Слова на букву so b-take (459) Словарь американских идиом
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Слова на букву so b-take (459)

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stick-up
{n.}, {informal} A robbery by a man with a gun. * /Mr. Smith was the victim of a stick-up last night./
sticky fingers
{n. phr.}, {slang} 1. The habit of stealing things you see and want. * /Don't leave money in your locker; some of the boys have sticky fingers./ * /Don't leave that girl ...
stiff
See: KEEP A STIFF UPPER LIP, SCARE OUT OF ONE'S WITS or SCARE STIFF.
still
See: HEART STAND STILL.
still waters run deep
Quiet people probably are profound thinkers. - A proverb. * /He doesn't say much, but he sure looks smart. Well, still waters run deep, isn't that true?/
still life
{n. phr.} A term used by artists to describe a motionless picture of a bowl of fruit, flowers, etc. * /One of van Gogh's most famous still lifes is a vase of yellow ...
stir up
{v.} 1. To bring (something) into being, often by great exertion or activity; cause. * /It was a quiet afternoon, and John tried to stir up some excitement./ * /Bob ...
stir up a hornet's nest
{v. phr.} To make many people angry; do something that many people don't like. * /The principal stirred up a hornet's nest by changing the rules at school./
stitch
See: IN STITCHES.
stock
See: IN STOCK, OUT OF STOCK, TAKE STOCK, TAKE STOCK IN.
stock-in-trade
{n. phr.} The materials which one customarily deals, sells, or offers. * /Imported silk blouses from the Orient are the stock-in-trade of their small shop./ * /Anecdotes ...
stomach
See: EYES BIGGER THAN ONE'S STOMACH, BUTTERFLIES IN YOUR STOMACH, TURN ONE'S STOMACH.
stone
See: CAST THE FIRST STONE, HAVE A HEART OF STONE, KILL TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE, LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED, PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN GLASS HOUSES SHOULD NOT THROW STONES, ...
stone wall
or[brick wall] {adj.} Something hard to overcome; an idea or belief that is hard to change. * /The students ran into a brick wall when they asked the principal to put ...
stone's throw
or[within a stone's throw] {adv. phr.} Within a very short distance. * /They live across the street from us, just within a stone's throw./ See: HOP, SKIP AND A ...
stone-blind
{adj. phr.} 1. Completely blind. * /Poor Al is stone-blind and needs help to get across the street carefully./ 2. Highly intoxicated. * /George drank too much and ...
stone-broke
or[dead broke] or[flat broke] {adj.}, {informal} Having no money; penniless. * /Jill wanted to go to the movies but she was stone-broke./ * /The man gambled and was soon ...
stone-cold
{adj.} Having no warmth; completely cold. - Used to describe things that are better when warm. * /The boys who got up late found their breakfast stone-cold./ * /The furnace ...
stone-dead
{adj.}, {informal} Showing no signs of life; completely dead. * /Barry tried to revive the frozen robin but it was stone-dead./
stone-deaf
{adj. phr.} Completely deaf. * /Sam is stone-deaf so let him read your lips if you know no sign language./
stool pigeon
{n.} A criminal who informs on his associates. * /The detective was able to solve the crime mainly through information obtained from a stool pigeon./
stop
See: PUT AN END TO(1), or PUT A STOP TO.
stop at nothing
{v. phr.} To be unscrupulous. * /Al will stop at nothing to get Nancy to go out with him./
stop by
See: DROP BY.
stop cold
or[stop dead] or[stop in one's tracks] {v. phr.}, {informal} To stop very quickly or with great force. * /The hunter pulled the trigger and stopped the deer cold./ * ...
stop off
{v.} To stop at a place for a short time while going somewhere. * /We stopped off after school at the soda fountain before going home./ * /On our trip to California we ...
stop over
{v.} To stay at a place overnight or for some other short time while on a trip elsewhere. * /When we came back from California, we stopped over one night near the ...
stop short
{v. phr.} To suddenly stop. * /Jake stopped short when he heard somebody yell out his name loud but there was no one in sight./
stop street
{n.} A street where cars must come to a full stop before crossing another street. * /Johnny was late because he traveled on a stop street./ Contrast: THROUGH STREET.
stop the show
{v. phr.} To elicit such a strong applause from the audience that the show is interrupted. * /Pavarotti's rendition of "O sole mio" always stops the show./
stop up
{v. phr.} To block; close. * /If you want to get rid of the leak, you must stop up the two holes you have in the ceiling./
store
See: DIME STORE, IN STORE, SET STORE BY, VARIETY STORE.
storm
See: TAKE BY STORM.
story
See: OLD STORY, SOB STORY, UPPER STORY.
stow away
{v.} 1. {informal} To pack or store away. * /After New Year's Day the Christmas decorations were stowed away until another season./ 2. To hide on a ship or another kind ...
straight
See: GO STRAIGHT, SHOOT STRAIGHT.
straight face
{n.} A face that is not laughing or smiling. * /Mary told all the funny stories she knew to try to make Joan laugh, but Joan kept a straight face./ * /It is hard to ...
straight from the horse's mouth
{slang} Directly from the person or place where it began; from a reliable source or a person that cannot be doubted. * /They are going to be married. I got the news ...
straight from the shoulder
{adv. phr.}, {informal} In an open and honest way of speaking; without holding back anything because of fear or politeness or respect for someone's feelings; frankly. * ...
straight off
{adv. phr.} At once; immediately. * /After school is over, you come home straight off, and don't waste time./ * /He asked his father for the car, but his father said ...
straight out
See: RIGHT OUT.
straight shooters
See: SHOOT STRAIGHT.
straight ticket
{n.} A vote for all the candidates of a single party. * /Uncle Fred was a loyal member of his party. He always voted the straight ticket./ Contrast: SPLIT TICKET.
straighten out
{v.} To correct a mistake; make you realize you are wrong. * /The teacher saw Jim's awkward sentence on the board and asked for volunteers to straighten it out./ * ...
straighten up
{v.} To put in order; make neat. * /Vic had to straighten up his room before he could go swimming./ * /Mrs. Johnson straightened up the house before company came./ ...
straightlaced
{adj.} Of very strict morals and manners. * /She is so straightlaced that she won't even go out with a man unless she senses that he is serious about her./
strain a point
See: STRETCH A POINT.
strange to say
{adv. phr.} Not what you might think; surprisingly. - Used for emphasis. * /Strange to say, Jerry doesn't like candy./ * /Strange to say, the Indians didn't kill ...
strapped for
{adj.} Broke; out of funds. * /My brother is so extravagant that he is always strapped for cash./
straw
See: GIVE A HANG, GRASP AT A STRAW, GRASP AT STRAWS, LAST STRAW or STRAW THAT BREAKS THE CAMEL'S BACK, MAKE BRICKS WITHOUT STRAW.
straw boss
{n.} 1. The boss of a few workers who is himself under another boss or foreman. * /The straw boss told Jim he would have to see the foreman about a job./ 2, A man who ...
straw in the wind
{n. phr.} A small sign of what may happen. * /The doctor's worried face was a straw in the wind./ * /The quickly-called meeting of the President and his ...
straw poll
{n. phr.} An informal survey taken in order to get an opinion. * /The results of our straw poll show that most faculty members prefer to teach between 9 and 11 A.M./
straw vote
See: STRAW POLL.
streak
See: WINNING STREAK.
streak of luck
See: RUN OF LUCK.
stream
See: CHANGE HORSES IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREAM, SWIM AGAINST THE CURRENT or SWIM AGAINST THE STREAM.
street
See: BACK STREET, CROSS STREET, MAN IN THE STREET, ON EASY STREET, SIDE STREET, STOP STREET, THROUGH STREET.
strength
See: ON THE STRENGTH OF.
stretch a point
or[strain a point] {v. phr.} To permit something different or more than usual; not tell the exact truth or make an exception. * /Mother stretched a point because it was ...
stretch of the imagination
{n. phr.} Imaginative attempt or effort. * /By no stretch of the imagination can I see Al as a successful lawyer./
stride
See: HIT ONE'S STRIDE, TAKE IN STRIDE.
strike
See: CALLED STRIKE, HAVE TWO STRIKES AGAINST ONE, LIGHTNING NEVER STRIKES TWICE IN THE SAME PLACE, TWO STRIKES AGAINST ONE.
strike a bargain
{v. phr.} To arrive at a price satisfactory to both the buyer and the seller. * /After a great deal of haggling, they managed to strike a bargain./
strike a happy medium
{v. phr.} To find an answer to a problem that is halfway between two unsatisfactory answers. * /Mary said the dress was blue. Jane said it was green. They finally ...
strike all of a heap
See: ALL OF A HEAP.
strike gold
{v. phr.} 1. To find gold. * /Ted struck gold near an abandoned mine in California./ 2. To find suddenly the answer to an old puzzle. * /Professor Brown's assistant ...
strike home
See: HIT HOME.
strike it rich
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To discover oil, or a large vein of minerals to be mined, or a buried treasure. * /The old prospector panned gold for years before he struck ...
strike one funny
{v. phr.} To appear or seem laughable, curious, ironic, or entertaining. * /"It strikes me funny," he said, "that you should refuse my invitation to visit my chateau in France. ...
strike one's colors
See: HAUL DOWN ONE'S COLORS.
strike one's fancy
{v. phr.} To please one's predilections; appeal to one. * /The red tie with the yellow dragon on it happened to strike my fancy, so I bought it./
strike out
{v.} 1. To destroy something that has been written or drawn by drawing a line or cross through it or by erasing it. * /John misspelled "corollary. " He struck it out and wrote ...
strike out at
{v. phr.} To attack someone verbally or physically. * /She was so angry that she struck out at him every occasion she got./
strike the hour
{v. phr.} To mark or toll the hour (said of clocks or bells). * /We heard the church clock strike the hour of two./
strike up
{v.} 1a. To start to sing or play. * /We were sitting around the camp fire. Someone struck up a song, and we all joined in./ * /The President took his place on the platform, ...
strike while the iron is hot
See: MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES.
strikebreaker
{n.} One who takes the place of workers on strike or one who recruits such people. * /The striking workers threw rotten eggs at the strikebreakers./
string
See: FIRST STRING, LATCH STRING, ON THE STRING or ON A STRING, PULL STRINGS, PURSE STRINGS, SHOE-STRING CATCH, TIED TO ONE'S MOTHER'S APRON STRINGS.
string along
{v.}, {informal} 1. To deceive; fool; lead on dishonestly. * /Mary was stringing John along for years but she didn't mean to marry him./ * /George told the new boy that ...
string out
{v.} To make (something) extend over a great distance or a long stretch of time. * /The telephone poles were strung out along the road as far as we could see./ * /Mary ...
string up
{v.}, {slang} To put a rope around the neck of a person and choke him to death; hang. * /The posse strung up the rustler without a trial./ Compare: NECKTIE PARTY.
stroke
See: AT A STROKE or AT ONE'S STROKE.
stroke of luck
See: RUN OF LUCK.
strong language
{n. phr.} Cursing; swearing. * /When Ned learned that he had been fired, he used some very strong language about his boss./
strung out
{adj.}, {slang}, {colloquial} 1. Nervous, jittery, jumpy; generally ill because of drug use or withdrawal symptoms. * /The only explanation I can think of for Max's ...
stuck on
{slang} Very much in love with; crazy about. * /Judy thinks she is very pretty and very smart. She is stuck on herself./ * /Lucy is stuck on the football captain./
stuck with
{adj. phr.} Left in a predicament; left having to take care of a problem caused by another. * /Our neighbors vanished without a trace and we got stuck with their cat and dog./ ...
stuck-up
{adj.}, {informal} Acting as if other people are not as good as you are; conceited; snobbish. * /Mary is very stuck-up, and will not speak to the poor children in her ...
study
See: BROWN STUDY.
stuff
See: KNOW ONE'S WAY AROUND(2).
stuff and nonsense
{n.} Foolish or empty writing or talk; nonsense. * /Fred told a long story about his adventures in Africa, but it was all stuff and nonsense./ Often used as an ...
stuff the ballot box
{v. phr.} To give more votes to a candidate in an election than there are people who actually voted for him. * /It is a crime to stuff the ballot box./ -[ballot-stuffing] {adj. ...
stuffed shirt
{n. phr.} A pretentious bore; a pompous, empty person. * /I think that Howard is a terrible stuffed shirt with no sense of humor./
stuffed up
{adj. phr.} Impeded; blocked. * /Our kitchen sink is all stuffed up so I have to call the plumber./
stumble across
{v. phr.} To encounter a person or thing, mostly by accident. * /I gave up looking for my old hat when I accidentally stumbled across it in a dark corner of the closet./ ...
stump
See: TAKE THE STUMP or TAKE TO THE STUMP, UP A STUMP.
style
See: CRAMP ONE'S STYLE, HIGH STYLE.
subject to
{adj. phr.} 1. Under the government or control of; in the power of. * /The English colonies in America were subject to the English king./ * /The principal and the teachers ...
substance
See: IN SUBSTANCE.
succeed
See: HOWLING SUCCESS, NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE SUCCESS.
such and such
{pron.} Something whose name is not mentioned because it does not need to be mentioned. * /George's argument tries to prove such and such to be true, but it does not ...
such as
{conj.} 1. Of a kind or amount shown or named; of a kind like. * /The explorer took only such men and things as he really needed into the jungle with him./ * /They felt ...
such as it is
Just as it appears or is presented, not being any better or worse than most others of its kind; being average or mediocre. * /This pie, such as it is, is the ...
such that
{conj.} Of a kind or amount that; so great or so little that; enough that. * /There was such a big line at me movie that we had to wait before we could get in./ * /Jimmy ...
such-and-such
{adj. phr.} Being one whose name has been forgotten or whose name does not need to be mentioned. * /She told me to go to such-and-such a street and turn right./ * /Suppose, ...
suck in
{v.} 1. {informal} To pull in by taking a deep breath and tightening the muscles; flatten. * /"Suck in those stomachs," the gym teacher said./ 2. {slang} To make a fool of; ...
sucker list
{n.}, {slang} A list of easily-fooled people, especially people who are easily persuaded to buy things or give money. * /The crook got hold of a sucker list and ...
sugar daddy
{n.}, {slang}, {semi-vulgar}, {avoidable} An older, well-to-do man, who gives money and gifts to a younger woman or girls usually in exchange for sexual favors. * /Betty ...
suit
See: BIRTHDAY SUIT, FOLLOW SUIT.
suit to a T
See: TO A T.
suit up
{v. phr.} To don a uniform or sports outfit. * /The veterans like to suit up for the Fourth of July parade./
suit yourself
{v. phr.}, {informal} To do what one likes or prefers. * /"I don't care where you want to sleep," he said. " Suit yourself!"/
sum total
{n.} The final amount; everything taken together; total. * /The sum total of expenses for the trip was $450./ * /Ten years was the sum total of John's education./
sum up
{v.} To put something into a few words; shorten into a brief summary; summarize. * /The teacher summed up the lesson in three rules./ * /The mailman's job, in all kinds of ...
sun
See: UNDER THE SUN.
sunbelt
{n.}, {informal} A portion of the southern United States where the winter is very mild in comparison to other states. * /The Simpsons left Chicago for the sunbelt because of ...
Sunday
See: MONTH OF SUNDAYS.
Sunday best
or[Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes] See: BEST BIB AND TUCKER.
sunny-side up
{adj.} Fried on one side only. * /Barbara likes her eggs sunny-side up./
supper
See: COVERED-DISH SUPPER or POTLUCK SUPPER.
supply
See: IN SHORT SUPPLY.
sure
See: FOR SURE, MAKE SURE, TO BE SURE.
sure thing
1. {n.}, {informal} Something sure to happen; something about which there is no doubt. * /It's no fun betting on a sure thing./ 2. {adv.} Of course; certainly * ...
sure enough
{adv.} As expected. * /Charles was afraid he had done badly on the test, and sure enough, his grade was failing./ * /The children saw a familiar shape coming up the ...
sure-enough
{adj.} Real; genuine. * /Rick found a sure-enough nickel./ * /Martha's uncle gave her a sure-enough pearl on a little gold chain./ * /Jane's uncle is a sure-enough ...
surefire
{adj.} Without fail; effective; bringing actual results. * /During a campaign the only surefire way to get the sympathy of the voters is to mingle with them in person./
surface
See: SCRATCH THE SURFACE.
surprise
See: TAKE BY SURPRISE.
survival of the fittest
{n. phr.} The staying alive or in action of the best prepared; often: idea that those living things best able to adjust to life survive and those unable to adjust die ...
suspicion
See: ABOVE SUSPICION.
swallow
See: LOOK LIKE THE CAT THAT ATE THE CANARY.
swallow hook, line, and sinker
See: HOOK, LINE, AND SINKER.
swallow one's pride
{v. phr.} To bring your pride under control; humble yourself. * /After Bill lost the race, he swallowed his pride and shook hands with the winner./ Compare: EAT ONE'S ...
swallow one's words
1. To speak unclearly; fail to put enough breath into your words. * /Phyllis was hard to understand because she swallowed her words./ 2. See: EAT ONE'S WORDS.
swallow up
{v. phr.} To do away with; absorb; engulf. * /My expenses are so great that they swallow up my modest salary./
swan song
{n. phr.}, {literary} A farewell or last appearance. * /The famous soprano gave her swan song in La Traviata before she retired./
SWAT team
{n.}, {informal} Police unit trained for especially hazardous or sensitive law-enforcement assignments; short for Special Weapons and Tactics. * /Joe made the SWAT team of ...
swathe
See: CUT A SWATHE.
swear by
{v.} 1. To use as the support or authority that what you are saying is truthful; take an oath upon. * /A witness swears by the Bible that he will tell the truth./ * /In ...
swear in
or[swear into] {v.} To have a person swear or promise to do his duty as a member or an officer of an organization, government department, or similar group. - "Swear ...
swear off
{v.}, {informal} To give up something you like or you have got in the habit of using by making a promise. * /Mary swore off candy until she lost ten pounds./ * /John has ...
swear out
{v.} To get (a written order to do something) by swearing that a person has broken the law. * /The policeman swore out a warrant for the suspect's arrest./ * /The ...
sweat
See: BY THE SWEAT OF ONE'S BROW.
sweat out
{v.}, {informal} To wait anxiously; worry while waiting. * /Karl was sweating out the results of the college exams./ * /The search plane signaled that help was on the ...
sweat blood
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To be very much worried. * /The engine of the airplane stopped, and the pilot sweated blood as he glided to a safe landing./ 2. To work very hard. * ...
Sweeney
See: TELL IT TO THE MARINES or TELL IT TO SWEENEY.
sweep
See: NEW BROOM SWEEPS CLEAN.
sweep off one's feet
{v. phr.} To make (someone) have feelings (as love or happiness) too strong to control; overcome with strong feeling; win sudden and complete acceptance by (someone) ...
sweep out of
{v. phr.} To leave in an impressive, majestic manner. * /Offended by Tim's remark, Mary swept out of the room with her head high in the air./
sweep the city
or[country] or[nation] or[world] {v. phr.} To gain great attention or popularity throughout the city, country, etc. * /Pavarotti's unmatched tenor voice swept the ...
sweep under the rug
{v. phr.} To hide or dismiss casually (something one is ashamed of or does not know what to do about). * /In many places, drug abuse by school children is swept under the ...
sweet
See: SHORT AND SWEET.
sweet on
{adj. phr.}, {informal} In love with; very fond of. * /John is sweet on Alice./
sweet talk
1. {n.}, {informal} Too much praise; flattery. * /Sometimes a girl's better judgment is overcome by sweet talk./ 2. {v.}, {informal} To get what you want by great ...
sweet tooth
{n. phr.} A great weakness or predilection for sweets. * /Sue has such a sweet tooth that she hardly eats anything else but cake./
sweetie pie
{n.}, {informal} A person who is loved; darling; sweetheart. * /Arnold blushed with pleasure when Annie called him her sweetie pie./ * /Nancy is Bill's sweetie pie./
swell-headed
See: SWELLED HEAD.
swelled head
{n.}, {informal} A feeling that you are very important or more important than you really are. * /When John won the race, he got a swelled head./ * /Pretty girls shouldn't ...
swim
See: IN THE SWIM, SINK OR SWIM.
swim against the current
or[swim against the stream] {v. phr.} To do the opposite of what most people want to do; go against the way things are happening; struggle upstream. * /The boy who tries ...
swine
See: CAST PEARLS BEFORE SWINE or CAST ONE'S PEARLS BEFORE SWINE.
swing
See: IN FULL SWING.
swing one's weight
{v. phr.} To use your personal power to get something done * /The President swings his weight to get laws passed./ * /Mr. Thomas swung his weight to get his son a job with ...
switch
See: ASLEEP AT THE SWITCH.
switched on
{adj.}, {slang} 1. In tune with the latest fads, ideas, and fashions. * /I dig Sarah, she is really switched on./ 2. Stimulated; as if under the influence of alcohol or ...
swoop
See: AT ONE FELL SWOOP.
sword
See: AT SWORDS' POINTS, PUT TO THE SWORD.
sword rattling
See: SABER RATTLING.
sworn enemies
{n. phr.} People or groups or nations that have a long-standing dislike for each other. * /The Israelis and the Arabs used to be sworn enemies but hopefully they will sign ...
syllable
See: WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.
system
See: PUBLIC-ADDRESS SYSTEM.
T
See: TO A T.
T-bone steak
{n.} A steak with a bone in it which looks like a "T". * /On Jim's birthday we had T-bone steak for supper./
tab
See: KEEP TAB ON or KEEP TABS ON.
table
See: AT THE TABLE or AT TABLE, COFFEE TABLE, PUT ONE'S CARDS ON THE TABLE or LAY ONE'S CARDS ON THE TABLE, TURN THE TABLES, WAIT AT TABLE or WAIT ON TABLE.
tack
See: GET DOWN TO BRASS TACKS, GO SIT ON A TACK, SHARP AS A TACK.
tack on
{v. phr.} To append; add. * /We were about to sign the contract when we discovered that the lawyer had tacked on a codicil that was not acceptable to us./
tackle
See: FLYING TACKLE
tag end
or[tail end] {n.}, {informal} The end, farthest to the rear, last in line, nearest the bottom, or least important. * /John was at the tail end of his class./ * /Mary's ...
tail
See: COW'S TAIL, HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU LOSE, MAKE HEAD OR TAIL OF, TURN TAIL.
tail between one's legs
{n. phr.} State of feeling beaten, ashamed, or very obedient, as after a scolding or a whipping. * /The army sent the enemy home with their tails between their legs./ * ...
tail end
See: TAG END.
tail wags the dog
Said of situations in which a minor part is in control of the whole. * /He is just a minor employee at the firm, yet he gives everyone orders, a case of the tail wagging the ...
taillight
{n.} The rear red light of a car. * /My father was fined $15 for driving without a taillight./
tailor-made
See: MADE-TO-MEASURE.
tailspin
See: GO INTO A TAILSPIN.
take
See: CAN TAKE IT WITH ONE, GIVE AND TAKE, GIVE ONE AN INCH AND HE WILL TAKE A MILE, GIVE OR TAKE, SIT UP AND TAKE NOTICE.
take it all in
{v. phr.} To absorb completely; listen attentively. * /Bill's piano music filled the room and we took it all in with admiration./
take it from the top
{v. phr.}, {informal} {Musical and theatrical expression} To start again from the beginning. * /The conductor said, "We must try it once again. Take it from the top ...
take off one's hands
{v. phr.} 1. To abdicate one's responsibility of a person or matter. * /"I am herewith taking my hand off your affairs," Lou's father said. "See how you succeed on ...
take pains
{v. phr.} To do something very carefully and thoroughly. * /She had taken pains to see that her guests had everything that they could possibly want./ * /She ...
take a hand in
{v. phr.} To assist in the direction of; participate. * /The University Faculty Club decided to take a hand in helping the recent refugees./

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