Слова на букву turn-word (463) Словарь американских идиом
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EN-DE-FR →  Словарь американских идиом →  --- -be m be n-bull bum -come come-does dog-fill fill-get get -hard hard-in a in a-keep keep-long long-nest nest-open open-pull pull-scen sche-so b so b-take take-turn turn-word


Слова на букву turn-word (463)

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wear the trousers
or[wear the pants] {v. phr.}, {informal} To have a man's authority; be the boss of a family or household. * /Mr. Wilson is henpecked by his wife; she wears the ...
wear thin
{v.} 1. To become thin from use, wearing, or the passing of time. * /My old pair of pants has worn thin at the knees./ * /This old dime has worn very thin./ 2. To ...
wear well
{v.} 1. To continue to be satisfactory, useful, or liked for a long time. * /My old overcoat has worn very well./ * /Their marriage has worn well./ * /That author wears ...
weasel out
{v. phr.} To renege on a previous promise; not keep an obligation for some not always straight reason. * /I'm so tired I think I am going to weasel my way out of going ...
weasel word
{n.}, {informal} A word which has more than one meaning and may be used to deceive others. * /When the thief was being questioned by the police, he tried to fool them ...
weather
See: FAIR-WEATHER FRIEND.
weather eye
{n.} 1. Eyes that can tell what the weather will be. * /Grandfather's weather eye always tells him when it will rain./ 2. Eyes ready or quick to see; careful watch. - ...
weather the storm
{v. phr.} To survive some disaster. * /When Peter and Sue started their business they had very little money, but in a year they weathered the storm./
wedge
See: FLYING WEDGE.
wedlock
See: BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK.
wee folk
or[little folk] or[little people] {n. phr.} Fairy people; brownies; elves; fairies; or goblins. * /Mother read me a story about the wee folk who lived in the forest ...
wee hours
The crack of dawn, or just before it, usually between 1 A.M. and 4 A.M. or 2 A.M. and 5 A.M. * /He stayed up all night when they were expecting their first child; finally, a ...
weed out
{v.} 1. To remove what is unwanted, harmful, or not good enough from. * /Mother weeded out the library because there were too many books./ * /Many colleges and universities ...
week in, week out
See: DAY IN, AND DAY OUT.
week of Sundays
{n. phr.} A long time; seven weeks. * /I haven't seen them in a week of Sundays./
weeper
See: FINDERS KEEPERS or FINDERS KEEPERS LOSERS WEEPERS.
weigh anchor
{v. phr.} To set sail; get going. * /After a week in Hawaii, we weighed anchor and sailed south toward Tahiti./
weigh down
also[weight down] 1. To make heavy; cause to go down or bend with weight; overload. * /The evergreens are weighed down by the deep snow./ - Often used with "with" or "by". * ...
weigh in
{v.} 1a. To take the weight of; weigh. * /The man at the airport counter weighed in our bags and took our plane tickets./ * /A doctor weighed in the wrestlers./ 1b. To have ...
weigh on
or[weigh upon] {v.} 1. To be a weight or pressure on; be heavy on. * /The pack weighed heavily on the soldier's back./ 2. To make sad or worried; trouble; disturb; upset. * ...
weigh on one's mind
See: WEIGH ON(2).
weigh one's words
{v. phr.} To choose your words carefully; be careful to use the right words. * /When a teacher explains about religion, he must weigh his words because his pupils may ...
weigh upon
See: WEIGH ON.
weight
See: PULL ONE'S WEIGHT, SWING ONE'S WEIGHT, THROW ONE'S WEIGHT AROUND.
weight down
See: WEIGH DOWN.
weight of the world on one's shoulders
or[world on one's shoulders] or[world on one's back] {n. phr.} A very heavy load of worry or responsibility; very tired or worried behavior, as if carrying the ...
welcome
See: WEAR OUT ONE'S WELCOME.
welcome mat
{n.} 1. A mat for wiping your shoes on, often with the word " welcome" on it, that is placed in front of a door. * /Mother bought a welcome mat for our new house./ 2. ...
welcome with open arms
See: WITH OPEN ARMS.
well
See: ALL VERY WELL, AS WELL, AS WELL AS, HAIL FELLOW WELL MET, LET WELL ENOUGH ALONE, PLAY ONE'S CARDS RIGHT or PLAY ONE'S CARDS WELL, VERY WELL, WEAR WELL.
well and good
{adj. phr.} Good; satisfactory. * /If my daughter finishes high school, I will call that well and good./ - Often used without a verb to show agreement or understanding. * ...
well put
{adj. phr.} Well expressed or defined. * /His remarks about too much violence on television were extremely well put./
well-heeled
{adj.}, {slang} Wealthy; having plenty of money. * /Bob's father, who is well-heeled, gave him a sports car./ Compare: IN CLOVER, ON EASY STREET.
well-off
{adj. phr.} 1. Rich. * /They may not be millionaires, but they are sufficiently well-off./ 2. In good condition; free of problems or difficulties./ * /He is pleased ...
well-to-do
{adj.} Having or making enough money to live comfortably; prosperous. * /John's father owns a company and his family is well-to-do./ - Often used with "the" ...
wet
See: ALL WET, GET ONE'S FEET WET, MAD AS A WET HEN, WRINGING WET.
wet behind the ears
{adj. phr.}, {informal} Not experienced; not knowing how to do something; new in a job or place. * /The new student is still wet behind the ears; he has not yet learned the ...
wet blanket
{n.}, {informal} A person or thing that keeps others from enjoying life. * /The teenagers don't invite Bob to their parties because he is a wet blanket./ * /The weatherman ...
wet one's whistle
{v. phr.}, {slang} To have a drink, especially of liquor. * /Uncle Willie told John to wait outside for a minute while he went in to the cafe to wet his whistle./
whack
See: OUT OF WHACK.
whale away
{v.}, {informal} 1. To beat or hit hard; strike again and again. - Often used with "at". * /The boxer is whaling away at his opponent with both fists./ 2. To attack severely ...
whale the --- out of
See: BEAT THE --- OUT OF.
what
See: COME WHAT MAY, GET WHAT'S COMING TO ONE, I'LL TELL YOU WHAT, JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED, SO WHAT.
what for(2)
{n. phr.}, {informal} A scolding, or other punishment. - Usually used with "get" or "give". * /Tom got what for from his father for answering him rudely, and I heard ...
What a pity!
How unfortunate! What a shame! * /What a pity that he couldn't join us on our Hawaiian trip./
what about
{interrog.} 1. About or concerning what; in connection with what. - Often used alone as a question. * /"I want to talk to you." "What about?"/ Compare: WHAT FOR. 2. See: ...
what about that
See: HOW ABOUT THAT.
what for(1)
{interrog.} For what reason; why? * /I told Mary what I was going to town for./ * /What are you running for?/ - Often used alone as a question. * /Billy's mother told him to ...
what have you
or[what not] {n. phr.}, {informal} Whatever you like or want; anything else like that. * /The store sells big ones, small ones, medium ones, or what have you./ * /We ...
what if
What would, or will, happen if; what is the difference if; suppose that. * /What if you go instead of me?/ * /What if we paint it red. How will it look?/ * /"You can't ...
what is what
See: WHAT'S WHAT.
what not
See: WHAT HAVE YOU.
what of it
or[what about it] {interj.}, {informal} What is wrong with it; what do you care. * /Martha said "That boy is wearing a green coat." Jan answered, "What of it?"/ * /"John missed ...
what with
{prep.} Because; as a result of. * /I couldn't visit you, what with the snowstorm and the cold I had./ * /What with dishes to wash and children to put to bed, mother was ...
what's cooking
See: WHAT'S UP.
what's doing
See: WHAT'S UP..
what's sauce for the goose, is sauce for the gander
What goes for the one, also goes for the other. - A proverb. * /If Herb gets a speeding ticket, so should Erica, who was right behind him; after all, what's sauce for ...
what's the big idea
or[what's the idea] {informal} What is the purpose; what do you have in mind; why did you do that; what are you doing; how dare you. - Often used to question someone or ...
what's the idea
See: WHAT'S THE BIG IDEA.
what's up
or[what's cooking] also[what's doing] {slang} What is happening or planned; what is wrong. - Often used as a greeting. * /"What's up?" asked Bob as he joined his friends. "Are ...
what's what
or[what is what] {n. phr.}, {informal} 1. What each thing is in a group; one thing from another. * /The weeds and the flowers are coming up together, and we can't tell what ...
what's with
or[what's up with] also[what's by] {slang} What is happening to; what is wrong; how is everything; what can you tell me about. * /Mary looks worried. What's with her?/ * ...
wheel
See: BIG CHEESE or BIG WHEEL, GREASE THE WHEELS, PUT ONE'S SHOULDER TO THE WHEEL.
wheel and deal
{v. phr.}, {slang} To make many big plans or schemes; especially with important people in government and business; in matters of money and influence; handle money or ...
wheelhorse
{n. phr.} A reliable and industrious worker on whom one may depend. * /Jake is such a good worker that he is the wheelhorse of our tiny firm./
when hell freezes over
{adv. phr.}, {slang} Never. * /I'll believe you when hell freezes over./ Contrast: UNTIL HELL FREEZES OVER.
when it comes to
See: COME TO(4).
when one's ship comes in
See: SHIP COME IN.
when push comes to shove
{adv. phr.} A time when a touchy situation becomes actively hostile or a quarrel turns into a fight. * /Can we count on the boss' goodwill, when push comes to shove?/
when the chips are down
{adv. cl.}, {informal} When the winner and loser of a bet or a game are decided; at the most important or dangerous time. * /Tom hit a home run in the last inning of ...
where
See: TELL ONE WHERE TO GET OFF or TELL ONE WHERE TO HEAD IN.
where it's at
{adv. phr.}, {informal} That which is important; that which is at the forefront of on-going social, personal, or scientific undertakings. * /Young, talented and black, ...
where the shoe pinches
{n. phr.}, {informal} Where or what the discomfort or trouble is. * /Johnny thinks the job is easy, but he will find out where the shoe pinches when he tries it./ * ...
wherefore
See: WHY AND WHEREFORE.
whether --- or
or[whether --- or whether[] 1. {coord. conj.} Used to introduce an indirect question. * /You must decide whether you should go or stay./ * /I don't know whether Jack or Bill ...
whether one is coming or going
See: KNOW IF ONE IS COMING OR GOING.
which
See: GAME AT WHICH TWO CAN PLAY.
which is which
{n. phr.} Which is one person or thing and which is the other; one from another; what the difference is between different ones; what the name of each one is. * ...
which was which
See: WHICH is WHICH.
while
See: AFTER A WHILE or IN A WHILE, ALL THE TIME(1), EVERY NOW AND THEN or EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, ONCE IN A WHILE.
while ago
{adv.} At a time several minutes in the past; a few minutes ago; a short time ago. - Used with "a". * /I laid mv glasses on this table a while ago; and now they're ...
while away
{v.} To make time go by pleasantly or without being bored; pass or spend. * /We whiled away the time that we were waiting by talking and playing cards./ * /We whiled away ...
while back
{adv.} At a time several weeks or months in the past. - Used with "a". * /We had a good rain a while back, but we need more now./ * /Grandfather is well now, but a while ...
whip hand
See: UPPER HAND.
whip up
{v.}, {informal} 1. To make or do quickly or easily. * /Mary whipped up a lunch for the picnic./ * /The reporter whipped up a story about the fire for his paper./ 2. To ...
whipping boy
{n. phr.} The person who gets punished for someone else's mistake. * /"I used to be the whipping boy during my early days at the company," he musingly remembered./
whispering campaign
{n.} The spreading of false rumors, or saying bad things, about a person or group, especially in politics or public life. * /A bad man has started a whispering campaign ...
whistle
See: BLOW THE WHISTLE ON, WET ONE'S WHISTLE.
whistle a different tune
See: SING A DIFFERENT TUNE.
whistle for
{v.}, {informal} To try to get (something) but fail; look for (something) that will not come. * /Mary didn't even thank us for helping her, so the next time she needs help she ...
whistle in the dark
{v. phr.}, {informal} To try to stay brave and forget your fear. * /Tom said he could fight the bully with one hand, but we knew that he was just whistling in the dark./ ...
whistle-stop
{n.} A small town where the trains only stop on a special signal. * /President Truman made excellent use of the whistle-stop during his 1948 campaign for the ...
white
See: BLACK AND WHITE, IN BLACK AND WHITE.
white around the gills
See: GREEN AROUND THE GILLS.
white elephant
{n. phr.} Unwanted property, such as real estate, that is hard to sell. * /That big house of theirs on the corner sure is a white elephant./
white lie
{n. phr.} An innocent social excuse. * /I am too busy to go to their house for dinner tonight. I will call them and tell a little white lie about having the flu./
white sale
{n.} The selling, especially at lower prices, of goods or clothing usually made of white cloth. * /Mother always buys many things at the January white sale to save money./ ...
white-collar workers
{n. phr.} Workers employed in offices and at desks as opposed to those who work as manual workers; the middle class. * /It is a well-known fact that white-collar workers ...
whitewash
{n.}, {informal} A soothing official report that attempts to tranquilize the public. * /Some people believe that the Warren Commission's report on the Kennedy ...
whitewash something
{v.}, {informal} To explain a major, national scandal in soothing official terms so as to assure the public that things are under control and there is no need to panic. * ...
whiz
See: GEE WHIZ.
who
See: SAYS WHO.
who is who
See: WHO'S WHO.
who laughs last laughs best
See: HE LAUGHS BEST WHO LAUGHS LAST.
who's who
or[who is who] {informal} 1. Who this one is and who that one is; who the different ones in a group of people are or what their names or positions are. * /It is hard to tell ...
whodunit
{n.} A detective story; a murder story; a thriller. * /Agatha Christie was a true master of the whodunit./
whole
See: ALL THE WAY or THE WHOLE WAY, GO THE WHOLE HOG, ON THE WHOLE, WITH A WHOLE SKIN or IN A WHOLE SKIN.
whole cheese
{slang} or {informal}[whole show] {n.}, {informal} The only important person; big boss. * /Joe thought he was the whole cheese in the game because he owned the ball./ * ...
whole hog
See: GO THE WHOLE HOG.
whole lot
See: A LOT.
whole show
See: WHOLE CHEESE.
whoop it up
{v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To make a loud noise; have a noisy celebration; enjoy yourself noisily. * /The team whooped it up after winning the game./ 2. To praise something ...
why and wherefore
{n.} The answer to a question or problem. Usually used in the plural. * /Father told him not to always ask the whys and wherefores when he was told to do something./
wide
See: FAR AND WIDE, GIVE A WIDE BERTH.
wide of the mark
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Far from the target or the thing aimed at. * /James threw a stone at the cat but it went wide of the mark./ 2. Far from the truth; incorrect. * /You ...
wide-eyed
See: ROUND-EYED.
widow
See: GOLF WIDOW.
wiener roast
or[hot dog roast] {n.} A party where frankfurters are cooked and eaten over an outdoor fire. * /For his birthday party, John had a wiener roast in his backyard./ * /Mary's ...
wig
See: BIG CHEESE or BIG WIG.
wild
See: RUN WILD, SOW ONE'S WILD OATS.
wild goose chase
{n. phr.} An absurd and completely futile errand. * /I was on a wild goose chase when I was sent to find a man who never really existed./
wild pitch
{n.} A pitch in baseball that is so high, so low, or so far from the plate that the catcher cannot catch it and a base runner can move to the next base. * /The ...
wildcat strike
{n.}, {informal} A strike not ordered by a labor union; a strike spontaneously arranged by a group of workers. * /The garbage collectors have gone on a wildcat strike, but ...
will
See: AT WILL, OF ONE'S OWN ACCORD or OF ONE'S OWN FREE WILL.
will not hear of
{v. phr.} Will not allow or consider, refuse attention to or permission for. * /I want to go to the show tonight, but I know my mother will not hear of it./ * /Mary needs ...
win
See: HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU LOSE.
win hands down
{v. phr.} To win conclusively and without external help. * /The opposition was so weak that Dan won the election hands down./
win in a walk
or[win in a breeze] {v. phr.}, {informal} To win very easily; win without having to try hard. * /Joe ran for class president and won in a walk./ * /Our team won the game ...
win one's spurs
{v. phr.} 1. In old times, to be named a knight with the right to wear little sharp spikes on your heels. * /A young squire won his spurs in battle./ 2. To win fame or ...
win out
{v. phr.} To win after a rather protracted struggle. * /The lawsuit lasted a long time, but we finally won out./
win over
{v. phr.} To convert to one's position or point of view. * /The Democrats offered him a high-level executive position and thus way won him over to their side./
wind
See: GET WIND OF, GOD TEMPERS THE WIND TO THE SHORN LAMB, GONE WITH THE WIND, IN THE WIND, IT'S AN ILL WIND THAT BLOWS NOBODY GOOD, SECOND WIND, STRAW IN THE WIND, ...
wind up
{v.} 1. To tighten the spring of a machine; to make it work or run. * /Mary wound up the toy car and let it run across the room./ * /He doesn't have to wind up his watch ...
windbag
{n.} Someone who talks too much; a boring person. * /Uncle Joe goes on and on; he is a boring windbag./
windfall
{n.} An unexpected gift or gain of sizeable proportion. * /The unexpected retroactive pay raise was a most welcome windfall./
window
See: GO OUT THE WINDOW.
window dressing
{n. phr.} An elaborate exterior, sometimes designed to conceal one's real motives. * /All those fancy invitations turned out to be nothing but window dressing./ * /All he ...
wing
See: CLIP ONE'S WINGS, LEFT-WING, ON THE WING, RIGHT-WING, UNDER ONE'S WING.
wink
See: FORTY WINKS, SLEEP A WINK.
wink at
{v.} To allow and pretend not to know about (a rule or law being broken). * /John was not allowed to stay out late at night, but his parents winked at his being five ...
winning streak
{n.} A series of several wins one after the other. * /The team extended their winning streak to ten./
wipe out
{v.} 1. To remove or erase by wiping or rubbing. * /The teacher wiped out with an eraser what she had written on the board./ Compare: RUB OUT. 2. {informal} To remove, ...
wipe out an old score
See: SETTLE A SCORE.
wipe the floor with
or[wipe up the floor with] See: MOP THE FLOOR WITH.
wipeout
{n.} A total failure. * /The guy is so bad at his job that he is a total wipeout./
wire
See: ACROSS THE WIRE, DOWN TO THE WIRE, PULL STRINGS or PULL WIRES.
wise
See: GET WISE, PENNY WISE AND POUND FOOLISH, PUT WISE, THE WISER.
wise guy
{n. phr.}, {informal} A person who acts as if he were smarter than other people; a person who jokes or shows off too much * /Bill is a wise guy and displeases others by what ...
wise up to
{v. phr.}, {slang} To finally understand what is really going on after a period of ignorance. * /Joe immediately quit his job when he wised up to what was really ...
wisecrack
{n.} A joke or witty remark usually made at someone else's expense. * /The comedians kept up a steady stream of wisecracks./
wish on
{v.} 1. To use as a lucky charm while making a wish. * /Mary wished on a star that she could go to the dance./ * /Bob wished on his lucky rabbit's foot that he could ...
wit
See: AT ONE'S WITS' END, KEEP ONE'S HEAD or KEEP ONE'S WITS ABOUT ONE, SCARE OUT OF ONE'S WITS.
witch-hunt
{n. phr.} A hysterical movement during which people are persecuted for having views (political or religious) considered different or unpopular. * /During the McCarthy ...
with child
{adv. phr.}, {literary} Going to have a baby; pregnant. * /The angel told Mary she was with child./ Compare: IN A FAMILY WAY or IN THE FAMILY WAY.
with a free hand
See: FREE HAND.
with a grain of salt
or[with a pinch of salt] See: TAKE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT.
with a silver spoon in one's mouth
See: BORN WITH A SILVER SPOON IN ONE'S MOUTH.
with a whole skin
also[in a whole skin] {adv. phr.} With no injury; unhurt; safely. * /The boy was lucky to escape with a whole skin when the car went off the road./ * /Jack came ...
with all one's heart
See: FROM THE BOTTOM OF ONE'S HEART.
with an eye to
See: EYE TO.
with bad grace
or[with a bad grace] {adv. phr.} In an unpleasant or discourteous way; unwillingly, * /Fred takes defeat with bad grace./ * /Tom shouted "Hello" to Bill. Bill was in a ...
with bells on
{adv. phr.}, {informal} With enthusiasm; eager or ready and in the best of spirits for an event. * /"Will you come to the farewell party I'm giving for Billy?" asked ...
with fire
See: PLAY WITH FIRE.
with flying colors
{adv. phr.} With great or total success; victoriously. * /Tow finished the race with flying colors./ * /Mary came through the examination with flying colors./
with good grace
{adv. phr.} With pleasant and courteous behavior; politely; willingly; without complaining. * /The boys had been well-coached; they took the loss of the game with good ...
with heart and soul
See: HEART AND SOUL.
with it
See: GET WITH IT.
with might and main
{adv. phr.} With full strength or complete effort. * /The sailors pulled the rope with might and main./ * /John tried with all his might and main to solve the ...
with one's boots on
See: DIE IN ONE'S BOOTS or DIE WITH ONE'S BOOTS ON.
with one's pants down
See: CATCH ONE WITH ONE'S PANTS DOWN.
with open arms
{adv. phr.} 1. With the arms spread wide for hugging or catching. * /When Father came home from work, little Sally ran out to meet him with open arms./ * /Dick stood ...
with reference to
See: IN REFERENCE TO.
with regard to
See: IN REFERENCE TO.
with relation to
See: IN RELATION TO.
with respect to
See: IN RESPECT TO.
with the best
or[with the best of them] {adv. phr.} As well as anyone. * /Bob could horseback ride with the best of them, but he never boasted about it./ * /John can bowl with the ...
with the Joneses
See: KEEP UP WITH THE JONESES.
wither on the vine
See: DIE ON THE VINE.
within an ace of
{informal} or[within an inch of] {adv. phr.} Almost but not quite; very close to; nearly. * /Tim came within an ace of losing the election./ * /John was within an inch of ...
within an inch of one's life
{adv. phr.} Until you are almost dead; near to dying. * /The bear clawed the hunter within an inch of his life./ Often used after "to". * /The prize fighter was beaten ...
within bounds
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Inside of the boundary lines in a game; on or inside of the playing field. * /You must hit the ball inside the lines of the tennis court or it ...
within call
or[within hail] {adv. phr.} 1. Near enough to hear each other's voices. * /When the two ships were within hail, their officers exchanged messages./ * /Billy's mother ...
within reason
{adv.} or {adj. phr.} Within the limits of good sense; in reasonable control or check; moderate. * /I want you to have a good time tonight, within reason./ * /If Tom wants ...
without
See: DO WITHOUT or GO WITHOUT, MAKE BRICKS WITHOUT STRAW, RECKON WITHOUT.
without a paddle
See: UP THE CREEK or UP THE CREEK WITHOUT A PADDLE.
without batting an eye
or[without batting an eyelash] See: BAT AN EYE.
without fail
{adv. phr.} Without failing to do it or failing in the doing of it; certainly, surely. * /Be here at 8 o'clock sharp, without fail./ * /Ben promised to return the bike ...
without number
See: BEYOND NUMBER.
without rhyme or reason
See: RHYME OR REASON.
wolf
See: CRY WOLF, KEEP THE WOLF FROM THE DOOR, LONE WOLF, THROW TO THE WOLVES.
wolf in sheep's clothing
{n. phr.} A person who pretends to be good but really is bad. * /Mrs. Martin trusted the lawyer until she realized that he was a wolf in sheep's clothing./ * /Mr. ...
wonder
See: NO WONDER also SMALL WONDER.
woo
See: PITCH WOO.
wood
See: CAN'T SEE THE WOOD FOR THE TREES, KNOCK ON WOOD, SAW WOOD.
woodpile
See: NIGGER IN THE WOODPILE.
woods
See: BABE IN THE WOODS, CROW BEFORE ONE IS OUT OF THE WOODS, NECK OF THE WOODS, TAKE TO THE WOODS.
wool
See: ALL WOOL AND A YARD WIDE, PULL THE WOOL OVER ONE'S EYES.
word
See: ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS, AS GOOD AS ONE'S WORD, BY WORD OF MOUTH, EAT ONE'S WORDS, FROM THE WORD "GO", GET A WORD IN, GET THE MESSAGE or GET THE WORD, HANG ON ...

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