Слова на букву turn-word (463) Словарь американских идиом
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву turn-word (463)

1 2 > >>
turn down
{v.} 1. To reduce the loudness, brightness, or force of. * /The theater lights were turned down./ * /Turn down that radio, will you?/ * /The hose was throwing too much ...
turn for the worse
See: FOR THE WORSE.
turn in
{v.} 1. or[hand in] To give to someone; deliver to someone. * /I want you to turn in a good history paper./ * /When the football season was over, we turned in our ...
turn in one's grave
or[turn over in one's grave] {v. phr.} To be so grieved or angry that you would not rest quietly in your grave. * /If your grandfather could see what you're doing now, he ...
turn loose
See: LET LOOSE(1a).
turn of the century
{n. phr.} The time at the end of one century and the beginning of the next century; {especially}: The time when the 1800's became the 1900's; the early 1900's. * ...
turn off
{v.} 1. To stop by turning a knob or handle or by working a switch; to cause to be off. * /He turned the water off./ * /He turned off the light./ 2. To leave by ...
turn on
{v.} 1. To start by turning a knob or handle or working a switch; cause to be on. * /Jack turned on the water./ * /Who turned the lights on?/ 2. {informal} To put forth ...
turn on a dime
{v. phr.} To be able to turn in a very narrow spot comparable to a small coin. * /This new sports car can turn on a dime./
turn on one's heel
{v. phr.} To turn around suddenly. * /When John saw Fred approaching him, he turned on his heel./ * /When little Tommy's big brother showed up, the bully turned on his heel./
turn one around one's little finger
See: TWIST ONE AROUND ONE'S LITTLE FINGER.
turn one's back on
{v. phr.} To refuse to help (someone in trouble or need.) * /He turned his back on his own family when they needed help./ * /The poorer nations are often not grateful ...
turn one's hand to
See: PUT ONE'S HAND TO.
turn one's head
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make you lose your good judgment. * /The first pretty girl he saw turned his head./ * /Winning the class election turned his head./
turn one's nose up at
{v. phr.} To scorn; snub; look down at somebody or something. * /I don't understand why Sue has to turn her nose up at everyone who didn't go to an Ivy League college./ ...
turn one's stomach
{v. phr.}, {informal} To make you feel sick. * /The smell of that cigar was enough to turn your stomach./ * /The sight of blood turns my stomach./
turn out
{v.} 1. To make leave or go away. * /His father turned him out of the house./ * /If you don't behave, you will be turned out./ Compare: THROW OUT. 2. To turn inside out; ...
turn over
{v.} 1. To roll, tip, or turn from one side to the other; overturn; upset. * /He's going to turn over the page./ * /The bike hit a rock and turned over./ 2, To think ...
turn over a new leaf
{v. phr.} To start afresh; to have a new beginning. * /"Don't be sad, Jane," Sue said. "A divorce is not the end of the world. Just turn over a new leaf and you will ...
turn over in one's grave
See: TURN IN ONE'S GRAVE.
turn over in one's mind
{v. phr.} To carefully consider. * /I will have to turn it over in my mind whether to accept the new job offer from Japan./
turn tail
{v. phr.}, {informal} To run away from trouble or danger. * /When the bully saw my big brother, he turned tail and ran./
turn the clock back
{v. phr.} To return to an earlier period. * /Mother wished she could turn the clock back to the days before the children grew up and left home./ * /Will repealing the ...
turn the other cheek
{v. phr.} To let someone do something to you and not to do it in return; not hit back when hit; be patient when injured or insulted by someone; not try to get even. * /Joe ...
turn the scales
{v. phr.} To affect the balance in favor of one party or group against the other. * /It could well be that the speech he made turned the scales in their favor./
turn the tables
{v. phr.} To make something happen just the opposite of how it is supposed to happen. * /The boys turned the tables on John when they took his squirt gun away and ...
turn the tide
{v. phr.} To change what looks like defeat into victory. * /We were losing the game until Jack got there. His coming turned the tide for us, and we won./ Compare: TIP ...
turn the trick
{v. phr.}, {informal} To bring about the result you want; succeed in what you plan to do. * /Jerry wanted to win both the swimming and diving contests, but he couldn't ...
turn thumbs down
{v. phr.} To disapprove or reject; say no. - Usually used with "on". * /The company turned thumbs down on Mr. Smith's sales plan./ * /The men turned thumbs down on a ...
turn to
{v.} To begin working with much energy. * /All the boys turned to and cleaned the cabin in a few minutes./ * /Mary turned to and studied for the test./ Syn.: FALL TO.
turn turtle
{v. phr.} To turn upside down. * /The car skidded on the ice and turned turtle./
turn up
{v.} 1. To find; discover. * /The police searched the house hoping to turn up more clues./ 2. To appear or be found suddenly or unexpectedly. * /The missing boy turned up an ...
turn up one's nose at
{v. phr.} To refuse as not being good enough for you. * /He thinks he should only get steak, and he turns up his nose at hamburger./
turn up one's toes
{v. phr.}, {slang} To die. * /One morning the children found that their pet mouse had turned up his toes, so they had a funeral for him./ Compare: PUSH UP THE DAISIES.
turnout
{n.} The number of people in attendance at a gathering. * /This is a terrific turnout for Tim's poetry reading./
turnover
{n.} 1. The proportion of expenditure and income realized in a business; the volume of traffic in a business. * /Our turnover is so great that in two short years we ...
turtle
See: TURN TURTLE.
tut-tut
{interj.}, {informal} Used to express mild disapproval. * /"Tut-tut," said the teacher. "You shouldn't cross the street without looking."/ * /Tut-tut, put that piece of candy ...
twice
See: BIG AS LIFE(2), LIGHTNING NEVER STRIKES TWICE IN THE SAME PLACE, THINK TWICE, ONCE BITTEN, TWICE SHY and BURNT CHILD DREADS THE FIRE.
twice as natural
See: BIG AS LIFE or BIG AS LIFE AND TWICE AS NATURAL.
twiddle one's thumbs
{v. phr.} To do nothing; be idle. * /I'd rather work than stand around here twiddling my thumbs./
twist one around one's little finger
also[turn one around one's little finger] or[wrap one around one's finger] {v. phr.} To have complete control over; to be able to make (someone) do anything you want. * ...
twist one's arm
{v. phr.}, {informal} To force someone; threaten someone to make him do something. - Usually used jokingly. * /Will you dance with the prettiest girl in school? Stop, you're ...
two
See: BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA or BETWEEN TWO FIRES, TWO CENTS, BIRD IN THE HAND IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH, CUT BOTH WAYS or CUT TWO WAYS, HAVE TWO ...
two strikes against one
{n. phr.}-From baseball. Two opportunities wasted in some undertaking, so that only one chance is left. * /Poor John has two strikes against him when it comes to ...
two bits
{n.}, {slang} Twenty-five cents; a quarter of a dollar. * /A haircut only cost two bits when Grandfather was young./ Compare: FOUR BITS, SIX BITS.
two cents
{n.} {informal} 1. Something not important or very small; almost nothing. * /Paul was so angry that he said for two cents he would quit the team./ * /When John saw ...
two to one
See: TEN TO ONE.
two ways about it
See: NO TWO WAYS ABOUT IT.
two's company; three's a crowd
An informal way to express a situation when two people desire privacy and a third one is present. - A proverb. * /Beth and Carl wanted to be alone so when Maggie joined ...
two-faced
{adj.} Insincere; disloyal; deceitful. * /Don't confide too much in him as he has the reputation of being two-faced./ Compare: SPEAK WITH A FORKED TONGUE.
two-time
{v.}, {slang} To go out with a second boy or girlfriend and keep it a secret from the first. * /Joan was two-timing Jim with Fred./ * /Mary cried when she found that Joe ...
U.F.O.
{n. phr.} Unidentified Flying Object. * /Some people think that the U.F.O.s are extraterrestrial beings of higher than human development who pay periodic visits to ...
ugly duckling
{n.} An ugly or plain child who grows up to be pretty and attractive. * /Mary was the ugly duckling in her family, until she grew up./
uh-huh
or[um-hum] {adv.}, {informal} Yes. - Used only in speech or when recording dialogue. * /Are you going to the Fair? Uh-huh./ * /We were in Alaska, um-hum, but that was long ...
um-hum
See: UH-HUH.
unbosom oneself
{v. phr.} To confess one's personal thoughts or feelings; disclose private information to a confidante. * /Once she was at home with her mother, she unbosomed herself ...
uncertain
See: IN SO MANY WORDS(2). or IN NO UNCERTAIN TERMS.
uncle
See: SAY UNCLE also CRY UNCLE.
under
See: CUT THE GROUND FROM UNDER, GO UNDER, OUT FROM UNDER, SNOW UNDER.
under lock and key
{adv. phr.} Secured; locked up; well protected. * /Dad keeps all his valuables under lock and key./
under a bushel
See: HIDE ONE'S LIGHT UNDER A BUSHEL.
under a cloud
{adj. phr.} 1. Under suspicion; not trusted. * /Joyce has been under a cloud since her roommate's bracelet disappeared./ * /The butcher is under a cloud because ...
under age
{adj. phr.} Too young; not old enough; below legal age. * /He could not enlist in the army because he was under age./ * /Rose was not allowed to enroll in the Life Saving ...
under arrest
{adj. phr.} Held by the police. * /The man believed to have robbed the bank was placed under arrest./ * /The three boys were seen breaking into the school building and soon ...
under construction
{adv. phr.} In the process of being built or repaired. * /It is a good idea to take the train to work while the expressway is under construction./
under cover
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Hidden; concealed. * /The prisoners escaped under cover of darkness./ * /He kept his invention under cover until it was patented./ Compare: UNDER ...
under false colors
See: SAIL UNDER FALSE COLORS.
under fire
{adv. phr.} Being shot at or being attacked; hit by attacks or accusations; under attack. * /The soldiers stood firm under fire of the enemy./ * /The principal was under ...
under one's belt
{adv. phr.}, {informal} 1. In your stomach; eaten; or absorbed. * /Once he had a good meal under his belt, the man loosened his tie and fell asleep./ * /Jones is talkative ...
under one's breath
{adv. phr.} In a whisper; with a low voice. * /The teacher heard the boy say something under his breath and she asked him to repeat it aloud./ * /I told Lucy the ...
under one's hat
See: KEEP UNDER ONE'S HAT.
under one's heel
{adv. phr.} In one's power or control. * /If one marriage partner always wants to keep the other person under his or her heel, it is not a happy or democratic arrangement and ...
under one's nose
or[under the nose of] {adv. phr.}, {informal} In sight of; in an easily seen or noticeable place. * /The thief walked out of the museum with the painting, right under ...
under one's own steam
{adv. phr.}, {informal} By one's own efforts; without help. * /The boys got to Boston under their own steam and took a bus the rest of the way./ * /We didn't think he ...
under one's skin
See: GET UNDER ONE'S SKIN.
under one's spell
{adv. phr.} Unable to resist one's influence. * /From the first moment they saw each other, Peter was under Nancy's spell./
under one's thumb
or[under the thumb] {adj.} or {adv. phr.} Obedient to you; controlled by you; under your power. * /The Jones family is under the thumb of the mother./ * /Jack is a ...
under one's wing
{adv. phr.} Under the care or protection of. * /Helen took the new puppy under her wing./ * /The boys stopped teasing the new student when Bill took him under his wing./ ...
under orders
{adv. phr.} Not out of one's own desire or one's own free will; obligatorily; not freely. * /"So you were a Nazi prison guard? " the judge asked. "Yes, your Honor," the man ...
under pain of
See: ON PAIN OF also UNDER PAIN OF.
under protest
{adv. phr.} Against one's wish; unwillingly. * /"I'll go with you all right," she said to the kidnapper, "but I want it clearly understood that I do so under protest."/
under the circumstances
also[in the circumstances] {adv. phr.} In the existing situation; in the present condition; as things are. * /In the circumstances, Father couldn't risk giving up his ...
under the collar
See: HOT UNDER THE COLLAR.
under the counter
{adv. phr.}, {informal} Secretly (bought or sold). * /That book has been banned, but there is one place you can get it under the counter./ * /The liquor dealer was ...
under the hammer
{adv. phr.} Up for sale at auction. * /The Brights auctioned off the entire contents of their home. Mrs. Bright cried when her pewter collection went under the ...
under the nose of
See: UNDER ONE'S NOSE.
under the sun
{adj.} or {adv. phr.} On earth; in the world. - Used for emphasis. * /The President's assassination shocked everyone under the sun./ * /Where under the sun could I have ...
under the table
See: UNDER THE COUNTER.
under the thumb of
See: UNDER ONE'S THUMB.
under the weather
{adv. phr.} In bad health or low spirits. * /Mary called in today asking for a sick day as she is under the weather./
under the wire
{adv. phr.} With a narrow time limit; in the last minute. * /The journalist's new lead article on Russia was due in press at 5 P.M., and he got it in at 4:57, just under ...
under wraps
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Not allowed to be seen until the right time; not allowed to act or speak freely; in secrecy; hidden. - Usually used with "keep". * /We have a new ...
understand
See: GIVE ONE TO UNDERSTAND.
underway
{adv. phr.} In progress; in motion. * /The yearly fund-raising campaign for the renovation of our university campus is already underway./
unknown quantity
{n.} Someone or something whose value and importance are not known, especially in a certain situation, time or place; a new and untested person or thing. * /What we ...
unseen
See: SIGHT UNSEEN.
until all hours
{adv. phr.} Until very late at night. * /He is so anxious to pass his exams with flying colors that he stays up studying until all hours./
until hell freezes over
{adv. phr.}, {slang} Forever, for an eternity. * /He can argue until hell freezes over; nobody will believe him./ Contrast: WHEN HELL FREEZES OVER.
until the last gun is fired
See: TILL THE LAST GUN IS FIRED.
unturned
See: LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED.
up against it
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Faced with a great difficulty or problem; badly in need. * /The Smith family is up against it because Mr. Smith cannot find a job./ * /You ...
up tight
or[uptight] {adj.}, {slang}, {informal} Worried, irritated, excessively eager or anxious. * /Why are you so uptight about getting that job? The more you worry, the less ...
up a stump
{adj. phr.}, {slang} Stumped; blocked; mixed up or confused in what you are trying to do. * /Jimmy knows how to add and subtract but fractions have him up a stump./
up a tree
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Hunted or chased into a tree; treed. * /The dog drove the coon up a tree so the hunter could shoot him./ 2. {informal} in trouble; having problems; in ...
up against
{prep. phr.} Blocked or threatened by. * /When she applied to medical school, the black woman wondered whether she was up against barriers of sex and race prejudice./
up and about
or[around] {adv. phr.} Recovered and able to move about; once again in good health after an illness. * /My sister was ill for several weeks, but is now up and about ...
up and at them
1. {adv. phr.} Actively engaged in a task as if doing combat. * /"You want to know whether he will make a diligent worker?" Dick asked. "Well, I can tell you that most of ...
up for grabs
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Available for anyone to try to get; ready to be competed for; there for the taking. * /When the captain of the football team moved out of town, his ...
up front(1)
{n.}, {slang}, {informal} The managerial section of a corporation or firm. * /Joe Catwallender finally made it (with the) up front./
up front(2)
{adj.}, {slang}, {informal} Open, sincere, hiding nothing. * /Sue was completely up front about why she didn't want to see him anymore./
up in arms
{adj. phr.} 1. Equipped with guns or weapons and ready to fight. * /All of the colonies were up in arms against the Redcoats./ Syn.: IN ARMS. 2. Very angry and ...
up the creek
or[up the creek without a paddle] {adj. phr.}, {informal} In trouble or difficulty and unable to do anything about it; stuck. * /Father said that if the car ran out of ...
up to
{prep.} 1. As far, as deep, or as high as. * /The water in the pond was only up to John's knees./ * /Mary is small and just comes up to Bill's chest./ * /The shovel sank ...
up to no good
{adv. phr.} Intending to do something bad; perpetrating an illicit act. * /We could tell from the look on Dennis the Menace's face that he was once again up to no ...
up to one's ears
{adv. phr.} Immersed in; covered with. * /"Around final examination time," Professor Brown explained, "I am always up to my ears in work."/
up to one's neck
{adv. phr.} Overwhelmed with; submerged in. * /"During the summer season in our cottage by the lake," the Allens complained, "we are usually up to our necks in ...
up to par
or {informal}[up to scratch] or {informal}[up to snuff] 1. In good or normal health or physical condition. * /I have a cold and don't feel up to par./ * /The boxer is ...
up to scratch
See: UP TO FAR.
up to snuff
See: UP TO PAR.
up to the chin in
or[in --- up to the chin] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Used also with "ears", "elbows", "eyes" or "knees" instead of " chin", and with a possessive instead of "the". 1. ...
up to the hilt
See: TO THE HILT.
up to the last minute
{adv. phr.} Until the last possible moment; until the very end. * /When I try to send in an important eyewitness report from the scene of a major accident, I must keep working ...
up to the mark
See: UP TO PAR(2).
up-and-coming
{adj. phr.} Bound toward success; upwardly mobile; progressive; ambitious. * /The newly elected state senator is an up-and-coming young politician who is expected to be ...
up-to-date
{adj.} Modern; contemporary; the latest that technology can offer. * /"I want an up-to-date dictionary of American idioms," Mr. Lee said, "that has all the latest Americanisms ...
up-to-the-minute
See: UP-TO-DATE.
upon one's head
See: ON ONE'S HEAD.
upon oneself
See: TAKE ON ONESELF also TAKE UPON ONESELF.
upon the spot
See: ON THE SPOT(1).
upper
See: KEEP A STIFF UPPER LIP, ON ONE'S UPPERS.
upper crust
{n.}, {informal} The richest, most famous, or important people in a certain place; the highest class. * /It is a school that only the children of the upper crust can ...
upper hand
or[whip hand] {n.} Controlling power; advantage. * /In the third round the champion got the upper hand over his opponent and knocked him out./ * /The cowboy trained the ...
upper story
{n.} 1. A floor or level of a building above the first floor. * /The apartment house where Gene lives is five stories high and he lives in one of the upper stories./ 2. ...
ups and downs
{n. phr.} Vicissitudes; alternating periods between good and bad times; changes in fortune. * /He is now a wealthy stock trader, but at the beginning of his career he, too, ...
Upsadaisy!
or[Upsee-daisy!] or[Upsy-daisy!] {adv. phr.} - A popular exclamation used when just about anything is lifted, particularly a small child raised to his or her ...
upset the applecart
or[upset one's applecart] {v. phr.}, {informal} To ruin a plan or what is being done, often by surprise or accident; change how things are or are being done, often ...
upside down
{adv. phr.} Overturned so that the bottom is up and the top is down. * /The ladybug lay upside down in the sand and was unable to take off./ * /The problem with this ...
upstairs
See: NOBODY HOME UPSTAIRS.
urban homesteading
{n.}, {informal} Renovation and occupation through cooperative ownership by tenants of previously abandoned city apartment buildings. * /Urban homesteading is on the rise in ...
use
See: NO USE, PUT TO USE.
use every trick in the book
{v. phr.}, {informal} To avail oneself of any means at all in order to achieve one's goal, not exclusive of possibly immoral or illegal acts. * /Algernon used ...
use one's head
or {slang}[use one's bean] or {slang}[use one's noodle] or {slang} use[one's noggin] {v. phr.} To use your brain or mind; think; have common sense. - Often used as a ...
use up
{v. phr.} 1. To use until nothing is left; spend or consume completely. * /Don't use up all the soap. Leave me some to wash with./ * /Jack used up his last ...
used to be
or[did use to be] {v. phr.} Formerly or once was. * /Mary used to be small; but she has grown up./ * /Dick used to be the best pitcher on the team last year; now two other ...
used to(1)
{adj. phr.} In the habit of or familiar with. * /People get used to smoking and it is hard for them to stop./ * /Farmers are used to working outdoors in the winter./ ...
used to(2)
or[did use to] {v. phr.} Did formerly; did in the past. - Usually used with an infinitive to tell about something past. * /Uncle Henry used to have a beard, but he shaved ...
utility room
{n.} A room in a house or building for machinery and other things important in the daily use of the building and the work of the people in it. * /There is a utility room ...
vain
See: IN VAIN, TAKE ONE'S NAME IN VAIN.
valor
See: DISCRETION IS THE BETTER PART OF VALOR.
value
See: FACE VALUE.
vanish into thin air
See: DISAPPEAR INTO THIN AIR.
vanishing cream
{n.} A cosmetic cream for the skin that is used chiefly before face powder. * /Mrs. Jones spread vanishing cream on her face before applying her face powder./
vanity case
{n.} 1. A small case containing face powder, lipstick, and other things and usually carried in a woman's handbag; a compact. * /She took out her vanity case and put ...
variety show
{n.} A program that includes several different kinds of entertainment (as songs, dances, comic skits and little dramas). * /Jane's father was the master of ceremonies of a ...
variety store
{n.} A store that sells many different kinds of things, especially items that are fairly small and in everyday use. * /I went into a variety store and bought some paint./ ...
vein
See: FREEZE ONE'S BLOOD or FREEZE THE BLOOD IN ONE'S VEINS, FREEZE ONE'S VEINS.
verbal diarrhea
{n. phr.} The inability to keep silent; over-talkativeness. * /Archibald is a nice guy but he's got verbal diarrhea and he can't shut up for a single minute./
very
See: ALL VERY WELL.
very well
{interj.}, {formal} Agreed; all right. - Used to show agreement or approval. * /Very well. You may go./ * /Very well, I will do as you say./ Compare: ALL RIGHT(2).
vibrations
or[vibes] {n.} Psychic emanations radiating from an object, situation, or person. * /I don't think this relationship will work out - this guy has given me bad vibes./
vicious circle
{n. phr.} A kind of circular or chain reaction in which one negative thing leads to another. * /Some people take so many different kinds of medicine to cure an illness that ...
Vietnam syndrome
{n.}, {informal} An attitude in government circles that diplomacy may be more effective in solving local political problems in other countries than the use of ...
view
See: IN VIEW, IN VIEW OF, TAKE A DIM VIEW OF.
vine
See: DIE ON THE VINE or WITHER ON THE VINE, CLINGING VINE.
virtue
See: BY VIRTUE OF, MAKE A VIRTUE OF NECESSITY.
visiting nurse
{n.} A nurse who goes from home to home taking care of sick people or giving help with other health problems. * /After John returned home from the hospital, the ...
voice
See: AT THE TOP OF ONE'S VOICE, GIVE VOICE.
voice box
{n.} The part of the throat where the sound of your voice is made; the larynx. * /Mr. Smith's voice box was taken out in an operation, and he could not talk after ...
voiceprint
{n.}, {technological}, {colloquial} The graphic pattern derived from converting an individual's voice into a visible graph used by the police for identification ...
volcano
See: SIT ON A VOLCANO.
volume
See: SPEAK VOLUMES.
vote a straight ticket
{v. phr.} To not differentiate one's ballot according to individual names and posts, but to vote for all candidates for all positions of the same party. * /"I ...
vote in
{v. phr.} To elevate to the status of " Law of the Land" by special or general ballot. * /Congress has finally voted in the Brady Law that requires that prospective gun ...
vote one out
{v. phr.} To terminate one's elected office by casting a negative vote about that person (judge, congressman, etc.), mostly so that someone else might occupy the ...
wade in
or[wade into] {v.}, {informal} 1. To go busily to work. * /The house was a mess after the party, but Mother waded in and soon had it clean again./ 2. To attack. * /When ...
wade through
{v. phr.} To read through something long and laborious. * /It took John six months to wade through Tolstoy's War and Peace in the original Russian./
wag
See: TONGUES TO WAG or TONGUES WAG.
wag one's chin
See: BEAT ONE'S GUMS, CHEW THE FAT, CHEW THE RAG, SHOOT THE BREEZE.
wagon
See: FIX SOMEONE'S WAGON, HITCH ONE'S WAGON TO A STAR, JUMP ON THE BAND WAGON, OFF THE WAGON, ON THE WAGON.
wait
See: LIE IN WAIT.
wait at table
or[wait on table] or[wait table] {v. phr.} To serve food. * /Mrs. Lake had to teach her new maid to wait on table properly./ * /The girls earn spending money by ...
wait on
or[wait upon] {v.} 1. To serve. * /Sue has a summer job waiting on an invalid./ * /The clerk in the store asked if we had been waited upon./ 2. {formal} To visit as a courtesy ...
wait on hand and foot
{v. phr.} To serve in every possible way; do everything for (someone). * /Sally is spoiled because her mother waits on her hand and foot./ * /The gentlemen had a valet to ...
wait on table
See: WAIT AT TABLE.
wait up
{v. phr.} To not go to bed until a person one is worried about comes home (said by parents and marriage partners). * /My mother always waited up for me when I went out as a ...
wait upon
See: WAIT ON.
waiting list
{n.} A list of persons waiting to get into something (as a school). * /The nursery school enrollment was complete, so the director put our child's name on the waiting list./ ...
waiting room
{n. phr.} The sitting area in a doctor's, lawyer's, accountant's, etc. office, or in a hospital, or other workplace, where people wait their turn. * /Some doctor's offices ...
wake
See: IN THE WAKE OF.
walk
See: WIN IN A WALK.
walk a tightrope
{v. phr.} To be in a dangerous or awkward situation where one cannot afford to make a single mistake. * /"When we landed on the moon in 1969," Armstrong explained, ...
walk all over
See: WALK OVER.
walk away with
or[walk off with] {v.} 1. To take and go away with; take away; often: steal. * /When Father went to work, he accidentally walked off with Mother's umbrella./ * /How ...
walk of life
{n. phr.} Way of living; manner in which people live. * /Many rich people have yachts; people in their walk of life can afford them./ * /The banker did not want his ...
walk off with
See: WALK AWAY WITH.
walk on air
{v. phr.}, {informal} To feel happy and excited. * /Sue has been walking on air since she won the prize./ * /His father's compliment left Jed walking on air./ Compare: ...
walk on eggs
{v. phr.} To act with utmost caution due to being in a precarious position. * /Tom has been walking on eggs ever since he started working for a new boss in Cincinnati./
walk out
{v.} 1. To go on strike. * /When the company would not give them higher pay, the workers walked out./ 2. To leave suddenly; especially to desert. * /He didn't say he ...
walk over
or[walk all over] or[step all over] {v. phr.} {informal} To make (someone) do whatever you wish; make selfish use of; treat like a slave; impose upon. * /Jill is so ...
walk the chalk
or[walk the chalk line] or[walk the chalk mark] To act exactly as you are supposed to; behave properly; obey. * /That new teacher really makes the students walk the ...
walk the floor
{v. phr.} To walk one direction and then the other across the floor, again and again; pace. * /Mr. Black walked the floor, trying to reach a decision./ * /The sick ...
walk the plank
{v. phr.} 1. To walk off a board extended over the side of a ship and be drowned. * /The pirates captured the ship and forced the crew to walk the plank./ 2. {informal} ...
walking dictionary
{n. phr.} A person highly knowledgeable in matters of language use. * /If you want to know what "serendipity" means, ask my Uncle Fred. He is a professor of English and ...
walking encyclopedia
{n. phr.} A polymath; a person very well versed in a number of different disciplines. * /My uncle is a veritable walking encyclopedia when it comes to the ...
walking papers
or[walking orders] also[walking ticket] {n.}, {informal} A statement that you are fired from your job; dismissal. * /The boss was not satisfied with Paul's work and gave him ...
wall
See: BACK TO THE WALL, BEAT ONE'S HEAD AGAINST A WALL, CLIMB THE WALL, FORWARD WALL, HANDWRITING ON THE WALL, HOLE-IN-THE-WALL, STONE WALL or BRICK WALL, TO THE WALL. ...
wallflower
{n.} A girl who has to sit out dances because nobody is asking her to dance. * /"I used to be a wallflower during my high school days," Valerie complained, "but my luck ...
wallop
See: PACK A PUNCH or PACK A WALLOP.
walls have ears
Sometimes one's most confidential conversations are overheard. * /"Be careful what you say," he whispered. "Remember that walls have ears."/
want ad
{n.} A small advertisement on a special page in a newspaper that offers employment opportunities and merchandise. * /"You want a temporary job?" he asked the recent ...
war
See: COLD WAR, TUG OF WAR.
war baby
{n.}, {informal} A person born during a war. * /War babies began to increase college enrollments early in the 1960s./ * /The war babies forced many towns to build new ...
ward off
{v. phr.} To deflect; avert. * /Vitamin C is known to ward off the common cold./
warm one's blood
{v. phr.} To make you feel warm or excited. * /When the Bakers came to visit on a cold night, Mr. Harmon offered them a drink to warm their blood./
warm out
{v. phr.} To learn through persistent questioning; draw out from. * /I finally wormed out of her the reason she broke off her engagement to Larry./
warm the bench
{v. phr.}, {informal} To act as a substitute on an athletic team. * /Bill has been warming the bench for three football seasons; he hopes that the coach will let him play ...
warm up
{v.} 1. To reheat cooked food. * /Mr. Jones was so late that his dinner got cold; his wife had to warm it up./ * /When the children had left for school, their mother ...
warm-up
{n.} A period of exercise or practice in preparation for a game or other event. * /During the warm-up the baseball players were throwing the ball around and running up and ...
warmer
See: BENCH WARMER.
warpath
See: ON THE WARPATH.
warrant
See: SIGN ONE'S OWN DEATH WARRANT.
wash and wear
{adj.} Not needing to be ironed. - Refers especially to synthetic and synthetic blend fabrics. * /Dick bought three wash and wear shirts to take on his trip./ * ...
wash one's dirty linen in public
See: AIR ONE'S DIRTY LINEN IN PUBLIC.
wash one's hands of
{v. phr.} To withdraw from or refuse to be responsible for. * /We washed our hands of politics long ago./ * /The school washed its hands of the students' behavior ...
wash out
{v. phr.} To disappear; vanish. * /Do you think this stain will wash out?/
washed out
{adj.} Listless in appearance; pale, wan. * /Small wonder Harry looks so washed out; he has just recovered from major surgery./
washed up
{adj.} Ruined; finished; a failure. * /Harry is looking awfully sad. I hear his business has collapsed and he is all washed up./
washout
{n.} A dismal failure. * /As far as investments were concerned, Dick and his precious advice turned out to he a total washout./
waste
See: GO TO WASTE, LAY WASTE.
waste away
{v.} To become more thin and weak every day. * /Jane is wasting away with tuberculosis./ * /After Mrs. Barnes died, her husband wasted away with grief./
waste one's breath
{v. phr.} To speak or to argue with no result; do nothing by talking. * /The teacher saw that she was wasting her breath; the children refused to believe her./ * /I know ...
watch
See: BIRD WATCHER, BEAR WATCHING, ON THE WATCH.
watch every penny
See: PINCH PENNIES.
watch it
{v. phr.}, {informal} To be careful. - Usually used as a command. * /You'd better watch it. If you get into trouble again, you'll be expelled./ * /Watch it - the bottom ...
watch one's dust
or[watch one's smoke] {v. phr.}, {slang} To notice your quick action; watch you do something quickly. * /Offer Bill a dollar to shovel your sidewalk, and watch his ...
watch one's language
{v. phr.} To be careful of how one speaks; avoid saying impolite or vulgar things. * /"You boys watch your language," Mother said, "or you won't be watching television ...
watch one's step
{v. phr.} To mend one's ways; exercise prudence, tact, and care. * /I have to watch my step with the new boss as he is a very proud and sensitive individual./
watch out
See: LOOK OUT.
watch over
{v. phr.} To guard; take care of. * /The museum guards carefully watch over the world-famous paintings./
watched pot never boils
If you watch or wait for something to get done or to happen, it seems to take forever. - A proverb. * /Jane was nine months pregnant and Tom hovered over her anxiously. She ...
watcher
See: CLOCK WATCHER.
water
See: BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WATER, COME HELL OR HIGH WATER, DEEP WATER, FISH OUT OF WATER, GO THROUGH HELL AND HIGH WATER, HEAD ABOVE WATER, HOLD WATER, HELL AND HIGH ...
water down
{v.} To change and make weaker; weaken. * /The Senator argued that the House should water down the bill before passing it./ * /The African American did not accept watered ...
water over the dam
or[water under the bridge] {n. phr.} Something that happened in the past and cannot be changed. * /Since the sweater is too small already, don't worry about its ...
water under the bridge
See: WATER OVER THE DAM.
water wagon
See: ON THE WAGON.
watered down
{adj.} Weakened; diluted. * /The play was a disappointing, watered down version of Shakespeare's Othello./
waterfront
See: COVER THE WATERFRONT.
watering hole
or[place] {n. phr.} A bar, pub, or nightclub where people gather to drink and socialize. * /I like "The Silver Dollar" - it is my favorite watering hole in all of Sidney, ...
Waterloo
See: MEET ONE'S WATERLOO.
way
See: ALL THE WAY or THE WHOLE WAY, BY THE WAY, BY WAY OF, COME A LONG WAY, CUT BOTH WAYS or CUT TWO WAYS, EVERY WHICH WAY, FROM WAY BACK, GO OUT OF ONE'S WAY, HARD ...
way off
{adj. phr.} At a great distance from a particular point (said of a discrepancy). * /We were way off on our calculations; the house cost us twice as much as we had ...
way the wind blows
or[how the wind blows] {n. phr.} The direction or course something may go; how things are; what may happen. * /Most senators find put which way the wind blows in their ...
ways and means
{n. plural} Methods of getting something done or getting money; how something can be done and paid for. * /The boys were trying to think of ways and means to go camping for ...
wayside
See: FALL BY THE WAYSIDE.
wear
See: IF THE SHOE FITS - WEAR IT, WASH AND WEAR, WORSE FOR WEAR.
wear and tear
{n. phr.} Deterioration through use. * /After 75,000 miles there is usually a lot of wear and tear on any car./
wear away
See: WEAR DOWN.
wear blinders
or[blinkers] {v. phr.} To refuse or be unable to consider alternative ways of thinking or acting. * /Anybody who disputes the importance of learning languages is wearing ...
wear down
,[wear off] or[wear away] {v.} 1. To remove or disappear little by little through use, time, or the action of weather. * /Time and weather have worn off ...
wear on
{v.} 1. To anger or annoy; tire. * /Having to stay indoors all day long is tiresome for the children and wears on their mother's nerves./ 2. To drag on; pass gradually ...
wear one's heart on one's sleeve
also[pin one's heart on one's sleeve] {v. phr.} To show your feelings openly; show everyone how you feel; not hide your feelings. * /She wears her heart on her sleeve. ...
wear out
{v.} 1a. To use or wear until useless. * /Bobby got a toy truck that would run on a battery, and he used it so much that he soon wore it out./ * /The stockings are so worn ...
wear out one's welcome
{v. phr.}, {informal} To visit somewhere too long or come back too often so that you are not welcome any more. * /The Smith children have worn out their welcome at our ...

1 2 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.015 c;