Слова на букву sche-so b (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву sche-so b (459)

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shrink
See: HEAD SHRINKER.
shrug off
or[shrug away] {v.} To act as if you are not interested and do not care about something; not mind; not let yourself be bothered or hurt by. * /Alan shrugged off our ...
shudder to think
{v. phr.} To be afraid; hate to think about something. * /The professor is so strict I shudder to think what his final exam questions will be like./
shut
See: KEEP ONE'S MOUTH SHUT, PUT UP or SHUT UP, CLOSE ONE'S EYES.
shut down
See: CLOSE DOWN.
shut off
{v.} 1. To make (something like water or electricity) stop coming. * /Please shut off the hose before the grass gets too wet./ Compare: TURN OFF. 2. To be apart; be ...
shut one's eyes
See: CLOSE ONE'S EYES.
shut out
{v.} 1. To prevent from coming in; block. * /During World War II, Malta managed to shut out most of the Italian and German bombers by throwing up an effective anti-aircraft ...
shut the door
See: CLOSE THE DOOR.
shut up
{v.} 1. {informal} To stop talking. * /Little Ruthie told Father about his birthday surprise before Mother could shut her up./ - Often used as a command; usually considered ...
shut-eye
{n.}, {slang} Sleep. * /It's very late. We'd better get some shut-eye./ * /I'm going to get some shut-eye before the game./ Compare: FORTY WINKS.
shy
See: ONCE BITTEN, TWICE SHY and BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE.
shy away
or[shy off] {v.} To avoid; seem frightened or nervous. * /The boys shied away from our questions./ * /The horse shied off when Johnny tried to mount it./
sick
See: TAKE ILL or TAKE SICK.
sick and tired
{adj.} 1. Feeling strong dislike for something repeated or continued too long; exasperated; annoyed. * /Jane was sick and tired of always having to wait for Bill, so when ...
side
See: CHOOSE UP SIDES, FROM SIDE TO SIDE, GET UP ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE BED, GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE or GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER ON THE ...
side against
{v.} To join or be on the side that is against; disagree with; oppose. * /Bill and Joe sided against me in the argument./ * /We sided against the plan to go by ...
side by side
{adv.} 1. One beside the other in a row. * /Alice's dolls were lined up side by side on the window seat./ * /Charles and John are neighbors; they live side by side on Elm ...
side of the tracks
See: THE TRACKS.
side street
{n.} A street that runs into and ends at a main street. * /The store is on a side street just off Main Street./ * /The Spellmans bought a house on a side street that ...
side with
{v.} To agree with; help. * /Alan always sides with Johnny in an argument./ * /Gerald sided with the plan to move the club./ Contrast: SIDE AGAINST.
sidekick
{n.} A companion; a close friend of lesser status. * /Wherever you see Dr. Howell, Dr. Percy, his youthful sidekick is sure to be present as well./
sight
See: AT FIRST GLANCE or AT FIRST SIGHT, AT SIGHT or ON SIGHT, CATCH SIGHT OF, HEAVE IN SIGHT, LOSE SIGHT OF, ON SIGHT, SET ONE'S SIGHTS.
sight for sore eyes
{n. phr.}, {informal} A welcome sight. * /After our long, dusty hike, the pond was a sight for sore eyes./ * /"Jack! You're a sight for sore eyes!"/
sight unseen
{adv. phr.} Before seeing it; before seeing her, him, or them. * /Tom read an ad about a car and sent the money for it sight unseen./
sight-read
{v.} To be able to play music without memorization by reading the sheet music and immediately playing it. * /Experienced, good musicians are expected to be able to ...
sign
See: HIGH SIGN, INDIAN SIGN, ROAD SIGN.
sign in
{v.} To write your name on a special list or in a record book to show that you are present. * /Every worker must sign in when coming back to work./ * /Teachers go to the ...
sign of the times
{n. phr.} A characteristic of the times in which one lives. * /It is a sad sign of the times that all the major lakes and rivers are badly polluted and fish in them are ...
sign off
{v.} 1. To end a program on radio or television. * /That TV newscaster always signs off by saluting./ 2. To stop broadcasting for the day. * /That TV station always signs ...
sign on
{v. phr.} 1. To sign an agreement to become an employee. * /The new cowboys signed on with the wealthy rancher in Nevada./ 2. To start a radio or television broadcast. * ...
sign on the dotted line
{v. phr.} To attach one's signature on an important document, such as a contract, a bill of sales, etc. * /The seller said to the buyer, "All you need to do is sign on the ...
sign one's own death warrant
{v. phr.} To cause your own death or the loss of something you want very much. * /Mr. Carter had lung trouble, and the doctor told him he would sign his own death ...
sign out
{v.} To write your name on a special list or in a record book to show that you are leaving a place. * /Most of the students sign out on Friday./ Contrast SIGN IN.
sign over
{v.} To give legally by signing your name. * /He signed his house over to his wife./
sign up
{v.} 1. To promise to do something by signing your name; join; sign an agreement. * /We will not have the picnic unless more people sign up./ * /John wants to sign up for ...
signed, sealed, and delivered
{adj. phr.} Finished; completed; in a state of completion. * /"How is the campus renovation plan for the governor's office coming along?" the dean of the college asked. ...
silence gives consent
If you say nothing or do not say no to something, it means that you agree. - A proverb. * /Don't be afraid to say, if you don't like something. Silence gives consent./
silent majority
{n.}, {informal} The large majority of people who, unlike the militants, do not make their political and social views known by marching and demonstrating and who, ...
silver
See: BORN WITH A SILVER SPOON IN ONE'S MOUTH, EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING, HAND SOMETHING TO ONE ON A SILVER PLATTER.
silver anniversary
or[wedding] {n. phr.} The twenty-fifth wedding anniversary of a couple; the twenty-fifth anniversary of a business or an association, etc. * /"The day after tomorrow is ...
simmer down
{v.}, {informal} To become less angry or excited; become calmer. * /Tom got mad, but soon simmered down./
Simon Legree
{n.}, {informal} A strict person, especially a boss, who makes others work very hard. * /Don't talk on the job; the boss is a real Simon Legree./ * /Everybody avoids the ...
simple
See: PURE AND SIMPLE.
sing a different tune
or[whistle a different tune] also[sing a new tune] {v. phr.}, {informal} To talk or act in the opposite way; contradict something said before. * /Charles said that all ...
sing for one's supper
{v. phr.}, {informal} To have to work for what one desires. * /I realized a long time ago that I had to sing for my supper if I wanted to get ahead in my profession./
sing in tune
See: IN TUNE.
sing one's praises
{v. phr.} To extol or praise continuously. * /The audience left the concert with everyone singing the praises of the young piano virtuoso./
sing out of tune
See: OUT OF TUNE.
single
See: EVERY SINGLE.
single out
{v. phr.} To select or choose one from among many. * /There were a lot of pretty girls at the high school prom but Don immediately singled out Sally./
sink
See: HEART SINKS.
sink in
or[soak in] {v.}, {informal} To be completely understood; be fully realized or felt. * /Everybody laughed at the joke but Joe; it took a moment for it to sink in ...
sink one's teeth into
See: GET ONE'S TEETH INTO.
sink or swim
{v. phr.} To succeed or fail by your own efforts, without help or interference from anyone else; fail if you don't work hard to succeed. * /When Joe was fourteen, his ...
sinker
See: HOOK, LINE AND SINKER.
sit
See: GO SIT ON A TACK, ON THE FENCE also FENCE-SITTING.
sit through
{v.} To watch or listen until (something) is finished. * /The show was so boring that we could hardly sit through the first act./ * /Elaine liked the movie so much that ...
sit back
{v.} 1. To be built a distance away; stand away (as from a street). * /Our house sits back from the road./ 2. To relax; rest, often while others are working; take time out. ...
sit by
{v.} 1. To stay near; watch and care for. * /The nurse was told to sit by the patient until he woke up./ * /Mother sat by her sick baby all night./ 2. To sit and watch ...
sit down
{v.} To sit on a seat or resting place. * /After gym class Jim was tired and was glad to sit down and rest./
sit in
{v.} 1. To be a member; participate. * /We're having a conference and we'd like you to sit in./ also[sit in on]: To be a member of; participate in. * /We want you to sit ...
sit on
{v.} 1. To be a member of (a jury, board, commission), etc. * /Mr. Brown sat on the jury at the trial./ 2. {informal} To prevent from starting or doing something; ...
sit on a bomb
or[bombshell] {v. phr.}, {informal} To be in possession of anything that is potentially disastrous or dangerous. * /The finance department will be sitting on a bomb ...
sit on a volcano
{v.}, {informal} 1. To be in a place where trouble may start or danger may come suddenly. * /Bob was in that part of South America before the revolution began. He knew he ...
sit on one's hands
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do nothing; fail or refuse to do anything. * /We asked Bill for help with our project, but he sat on his hands./
sit on the fence
See: ON THE FENCE.
sit out
{v.} To not take part in. * /The next dance is a polka. Let's sit it out./ * /Toby had to sit out the last half of the game because his knee hurt./
sit tight
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make no move or change; stay where you are. - Often used as a command. * /Sit tight; I'll be ready to go in a few minutes./ * /The doctor said to ...
sit up
{v.} 1. To move into a sitting position. * /Joe sat up when he heard the knock on his bedroom door./ 2. To stay awake instead of going to bed. * /Mrs. Jones will sit ...
sit up and take notice
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be surprised into noticing something. * /Grace had never impressed her teachers. Hearing that she had won the essay contest made them sit up and take ...
sit up for
{v. phr.} To wait until after the usual bedtime for someone's return. * /Mrs. Smith always sits up for her two daughters, no matter how late it is./
sit up with
{v. phr.} To be with; particularly to keep someone ill company. * /Mrs. Brown sat up with her sick husband all night in the hospital room./
sit well (with)
{v.} Find favor with; please. * /The reduced school budget did not sit well with the teachers./
sit with
{v.}, {informal} To be accepted by; affect. - Used in interrogative sentences and in negative sentences modified by "well". * /How did your story sit with your ...
sit-up
{n.} A vigorous exercise in which the abdominal muscles are strengthened by locking one's feet in a fastening device and sitting up numerous times. * /Do a few sit-ups ...
sitter
See: ON THE FENCE also FENCE-SITTER.
sitting on a powder keg
See: SIT ON A VOLCANO.
sitting on top of the world
See: ON TOP OF THE WORLD.
sitting pretty
{adj.}, {slang} To be in a lucky position. * /The new library is sitting pretty because a wealthy woman gave it $10,000 worth of reference books./ * /Mr. Jones was sitting ...
six
See: AT SIXES AND SEVENS, DEEP-SIX.
six bits
{n.}, {slang} Seventy-five cents. * /"Lend me six bits till Friday, Sam," said Jim. "I've spent all my allowance."/ Compare: TWO BITS.
six of one and half-a-dozen of the other
{n. phr.} Two things the same; not a real choice; no difference. * /Which coat do you like better, the brown or the blue? It's six of one and half-a-dozen of the ...
size
See: CUT DOWN TO SIZE, PINT-SIZE.
size up
{v.}, {informal} To decide what one thinks about (something); to form an opinion about (something). * /Give Joe an hour to size up the situation and he'll tell you what ...
skate
See: CHEAP SKATE.
skate on thin ice
{v. phr.} To take a chance; risk danger, disapproval or anger. * /You'll be skating on thin ice if you ask Dad to increase your allowance again./ * /John knew he was ...
skating rink
{n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Slippery road. * /Attention all units - there's a skating rink ahead!/
skeleton in the closet
{n. phr.} A shameful secret; someone or something kept hidden, especially by a family. * /The skeleton in our family closet was Uncle Willie. No one mentioned him because ...
skid lid
{n.}, {slang} A crash helmet worn by motorcyclists and race drivers. * /How much did you pay for that handsome skid lid?/
skid row
{n.} The poor part of a city where men live who have no jobs and drink too much liquor. * /That man was once rich, but he drank and gambled too much, and ended his life ...
skim the surface
{v. phr.} To do something very superficially. * /He seems knowledgeable in many different areas but his familiarity is very superficial, since he only skims the surface of ...
skin
See: BY THE SKIN OF ONE'S TEETH, GET UNDER ONE'S SKIN, JUMP OUT OF ONE'S SKIN, KEEP ONE'S EYES PEELED or KEEP ONE'S EYES SKINNED, SAVE ONE'S NECK or SAVE ONE'S SKIN, WITH A ...
skin alive
{v. phr.} 1. {informal} To scold angrily. * /Mother will skin you alive when she sees your torn pants./ 2. {informal} To spank or beat. * /Dad was ready to skin us alive ...
skin and bones
{n.} A person or animal that is very thin; someone very skinny. * /The puppy is healthy now, but when we found him he was just skin and bones./ * /Have you been dieting? ...
skin off one's nose
{n. phr.}, {slang} Matter of interest, concern, or trouble to you. Normally used in the negative. * /Go to Jake's party if you wish. It's no skin off my nose./ * ...
skin-deep
{adj.} Only on the surface; not having any deep or honest meaning; not really or closely connected with what it seems to belong to. * /Mary's friendliness with Joan is ...
skip
See: HEART SKIP A BEAT.
skip bail
See: JUMP BAIL.
skip it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To forget all about it. * /When Jack tried to reward him for returning his lost dog, the man said to skip it./ * /I asked what the fight was ...
skip out
{v.}, {informal} To leave in a hurry; especially after cheating or taking money dishonestly; sneak away; leave without permission. * /The man skipped out of the hotel ...
skirt around
{v. phr.} To avoid something. * /"Let's not skirt around the facts," said the attorney to his client. "You must tell me the truth."/
sky
See: OUT OF THE BLUE or OUT OF A CLEAR SKY or OUT OF A CLEAR BLUE SKY, REACH FOR THE SKY.
sky is the limit
There is no upper limit to something. * /"Buy me the fastest racehorse in Hong Kong," Mr. Lee instructed his broker. "Spend whatever is necessary; the sky is the limit."/
slack off
{v. phr.} 1. To become less active; grow lazy. * /Since construction work has been slacking off toward the end of the summer, many workers were dismissed./ 2. To gradually ...
slam
See: GRAND SLAM.
slap down
{v.}, {slang} 1. To stop (someone, usually in a lower position or job) from doing or saying something, in a rough way or with a scolding; silence. * /When Billy talked ...
slap in the face(1)
{n.} An insult; a disappointment. * /We felt that it was a slap in the face when our gift was returned unopened./ * /Doris thought it was a slap in the face when her ...
slap in the face(2)
{v. phr.} To insult; embarrass; make feel bad. * /John slapped our club in the face by saying that everyone in it was stupid./ * /I don't want to slap her in the face ...
slap one's wrist
{v. phr.} To receive a light punishment. * /She could have been fired for contradicting the company president in public, but all she got was a slap on the wrist./
slap together
See: THROW TOGETHER(1).
slate
See: CLEAN SLATE.
slated for
or[slated to be] Going to be; planned or intended for. * /People think the governor is slated to be president./ * /That subject is slated for debate at the next meeting./
slave driver
{n.} A cruel, merciless boss or employer who makes the people under him work extremely hard for little compensation. * /Mr. Catwallender is such a slave driver that nobody ...
sledding
See: HARD SLEDDING or ROUGH SLEDDING or TOUGH SLEDDING.
sleep
See: BEAUTY SLEEP, LET SLEEPING DOGS LIE, SLEEP A WINK.
sleep a wink
{v. phr.} To get a moment's sleep; enjoy a bit of sleep. - Used in negative and conditional statements and in questions. * /I didn't sleep a wink all night./
sleep around
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To be free with one's sexual favors; to behave promiscuously. * /Sue Catwallender is a nice girl but she sleeps around an awful lot with ...
sleep like a log
{v. phr.} To sleep very deeply and soundly. * /Although I am usually a light sleeper, I was so exhausted from the sixteen-hour transpacific flight that, once we got home, ...
sleep off
{v. phr.} To sleep until the effect of too much alcohol or drugs passes. * /George had too many beers last night and he is now sleeping off the effects./
sleep on
{v.} To postpone a decision about. * /We asked Judy if she would join our club and she answered that she would sleep on it./ * /We will have to sleep on your invitation ...
sleep out
{v.} 1. To sleep outdoors. * /The Scouts plan to sleep out next Saturday./ 2. To go home at night instead of sleeping at the place where you work. * /Mrs. Jones' maid ...
sleep with
{v. phr.} To have a sexual affair with someone; have sex; copulate. * /It has been rumored in the office that the boss sleeps with all the girls he hires./
sleeve
See: CARD UP ONE'S SLEEVE, LAUGH UP ONE'S SLEEVE or LAUGH IN ONE'S SLEEVE, ROLL UP ONE'S SLEEVES, UP ONE'S SLEEVE or IN ONE'S SLEEVE, WEAR ONE'S HEART ON ONE'S SLEEVE ...
sling hash
{v.}, {slang} To serve food, especially in a cheap, small diner, a drive-in, or short-order restaurant. * /Jake got a job slinging hash at the new drive-in restaurant./ * ...
slinging match
{n. phr.} A loud, angry quarrel. * /The debate deteriorated into a most unseemly slinging match./
slip
See: GIVE THE SLIP, SALES CHECK or SALES SLIP.
slip a cog
or[slip a gear] {v. phr.}, {slang} To make a mistake. * /I must have been slipping a cog when I said that I would run for mayor./ * /Jim hates to sleep outdoors. He's ...
slip away
{v. phr.} To leave unnoticed. * /The party was such a bore that we decided to quietly slip away./
slip of the lip
See: SLIP OF THE TONGUE.
slip of the pen
{n. phr.} The mistake of writing something different from what you should or what you planned. * /That was a slip of the pen. I meant to write September, not November./ * ...
slip of the tongue
also[slip of the lip] {n. phr.} The mistake of saying something you had not wanted or planned to say; an error of speech. * /No one would have known our plans if Kay hadn't ...
slip off
{v. phr.} 1. To slide off something. * /The children climbed up the hill but when it was time to come down, they didn't walk, but slipped off the smooth, old ledges./ 2. ...
slip one's mind
{v. phr.} To forget something. * /I meant to mail those letters but it entirely slipped my mind./
slip over
See: PUT OVER(2).
slip through one's fingers
{v. phr.} To escape without someone's knowing how. * /Policemen surrounded the building, but the thief managed to slip through their fingers./ * /Mike earns a good wage, ...
slip up
{v. phr.} To make a mistake. * /Someone at the bank slipped up. There are only 48 pennies in this 50c roll of coins./ * /If he hadn't slipped up on the last ...
slipup
{n.} A mistake. * /"I'm sorry, sir. That was an unfortunate slipup," the barber said when he scratched the client's face./
slow burn
{n.}, {informal} A slowly increasing feeling of anger. * /The boys kept teasing John, and watched him do a slow burn./ * /Barbara's slow burn ended only when ...
slow down
{v. phr.} To go more slowly than usual. * /The road was slippery, so Mr. Jones slowed down the car./ * /Pat once could run a mile in five minutes, but now that he's older ...
slow on the draw
{adj. phr.} Not very smart; having difficulty figuring things out. * /Poor Eric doesn't get very good grades in physics; when it comes to problem-solving, he is rather ...
slow on the uptake
See: SLOW ON THE DRAW.
slow tune
See: STANDARD TIME.
slow up
{v.} 1. To go more slowly. * /The truck slowed up as it approached the toll gate./ * /Construction on the road slows up traffic./ 2. To become less busy. * /Business ...
slowdown
{n.} A period of lesser activity, usually in the economic sphere. * /We all hope the current slowdown in the economy will soon be over./
slug it out
{v. phr.} To have a strong verbal or physical battle with someone; to contest something most vigorously. * /The two contenders for the lightweight boxing championship ...
sly
See: ON THE SLY.
smack one's lips
{v. phr.} To reveal an appetite for; show enjoyment of. * /Eleanor smacked her lips over the dessert of strawberries and whipped cream./
smack-dab
also {Southern}[smack-to-dab] {adv.}, {informal} Exactly; squarely. * /The ball landed smack-dab at our feet./ * /The plane landed smack-to-dab in the middle of the hay ...
small
See: BIG FROG IN A SMALL POND.
small frog in a big pond
See: LITTLE FROG IN A BIG POND.
small fry
{n.} 1. Young children. * /In the park, a sandbox is provided for the small fry./ 2. Something or someone of little importance. * /Large dairies ignore the ...
small talk
{n. phr.} General idle conversation. * /At the party there was the usual kind of small talk about the cost of living increase and the war in Africa./
small wonder
See: NO WONDER.
small-time
{adj.}, {informal} Unimportant; minor; with little power or importance. * /He has a job as a drummer with a small-time band./ * /It is a small-time business, but it ...
smash hit
{n.}, {informal} A very successful play, movie or opera. * /The school play was a smash hit./
smell a rat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be suspicious; feel that something is wrong. * /Every time Tom visits me, one of my ashtrays disappears. I'm beginning to smell a rat./ * /When ...
smell out
See: FERRET OUT.
smell up
{v.}, {informal} To make a bad smell. * /A skunk smelled up our yard last night./ * /Mr. Brodsky's cigar smelled up the living room./
smile
See: CRACK A SMILE.
smoke
See: CHAIN-SMOKE, GO UP IN FLAMES or GO UP IN SMOKE, PUT THAT IN YOUR PIPE AND SMOKE IT, WATCH ONE'S DUST or WATCH ONE'S SMOKE.
smoke like a chimney
{v. phr.}, {informal} To smoke very heavily and continuously. * /"If you continue smoking like a chimney" the doctor told my uncle, "you'll wind up in the hospital ...
smoke out
{v. phr.} 1. To force out with smoke. * /The boys smoked a squirrel out of a hollow tree./ * /The farmer tried to smoke some gophers out of their burrows./ 2. ...
smoke screen
{n. phr.} A camouflage; a veil; something used to cover or hide something. * /June hides her commercial interests behind a smoke screen of religious piety./
smoke-out
{n.} A successful conclusion of an act of investigative journalism revealing some long-kept secrets. * /Journalist Bob Woodward was the hero of the Watergate smoke-out./
Smokey Bear
or[Smokey-the-Bear] or[the Smokies] {n.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} A policeman; a patrol car; frequently abbreviated as Smokey. * /Slow down, Smokey's ahead!/ ...
smooth away
{v.} To remove; (unpleasant feelings) take away. * /Mr. Jones' new job smoothed away his worry about money./
smooth down
{v.} To make calm; calm down. * /Mrs. Smith's feelings were hurt and we couldn't smooth her down./
smooth over
{v.} To make something seem better or more pleasant; try to excuse. * /Bill tried to smooth over his argument with Mary by making her laugh./ Syn.: GLOSS OVER. Compare: ...
smooth sailing
See: PLAIN SAILING.
snail's pace
{n.} A very slow movement forward. * /Time moved at a snail's pace before the holidays./ * /The donkey on which he was riding moved at a snail's pace./
snake in the grass
{n. phr.}, {informal} A person who cannot be trusted; an unfaithful traitor; rascal. * /Did Harry tell you that? He's a snake in the grass!/ * /Some snake in the grass ...
snap
See: COLD SNAP.
snap it off
See: MAKE IT SNAPPY.
snap one's fingers at
{v. phr.} To show contempt for; show no respect for; pay no attention to; scorn; disregard. * /John snapped his fingers at the sign that said "Do not enter," and he went ...
snap out of
{v.}, {informal} To change quickly from a bad habit, mood, or feeling to a better one. - Often used with "it". * /Mary was unhappy when her fiance abandoned her, but she ...
snap up
{v.}, {informal} To take or accept eagerly. * /Eggs were on sale cheap, and the shoppers snapped up the bargain./ * /Mr. Hayes told Bob that he would take him skiing, and Bob ...
snappy
See: MAKE IT SNAPPY.
snapshot
{n.} A small photograph, unlike a professional portrait. * /We took several snapshots of the scenery while driving around the island./
sneak
See: QUARTERBACK SNEAK.
sneak away
See: SLIP AWAY.
sneak up on
See: CREEP UP ON.
sneeze at
{v.}, {informal} To think of as not important; not take seriously. - Used with negative or limiting words and in questions. * /Mr. Jones was chosen by his party to run for ...
sniff out
See: FERRET OUT.
snow in
{v.} To block up or trap by much snow; keep inside, * /After the storm the farmer and his family were snowed in for three days./ * /The train went off the track and the ...
snow job
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Insincere or exaggerated talk designed to gain the favors of someone. * /Joe gave Sue a snow job and she believed every word of it./ 2. The ...
snow under
{v.} 1. To cover over with snow. * /The doghouse was snowed under during the blizzard./ 2. {informal} To give so much of something that it cannot be taken care of; to ...
snuff
See: UP TO PAR or UP TO SNUFF.
snug as a bug in a rug
{adj. phr.} Comfortable; cozy. * /"Are you warm enough?" the boy's mother asked. "Yeah," he replied, "I'm snug as a bug in a rug."/
so
See: AND SO FORTH or AND SO ON, EVEN SO, EVERY NOW AND THEN or EVERY SO OFTEN, HOW SO, IN SO MANY WORDS, IS THAT SO, OR SO, THUS AND SO.
so --- as to
- Used with an adjective or adverb before an infinitive to show a result. * /Who could be so mean as to do a thing like that?/ * /Ruth wouldn't be so careless as to ...
so --- that
- Used with an adjective or adverb before a clause of result. * /The bus was so full that I could hardly turn around./ * /Billy pitched so well that everyone cheered him at ...
so as to
See: IN ORDER TO.
so bad
See: NOT BAD.

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