Слова на букву take-turn (459) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву take-turn (459)

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throw over
{v.} To give up for another; break your loyalty or attachment to. * /Bob threw Mary over for a new girlfriend./ * /Tom threw over those who helped him run for class ...
throw something in one's face
or[throw something in one's teeth] {v. phr.} To blame a person for (something wrong); not allow someone to forget (a mistake or failure). - Often used with "back". * ...
throw the baby out with the bath (bathwater)
{v. phr.} To reject all of something because part is faulty. * /God knows that there are weaknesses in the program, but if they act too hastily they may cause the baby to ...
throw the book at
{v. phr.}, {informal} To give the most severe penalty to (someone) for breaking the law or rules. * /Because it was the third time he had been caught speeding that month, the ...
throw together
{v.} 1. also[slap together] To make in a hurry and without care. * /Bill and Bob threw together a cabin out of old lumber./ * /The party was planned suddenly, and Mary ...
throw up
{v.} 1. {informal} or {slang}[heave up]. To vomit. * /The heat made him feel sick and he thought he would throw up./ * /He took the medicine but threw it up a minute ...
throw up one's hands
{v. phr.} To give up trying; admit that you cannot succeed. * /Mrs. Jones threw up her hands when the children messed up the living room for the third time./ * /When ...
throw up one's hands in horror
{v. phr.} To be horrified; feel alarmed; give up hope of straightening things out; be shocked by something terrible. * /When Mrs. Brown saw the mess the children ...
throw up the sponge
See: THROW IN THE SPONGE.
thumb
See: ALL THUMBS, GREEN THUMB, TURN THUMBS DOWN, TWIDDLE ONE'S THUMBS, UNDER ONE'S THUMB or UNDER THE THUMB OF.
thumb a ride
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get a ride by hitchhiking; hitchhike. * /Not having much money, Carl decided to thumb a ride to New York./
thumb one's nose
{v. phr.} 1. To hold one's open hand in front of one's face with one's thumb pointed at one's nose as a sign of scorn or dislike. * /After Bob ran into the house he ...
thumb through
{v. phr.} To examine superficially; read cursorily. * /I have read "War and Peace" but Fran has only thumbed through it./
thunder
See: BLOOD AND THUNDER, STEAL ONE'S THUNDER.
thus and so
also[thus and thus] {adv. phr.} In a particular way; according to directions that have been given. * /The teacher is very fussy about the way you write your report. If you ...
thus far
See: SO FAR.
tick off
{v.} 1. To mention one after the other; list. * /The teacher ticked off the assignments that Jane had to do./ 2. To scold; rebuke. * /The boss ticked off the waitress for ...
ticket
See: SPLIT TICKET, STRAIGHT TICKET, THE TICKET, WALKING PAPERS also WALKING TICKET.
tickle pink
{v. phr.}, {informal} To please very much; thrill; delight. Usually used in the passive participle. * /Nancy was tickled pink with her new dress./
tickle to death
See: TO DEATH.
tide
See: TURN THE TIDE.
tide over
{v.} To carry past a difficulty or danger; help in bad times or in trouble. * /He was out of work last winter but he had saved enough money to tide him over until ...
tide turn
See: TURN THE TIDE.
tidy sum
{n. phr.} A large amount of money. * /The Smith's big new home cost them a tidy sum./ Compare: PRETTY PENNY.
tie
See: FIT TO BE TIED.
tie down
{v.} To keep (someone) from going somewhere or doing something; prevent from leaving; keep in. * /Mrs. Brown can't come to the party. She's tied down at home with the ...
tie in
{v.} To connect with something else; make a connection for. - Often used with "with". * /The teacher tied in what she said with last week's lesson./ * /The English ...
tie in knots
{v. phr.} To make (someone) very nervous or worried. * /The thought of having her tooth pulled tied Joan in knots./ * /The little boy's experience with the kidnapper tied him ...
tie into
See: LACE INTO.
tie one's hands
{v. phr.} To make (a person) unable to do anything. - Usually used in the passive. * /Since Mary would not tell her mother what was bothering her, her mother's hands ...
tie the knot
{v. phr.}, {informal} To get married; also to perform a wedding ceremony. * /Diane and Bill tied the knot yesterday./ * /The minister tied the knot for ...
tie up
{v. phr.} 1. To show or stop the movement or action of; hinder; tangle. * /The crash of the two trucks tied up all traffic in the center of town./ * /The strike tied up the ...
tie-in
{n.} A connection; a point of meeting. * /John's essay on World War II provides a perfect tie-in with his earlier work on World War I./
tie-up
{n.} A congestion; a stoppage of the normal flow of traffic, business or correspondence. * /There was a two-hour traffic tie-up on the highway./ * /No pay checks were ...
tied to one's mother's apron strings
Not independent of your mother; not able to do anything without asking your mother. * /Even after he grew up he was still tied to his mother's apron strings./
tight
See: SIT TIGHT.
tight squeeze
{n. phr.} A difficult situation; financial troubles. * /The Browns aren't going out to dinner these days; they are in a tight squeeze./
tight end
{n.} An end in football who plays close to the tackle in the line. * /The tight end is used to catch passes but most often to block./ Contrast: SPLIT END.
tight money
{n. phr.} The opposite of inflation, when money is hard to borrow from the banks. * /The government decided that tight money is the way to bring down inflation./
tight-lipped
{adj.} A taciturn person; one who doesn't say much. * /The witness was tight-lipped about what she saw for fear of physical retaliation by the mob./
tighten one's belt
{v. phr.} To live on less money than usual; use less food and other things. * /When father lost his job we had to tighten our belts./ Often used in the expression "tighten ...
tighten the screws
{v. phr.} To try to make someone do something by making it more and more difficult not to do it; apply pressure. * /When many students still missed class after he began ...
tightwad
{n. phr.} A stingy person. * /My father is such a tightwad that he won't give me an allowance./
Tijuana taxi
{., {slang}, {citizen's band radio jargon} A police car. * /I've got a Tijuana taxi in sight./
till
See: ROB THE TILL or HAVE ONE'S HAND IN THE TILL.
till the cows come home
{adv. phr.} Until sunset; until the last. * /The women in the country used to sit in the spinning room making yarn out of skeins of wool, usually till the cows came home./ ...
till the last gun is fired
or[until the last gun is fired] {adv. phr.} Until the end; until everything is finished or decided. * /Fred always liked to stay at parties until the last gun was fired./ * ...
tilt
See: FULL TILT.
tilt at windmills
{v. phr.}, {literary} To do battle with an imaginary foe (after Cervantes' Don Quixote). * /John is a nice guy but when it comes to departmental meetings he wastes ...
time
See: ABOUT TIME, AGAINST TIME, AT A TIME, AT ONE TIME, AT THE SAME TIME, AT TIMES, BEHIND THE TIMES, BEHIND TIME, BIDE ONE'S TIME, BIG TIME, EVERY TIME ONE TURNS ...
time and a half
{n. phr.} Pay given to a worker at a rate half again as much as he usually gets. * /John got time and a half when he worked beyond his usual quitting time./ * /Tom gets ...
time and again
or[time and time again] {adv.} Many times; repeatedly; very often, * /I've told you time and again not to touch the vase!/ * /Children are forgetful and must be told time ...
time is ripe
The best time has come for doing something. * /The Prime Minister will hold elections when the time is ripe./ * /Lee saw his mother was upset, so he decided the time was ...
time of day
See: NOT TO GIVE ONE THE TIME OF DAY.
time of one's life
{n. phr.} A very happy or wonderful time. * /John had the time of his life at the party./ * /I could see that she was having the time of her life./
time off
{n. phr.} A period of release from work. * /If I had some time off this afternoon, I would finish writing the letters I promised to my family./
time out
{n. phr.} Time during which a game, a lecture, a discussion or other activity is stopped for a while for some extra questions or informal discussion, or some other ...
tin ear
{n. phr.} 1. A lack of sensitivity to noise. * /The construction noise doesn't bother Fred; he's got a tin ear./ 2. A lack of musical ability; state of being tone deaf. * ...
Tin Pan Alley
{n. phr.} The pop music industry. * /What kind of music will Tin Pan Alley come up with this year?/
tingle
See: SPINE-TINGLING.
tinker's damn
See: NOT WORTH A TINKER'S DAMN.
tip
See: AT THE TIP OF ONE'S TONGUE, FROM TIP TO TIP.
tip off
{v.}, {informal} To tell something not generally known; tell secret facts to; warn. * /The class president tipped off the class that it was the superintendent's birthday./ ...
tip the balance
See: TIP THE SCALES(2).
tip the scales
{v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To weigh. * /Martin tips the scales at 180 pounds./ 2. or[tip the balance] To have important or decisive influence; make a decision go for or against ...
tire out
See: WEAR OUT(2).
tired
See: DEAD TIRED, SICK AND TIRED.
tit for tat
{n. phr.} Equal treatment in return; a fair exchange. * /Billy hit me, so I gave him tit for tat./ * /I told him if he did me any harm I would return tit for tat./ * /They ...
to no avail(2)
{adv. phr.}, {formal} Without result; unsuccessfully. * /John tried to pull the heavy cart, but to no avail./ * /Mary studied hard for the test but to no ...
to a conclusion
See: JUMP TO A CONCLUSION.
to a crisp
See: BURN TO A CRISP.
to a degree
{adv. phr.} 1. {Chiefly British} Very; to a large extent. * /In some things I am ignorant to a degree./ 2. Somewhat; slightly; in a small way; rather. * /His anger was, ...
to a fault
{adv. phr.} So very well that it is in a way bad; to the point of being rather foolish; too well; too much. * /Aunt May wants everything in her house to be exactly ...
to a halt
See: GRIND TO A HALT.
to a large extent
See: IN GREAT MEASURE.
to a man
{adv. phr.} Without exception; with all agreeing. * /The workers voted to a man to go on strike./ * /To a man John's friends stood by him in his trouble./ Compare: EVERY ...
to a T
or[to a turn] {adv. phr.} Just right; to perfection; exactly. * /The roast was done to a turn./ * /His nickname, Tiny, suited him to a T./ Compare: TO THE LETTER.
to advantage
{adv. phr.} So as to bring out the good qualities of; favorably; in a flattering way. * /The jeweler's window showed the diamonds to advantage./ * /The green dress showed ...
to all intents and purposes
{adv. phr.} In most ways; in fact. * /The president is called the head of state, but the prime minister, to all intents and purposes, is the chief executive./
to and fro
{adv. phr.} Forward and back again and again. * /Father pushed Judy in the swing, and she went to and fro./ * /Busses go to and fro between the center of the city and ...
to another tune
See: DANCE TO ANOTHER TUNE.
to bat
See: GO TO BAT FOR.
to bay
See: BRING TO BAY.
to be on the safe side
{adv. phr.} To take extra precautions; reduce or eliminate the possibility of a mistake, an error, or even danger. * /Dad always keeps his valuables in a bank's safe ...
to be sure
{adv. phr.} Without a doubt; certainly; surely. * /"Didn't you say Mr. Smith would take us home?" "Oh, yes. To be sure, I did."/ - Often used before a clause beginning ...
to bed
See: PUT TO BED, PUT TO BED WITH A SHOVEL.
to blame
{adj. phr.} Having done something wrong; to be blamed; responsible. * /John was to blame for the broken window./ * /The teacher tried to find out who was to blame in ...
to boot
{adv. phr.} In addition; besides; as something extra. * /He not only got fifty dollars, but they bought him dinner to boot./ Compare: FOR GOOD MEASURE, IN THE BARGAIN, ...
to date
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Up to the present time; until now. * /To date twenty students have been accepted into the school./ * /The police have not found the runaway to date./ * ...
to death
{adv. phr.}, {informal} To the limit; to the greatest degree possible. - Used for emphasis with verbs such as "scare", "frighten", "bore". * /Cowboy stories bore me to ...
to do
See: HAVE TO DO WITH.
to first base
See: GET TO FIRST BASE.
to grips
See: COME TO GRIPS WITH.
to heart
See: TAKE TO HEART also LAY TO HEART.
to heel
{adj. phr.} 1. Close behind. * /The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel./ 2. Under control; to obedience. * /When Peter was sixteen, he thought he ...
to hell with
or[the hell with] {prep. phr.}, {informal} Used to express disgusted rejection of something. * /It's slop; the hell with what the cook calls it./ Compare: FED UP, GIVE A ...
to it
See: PUT ONE'S BACK TO IT.
to light
See: BRING TO LIGHT, COME TO LIGHT.
to no avail
or[of no avail(1)] {adj. phr.}, {formal} Having no effect; useless, unsuccessful. * /Tom's practicing was of no avail. He was sick on the day of the game./ * /Mary's ...
to one
See: TEN TO ONE, TWO TO ONE.
to one's face
{adv. phr.} Directly to you; in your presence. * /I told him to his face that I didn't like the idea./ * /I called him a coward to his face./ Compare: IN ONE'S FACE. ...
to one's feet
{adv. phr.} To a standing position; up. * /After Henry had been tackled hard by four big players, he got to his feet slowly and painfully./ * /When Sally saw the bus ...
to one's guns
See: STICK TO ONE'S GUNS.
to one's heart's content
{adv. phr.} To the extent of one's wishes; one's complete satisfaction. * /There is a wonderful small restaurant nearby where you can eat to your heart's content./
to one's heels
See: TAKE TO ONE'S HEELS.
to one's name
{adv. phr.} In your ownership; of your own; as part of your belongings. * /David did not have a book to his name./ * /Ed had only one suit to his name./
to one's ribs
See: STICK TO ONE'S RIBS.
to one's senses
See: COME TO ONE'S SENSES.
to oneself(1)
{adv. phr.} 1. Silently; in the thoughts; without making a sign that others can see; secretly. * /Tom thought to himself that he could win./ * /Mary said to herself that ...
to oneself(2)
{adj. phr.} 1. Without company; away from others; alone; deserted. * /The boys went home and John was left to himself./ * /When Mary first moved to her new neighborhood she ...
to order
{adv. phr.} According to directions given in an order in the way and size wanted. * /The manufacturer built the machine to order./ * /A very big man often has his suits ...
to pass
See: COME TO PASS.
to pieces
{adv. phr.} 1. Into broken pieces or fragments; destroyed. * /The cannon shot the town to pieces./ * /The vase fell to pieces in Mary's hand./ 2. {informal} So as not to ...
to put It mildly
See: TO SAY THE LEAST.
to reason
See: STAND TO REASON.
to rest
See: LAY TO REST.
to rights
See: PUT TO RIGHTS or SET TO RIGHTS.
to Rome
See: ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME.
to say nothing of
See: NOT TO MENTION.
to say the least
{v. phr.} To understate; express as mildly as possible. * /After all we did for him, his behavior toward us, to say the least, was a poor way to show his appreciation./
to scale
{adv. phr.} In the same proportions as in the true size; in the same shape, but not the same size. * /The statue was made to scale, one inch to a foot./ * /He drew the ...
to sea
See: PUT TO SEA.
to shame
See: PUT TO SHAME.
to size
See: CUT DOWN TO SIZE.
to speak of
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Important; worth talking about; worth noticing. - Usually used in negative sentences. * /Did it rain yesterday? Not to speak of./ * /What happened ...
to spite one's face
See: CUT OFF ONE'S NOSE TO SPITE ONE'S FACE.
to task
See: TAKE TO TASK.
to terms
See: BRING TO TERMS, COME TO TERMS.
to that effect
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} With that meaning. * /She said she hated spinach, or words to that effect./ * /When I leave, I will write you to that effect so you will know./
to the kings taste
or[to the queen's taste] {adv. phr.} Perfectly; just as anyone could want it; very satisfactorily. * /The rooms in her new home were painted and decorated to the ...
to the best of one's knowledge
As far as you know; to the extent of your knowledge. * /He has never won a game, to the best of my knowledge./ * /To the best of my knowledge he is a college man, ...
to the bitter end
{adv. phr.} To the point of completion or conclusion. - Used especially of a very painful or unpleasant task or experience. * /Although Mrs. Smith was bored by the ...
to the bone
{adv.}, {slang}, {informal} Thoroughly, entirely, to the core, through all layers. * /I am dreadfully tired; I've worked my fingers to the bone./ See: ALSO WORK ONE'S FINGERS ...
to the bottom
See: GET TO THE BOTTOM OF.
to the contrary
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} With an opposite result or effect; just the opposite; in disagreement; saying the opposite. * /Although Bill was going to the movies, he told Joe to ...
to the effect that
{adj. phr.} With the meaning or purpose; to say that. * /He made a speech to the effect that we would all keep our jobs even if the factory were sold./ * /The new governor ...
to the eye
{adv. phr.} As it is seen; as a person or thing first seems; apparently. * /That girl looks to the eye like a nice girl to know, but she is really rather mean./ * /That suit ...
to the fore
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Into leadership; out into notice or view; forward. * /The hidden skill of the lawyer came to the fore during the trial./ * /In the progress of the ...
to the full
{adv. phr.} Very much; fully. * /The campers enjoyed their trip to the full./ * /We appreciated to the full the teacher's help./ Compare: TO THE HILT.
to the gallery
See: PLAY TO THE GALLERY.
to the good
{adv. phr.} On the side of profit or advantage; in one's favor; to one's benefit; ahead. * /After I sold my stamp collection, I was ten dollars to the good./ * ...
to the grindstone
See: KEEP ONE'S NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE.
to the heart
See: GET TO THE HEART OF.
to the hilt
or[up to the hilt] {adv. phr.} To the limit; as far as possible; completely. * /The other boys on the team told Tom he couldn't quit. They said, "You're in this to the ...
to the letter
{adv. phr.} With nothing done wrong or left undone; exactly; precisely. * /He carried out his orders to the letter./ * /When writing a test you should follow the ...
to the manner born
{adj. phr.} At ease with something because of lifelong familiarity with it. * /She says her English is the best because she is to the manner born./
to the nth degree
{adv. phr.} To the greatest degree possible; extremely; very much so. * /Scales must be accurate to the nth degree./ * /His choice of words was exactly to the nth ...
to the point
See: COME TO THE POINT.
to the punch
See: BEAT TO THE PUNCH.
to the ribs
See: STICK TO ONE'S RIBS or STICK TO THE RIBS.
to the salt mines
See: BACK TO THE SALT MINES.
to the stump
See: TAKE THE STUMP or TAKE TO THE STUMP.
to the sword
See: PUT TO THE SWORD.
to the tune of
{adv. phr.}, {informal} To the amount or extent of; in the amount of. * /He had to pay to the tune of fifty dollars for seeing how fast the car would go./ * /When she ...
to the wall
{adv. phr.} Into a place from which there is no escape; into a trap or corner. - Usually used after " drive" or a similar word. * /John's failing the last test ...
to the wolves
See: THROW TO THE WOLVES.
to the woods
See: TAKE TO THE WOODS.
to the world
See: DEAD TO THE WORLD.
to think of it
See: COME TO THINK OF IT.
to use
See: PUT TO USE.
to your hat
See: HANG ON TO YOUR HAT or HOLD ON TO YOUR HAT.
to-be
{adj.} That is going to be; about to become. - Used after the noun it modifies. * /Bob kissed his bride-to-be./ * /The principal of the high school greeted the high school ...
toe
See: CURL ONE'S HAIR or CURL ONE'S TOES, ON ONE'S TOES, STEP ON THE TOES OF.
toe the line
or[toe the mark] {v. phr.} To be very careful to do just what you are supposed to do; obey the rules and do your duties. * /The new teacher will make Joe toe the line./ * ...
together
See: GET IT ALL TOGETHER.
together with
{prep.} In addition to; in the company of; along with. * /John, together with his brother, has gone to the party./ * /The police found a knife, together with the ...
toll
See: TAKE ITS TOLL.
toll call
{n. phr.} A long distance telephone call for which one has to pay. * /We had several toll calls on last month's telephone bill./
toll free
{adv. phr.} Calling an (800) telephone number with the call paid by the business whose number one has dialed. * /You can call us day and night, seven days a week, toll ...
Tom
See: PEEPING TOM.
Tom, Dick, and Harry
{n. phr.} People in general; anyone; everyone. - Usually preceded by "every" and used to show scorn or disrespect. * /The drunk told his troubles to every Tom, ...
tone down
{v.} To make softer or quieter; make less harsh or strong; moderate. * /He toned down the sound of the TV./ * /She wanted the bright colors in her house toned down./ * ...
tong
See: GO AT IT HAMMER AND TONGS.
tongue
See: AT THE TIP OF ONE'S TONGUE, CAT GET ONE'S TONGUE, HOLD ONE'S TONGUE, KEEP A CIVIL TONGUE IN ONE'S HEAD, SLIP OF THE TONGUE.
tongue twister
{n.} A word or group of words difficult to pronounce whose meaning is irrelevant compared to the difficulty of enunciation. * /"She sells sea shells by the seashore" ...
tongue-in-cheek
{adj. phr.} In an ironic or insincere manner. * /When the faculty complained about the poor salary increments, the university's president said that he was not a ...
tongue-lashing
{n.} A sharp scolding or criticism. * /Jim's mother gave him a tongue-lashing for telling family secrets./ Syn.: PIECE OF ONE'S MIND.
tongue-tied
See: TIGHT-LIPPED.
tongues wag
{informal} People speak in an excited or gossipy manner; people spread rumors. * /If married women go out with other men, tongues will wag./ * /When the bank ...
too
See: EAT ONE'S CAKE AND HAVE IT TOO.
too ---- by half
{adj.} ({princ. British}) Much too; excessively. * /The heroine of the story is too nice by half; she is not believable./
too bad
{adj.} To be regretted; worthy of sorrow or regret; regrettable. - Used as a predicate. * /It is too bad that we are so often lazy./ * /It was too bad Bill had measles ...
too big for one's breeches
or[too big for one's boots] {adj. phr.} Too sure of your own importance; feeling more important than you really are. * /That boy had grown too big for his breeches. I'll ...
too close for comfort
{adj. phr.} Perilously near (said of bad things). * /When the sniper's bullet hit the road the journalist exclaimed, "Gosh, that was too close for comfort!"/ ...
too many cooks spoil the broth
or[stew] A project is likely to go bad if managed by a multiplicity of primary movers. - A proverb. * /When several people acted all at once in trying to reshape the ...
too many irons in the fire
See: IRONS IN THE FIRE.
turn
See: AT EVERY TURN, BLOOD RUN COLD or BLOOD TURNS TO ICE, BY TURNS, CALL THE TURN at CALL ONE'S SHOTS(2), EVERY TIME ONE TURNS AROUND, IN TURN, NOT KNOW WHICH WAY ...
turn a blind eye
{v. phr.} To pretend not to see; not pay attention. * /The corrupt police chief turned a blind eye to the open gambling in the town./ * /Bob turned a blind eye to ...
turn a cold shoulder
See: COLD SHOULDER.
turn a deaf ear to
{v. phr.} To pretend not to hear; refuse to hear; not pay attention. * /Mary turned a deaf ear to Lois's asking to ride her bicycle./ * /The teacher turned a deaf ear to ...
turn a hand
{v. phr.} To do anything to help. - Usually used in the negative. * /When we were all hurrying to get the house ready for company, Mary sat reading and wouldn't turn a ...
turn an honest penny
{v. phr.} To realize a good profit. * /Tom turned an honest penny in the soybean trading business./ Compare: PRETTY PENNY.
turn back the clock
See: PUT BACK THE CLOCK.
turn color
{v. phr.} To become a different color. * /In the fall the leaves turn color./ * /When the dye was added the solution turned color./

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