a classical sellout./
send C.O.D.
See: C.O.D.
send off
{v. phr.} To say good-bye to someone ceremoniously. * /They sent us off to the Mainland from our first visit to Hawaii with an elaborate champagne party at the pier./
send one about one's business
{v. phr.} To dismiss someone summarily; tell one off. * /When Mrs. Atwater discovered that her daughter's French tutor was an ordinary fortune hunter, she sent him ...
send one packing
{v. phr.} To fire someone summarily. * /When the boss caught Smith stealing from the cash register, he sent him packing./ Compare: SEND ONE ABOUT ONE'S BUSINESS.
send to the minors
{v. phr.} To dismiss someone; tell them off; terminate a relationship. - A baseball term. * /"What did you do to your girlfriend?" Ernie asked Bert, when Bert started dating ...
send up
{v. phr.}, {colloquial} To sentence (someone) to prison. * /Did you know that Milton Shaeffer was sent up for fifteen years?/
send word
{v. phr.} To send notification to; advise. * /When his father fell seriously ill, we sent word to Mike to come home as quickly as possible./
send-off
{n. phr.} A demonstration of affection or respect at someone's departure, as a retirement ceremony. * /When our colleague retired after 35 years of teaching, we all got ...
senior citizen
{n.} An older person, often one who has retired from active work or employment. * /Mrs. North, the history teacher, is a senior citizen./
sense
See: COME TO ONE'S SENSES, HORSE SENSE, MAKE SENSE, OUT OF ONE'S HEAD or OUT OF ONE'S SENSES.
separate the men from the boys
{v. phr.}, {informal} To show who has strength, courage and loyalty and find who do not. * /When the ship hit an iceberg and sank, it separated the men from the boys./ ...
separate the sheep from the goats
See SEPARATE THE MEN FROM THE BOYS.
serve
See: FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.
serve a sentence
{v. phr.} To be in jail. * /Charlie served four years of an eight-year sentence, after which he was paroled and released./
serve notice
{v. phr.} 1. To notify one's employer in a formal or legal manner that one is quitting the former's employment. * /She gave notice to her boss that she was quitting because of ...
serve one right
{v. phr.} To be what (someone) really deserves as a punishment; be a fair exchange for what (someone) has done or said or failed to do or say. * /He failed his exam; it ...
serve time
See: SERVE A SENTENCE.
serve up
{v.} To prepare and serve (as a food). * /Father caught a trout and Mother served it up at dinner./
service
See: AT ONE'S SERVICE, CURB SERVICE, LIP SERVICE, OF SERVICE, ROOM SERVICE.
session
See: BULL SESSION.
set
See: GET SET.
set in one's ways
{adj. phr.} Stubborn; opinionated; unchangeable. * /My grandfather is so old and set in his ways that he'll eat nothing new./
set off
{v.} 1. To decorate through contrast; balance by difference. * /The bright colors of the birds were set off by the white snow./ * /A small gold pin set off her ...
set ablaze
{v. phr.} To cause to burn by lighting with a match or other incendiary device. * /The criminals poured gasoline on the house and set it ablaze with a small lighter./
set about
{v.} To begin; start. * /Benjamin Franklin set about teaming the printer's trade at an early age./ * /After breakfast, Mother set about her household duties./
set afire
or[set on fire] See: SET ABLAZE.
set aside
{v.} 1. To separate from the others in a group or collection. * /She set aside the things in the old trunk which she wanted to keep./ 2. To select or choose from ...
set back
{v.} 1. To cause to put off or get behind schedule; slow up; check. * /The cold weather set back the planting by two weeks./ 2. {informal} To cause to pay out or to lose ...
set back on one's heels
or[knock back on one's heels] {v. phr.}, {informal} To give an unpleasant surprise; upset suddenly; stop or turn back (someone's) progress. * /Jack brags too much and it set ...
set down
{v.} 1. To write; record. * /He set down all his important thoughts in his dairy./ * /At the beginning of his letter Dan set down the date./ Syn.: PUT DOWN. 2. To ...
set eyes on
See: LAY EYES ON.
set fire to
{v. phr.} To cause to burn; start a fire in. * /The sparks set fire to the oily rags./ Compare: CATCH FIRE.
set foot
{v. phr.} To step; walk; go. - Used with a negative. * /She would not let him set foot across her threshold./ * /She told the boy not to set foot out of the house until he ...
set forth
{v.}, {formal} 1. To explain exactly or clearly. * /The President set forth his plans in a television talk./ 2. To start to go somewhere; begin a trip. * /The troop set forth on ...
set free
{v. phr.} To liberate. * /The trapper set all the small animals free before the snowstorm hit./
set great store by
See: SET STORE BY.
set in
{v.} To begin; start; develop. * /Before the boat could reach shore, a storm had set in./ * /He did not keep the cut clean and infection set in./ * /The wind set in from ...
set loose
See: LET LOOSE(1a).
set of new threads
{n. phr.} New men's suit. * /"Nice set of new threads'" Ed said, when he saw Dave in his new tailor-made outfit./
set on
also[set upon] {v.} 1. To begin suddenly to fight against; attack fiercely. * /Tom was walking through the park when a gang of boys set on him./ 2. To cause to attack. ...
set on foot
See: ON FOOT.
set one's cap for
{v. phr.}, {informal} To attempt to win the love of or to marry. * /Usually used of a girl or woman./ * /The young girl set her cap for the new town doctor, who was a ...
set one's face against
{v. phr.}, {literary} To be very much against; strongly disapprove. * /The banker's daughter wanted to marry a poor boy, but her father set his face against it./
set one's hand to
See: PUT ONE'S HAND TO.
set one's hand to the plow
See: PUT ONE'S HAND TO THE PLOW.
set one's heart on
{v. phr.} To want very much. * /He set his heart on that bike./ also: To be very desirous of; hope very much to succeed in. - Used with a verbal noun. * /He set his heart ...
set one's house in order
See: PUT ONE'S HOUSE IN ORDER.
set one's mind at rest
{v. phr.} To relieve someone's anxieties; reassure someone. * /"Lef me set your mind at rest about the operation," Dr. Vanek said. "You'll be back on your feet in a ...
set one's mind on
{v. phr.} To be determined to; decide to. * /He has set his mind on buying an old chateau in France./
set one's sights
{v. phr.} 1. To want to reach; aim for. * /John has set his sights higher than the job he has now./ 2. To wish to get or win. * /Owen set his sights on the championship./
set one's teeth on edge
{v. phr.} 1. To have a sharp sour taste that makes you rub your teeth together. * /The lemon juice set my teeth on edge./ 2. To make one feel nervous or annoyed. * ...
set out
{v.} 1. To leave on a journey or voyage. * /The Pilgrims set out for the New World./ Compare: SET FORTH(2), SET OFF(4), START OUT. 2. To decide and begin to try; attempt. * ...
set right
{v. phr.} To discipline; correct; indicate the correct procedure. * /"Your bookkeeping is all messed up," the accountant said. "Let me set it right for you, once and for ...
set sail
{v. phr.} To begin a sea voyage; start sailing. * /The ship set sail for Europe./
set store by
{v. phr.}, {informal} To like or value; want to keep. Used with a qualifying word between "set" and " store". * /George sets great store by that old tennis racket./ * ...
set the ball rolling
See: GET THE BALL ROLLING.
set the pace
{v. phr.} To decide on a rate of speed of travel or rules that are followed by others. * /The scoutmaster set the pace so that the shorter boys would not get tired trying ...
set the stage for
{v. phr.} To prepare the way or situation for (an event); to make a situation ready for something to happen. * /The country's economic problems set the stage for a ...
set the world on fire
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do something outstanding; act in a way that attracts much attention or makes you famous. * /John works hard, but he will never set the world on ...
set to
{v.} 1. To make a serious beginning. * /Charlie took a helping of turkey, grabbed his knife and fork, and set to./ 2. To start to fight. * /One man called the other a ...
set to music
{v. phr.} To compose a musical accompaniment to verse. * /Schubert and Beethoven both set to music many a famous poem by Goethe and Schiller./
set to rights
See: PUT TO RIGHTS.
set tongues wagging
See: TONGUES WAG.
set upon
See: SET ON.
setback
{n.} A disadvantage; a delay. * /We suffered a major setback when my wife lost her job./
setting-up
{adj.} Done early in the morning to make you fresh and feel strong for the day. * /Tom jumped out of bed and did his setting-up exercises./ Compare: DAILY DOZEN.
settle a score
also[wipe out an old score] To hurt (someone) in return for a wrong or loss. * /John settled an old score with Bob by beating him./ Compare: GET BACK AT, GET EVEN.
settle down
{v.} 1. To live more quietly and sensibly; have a regular place to live and a regular job; stop acting wildly or carelessly, especially by growing up. * /John will ...
settle for
{v.} To be satisfied with (less) agree to; accept. * /Jim wanted $200 for his old car, but he settled for $100./
settle on
{v. phr.} To decide which one to choose among various alternatives. * /My parents have been debating what kind of a car to get and have finally settled on a BMW from ...
settle up
{v. phr.} To pay up; conclude monetary or other transactions. * /"Let's settle up," Carol's attorney said, when she sued Don for a hefty sum of money after their ...
setup
{v.} 1. To provide the money for the necessities for. * /When he was twenty-one, his father set him up in the clothing business./ 2. To establish; start. * /The ...
seven
See: AT SIXES AND SEVENS.
seventh heaven
{n. phr.}, {literary} The pinnacle of happiness. * /We were in seventh heaven when the helicopter flew us over the magnificent Grand Canyon./
sewed up
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Won or arranged as you wish; decided. * /They thought they had the game sewed up, but the other team won it with a touchdown in the last quarter./ ...
sexual harassment
{n. phr.} The act of constantly making unwanted advances of a sexual nature for which the offended party may seek legal redress. * /The court fined Wilbur Catwallender ...
shack up with
{v. phr.}, {slang} To move in with (someone) of the opposite sex without marrying the person. * /Did you know that Ollie and Sue aren't married? They just decided to shack up ...
shadow
See: AFRAID OF ONE'S SHADOW, EYE SHADOW.
shaggy dog (story)
{n. phr.} A special kind of joke whose long and often convoluted introduction and development delay the effect of the punch line. * /Uncle Joe only seems to bore his ...
shake
See: MORE THAN ONE COULD SHAKE A STICK AT.
shake a leg
{v. phr.}, {slang} To go fast; hurry. * /Shake a leg! The bus won't wait./ Compare: STEP ON IT.
shake down
{v. phr.} 1. To cause to fall by shaking. * /He shook some pears down from the free./ 2. {informal} To test, practice, get running smoothly (a ship or ship's crew). * ...
shake in one's shoes
or[shake in one's boots] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be very much afraid. * /The robber shook in his boots when the police knocked on his door./
shake off
{v.}, {informal} To get away from when followed; get rid of; escape from. * /A convict escaped from prison and shook off the officers trying to follow him./ * /Tom could ...
shake the dust from one's feet
{v. phr.} To depart or leave with some measure of disgust or displeasure. * /Jim was so unhappy in our small, provincial town that he was glad to shake the dust from ...
shake up
{v.}, {informal} To bother; worry; disturb. * /The notice about a cut in pay shook up everybody in the office./
shake-up
{n.} A change; a reorganization. * /After the scandal there was a major shake-up in the Cabinet./
shakedown
{n.} 1. A test. * /Let's take the new car out and give it a shakedown./ 2. An act of extorting money by threatening. * /It was a nasty shakedown, to get $500 from the old ...
shame
See: FOR SHAME, PUT TO SHAME.
shape
See: IN SHAPE, OUT OF SHAPE, TAKE SHAPE.
shape up
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To begin to act or work right; get along satisfactorily. * /If the new boy doesn't begin to shape up soon, he'll have to leave school./ * /"How is ...
shape up or ship out
{v. phr.}, {informal} To either improve one's disposition or behavior, or quit or leave. * /When Paul neglected to carry out his part of the research work ...
sharp
See: LOOK SHARP.
sharp as a tack
{adj. phr.} 1. Very neatly and stylishly dressed * /That new boy always looks sharp as a tack in class./ 2. Very intelligent; smart; quick-witted. * /Tom is sharp as a ...
shed light on
or upon See: CAST LIGHT ON; THROW LIGHT ON.
sheep
See: WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING.
sheepskin
{n.} Diploma. * /Dr. Miller has half a dozen different sheepskins hanging on the wall of his office./
sheet
See: SCANDAL SHEET, THREE SHEETS IN THE WIND or THREE SHEETS TO THE WIND.
shelf
See: ON THE SHELF.
shell
See: IN ONE'S SHELL or INTO ONE'S SHELL, OUT OF ONE'S SHELL.
shell out
{v.}, {informal} To pay or spend. * /Dick had to shell out a lot of money for his new car./
shift for oneself
{v. phr.} To live or act independently with no help, guidance or protection from others; take care of yourself. * /Mrs. McCarthy was forced to shift for herself after ...
shine
See: RAIN OR SHINE, TAKE A SHINE TO.
shine up to
{v.}, {slang} To try to please; try to make friends with. * /Smedley shines up to all the pretty girls./
shingle
See: HANG OUT ONE'S SHINGLE.
ship
See: GIVE UP THE SHIP, LANDING SHIP.
ship come in
All the money a person has wished for is received; wealth comes to a person. Used with a possessive. * /When my ship comes in, I will take a trip to Norway./ * /Mr. Brown ...
ship out
{v.} To begin a journey; leave. * /The army group shipped out for the Far East today./
shipshape
{adj.} In perfect condition; in good order. * /After we left the islands, we left the rented car shipshape for the next driver./
shirk one's duty
{v. phr.} To be negligent or irresponsible. * /If you continue to shirk your duty, you can expect to be fired./
shirt
See: GIVE THE SHIRT OFF ONE'S BACK, KEEP ONE'S SHIRT ON, LOSE ONE'S SHIRT.
shoe
See: COMFORTABLE AS AN OLD SHOE, COMMON AS AN OLD SHOE, FILL ONE'S SHOES, IF THE SHOE FITS, WEAR IT, IN ONE'S SHOES, SHAKE IN ONE'S SHOES, SADDLE SHOE, STEP INTO ONE'S ...
shoe on the other foot
The opposite is true; places are changed. * /He was my captain in the army but now the shoe is on the other foot./
shoestring
See: ON A SHOESTRING.
shoestring catch
{n.} A catch of a hit baseball just before it hits the ground. * /The left fielder made a shoestring catch of a line drive to end the inning./
shoo away
{v. phr.} To frighten or chase away. * /When the children gathered around the new sports car, we shooed them away./
shoo-in
{n.}, {informal} Someone or something that is expected to win; a favorite; sure winner. * /Chris is a shoo-in to win a scholarship./ * /Do you think he will win ...
shoot questions at
{v. phr.} To interrogate rapidly and vigorously. * /The attorney for the prosecution shot one question after another at the nervous witness./
shoot a line
See: DROP A LINE.
shoot ahead of
or[past] or[through] or[alongside of] {v. phr.} To move or drive ahead rapidly. * /As we had to slow down before the tunnel, a red sports car shot ahead of us./
shoot from the hip
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To fire a gun held at the hip without aiming by aligning the barrel with one's eye. * /In many Western movies the heroic sheriff defeats the ...
shoot off one's mouth
or[shoot off one's face] {v. phr.}, {slang} To give opinions without knowing all the facts; talk as if you know everything. * /Tom has never been to Florida, but he's ...
shoot one's wad
{v. phr.} {slang}, {colloquial} 1. To spend all of one's money. * /We've shot our wad for the summer and can't buy any new garden furniture./ 2. To say everything that is on ...
shoot out
{v.} 1. To fight with guns until one person or side is wounded or killed; settle a fight by shooting. - Used with "it". * /The cornered bank robbers decided to shoot it out ...
shoot straight
or[shoot square] {v.}, {informal} To act fairly; deal honestly. * /You can trust that salesman; he shoots straight with his customers./ * /We get along well because we ...
shoot the breeze
or[bat the breeze] or[fan the breeze] or [shoot the bull] {v. phr.}, {slang} To talk. * /Jim shot the breeze with his neighbor while the children were playing./ * /Come ...
shoot the works
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To spare no expense or effort; get or give everything. * /Billy shot the works when he bought his bicycle; he got a bell, a light, a basket, and ...
shoot up
{v.} 1. To grow quickly. * /Billy had always been a small boy, but when he was thirteen years old he began to shoot up./ 2. To arise suddenly. * /As we watched, flames ...
shop
See: CLOSE UP SHOP, TALK SHOP.
shop around for
{v. phr.} To make the rounds of various commercial establishments in order to find the most economical answer for one's needs. * /We've been shopping around ...
shoplifter
{n.} A thief who steals things from a store. * /The TV camera identified the shoplifter, who was then arrested and sentenced to jail./
shopping center
{n.} A place usually for neighborhood shopping, where there is a group of stores and shops inside of a large parking lot. * /There is a bowling alley at the nearest ...
shopworn
{adj.} A piece of merchandise that is offered below the usual price because it is slightly damaged or soiled. * /Although shopworn, the jacket was perfectly usable, so he ...
shore leave
{n.} Permission given to a man in the Navy to leave his ship and go where he wants for a certain length of time. * /Jim went to visit New York when he was given three ...
shore patrol
{n.} The police of a navy. * /The sailors who were fighting in town were arrested by the shore patrol./ * /The shore patrol was ordered to search every sailor who went ...
shore up
{v.} To add support to (something) where weakness is shown; make (something) stronger where support is needed; support. * /When the flood waters weakened the bridge, it ...
shorn
See: GOD TEMPERS THE WIND TO THE SHORN LAMB.
short
See: CAUGHT SHORT, FALL SHORT, FOR SHORT, IN BRIEF or IN SHORT, IN SHORT ORDER, IN SHORT SUPPLY, MAKE SHORT WORK OF, RUN SHORT, SELL SHORT, THE LONG AND THE SHORT. ...
short haul
{n.} A short distance; a short trip. * /The Scoutmaster said that it was just a short haul to the lake./ * /The man from the moving company said they did not ...
show
See: GET THE SHOW ON THE ROAD, GO TO SHOW or GO TO PROVE, ROAD SHOW, STEAL THE SHOW, TALENT SHOW, VARIETY SHOW, WHOLE CHEESE or WHOLE SHOW.
show a clean pair of heels
See: TAKE TO ONE'S HEELS.
show around
{v. phr.} To act as a host or guide to someone; to show newly arrived people or strangers what's what and where. * /When Gordon and Rose arrived in Hawaii for the first ...
show cause
{v. phr.} To give a reason or explanation. * /The judge asked the defendants to show cause why they should not be held without bail./
show in
or[out] or[up] or[to the door] {v. phr.} To usher; conduct; accompany. * /"My husband will show you in," Mary said to the guests when they arrived at the door./
show of hands
{n. phr.} An open vote during a meeting when those who vote "yes" and those who vote "no" hold up their hands to be counted. * /The chairman said, "I'd like to see a ...
show off
{v. phr.} 1. To put out nicely for people to see; display; exhibit. * /The Science Fair gave Julia a chance to show off her shell collection./ * /The girls couldn't ...
show one's colors
{v. phr.} 1. To show what you are really like. * /We thought Toby was timid, but he showed his colors when he rescued the ponies from the burning barn./ 2. To make known what ...
show one's face
{v. phr.} To be seen; appear. * /Bill is afraid to show his face since Tom threatened to beat him up./ * /Judy is a wonderful mimic but she is too shy to show her ...
show one's hand
{v. phr.} To reveal or exhibit one's true and hitherto hidden purpose. * /Only after becoming Chancellor of Germany did Adolf Hitler really show his hand and reveal that he ...
show one's teeth
{v. phr.} To show anger; show belligerence. * /He is a very mild, private person, but during a tough business negotiation he knows how to show his teeth./
show signs
See: GIVE SIGNS.
show the door
{v. phr.} To ask (someone) to go away. * /Ruth was upsetting the other children, so I showed her the door./ * /Our neighbors invited themselves to the party and ...
show up
{v.} 1. To make known the real truth about (someone). * /The man said he was a mind reader, but he was shown up as a fake./ 2. To come or bring out; become or make easy to ...
showdown
{n.} A final challenge or confrontation during which both sides have to use all of their resources. * /You cannot know a country's military strength until a final ...
showgirl
{n.} One who works as an entertainer in a bar or nightclub, musical show, etc. * /Several famous Hollywood stars actually started their careers as showgirls./
showoff
{n.} A boastful person. * /Jim always has to be the center of attention; he is an insufferable showoff./
shrift
See: SHORT SHRIFT.

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