Слова на букву take-turn (459) Словарь американских идиом
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву take-turn (459)

1 2 > >>
take a back seat
{v. phr.}, {informal} To accept a poorer or lower position; be second to something or someone else. * /During the war all manufacturing had to take a back seat to ...
take a bath
{v. phr.}, {informal} To come to financial ruin. * /Boy, did we ever take a bath on that merger with Brown & Brown, Inc./
take a bow
{v. phr.} To stand up or come on a stage to be clapped for or praised for success. * /The audience shouted for the author of the play to take a bow./ * /The basketball team ...
take a break
{v. phr.} To have a brief rest period during the course of one's work. * /"You've worked hard. It's time to take a break," the boss said./
take a chance
{v. phr.} To accept the risk of failure or loss. * /We will take a chance on the weather and have the party outdoors./
take a crack at
{v. phr.} To try doing something. * /It was a difficult challenge to reorganize our antiquated campus, but the resident architect decided to take a crack at it./
take a dig at
{v. phr.} To attack verbally; offend; denigrate. * /If you keep taking digs at me all the time, our relationship will be a short one./
take a dim view of
{v. phr.} 1. To have doubts about; feel unsure or anxious about. * /Tom took a dim view of his chances of passing the exam./ * /Betty hoped to go on a picnic, but she took a ...
take a dislike to
Contrast: TAKE A FANCY TO.
take a drop
{v. phr.} 1. To indulge in alcoholic drinks. * /Aunt Liz doesn't really drink; she just takes a drop every now and then./ 2. To lose value; decrease in price. * /Stocks ...
take a fancy to
{v. phr.} To become fond of; cultivate a predilection for. * /Aunt Hermione has taken a fancy to antique furniture./
take a flop
{v. phr.} To fall heavily. * /I took a nasty flop on the ice-covered sidewalk./
take a hard line with
See: HARD LINE, HARD-LINER.
take a hike
See: GO FLY A KITE.
take a hint
{v. phr.} To understand an allusion or a suggestion and behave accordingly. * /"I don't like people who smoke," she said. "Can't you take a hint and either quit smoking or ...
take a joke
{v. phr.} Accept in good spirit some derision directed at oneself. * /My brother has a good sense of humor when teasing others, but he cannot take a joke on ...
take a liking to
See: TAKE A FANCY TO.
take a load off one's feet
{v. phr.} To alleviate one's fatigue by sitting down during some taxing work. * /"You've been standing there for hours, Jake," John said. "Why don't you take a load off your ...
take a long breath
See: DRAW A LONG BREATH.
take a new turn
{v. phr.} To start a new course; decide upon a new direction. * /The company took a new turn under Jack's directorship./
take a nose dive
{v. phr.} To plummet; fall sharply. * /The stock market took a nose dive after the news of the President's heart attack./
take a notion
See: TAKE INTO ONE'S HEAD.
take a poke at
See: TAKE A PUNCH AT.
take a pot shot at
See: POTSHOT.
take a powder
{v. phr.}, {slang} To leave hurriedly; run out or away; desert, flee. * /All the gang except one had taken a powder when the police arrived./
take a punch at
or[take a poke at] or[take a sock at] {v. phr.} To try to hit (someone) with the fist; swing or strike at; attack with the fists. * /Bob was very angry and suddenly he ...
take a risk
See: RUN A RISK.
take a shine to
{v. phr.}, {slang} To have or show a quick liking for. * /He took a shine to his new teacher the very first day./ Compare: TAKE A FANCY TO.
take a shot at
{v. phr.} To try casually; attempt to do. * /"Can you handle all these new book orders?" Tom asked. "I haven't done it before," Sally replied, "but I can sure take a shot ...
take a sock at
See: TAKE A PUNCH AT.
take a spill
{v. phr.} To fall down; tip over. * /During the harsh winter, when the sidewalk is covered with ice, many people take a spill./
take a stand
{v. phr.} To assert one's point. of view; declare one's position. * /It is time for American society to take a stand against crime./
take a turn
{v. phr.} To become different; change. * /Mary's fever suddenly took a bad turn./ * /The story took an odd turn./ Often used with " for the better" or " for the worse". * ...
take a turn for the better
{v. phr.} To start improving; start to get better. * /Aunt Hermione was very ill for a long time, but last week she suddenly took a turn for the better./
take a turn for the worse
See: FOR THE WORSE. Contrast: TAKE A TURN FOR THE BETTER.
take a whack at
See: TAKE A SHOT AT.
take aback
See: TAKEN BACK.
take advantage of
{v. phr.} 1. To make good use of. * /The cat took advantage of the high grass to creep up on the bird./ * /Jean took advantage of the lunch hour to finish her ...
take after
{v.} To be like because of family relationship; to have the same looks or ways as (a parent or ancestor). * /He takes after his father in mathematical ability./ * /She ...
take aim
{v. phr.} To get ready to hit, throw at, or shoot at by sighting carefully. * /When the captain orders "Take aim," raise your gun to your shoulder and sight along the ...
take amiss
or[the wrong way] {v. phr.} To become offended due to a misunderstanding. * /"I hope you won't take it amiss," the boss said to Jane, "that I find you irresistibly ...
take apart
{v. phr.} To dismantle; disassemble. * /Boys like taking radios and watches apart, but they seldom know how to put them back together again./
take at one's word
{v. phr.} To believe everything (someone) says; to act on what is said. * /If you say you don't want this coat, I'll take you at your word and throw it away./ * /When ...
take back
{v.} To change or deny something offered, promised, or stated; admit to making a wrong statement. * /I take back my offer to buy the house now that I've had a good look at ...
take by storm
{v. phr.} 1. To capture by a sudden or very bold attack. * /The army did not hesitate. They took the town by storm./ 2. To win the favor or liking of; make (a group of ...
take by surprise
{v. phr.} 1. To appear in front of someone suddenly or to suddenly discover him before he discovers you; come before (someone) is ready; appear before (someone) ...
take by the scruff
{v. phr.} 1. To assert authority over a person. * /Tim's mother took him by the scruff and told him to get cleaned up./ 2. To punish a person. * /The boss took us by ...
take care
{v. phr.} To be careful; use wisdom or caution. * /Take care that you don't spill that coffee!/ * /We must take care to let nobody hear about this./
take care of
{v. phr.} 1. To attend to; supply the needs of. * /She stayed home to take care of the baby./ Syn.: KEEP AN EYE ON(2), LOOK AFTER. Compare: IN CHARGE(2). 2. {informal} ...
take charge
{v. phr.} To begin to lead or control; take control or responsibility; undertake the care or management (of persons or things). * /When Mrs. Jackson was in the hospital, ...
take cold
See: CATCH COLD.
take cover
{v. phr.} To seek shelter or protection. * /The rain began so suddenly that we had to take cover in a doorway./
take down
{v.} 1. To write or record (what is said). * /I will tell you how to get to the place; you had better take it down./ 2. To pull to pieces; take apart. * /It will be a ...
take down a notch
or[take down a peg] {v. phr.}, {informal} To make (someone) less proud or sure of himself. * /The team was feeling proud of its record, but last week the boys were taken down ...
take effect
{v. phr.} 1. To have an unexpected or intended result; cause a change. * /It was nearly an hour before the sleeping pill took effect./ 2. To become lawfully right, or ...
take exception to
{v. phr.} To speak against; find fault with; be displeased or angered by; criticize. * /There was nothing in the speech that you could take exception to./ * /Did she ...
take five
{v. phr.} To take a five-minute break during some work or theatrical rehearsal. * /"All right, everyone," the director cried. "Let's take five."/
take for
{v.} To suppose to be; mistake for. * /Do you take me for a fool?/ * /At first sight you would take him for a football player, not a poet./
take for a ride
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To take out in a car intending to murder. * /The gang leader decided that the informer must be taken for a ride./ 2. To play a trick on; fool. * ...
take for granted
{v. phr.} 1. To suppose or understand to be true. * /Mr. Harper took for granted that the invitation included his wife./ * /A teacher cannot take it for granted that ...
take French leave
{v. phr.} To leave secretly; abscond. * /The party was so boring that we decided to take French leave./ * /While the Smith family was in Europe, the house-sitter packed ...
take heart
{v. phr.} To be encouraged; feel braver and want to try. * /The men took heart from their leader's words and went on to win the battle./ * /When we are in trouble we can ...
take heed
{v. phr.}, {literary} To pay attention; watch or listen carefully; notice. * /Take heed not to spill coffee on the rug./
take hold of
{v. phr.} To grasp. * /The old man tried to keep himself from falling down the stairs, but there was no railing to take hold of./
take ill
or[take sick] {v.} To become sick. * /Father took sick just before his birthday./ - Used in the passive with the same meaning. * /The man was taken ill on the train./
take in
{v.} 1. To include. * /The country's boundaries were changed to fake in a piece of land beyond the river./ * /The class of mammals takes in nearly all warm-blooded animals ...
take in stride
{v. phr.} To meet happenings without too much surprise; accept good or bad luck and go on. * /He learned to take disappointments in stride./
take in tow
{v. phr.} To take charge of; lead; conduct. * /Brian and Kate took a group of children in tow when they went to see the circus./
take into account
{v. phr.} To remember and understand while judging someone or something; consider. * /How much time will we need to get to the lake? You have to take the bad road into ...
take issue with
{v. phr.} To be openly against; speak against; disagree with. * /He thought his boss was wrong but was afraid to take issue with him on the matter./
take it
{v. phr.} 1. To get an idea or impression; understand from what is said or done. - Usually used with "I". * /I take it from your silence that you don't want to go./ 2. ...
take it away
{v. phr.}, {informal}, {Theatrical expression} You're on; it's your turn; you're next. * /And here comes that wonderful comedian, Bob Hope. The announcer said, ...
take it easy
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. or[go easy] or[take things easy] To go or act slowly, carefully, and gently. - Often used with "on". * /Take it easy. The roads are icy./ * /"Go ...
take it into one's head
or {informal}[take a notion] {v. phr.} To get a sudden idea; decide without thinking. * /The boy suddenly took it into his head to leave school and get a job./ * ...
take it on the chin
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To be badly beaten or hurt. * /Our football team really took it on the chin today. They are all bumps and bruises./ * /Mother and I took it on the ...
take it or leave it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To accept something without change or refuse it; decide yes or no. - Often used like a command. * /He said the price of the house was $10,000, ...
take it out on
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be unpleasant or unkind to (someone) because you are angry or upset; get rid of upset feelings by being mean to. - Often used with the name of the ...
take its toll
{v. phr.} To cause loss or damage. * /The bombs had taken their toll on the little town./ * /The budget cut took its toll of teachers./
take kindly to
{v.} To be pleased by; like. - Usually used in negative, interrogative, and conditional sentences. * /He doesn't take kindly to any suggestions about running his business./ ...
take leave of
{v. phr.} I. To abandon, go away from, or become separated from. - Usually used in the phrase "take leave of one's senses". * /Come down from the roof, Billy! Have you ...
take leave of one's senses
{v. phr.} To go mad; become crazy. * /"Have you taken leave of your senses? "Jake cried, when he saw Andy swallow a live goldfish./
take liberties
{v. phr.} To act toward in too close or friendly a manner; use as you would use a close friend or something of your own. * /Mary would not let any boy take liberties with her./ ...
take lying down
{v. phr.} To accept something without defense or protest. * /If you take such insults lying down, you will only encourage more of the same./
take no stock in
See: TAKE STOCK IN.
take note of
or[take notice of] {v. phr.} 1. To look carefully at; pay close attention to; observe well. * /A detective is trained to take note of people and things./ 2. To notice and ...
take oath
{v. phr.} To promise to tell the truth or to do some task honestly, calling on God or some person or thing as a witness. * /Mary took her oath that she did not steal the ...
take off
{v. phr.} 1a. To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away. * /The dog took off after a rabbit./ Compare: LIGHT OUT. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /The six ...
take off one's hat to
{v. phr.} To give honor, praise, and respect to. * /He is my enemy, but I take off my hat to him for his courage./ Compare: HAND IT TO.
take off the edge
See: TAKE THE EDGE OFF.
take offense at
{v. phr.} To become indignant; become angry. * /Why do you always take offense at everything I say?/
take on
{v.} 1. To receive for carrying; be loaded with. * /A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale./ * /The bus driver stopped at the ...
take on faith
{v. phr.} To lend credence to something due to one's confidence in the source, rather than based on evidence. * /One should never take on faith what one hears about ...
take on oneself
or[take upon oneself] {v. phr.} 1. To accept as a duty or responsibility. * /He took it on himself to see that the packages were delivered./ 2. To assume wrongfully ...
take on the chin
{v. phr.} To gracefully accept criticism. * /It's good to be able to tell people what they do wrong, but it is equally important to be able to take it on the chin when ...
take one at one's word
{v. phr.} To naively lend credence to what one tells one. * /It's a bad idea to take street vendors at their word in large, crowded cities./
take one wrong
See: GET ONE WRONG.
take one's medicine
{v. phr.} To accept punishment without complaining. * /The boy said he was sorry he broke the window and was ready to take his medicine./ Compare: FACE THE MUSIC(2).
take one's breath away
{v. phr.} To surprise greatly; impress very much; leave speechless with surprise or wonder or delight; astonish. * /The sunset is so beautiful it takes our breath ...
take one's death of
See: CATCH ONE'S DEATH OF.
take one's leave
or[take leave of] {v. phr.}, {formal} To say good-bye and leave. * /He stayed on after most of the guests had taken their leave./ * /The messenger bowed and took leave of ...
take one's life in one's hands
{v. phr.} To face great danger or take great risk. * /Driving that car with those worn tires would be taking your life in your hands./ * /He took his life in his hands ...
take one's measure
or[take the measure of] {v. phr.} To judge the character, quality, or nature of; try to guess about something - how hard or easy, dangerous or safe, good or bad, etc. * ...
take one's name in vain
{v. phr.} 1. To call upon (God) as a witness to your truth or honesty when you are lying; swear by (God) untruthfully. * /You shall not take the name of the Lord your ...
take one's time
{v. phr.} To avoid haste; act in an unhurried way. * /He liked to take his time over breakfast./ * /It is better to take your time at this job than to hurry and make ...
take one's word
{v. phr.} To believe one's promise. * /Herb took Eric's word when he promised to pay up his debt./
take out
{v. phr.} 1. To ask for and fill in. * /Mary and John took out a marriage license./ 2. To begin to run. * /When the window broke, the boys took out in all directions./ * ...
take out after
{v. phr.} To start pursuing one. * /The watchdog took out after the burglars./
take out on
{v. phr.} To vent one's sadness, frustration, or anger on someone who is usually innocent of the problem at hand. * /"Why are you always taking out your frustrations on ...
take over
{v.} 1a. To take control or possession of. * /He expects to take over the business when his father retires./ 1b. To take charge or responsibility. * /The airplane ...
take part
{v. phr.} To have a part or share; join. * /Jim saw the new boy watching the game and asked him to take part./ * /The Swiss did not take part in the two World Wars./
take pity on
also[take pity upon] {v. phr.} To feel sympathy or pity and do something for. * /Mary took pity on the orphan kittens./ * /The farmer took pity upon the campers, and let ...
take place
{v. phr.} To happen; occur. * /The accident took place only a block from his home./ * /The action of the play takes place in ancient Rome./ * /The dance will take place ...
take potluck
{v. phr.} To share as a guest an everyday meal without special preparation. * /You are welcome to stay for dinner if you will take potluck./ * /They were about to ...
take root
{v. phr.} 1. To form roots so as to be able to live and grow. * /We hope the transplanted apple trees will take root./ 2. To be accepted; to be adopted; to live and ...
temper
See: GOD TEMPERS THE WIND TO THE SHORN LAMB, HOLD ONE'S TEMPER or KEEP ONE'S TEMPER, LOSE ONE'S TEMPER.
temperature
See: RUN A TEMPERATURE.
tempest in a teapot
{n. phr.} Great excitement about something not important. * /Bess tore her skirt a little and made a tempest in a teapot./
tempt fate
or[tempt the fates] {v. phr.} To take a chance; run a risk; gamble. * /You're tempting fate every time you drive that old wreck of a car./
ten
See: DIME STORE or FIVE-AND-TEN, COUNT TO TEN.
ten gallon hat
{n.}, {informal} A tall felt hat with a wide, rolled brim worn by men in the western part of the U.S. * /Men from the southwest usually wear ten gallon hats./
ten roger
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} I acknowledge. * /That's a ten roger./
ten to one
or[two to one] {adv.} or {adj. phr.}, {informal} Almost certainly, nearly sure to be true; very likely to happen. * /Ten to one it will rain tomorrow./ * /It is ten; ...
ten-four?
{v. phr.}, {interrog.}, {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} Do you understand? * /Is that a ten-four?/
term
See: BRING TO TERMS, COME TO TERMS, IN SO MANY WORDS(2) or IN NO UNCERTAIN TERMS, IN TERMS OF.
terror
See: HOLY TERROR.
test
See: ROAD TEST, SCREEN TEST.
tether
See: END OF ONE'S ROPE or END OF ONE'S TETHER.
than
See: LESS THAN, LESS THAN NO TIME, MORE THAN.
thank one's lucky stars
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be thankful for good luck; think oneself lucky. * /You can thank your lucky stars you didn't fall in the hole./
thanks to
{prep.} 1. With the help of. * /Thanks to a good teacher, John passed the examination./ * /I finally finished washing the dishes, no thanks to you./ 2. Owing to; because ...
that is
or[that is to say] I mean; that means; in other words. * /John is a New Yorker; that is, he lives in New York./ * /Susan is a good student; that is to say, she gets good grades ...
that is that
or[that's that] {informal} The matter is decided; there is nothing more to be said; it is done. * /Jim, you will go to school this morning, and that is that./
That makes two of us!
Informal way to say, "I am in agreement with what you arc saying or doing." * /So you voted for Senator Aldridge? So did I - that makes two of us./
That takes care of that!
Informal way to say, "That concludes our business." * /I paid my ex-wife the last alimony check and that takes care of that!/
That will do!
Informal expression of impatience meaning "stop," "no more." * /"That will do, Tommy," his mother cried. "I've had just about enough of your drumming on the table."/
that'll be the day
{informal} That will never happen. * /Joe wanted me to lend him money to take my girl to the movies. That'll be the day!/ * /"Wouldn't it be nice if we had to go to school ...
that's --- for you
That's the way (someone or something) is; (someone or something) is like that. * /John tried hard, but he lost the game. That's life for you./ * /Mary changed her mind ...
That's about the size of it!
Informal way to say, "What you said is true; the rumor or the news is true." * /"I am told you're leaving our firm for Japan," Fred said to Tom. "That's about the size of it," ...
That's the story of my life...
Usually spoken when something goes wrong. * /I spent seven years writing a novel, but no publisher wants to accept it. That's the story of my life./
That's the ticket!
Informal way to say, "excellent; correct." * /"First we'll go up the Sears Tower, and then we'll take a night sightseeing tour on the lake," Fran said. "That's the ...
That's the way the ball bounces
or[the cookie crumbles!] Nothing unusual about that. - Said of unpleasant things. * /"Susan left me for a heavyweight boxer, and then I got drunk and wrecked my car," Bob ...
the pits
{n.}, {slang} 1. A low class, blighted and ill-maintained place, motel room or apartment. * /Max, this motel is the pits, I will not sleep here!/ 2. The end of the ...
the wiser
{adj.} Knowing about something which might be embarrassing of knowing. - Usually used with " nobody" or "no one". * /Mary took the teacher's book home by mistake, ...
the business
{n.}, {slang} - Usually used with "give" or "get". 1. All that you are able to do; greatest effort. * /Johnny gave the tryouts the business but he failed to make the team./ ...
The cat did it!
A humorous and convenient way to pass the blame. * /"My vase is broken!" Mother shrieked in horror. "Well," Dad smirked cynically, "I guess the cat did it!"/
the creeps
{n.}, {informal} 1. An uncomfortable tightening of the skin caused by fear or shock. * /Reading the story of a ghost gave Joe the creeps./ * /The queer noises in the old ...
the devil to pay
{n. phr.} A severe penalty. * /If we don't finish the work by next Monday, there will be the devil to pay./
the edge
{n.}, {informal} The advantage. - Usually used in the phrases "get the edge on", "have the edge on". * /In the last quarter of the game, our team got the edge on the other ...
the idea
or[the very idea] {n. phr.} - Used in exclamations to show that you do not like something. * /The idea! Thinking Mother was my sister!/ * /The very idea of Tom bringing that ...
the lid
{n.}, {slang} Something that holds back or holds out of sight. * /The police blew the lid off the gambling operations./ * /John kept the lid on his plans until he was ...
the likes of
{informal} Something like or similar to; something of the same kind as. * /I have never seen the likes of John./ * /It was a chocolate sundae the likes of which Mary would ...
the long and the short
or[the long and short] {n. phr.} All that needs to be said; the basic fact; point. * /The long and the short of the matter is that the man is no actor./ * /The money isn't ...
the matter
{adj.} Not as it should be; wrong. - Used in questions or with negatives or "if". * /Why don't you answer me? What's the matter?/ * /John may be slow in arithmetic, but ...
the more --- the more ---
or[the ---er the ---er] - Used in two halves of a sentence to show that when there is more of the first, there is more of the second too. * /The more you eat. the fatter ...
the other day
{adv. phr.} In the recent past. * /I saw an incredible parade of elephants along Michigan Avenue the other day on my way to work./
the other way around
{adv. phr.} See: JUST THE OTHER WAY.
the picture
{n.} The way things are or were; the facts about something; the situation; what happened or happens. * /Where does Susan come into the picture./ * /When you are looking ...
the powers that be
{n. phr.} Constituted authority; those in power. * /I have done all I can; the rest is up to the powers that be./
the ropes
{n. plural}, {informal} Thorough or special knowledge of a job; how to do something; the ways of people or the world. * /On a newspaper a cub reporter learns his job from an ...
the score
{n.}, {slang} The truth; the real story or information; what is really happening; the way people and the world really are. * /Very few people know the score in politics./ * ...
the three R's
{n. phr.} (W)riting, reading, and (a)rithmetic, the three basic skills of an elementary education. * /Barry has completed the three R's, but otherwise he has had little formal ...
the ticket
{n.} Exactly what is needed. - Often used with "just". * /This airtight locker is just the ticket for storing your winter clothes./
the tracks
{n.} The line between the rich or fashionable part of town and the poor or unfashionable part of town. * /The poor children knew they would not be welcome on the other side ...
the whole way
See: ALL THE WAY.
the works
{n. plural}, {slang} 1. Everything that can be had or that you have; everything of this kind, all that goes with it. * /When the tramp found $100, he went into a fine ...
theater
See: LITTLE THEATER.
then
See: AND THEN SOME, EVERY NOW AND THEN, NOW AND THEN.
then again
{adv.} As an opposite possibility; another thing. * /He may be here tomorrow. Then again, he may not come until next week./ * /I thought you told me about the fire, ...
then and there
{adv. phr.} At that very time and place in the past; right then. * /He said he wanted his dime back then and there, so I had to give it to him./ Compare: IN ONE'S ...
there
See: ALL THERE, HERE AND THERE, NEITHER HERE NOR THERE, THEN AND THERE.
there is more than one way to get a pig to market
or[flay a fox] or[skin a cat] There are always new and different ways to accomplish a difficult task. - A proverb. * /"'How did you get Tommy to study so hard?" Eleanor asked. ...
there is nothing to it
Informal way to say, "It is easy." * /Cooking stir-fried Chinese food is really not difficult at all; in fact, there's nothing to it./
There you go!
1. Informal way to say, "You are doing it already and you are doing it well." * /"Is roller skating hard?" Freddie asked. "No," Beth replied, "let me show you how to do ...
these
See: ONE OF THESE DAYS or SOME OF THESE DAYS.
they
See: LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY.
thick
See: BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WATER, LAY IT ON or LAY IT ON THICK, THROUGH THICK AND THIN.
thicker
See: BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WATER.
thin
See: INTO THIN AIR, OUT OF THIN AIR, SIT ON THIN ICE, SPREAD ONESELF TOO THIN, THROUGH THICK AND THIN, WEAR THIN.
thing
See: A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE IS A DANGEROUS THING, DO ONE'S THING or DO ONE'S OWN THING, FIRST THINGS COME FIRST, FOR ONE THING, SEE THINGS, SURE THING, TAKE IT EASY or ...
thing or two
{n. phr.}, {informal} 1. Facts not generally known, or not known to the hearer or reader; unusual or important information. * /Mary told Joan a thing or two about ...
Things are looking up!
Informal way to say that conditions are improving. * /Things are looking up at our university as the governor promised a 5% salary raise./
think
See: COME TO THINK OF IT.
think a great deal of
or[think a lot of] also[think much of] {v. phr.} To consider to be very worthy, valuable, or important; to esteem highly. * /Mary thinks a great deal of Tim./ * /The ...
think a lot of
See: THINK A GREAT DEAL OF.
think aloud
or[think out loud] {v.} To say what you are thinking. * /"I wish I had more money for Christmas presents," Father thought aloud. "What did you say?" said Mother. ...
think better of
{v.} To change your mind about; to consider again and make a better decision about. * /John told his mother he wanted to leave school, but later he thought better of it./ ...
Think big!
{v. phr.}, {informal} To believe in one's ability, purpose, or power to perform or succeed. * /Be confident; be positive; tell yourself you are the greatest; above all, ...
think fit
See: FIT.
think little of
{v. phr.} Think that (something or someone) is not important or valuable. * /John thought little of Ted's plan for the party./ * /Joan thought little of walking two ...
think much of
See: THINK A GREAT DEAL OF.
think nothing of
{v. phr.} To think or consider easy, simple, or usual. * /Jim thinks nothing of hiking ten miles in one day./
think nothing of it
{v. phr.}, {informal} Used as a courteous phrase in replying to thanks. /"Thank you very much for your help." " Think nothing of it."/ Compare: YOU'RE WELCOME.
think on one's feet
{v. phr.} To think quickly; answer or act without waiting; know what to do or say right away. * /A good basketball player can think on his feet./ * /Our teacher can ...
think out
{v.} 1. To find out or discover by thinking; study and understand. * /Andy thought out a way of climbing to the top of the pole./ Compare FIGURE OUT, WORK OUT. 2. To ...
think out loud
See: THINK ALOUD.
think over
{v.} To think carefully about; consider; study. * /When Charles asked Betty to marry him, she asked him for time to think it over./ * /Think over what we studied in ...
think piece
{n.}, {slang} 1. The human brain. * /Lou's got one powerful think piece, man./ 2. Any provocative essay or article that, by stating a strong opinion, arouses the reader to ...
think tank
{n.} A company of researchers who spend their time developing ideas and concepts. * /The government hired a think tank to study the country's need for coins, and was ...
think twice
{v.} To think again carefully; reconsider; hesitate. * /The teacher advised Lou to think twice before deciding to quit school./ Compare: THINK BETTER OF.
think up
{v.} To invent or discover by thinking; have a new idea of. * /Mary thought up a funny game for the children to play./
thinking cap
See: PUT ON ONE'S THINKING CAP.
third sex
{n.}, {euphemism}, {slang}, {informal} Homosexual individuals who are either men or women. * /Billy is rumored to belong to the third sex./
third base
{n.} The base to be touched third in baseball. * /He reached third base standing up on a long triple./
third class
{n.} 1. The third best or highest group; the class next after the second class. * /Mary won the pie-making contest in the third class, for the youngest girls./ 2. Mail that ...
third degree
{n. phr.} A method of severe grilling used to extract information from an arrested suspect. * /"Why give me the third degree?" he asked indignantly. "All I did was ...
third world
{n.} 1. The countries not aligned with either the former U.S.S.R.-dominated Communist bloc or the U.S.A.-dominated capitalist countries. * /New Zealand made a move ...
third-class(1)
{adj.} Belonging to the third class; of the third highest or best class. * /Much advertising is sent by third-class mall./ * /I bought a third-class airline ticket to ...
third-class(2)
{adv.} By third class. * /How did you send the package? Third class./ * /We traveled third-class on the train./
this
See: OUT OF THIS WORLD.
this and that
also[this, that, and the other] {n. phr.} Various things; different things; miscellaneous things. * /When the old friends met they would talk about this and that./ * ...
this is how the cookie crumbles
or[that's how the cookie crumbles] {v. phr.}, {informal} That's how things are; that's life. * /It's too bad about John and Mary getting divorced, but then that's how ...
this, that, and the other
See: THIS AND THAT.
thither
See: HITHER AND THITHER.
thorn in the flesh
or[thorn in one's side] {n. phr.} Something that causes stubborn trouble; a constant bother; a vexation. * /The new voter organization soon became the biggest thorn in the ...
though
See: AS IF or AS THOUGH.
thought
See: FOOD FOR THOUGHT, PENNY FOR ONE'S THOUGHTS, PERISH THE THOUGHT, SECOND THOUGHT.
thousand
See: BY THE DOZEN or BY THE THOUSAND.
thrash out
{v. phr.} To discuss fully; confer about something until a decision is reached. * /They met to thrash out their differences concerning how to run the office./
thread
See: HANG BY A THREAD.
threat
See: TRIPLE THREAT.
three sheets in the wind
or[three sheets to the wind] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Unsteady from too much liquor; drunk. * /The sailor came down the street, three sheets in the wind./
three-ring circus
{n.} A scene of much confusion or activity. * /The street was a three-ring circus of cars, people, noise, and lights./ * /It is a three-ring circus to watch that ...
thrill one to death
or[pieces] See: TICKLE PINK.
throat
See: CUT ONE'S THROAT, FLY AT ONE'S THROAT, JUMP DOWN ONE'S THROAT, LUMP IN ONE'S THROAT, RAM DOWN ONE'S THROAT and SHOVE DOWN ONE'S THROAT.
through a hoop
See: JUMP THROUGH A HOOP.
through and through
{adv.} Completely; entirely; whole-heartedly. * /Bob was a ball player through and through./ * /Mary was hurt through and through by Betty's remarks./ Compare: ...
through hell and high water
See: HELL AND HIGH WATER.
through one's hat
See: TALK THROUGH ONE'S HAT.
through one's head
See: GET THROUGH ONE'S HEAD.
through one's mind
See: CROSS ONE'S MIND or PASS THROUGH ONE'S MIND.
through one's paces
See: PUT THROUGH ONE'S PACES.
through street
{n.} 1. A street on which cars can move without stopping at intersections, but cars on streets crossing it have to stop at the intersection. * /You have to be ...
through the mill
{adv. phr.} 1. Experienced. * /You could tell immediately that the new employee had been through the mill./ 2. Through real experience of the difficulties of a certain ...
through the motions
See: GO THROUGH THE MOTIONS.
through the nose
See: PAY THROUGH THE NOSE.
through thick and thin
{adv. phr.} Through all difficulties and troubles; through good times and bad times. * /The friends were faithful through thick and thin./ * /George stayed in college ...
through train
{n. phr.} A direct train that doesn't necessitate any changes. * /We'll take the through train from Chicago to New York because it's the most convenient./
throw
See: FREE THROW, PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN GLASS HOUSES SHOULD NOT THROW STONES.
throw a curve
{v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To mislead or deceive someone; to lie. * /John threw me a curve about the hiring./ 2. To take someone by surprise in an unpleasant way. * ...
throw a fit
See: HAVE A FIT.
throw a loop
See: KNOCK FOR A LOOP.
throw a monkey wrench
or[throw a wrench] {v. phr.}, {informal} To cause something that is going smoothly to stop. * /The game was going smoothly until you threw a monkey wrench into the ...
throw a party
{v. phr.}, {informal} To hold a party; have a party. * /The club is throwing a party in the high school gym Saturday night./ * /The Seniors threw a masquerade party ...
throw a punch
{v. phr.} To strike at someone with your fist; hit; punch. * /Bob became so mad at Fred that he threw a punch at him./ * /The bell rang and the boxers started throwing ...
throw a wet blanket
See: WET BLANKET.
throw away
{v.} 1. To get rid of as unwanted or not needed; junk. * /Before they moved they threw away everything they didn't want to take with them./ * /I never save those coupons; ...
throw caution to the winds
also[throw discretion to the winds] {v. phr.} To be daring; make a bold or risky move. * /Hearing that Apaches were planning to start a war, the whites decided to ...
throw cold water on
also[dash cold water on] or[pour cold water on] {v. phr.} To discourage; say or do something to discourage. * /We had high hopes of victory but our opponents soon threw ...
throw down the gauntlet
{v. phr.} To challenge, especially to a fight. * /Another candidate for the presidency has thrown down the gauntlet./
throw for a loss
{v. phr.} 1. To tackle a member of the opposing football team behind the place where his team had the ball at the beginning of the play; push the other team back so ...
throw in
{v.} 1. To give or put in as an addition; to give to or with something else. * /John threw in a couple of tires when he sold Bill his bicycle./ * /Mary and Tess were ...
throw in one's lot with
or {literary}[cast in one's lot with] {v. phr.} To decide to share or take part in anything that happens to; join. * /The thief decided to throw in his lot with the gang ...
throw in the sponge
or[throw up the sponge] or[throw in the towel] {v. phr.}, {informal} To admit defeat; accept loss. * /After taking a beating for five rounds, the fighter's seconds threw ...
throw light on
See: CAST LIGHT ON, SHED LIGHT ON.
throw off
{v.} 1. To get free from. * /He was healthy enough to throw off his cold easily./ Compare: RID OF. 2. To mislead; confuse; fool. * /They went by a different route to ...
throw off the scent
{v. phr.} To mislead; confuse. * /The robbers went different ways hoping to throw the sheriff's men off the scent./ Syn.: THROW OFF(2).
throw off the track
{v. phr.} To divert; mislead; confuse. * /The clever criminals threw the detective off the track by changing their names and faces./ Contrast: OFF THE BEATEN TRACK.
throw one's hat in the ring
or[toss one's hat in the ring] {v. phr.}, {informal} To announce that you are going to try to be elected to an official position; become a candidate for office. * /Bill ...
throw one's weight around
{v. phr.}, {informal} To use one's influence or position in a showy or noisy manner. * /John was the star of the class play, and he was throwing his weight around telling ...
throw oneself at someone's feet
{v. phr.} To make a public display of serving, loving, or worshipping someone. * /When Arthur became king, almost all of the nobles threw themselves at his feet and ...
throw oneself at someone's head
or[fling oneself at someone's head] {v. phr.}, {informal} To try hard and openly to make a person love you. * /She threw herself at his head, but he was interested in ...
throw open
1. To open wide with a sudden or strong movement. * /He dashed in and threw open the windows./ 2. To remove limits from. * /The Homestead Act threw open the West./ * /When ...
throw out
or[toss out] {v.} 1. To put somewhere to be destroyed because not wanted. * /He didn't need the brush anymore so he threw it out./ Syn.: THROW AWAY(1). 2. To refuse to accept. ...
throw out of gear
{v. phr.} 1. To separate the gears of (a car or some other machine) when you want to stop it. * /When John wanted to stop, he threw the car out of gear and braked sharply./ 2. ...

1 2 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.015 c;