Слова на букву so b-take (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву so b-take (459)

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so be it
also[be it so] {adv. phr.}, {formal} 1. Let it be that way; may it be so. So be it. * /We shall smoke the pipe of peace./ 2. Very well; all right. * /Will the company lose ...
so far
also[thus far] {adv.} Until this time or to this place. * /The weather has been hot so far this summer./ * /This is a lonely road. We have not met another car so far./
so far as
See: AS FAR AS.
so far, so good
{informal} Until now things have gone well. * /So far, so good; I hope we keep on with such good luck./
so help me
{interj.}, {informal} I promise; I swear; may I be punished if I lie. * /I've told you the truth, so help me./ * /So help me, there was nothing else I could do./
so it goes
Akin to the French "c'est la vie!" This exclamation means "that's life." * /Too bad Jim has lost his job but there are lots of people who are better qualified; well, so ...
so long
{interj.}, {informal} Good-bye. - Used when you are leaving someone or he is leaving you. * /So long, I will be back tomorrow./
so long as
See: AS LONG AS.
so many(1)
{adj.} 1. A limited number of; some * /Our school auditorium will hold only so many people./ 2. A group of. - Often used for emphasis. * /The children were all sitting ...
so many(2)
{pron}. A limited number; some. * /Many people want to come to the prom; but the gymnasium will hold only so many./ * /Don't give the boys all the cookies they want; give so ...
so much as
{adv. phr.} 1. Even. - Usually used in negative sentences and questions. * /He didn't so much as thank me for returning his money that I found./ * /Would you so ...
so much for
Enough has been said or done about. - Used to point out that you have finished with one thing or are going to take up something else. * /So much for the geography of ...
so much(1)
{adj.} 1. A limited amount of; some. * /Sometimes students wonder if the teacher knows they have only so much time to do their lessons./ * /If you can't give everyone a ...
so much(2)
{pron.} A limited amount; some; a price or amount that is agreed or will be agreed on. * /You can do only so much in a day./ * /Milk costs so much a quart but cream costs ...
so much(3)
{adv.} By that much; by the amount shown; even. - Used with the comparative and usually followed by "the". * /I can't go tomorrow. So much the better; we'll go today./ * ...
so that
{conj.} 1. or in order that; for the purpose that; so. - "So that" is usually followed by "can" or "could"; "in order that" is usually followed by " may" or " might". * ...
so to speak
{adv. phr.} To say it in this way. * /John was, so to speak, the leader of the club, but he was officially only the club's secretary./ * /The horse, so to speak, danced ...
so what
{informal} Used as an impolite reply showing that you don't care about what another has said. * /Roy boasted that he was in the sixth grade, but Ted said, "So what? I am in ...
so-and-so(1)
{pronoun}, {informal} Someone whose name is not given. * /Don't tell me what so-and-so thinks. Tell me what you think./
so-and-so(2)
{n.}, {informal} A person of a special kind and usually of a very bad kind. - This word is used in place of a more unacceptable word or swear word. * /I wish that ...
so-so
{adj.} Fair; neither good nor bad. * /The children's grades were just so-so on the test./ * /How is the fishing today? So-so./
soak in
See: SINK IN.
soak up
{v.} 1. To take up water or other liquid as a sponge does. * /The rag soaked up the water that I spilled./ 2. To use a sponge or something like a sponge to take up ...
soap opera
{n. phr.} Radio or television serialized stories of a sentimental nature, often involving sex, crime, and social intrigue. These shows often advertise soap products, hence ...
sob all the way to the bank
See: CRY ALL THE WAY TO THE BANK. Contrast: LAUGH ALL THE WAY TO THE BANK.
sob story
{n.} A story that makes you feel pity or sorrow; a tale that makes you tearful. * /The beggar told us a long sob story before he asked for money./ * /The movie is based on a ...
social climber
{n.} A person who tries to mix with rich or well-known people and be accepted by them as friends and equals. * /People do not like Mrs. Brown very well; she is ...
sock
See: TAKE A PUNCH AT or TAKE A SOCK AT.
sock it
{v. phr.}, also {interj.}, {slang}, {informal} To give one's utmost; everything one is capable of; to give all one is capable of. * /Right on, Joe, sock it to 'em!/ * /I was ...
soda jerk
or[soda jerker] {n.}, {informal} A person who serves soda and ice cream to customers, usually in a drug store or ice cream parlor. * /Bob worked as a soda jerk at the drug ...
soft drink
{n. phr.} A nonalcoholic beverage such as 7-Up, Coca-Cola, etc. * /She drinks no alcohol; she always orders a soft drink./
soft touch
{n.} A person with a sympathetic disposition from whom it is easy to get help, primarily money. * /My Uncle Herb is a soft touch; whenever I'm in need I ask him for a quick ...
softhearted
{adj.} Generous; sympathetic. * /Street beggars tend to exploit the softhearted nature of passersby./
soil one's hands
See: DIRTY ONE'S HANDS.
sold on
{adj.} Approving of; well disposed toward; convinced of the value of. * /When Japanese cars first appeared on the market Andy was hesitant to drive one but now he is sold ...
some
See: AND THEN SOME.
some of these days
See: ONE OF THESE DAYS.
somebody up there loves/hates me
{slang} An expression intimating that an unseen power in heaven, such as God, has been favorable or unfavorable to the one making the exclamation. * /Look at all the ...
something
See: HAVE SOMETHING GOING FOR ONE, HAVE SOMETHING ON, MAKE SOMETHING OF, START SOMETHING.
something else
{adj.}, {slang}, {informal} So good as to be beyond description; the ultimate; stupendous. * /Janet Hopper is really something else./
something else again
{n. phr.} A different kind of thing; something different. * /I don't care if you borrow my dictionary sometimes, but taking it without asking and keeping it is ...
son
See: FAVORITE SON, LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON.
son of a bitch
or[sunuvabitch] also S.O.B. {n. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} (but becoming more and more acceptable, especially if said with a positive or loving intonation). Fellow, ...
son of a gun
{n. phr.}, {slang} 1. A bad person; a person not liked. * /I don't like Charley; keep that son of a gun out of here./ Syn.: BAD ACTOR. 2. A mischievous rascal; a lively ...
song
See: FOR A SONG.
song and dance
{n.}, {informal} 1. Foolish or uninteresting talk; dull nonsense. Usually used with "give". * /I met Nancy today and she gave me a long song and dance about her family./ ...
sonic boom
{n.} A loud noise and vibration in the air, made when a jet plane passes the speed of sound (1087 feet per second). * /Fast jet planes sometimes cause a sonic boom, which ...
soon
See: AS SOON, FOOL AND HIS MONEY ARE SOON PARTED.
sooner
See: HAD RATHER or HAD SOONER, NO SOONER --- THAN.
sooner or later
{adv. phr.} At some unknown time in the future; sometime. * /John will come back sooner or later./ * /Grandpa is very slow about fixing things around the house, but he ...
sore
See: SIGHT FOR SORE EYES.
sore spot
or[sore point] {n.} A weak or sensitive part; a subject or thing about which someone becomes angry or upset easily. * /Don't ask Uncle John why his business failed; it's ...
sorrow
See: DROWN ONE'S SORROWS.
sort
See: OF SORTS, IN A WAY also IN A SORT OF WAY.
sort of
See: KIND OF.
sort out
{v. phr.} 1. To alphabetize; arrange in numerical order. * /The secretary helped Professor Brown sort out his numerous index cards./ 2. To clarify. * /"Help me sort out ...
sought after
{adj.} Wanted by many buyers; searched for. * /Antiques are much sought after nowadays./ Syn.: IN DEMAND.
soul
See: HEART AND SOUL, KEEP BODY AND SOUL TOGETHER.
soul-searching
See: SEARCH ONE'S HEART or SEARCH ONE S SOUL.
sound
See: HIGH-SOUNDING, SAFE AND SOUND.
sound sheet
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} A thin low-quality phonograph recording frequently bound into books and magazines for use as promotional or advertising material; it may have ...
sound effects
{n.} The noises made to imitate real sounds in a play, movie, or program. * /Greg agreed to plan the sound effects for the class play./ * /The movie was good but the sound ...
sound off
{v.} 1. To say your name or count "One! Two! Three! Four!" as you march. - Used as orders in U.S. military service. * /"Sound off!" said the sergeant, and the ...
sound out
{v.} To try to find out how a person feels about something usually by careful questions. * /Alfred sounded out his boss about a day off from his job./ * /When you see ...
sound truck
{n. phr.} A truck equipped with loudspeakers. * /During the senatorial campaign, the streets of the big city were full of sound trucks blaring out messages./
soup
See: IN THE SOUP.
souped-up
{adj.}, {informal} More powerful or faster because of changes and additions. * /Many teen-aged boys like to drive souped-up cars./ * /The basketball team won the last five ...
sow one's wild oats
{v. phr.} To do bad or foolish things, especially while you are young. * /Mr. Jones sowed his wild oats while he was in college, but now he is a wiser and better ...
space
See: OUTER SPACE.
space probe
{n.}, {Space English} An unmanned spacecraft other than an Earth satellite fitted with instruments which gather and transmit information about other planets in the ...
spaced out
{adj.}, {slang}, {informal} Having gaps in one's train of thought, confused, incoherent; resembling the behavior of someone who is under the influence of drugs. * /Joe's been ...
spade
See: CALL A SPADE A SPADE.
Spain
See: BUILD CASTLES IN THE AIR or BUILD CASTLES IN SPAIN.
spar with
See: FENCE WITH.
speak
See: ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS, CHILDREN AND FOOLS SPEAK THE TRUTH, NOT TO MENTION or NOT TO SPEAK OF, SHORT-SPOKEN, SO TO SPEAK, TO SPEAK OF.
speak for
{v.} 1. To speak in favor of or in support of. * /At the meeting John spoke for the change in the rules./ * /The other girls made jokes about Jane, but Mary spoke for ...
speak of the devil and he appears
A person comes just when you are talking about him. - A proverb. * /We were just talking about Bill when he came in the door. Speak of the devil and he appears./
speak one's mind
{v. phr.} To say openly what you think; give advice that may not be liked. * /John thought it was wrong to keep George out of the club and he spoke his mind about ...
speak one's piece
See: SAY ONE'S PIECE.
speak out
or[speak up] {v.} 1. To speak in a loud or clear voice. * /The trucker told the shy boy to speak up./ 2. To speak in support of or against someone or something. * ...
speak out of turn
{v. phr.} To say something tactless; commit an indiscretion. * /You spoke out of turn in criticizing Aunt Hermione's old furniture; she considers herself quite a ...
speak the same language
{v. phr.} To have similar feelings, thoughts, and tastes; have a mutual understanding with another person. * /We both love listening to Mozart. Obviously, we speak the ...
speak volumes
{v. phr.} To tell or show much in a way other than speaking; be full of meaning. * /The nice present she gave you spoke volumes for what she thinks of you./ * /A child's ...
speak well of
{v. phr.} To approve of; praise. * /Everyone always speaks well of my sister because she's so kind./
speak with a forked tongue
{v. phr.}, {literary} To lie; to say one thing while thinking of the opposite. * /I have learned not to trust Peter's promises because he speaks with a forked tongue./
speakeasy
{n.} A bar during Prohibition where illegal alcoholic beverages were sold. * /Al Capone's associates met in a Chicago speakeasy to drink and discuss business./
speaker
See: PUBLIC SPEAKER.
speed trap
{n.} A place where police hide and wait to catch drivers who are going even a little faster than the speed limit. * /Mr. Jones was caught in a speed trap./
speed up
{v.} To go faster than before; also, to make go faster. * /The car speeded up when it reached the country./ * /Push in the throttle to speed up the engine./ Compare: PICK ...
spell out
{v.} 1. To say or read aloud the letters ot a word, one by one; spell. * /John could not understand the word the teacher was saying, so she spelled it out on the ...
spell trouble
{v. phr.} To signify major difficulties ahead. * /The note we just received from the Chancellor seems to spell trouble./
spend the night
{v. phr.} To sleep somewhere. * /It was so late after the party that we decided to spend the night at our friends' house./
spending money
or[pocket money] {n.} Money that is given to a person to spend. * /When the seniors went to New York City on a trip, each was given $10 in spending money./ * /Father gave ...
spick-and-span
{adj.} Sparkling clean; having a brand new look. * /She is such a good housekeeper that her kitchen is always spick-and-span./
spill
See: CRY OVER SPILLED MILK.
spill the beans
{v. phr.}, {informal} To tell a secret to someone who is not supposed to know about it. * /John's friends were going to have a surprise party for him, but Tom spilled the ...
spin a yarn
{v. phr.} To tell a story of adventure with some exaggeration mixed in; embellish and protract such a tale. * /Uncle Fred, who used be a sailor, knows how to spin a ...
spin off
{v. phr.} To bring something into existence as a byproduct of something that already exists. * /When Dr. Catwallender opened his medical practice, he also spun off ...
spin one's wheels
{v. phr.} 1. Said of cars stuck in snow or mud whose wheels are turning without the car moving forward. * /There was so much snow on the driveway that my car's wheels were ...
spin out
{v. phr.} 1. To go out of control. * /The bus spun out on the icy road and fell into the ditch./ 2. To make something go out of control. * /Tom stepped on the brakes so ...
spine-chilling
{adj.} Terrifying; causing great fear. * /Many children find the movie, "Frankenstein," spine-chilling./ * /A was spine-chilling to learn that a murderer was in our ...
spine-tingling
{adj.} Very exciting; thrilling. * /Our ride up the mountain in a chair lift was spine-tingling./ * /The children's plane ride was a spine-tingling adventure to them./
spinoff
{n.} A byproduct of something else. * /The television soap opera "Knot's Landing" was considered a spinoff of "Dallas," with many of the same characters featured in both./ ...
spirit away
{v. phr.} To hide or smuggle something out; abduct. * /The famous actress was spirited away by her bodyguards as soon as she emerged from the door./
spit
or[piss into the wedding cake] {v. phr.}, {vulgar}, {avoidable} To spoil someone's pleasure or celebration by doing or saying something harsh or unseemly in an ...
spit up
{v.} To vomit a little. * /The baby always spits up when he is burped./ * /Put a bib on the baby. I don't want him to spit up on his clean clothes./
spite
See: CUT OFF ONE'S NOSE TO SPITE ONE'S FACE.
spitting image
{n.} or[spit and image] {informal} An exact likeness; a duplicate. * /John is the spitting image of his grandfather./ * /That vase is the spitting image of one ...
split hairs
{v. phr.} To find and argue about small and unimportant differences as if the differences are important. * /John is always splitting hairs; he often starts an ...
split end
{n.} An end in football who plays five to ten yards out from the tackle in the line. * /The split end is one of the quarterback's most important targets for passes./ ...
split second
{n.} A very short time; less than a second. * /The lightning flash lasted a split second, and then disappeared./
split the difference
{v. phr.}, {informal} To settle a money disagreement by dividing the difference, each person giving up half. * /Bob offered $25 for Bill's bicycle and Bill wanted $35; ...
split ticket
{n.} A vote for candidates from more than one party. * /Mr. Jones voted a split ticket./ * /An independent voter likes a split ticket./ Contrast: STRAIGHT TICKET.
split up
{v. phr.} 1. To separate; get a divorce. * /After three years of marriage, the unhappy couple finally split up./ 2. To separate something; divide into portions. * /The ...
split-up
{n.} A separation or division into two or many smaller parts. * /The split-up of our company was due to the founder's untimely death./
spoil for
{v. phr.} To want something very badly; be belligerent or pugnacious about something. * /After a few drinks it became embarrassingly evident that Hal was spoiling for a ...
spoken for
{adj.} Occupied; reserved; taken; already engaged or married. * /"Sorry, my boy," Mr. Jones said condescendingly, "but my daughter is already spoken for. She will marry ...
sponge
See: THROW IN THE SPONGE.
sponge bath
{n.} A bath with a cloth or sponge and a little water. * /During the drought the family had only sponge baths./ * /The family took sponge baths because they had no ...
sponge on
or[off] {v. phr.} To exploit parasitically; depend upon for support. * /He is already forty years old, but he refuses to go to work and sponges off his retired parents./
spoon
See: BORN WITH A SILVER SPOON IN ONE'S MOUTH.
spoon-feed
{v.} 1. To feed with a spoon. * /Mothers spoon-feed their babies./ 2a. To make something too easy for (a person). * /Bill's mother spoon-fed him and never let him ...
sporting blood
{n.} Willingness to take risks; spirit of adventure. * /The cowboy's sporting blood tempted him to try to ride the wild horse./ * /The boy's sporting blood caused ...
spot
See: HIT THE HIGH SPOTS, HIT THE SPOT, JOHNNY-ON-THE-SPOT, ON THE SPOT or UPON THE SPOT also IN A SPOT, SORE SPOT.
spot check
{n. phr.} A sample check or investigation. * /Internal Revenue Service employees often conduct a spot check of individual returns when the figures don't add up./
spotlight
See: STEAL THE SPOTLIGHT.
spread it on thick
See: LAY IT ON or LAY IT ON THICK.
spread like wildfire
{v. phr.} To spread uncontrollably and rapidly. * /Bad news has a tendency to spread like wildfire./
spread oneself too thin
{v. phr.} To try to do too many things at one time. * /As the owner, chef, waiter, and dishwasher of his restaurant, Pierre was spreading himself too thin./
spring a leak
{v. phr.} 1. To develop a hole (said of boats) through which water can enter, threatening the boat to sink. * /When our small boat sprang a leak, we rapidly returned ...
spring chicken
{n.}, {slang} A young person. - Usually used with "no". * /Mr. Brown is no spring chicken, but he can still play tennis well./ * /The coach is no spring chicken, but he ...
spring on one
{v. phr.} To approach someone unexpectedly with an unpleasant idea or project. * /Our firm was merely six weeks old when they sprang the news on me that I had to go to ...
spring up
{v. phr.} To arise suddenly. * /Small purple flowers were springing up all over our backyard./
sprout wings
{v. phr.} 1. To enter the stage after a period of development when wings appear (said of larvae that turn into butterflies). * /The dragonflies suddenly sprouted ...
spruce up
{v.}, {informal} To make clean or neat. * /Mary spruced up the house before her company came./ * /John spruced himself up before he went out on his date./
spur
See: ON THE SPUR OF THE MOMENT, WIN ONE'S SPURS.
squad
See: FIRING SQUAD.
square
See: FAIR AND SQUARE, SHOOT STRAIGHT or SHOOT SQUARE.
square oneself with
{v. phr.} To apologize; re-establish friendship with; make amends. * /"Mr. Alien is very angry with you for leaving the firm," Bob said. "It will take more than a few ...
square away
{v. phr.} 1. To arrange the sails of a ship so that the wind blows from behind. * /The captain ordered the crew to square away and sail before the wind./ 2. {informal} ...
square deal
{n. phr.} 1. Equitable or fair treatment. * /We are proud to say that at this firm every employee gets a square deal./ Contrast NEW DEAL, RAW DEAL.
square meal
{n. phr.} A full, nourishing well-balanced meal. * /The refugees looked as if they hadn't had a square meal in months./
square off
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stand ready for fighting with the fists. * /The two boxers squared off when the bell rang./
square one's shoulders
{v. phr.} To stand strong and ready to give battle; be brave. * /Jack squared his shoulders and entered the game./ * /Graduates must square their shoulders and face the ...
square peg in a round hole
{n.}, {informal} A person who does not fit into a job or position; someone who does not belong where he is. * /Arthur is a square peg in a round hole when he is playing ...
square shooter
See: SHOOT STRAIGHT.
square up
{v. phr.} To liquidate debts and other obligations. * /I want to square up my medical bills before I accept my new teaching assignment in Africa./
squared away
{adj. phr.} Looked after properly; tucked away; arranged. * /My first two daughters are happily married, but my third one, Jennifer, isn't squared away yet./
squeak
See: PIP-SQUEAK.
squeak by
{v. phr.} 1. To barely succeed. * /He was so poorly prepared for his bar exam that he barely squeaked by./ 2. To clear with difficulty. * /The entrance to the corridor ...
squeak through
{v.}, {informal} To be successful but almost fail; win by a small score. * /Susan squeaked through the history examination./ * /The football team squeaked through ...
squeeze out of
{v. phr.} To apply pressure to someone in order to obtain what one desires. * /The police were interrogating the suspect to squeeze information out of him./
stab in the back(1)
{v. phr.}, {slang} To say or do something unfair that harms (a friend or someone who trusts you). * /Owen stabbed his friend Max in the back by telling lies about ...
stab in the back(2)
{n. phr.}, {slang} An act or a lie that hurts a friend or trusting person; a promise not kept, especially to a friend. * /John stabbed his own friend in the back by ...
stab in the dark
{n. phr.} A random attempt or guess at something without previous experience or knowledge of the subject. * /"You're asking me who could have hidden grandpa's will," Fred ...
stack
See: BLOW A FUSE or BLOW ONE'S STACK.
stack the cards
{v. phr.} 1. To arrange cards secretly and dishonestly for the purpose of cheating. * /The gambler had stacked the cards against Bill./ 2. To arrange things unfairly ...
stag party
See: GO STAG. Contrast: HEN PARTY.
stage
See: AT --- STAGE OF THE GAME, HOLD THE STAGE, ON THE STAGE, SET THE STAGE.
stage fright
{n. phr.} The fear one feels before appearing in front of an audience. * /Many famous actors and actresses admit that they often have stage fright before the curtain ...
stage whisper
{n. phr.} A loud whisper intended to reach other ears than those of the person(s) addressed. * /Some jokes should be told in a stage whisper./
stagestruck
{adj.} Desirous of becoming an actor or actress; enamored of the acting profession. * /Milly is so stagestruck that she waits for actresses at the stage door after each ...
stake
See: AT STAKE, PULL UP STAKES.
stake a claim
{v. phr.} 1. To claim ownership of land by driving stakes to show boundaries. * /The gold hunters staked claims in the West./ 2. {informal} To claim a person or thing as ...
stamp
See: SAVINGS STAMP, TRADING STAMP.
stamp out
{v.} To destroy completely and make disappear. * /In the last few years, we have nearly stamped out polio by using vaccine./ * /The police and judges are trying to ...
stamping ground
{n.}, {informal} A place where a person spends much of his time. * /Pete's soda fountain is an afterschool stamping ground./ * /When John returned to his hometown many ...
stand
See: GOAL LINE STAND, HAIR STAND ON END, HEART STAND STILL, LEG TO STAND ON.
stand a chance
or[stand a show] {n. phr.} To have a possibility or opportunity; be likely to do or get something. * /Fred doesn't stand a chance of being elected./ * /We stand a good ...
stand by
{v.} 1. To be close beside or near. * /Mary could not tell Jane the secret with her little brother standing by./ * /Would you just stand by and watch the big boys beat ...
stand by one's guns
See: STICK TO ONE'S GUNS.
stand for
{v.} 1. To be a sign of; make you think of; mean. * /The letters "U.S.A." stand for "United States of America."/ * /The written sign "=" in an arithmetic problem stands ...
stand in awe of
{v. phr.} To look upon with wonder; feel very respectful to. * /Janet always stands in awe of the superintendent./ * /The soldier stood in awe to his officers./
stand in for
{v. phr.} To substitute for someone. * /The famous brain surgeon was called out of town so his assistant had to stand in for him during the operation./
stand in one's way
See: IN ONE'S WAY.
stand in with
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be liked by or friendly with. - Usually used with "well". * /John stands in well with the teacher./
stand off
{v.} 1. To stay at a distance; stay apart. * /At parties, Mr. Jones goes around talking to everyone, but Mrs. Jones is shy and stands off./ 2. To keep (someone or ...
stand on ceremony
{v. phr.} To follow strict rules of politeness; be very formal with other people. - Usually used with a helping verb in the negative. * /Grandmother does not stand on ...
stand on one's own feet
or[stand on one's own two feet] {v. phr.} To depend on yourself; do things yourself; earn your own living; be independent. * /After his father died, John had to stand on his ...
stand one in good stead
{v. phr.} To be helpful or useful to. * /A boy scout knife will stand you in good stead when you do not have other tools./ * /Julia knew how to typewrite, and that stood ...
stand one's ground
also[hold one's ground] {v. phr.} 1. To stay and fight instead of running away. * /The enemy attacked in great numbers but our men stood their ground./ Compare: ...
stand out
{v.} 1. To go farther out than a nearby surface; protect. * /A mole stood out on her cheek./ Compare: STICK OUT(1b). 2. To be more noticeable in some way than those ...
stand over
{v.} 1. To watch closely; keep checking all the time. * /Ted's mother had to stand over him to get him to do his homework./ 2. To be held over for later action; be ...
stand pat
{v.}, {informal} To be satisfied with things and be against a change. * /Bill had made up his mind on the question and when his friends tried to change his mind, he ...
stand the gaff
{v. phr.}, {informal} To stand rough treatment; do well in spite of great physical or mental hardship. * /An athlete must learn to stand the gaff./ * /No person running for ...
stand to reason
{v. phr.} To seem very likely from the known facts. * /If you have a driver's license, it stands to reason you can drive./ * /Joe is intelligent and studies hard; it ...
stand trial
{v. phr.} To submit to a trial by court. * /The case has been postponed and he may not have to stand trial until next April./
stand up
{v.} 1. To rise to a standing position; get up on your feet. * /A gentleman stands up when a lady enters a room./ 2. To be strong enough to use hard or for a long time. ...
stand up and be counted
{v. phr.} To be willing to say what you think in public; let people know that you are for or against something. * /The equal rights movement needs people who are ...
stand up for
or {informal}[stick up for] {v.} To defend against attack; fight for. * /John always stands up for his rights./ * /When Mary was being criticized, Jane stuck up for her./ ...
stand up to
{v.} To meet with courage. * /Mary stood up to the snarling dog that leaped toward her./ * /A soldier must stand up to danger./
stand up with
{v.}, {informal} To be best man or maid of honor at a wedding. * /A groom often chooses his brother to stand up with him./
standard time
also[slow time] {n.} Clock time that is set by law or agreement in a country or in part of a country; especially, in the United States: the clock time used between fall ...
standoffish
{adj.} Stiff; aloof; reserved in manner. * /The famous chess player is hard to get to know because he is so standoffish./
star
See: FIVE-STAR, SEE STARS, HITCH ONE'S WAGON TO A STAR, LUCKY STAR, THANK ONE'S LUCKY STARS.
starch
See: TAKE THE STARCH OUT OF.
stare in the face
{n. phr.} 1. To be about to meet or to happen to (you.) * /Grandmother became very sick and death was staring her in the face./ * /Defeat stared them in the face, but ...
stars in one's eyes
{n. phr.} 1. An appearance or feeling of very great happiness or expectation of happiness. * /Mary gets stars in her eyes when she thinks of her boyfriend./ 2. A belief in the ...
start
See: BY FITS AND STARTS, HEAD START, JACK-RABBIT START, RUNNING START.
start from scratch
See: FROM SCRATCH.
start in
{v.}, {informal} 1. To begin to do something; start. * /Fred started in weeding the garden./ * /The family started in eating supper./ Compare: GO AT. 2. To begin a career. * ...
start out
{v.} 1. To begin to go somewhere. * /Bill started out for school on his bicycle./ * /Art started out on a voyage around the world./ Compare: SET OUT. 2. To begin a career ...
start something
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make trouble; cause a quarrel or fight. * /John is always starting something./ * /Jack likes to play tricks on the other boys to start something./ ...
start the ball rolling
See: GET THE BALL ROLLING.
start up
{v.} 1. To begin operating, * /The driver started up the motor of the car./ * /The engine started up with a roar./ 2. To begin to play (music). * /The conductor waved his ...
stash bag
or[stuff bag] {n.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. A small bag containing marijuana cigarettes or the ingredients for making them. * /The police are holding John because they found a ...
state
See: LIE IN STATE.
state-of-the-art
{adj. phr.} The best and - the latest any field of research can offer; modern; the latest; the most advanced. * /State-of-the-art personal computers may cost a little ...
status symbol
{v. phr.} Signs of wealth and prestige. * /A new yacht or airplane might be a status symbol to a bank manager./
stave off
{v.}, {literary} To keep from touching or hurting you. Syn.: WARD OFF. * /The white knight struck with his sword. The black knight staved it off with his own sword./ * ...
stay in
{v. phr.} To remain at home. * /The weather was so bad that we decided to stay in all day./
stay out
{v. phr.} To stay away from home. * /Her father was very upset because Mary stayed out until 3 A.M. last night./
stay put
{v. phr.} To stay in place; not leave. * /Harry's father told him to stay put until he came back./ * /The rocks can be glued to the bulletin board to make them stay put./ * ...
stay up late
{v. phr.} To not go to bed until very late. * /Peter has to stay up late these days as he is preparing for his comprehensive exams./ See: BURN THE MIDNIGHT OIL. ...
stay with
See: STICK WITH.
stead
See: STAND IN GOOD STEAD.
steady
See: GO STEADY.
steak
See: SALISBURY STEAK, T-BONE STEAK.
steal
See: LOCK THE BARN DOOR AFTER THE HORSE IS STOLEN.
steal one's thunder
{v. phr.} To do or say something, intentionally or not, that another person has planned to say or do. * /Fred intended to nominate Bill for president, but John got up ...
steal a march on
{v. phr.} To get ahead of someone by doing a thing unnoticed; get an advantage over. * /The army stole a march on the enemy by marching at night and attacking them in ...
steal away
See: SLIP AWAY.
steal the show
{v. phr.} To act or do so well in a performance that you get most of the attention and the other performers are unnoticed. * /Mary was in only one scene of the play, ...
steal the spotlight
{v. phr.} To attract attention away from a person or thing that people should be watching. * /When the maid walked on the stage and tripped over a rug, she stole the ...
steal up on
{v. phr.} To stealthily approach one; sneak up on someone. * /The thief stole up on his victim, snatched her purse, and ran away./
steam
See: LET OFF STEAM or BLOW OFF STEAM, UNDER ONE'S OWN STEAM.
steamed up
{adj.}, {informal} Excited or angry about or eager to do something. * /The coach gave the team a pep talk before the game, and he got them all steamed up to win the game./ * ...
steel
See: MIND LIKE A STEEL TRAP.
steer clear of
{v.} 1. To steer a safe distance from; go around without touching. * /A ship steers clear of a rocky shore in stormy weather./ 2. {informal} To stay away from; keep ...
stem the tide
{v. phr.} To resist; hold back something of great pressure or strength. * /The way to stem the tide of juvenile delinquency is to strengthen education and to pass ...
step
See: IN STEP, OUT OF STEP, TAKE STEPS.
step all over
See: WALK OVER.
step down
{v.} 1. To come down in one move from a higher position to a lower. * /As soon as the train stopped, the conductor stepped down to help the passengers off./ 2. To make ...
step in
{v.} 1. To go inside for a quick visit. * /It was a cold night, and when the policeman passed, we invited him to step in for a cup of coffee./ 2. To begin to take part in ...
step inside
{v.} To come or go inside. * /Mother invited the callers to step inside./
step into
{v.} 1. To come or go into. * /The taxi stopped, and we stepped into it./ * /Mr. Jones called to his secretary to step into his office./ 2. To begin to do, undertake. * ...
step into one's shoes
{v. phr.} To do what someone else usually does after he has stopped doing it. * /When Bill's father died, Bill had to step into his father's shoes to support his mother./ * ...
step off
{v.} 1. To walk or march quickly. * /The drum major lowered his baton and the band stepped off./ 2. or[pace off]. To measure by taking a series of steps in a line. * ...
step on it
or[step on the gas] {v. phr.} 1. To push down on the gas pedal to make a car go faster. * /Be very careful when you step on the gas. Don't go too fast./ Compare: GIVE IT THE ...
step on one's toes
or[tread on one's toes] {v. phr.} To do something that embarrasses or offends someone else. * /If you break in when other people are talking, you may step on their ...
step on the gas
See: STEP ON IT.
step out
{v. phr.} 1. To go out, particularly socially, as on a date. * /Paul said to Sylvia, "You look so dressed up tonight - you must be stepping out, eh?"/ 2. To leave for a ...
step out on
{v. phr.} To be unfaithful to one's marriage partner or steady lover. * /It is rumored that he has been stepping out on his wife. That's why she's so upset./
step up
{v.} 1. To go from a lower to a higher place. * /John stepped up onto the platform and began to speak./ 2. To come towards or near; approach. * /The sergeant called for ...
stepped up
{adj.} Carried on at a faster or more active rate; increased. * /To fill the increase in orders, the factory had to operate at a stepped-up rate./
sterling character
{n. phr.} A person of irreproachable character; one of the highest professional standards. * /The nominee for the Supreme Court must be a sterling character in every ...
stew in one's own juice
{v. phr.}, {informal} To suffer from something that you have caused to happen yourself. * /John lied to Tom, but Tom found out. Now Tom is making John stew in his own ...
stick
See: CARROT AND STICK, MORE THAN ONE COULD SHAKE A STICK AT.
stick around
{v.}, {informal} To stay or wait nearby. * /John's father told him to stick around and they would go fishing./ * /After work Mr. Harris stuck around to ride home with his ...
stick by one
{v. phr.} To support; remain loyal to. * /All of Peter's friends stuck by him faithfully, in spite of what has been said about him in the press./
stick in one's craw
or[stuck in one's crop] {v. phr.} To make you angry; bother you; annoy you. * /His parents' praise of his brother stuck in Jerry's craw./ * /Sue's failure to get a ...
stick in one's throat
{v. phr.} To be something you do not want to say; be hard to say. * /Jean wanted to ask the teacher's pardon, but the words stuck in her throat./
stick one's neck out
or[stick one's chin out] {v. phr.}, {informal} To do something dangerous or risky. * /When I was in trouble, Paul was the only one who would stick his neck out ...
stick one's nose into
See: NOSE INTO.
stick out
{v.} 1a. To stand out from a wall or other surface; project; extend. * /The limb stuck out from the trunk of the tree./ 1b. To be seen or noticed more easily or ...
stick out like a sore thumb
{v. phr.} To be conspicuous; be different from the rest. * /When the foreign student was placed in an advanced English grammar class by mistake, it was no wonder that ...
stick to the point
{v. phr.} To stay on course during a discussion; adhere to the topic; not talk about extraneous matters. * /Stick to the point and stop telling us your life history!/ ...
stick to one's guns
or[stand by one's guns] {v. phr.} To hold to an aim or an opinion even though people try to stop you or say you are wrong. * /People laughed at Columbus when he said the world ...
stick to one's knitting
or[tend to one's knitting] {v. phr.}, {informal} To do your own job and not bother other people. * /The trouble with Henry is that he is always telling other people what ...
stick to one's ribs
or[stick to the ribs] {v. phr.}, {informal} To keep you from getting hungry again too quickly. * /Doctors say you should eat a good breakfast that sticks to your ribs./ * ...
stick together
{v.} To remain close together in a situation. * /Stick together in the cave so that no one gets lost./ * /The gang stuck together after the game./ * /Bill and Bob ...
stick up
{v.}, {informal} To rob with a gun. * /When the messenger left the bank, a man jumped out of an alley and stuck him up./ Syn.: HOLD UP. * /In the old West, ...
stick up for
See: STAND UP FOR.
stick with
{v.}, {informal} 1. or[stay with] To continue doing; not quit. * /Fred stayed with his homework until it was done./ * /Practicing is tiresome, but stick with it and ...
stick-in-the-mud
{n.}, {informal} An overcareful person; someone who is old-fashioned and fights change. * /Mabel said her mother was a real stick-in-the-mud to make a rule that she must be ...

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